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EECB 351 – COMMUNICATION SYSTEM LABORATORY

SEMESTER 2 2017/2018

EXPERIMENT 2: DOUBLE SIDEBAND SUPPRESSED CARRIER (DSBSC)


& SINGLE SIDEBAND SUPPRESSED CARRIER (SSBSC)

SECTION 07
DR. NORAZIZAH BTE MOHD ARIPIN

NO. NAME STUDENT ID


1. NURUL AUNI BINTI DARUL HISHAM EP098312

2. SHAHIRA AMIRA BINTI SHAARI EP098319


OBJECTIVES OF THE EXPERIMENT.
1. To investigate the generation and reception of double sideband suppressed carrier
waveform.
2. To observe the generation and reception of single sideband suppressed carrier
waveform.
3. To learn deeper about the function of the EMONA 101 and how to adjust the control
to get the desire output.
4. Able to recognize a mixer as practical multiplier.
5. To understand the amplitude modulation and the difference between suppressed and
transmitted carrier modulation.
6. To learn how to construct DSBSC modulators.
7. To know how to construct a synchronous demodulator.
8. To possess the necessary tools to evaluate and compare the performance of the
system.

INTRODUCTION.
In Double Sideband Full carrier (DSBFC), the power that is transmitted for the carrier is two
part out of the three part or more from the total transmitted power. This is a major
drawback because the carrier does not contain any information. Therefore, transmitting the
carrier power is a wastage and inefficient. DSBSC is introduced to suppress (remove) the
carrier power, but maintaining the bandwidth.
Figure 1 shows the difference between conventional AM and DSBSC in term of power
spectrum.

Figure 1(a) Conventional AM Figure 1(b) DSBSC

Figure 2 shows a simple message signal, an unmodulated carrier and the result of DSBSC. So
far, there doesn’t appear to be much difference between AM and DSBSC. The difference can
be observed in Figure 3, which illustrates that the alternating halves of the envelope form
the same shape as the message signal. In telecommunications theory, the mathematical
model that defines the AM signal is:
𝐃𝐒𝐁𝐒𝐂 = (𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞) × (𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐫)
Figure 2 Figure 3 : DSBSC waveform

To compare with the conventional AM, the sinewave of the carrier frequency does not
appear in the DSBSC signal. The presence of both sidebands and the absence of the carrier
give us the name of DSBSC. So, DSBSC offers a substantial power saving over conventional
AM by sending the carrier.
Figure 4 shows the differences between DSBFC waveform signal, DSBSC waveform signal
and SSBSC waveform signal.

Figure 4
Whereas for the Single Sideband Suppressed carrier (SSB), the system transmits only one
sideband. In other words, SSB transmits either the upper sideband or lower sideband
frequencies but not both. Thus, SSB requires only half the bandwidth of AM which is a
significant advantage.
There are few methods used to generate SSB. The most popular method to generate SSB is
called the Phasing Method. The phasing method uses a technique called phase
discrimination to cancel out one of the sideband at the generation stage. In
telecommunications theory, the mathematical model that defines this process:
𝐒𝐒𝐁 = (𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 × 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐫) + (𝒎𝒆𝒔𝒔𝒂𝒈𝒆 𝒘𝒊𝒕𝒉 𝟗𝟎° 𝒐𝒇 𝒑𝒉𝒂𝒔𝒆 𝒔𝒉𝒊𝒇𝒕 × 𝒄𝒂𝒓𝒓𝒊𝒆𝒓 𝒘𝒊𝒕𝒉 𝟗𝟎° 𝒐𝒇 𝒑𝒉𝒂𝒔𝒆 𝒔𝒉𝒊𝒇𝒕)

Regardless of the message signal’s phase shift, when the four signals are added together,
two of them are in phase and add together to produce one sinewave (either carrier +
message or carrier – message) and two of the sinewaves are phase inverted and cancels
each other. In short, the process produces only a sum or differential signal (i.e. just one
sideband).