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Volume 14 Issue 16 FREE November 23, 2018

Sullivan’s Island • Isle of Palms • Goat Island • Dewees Island

Seabrook Two arrested


Island Club in connection
wins annual with IOP thefts
Three Island BY MIMI WOOD

Challenge THE ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

A
bout six weeks ago, two arrests were
BY COLIN MCCANDLESS made in conjunction with property Ryan Patrick Josey (left), one of two arrested in conjunction
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS crimes committed on Isle of Palms. with recent spate of property thefts on IOP. Mary Elizabeth Ham
Neither arrest was made on the island and (right), a North Charleston resident, was also arrested.

T
police have yet to formally link the incidents, PHOTOS COURTESY OF IOPPD
he annual Three Island three in all. However, police do believe there
Challenge golf event, which may be a connection, especially as review of the morning, Oct. 9. They responded first to a call
pitted teams from Wild Dunes Circle K surveillance video showed the suspects from an island resident, who upon awakening,
Resort, Seabrook Island Club and together earlier that evening. had a message from her credit card company
Kiawah Island Golf Resort against Ryan Patrick Josey, 34, one of the two people stating that an attempted $1,565 purchase from
each other in a game called “Nines,” arrested in early October, was first arrested in Wal-Mart on James Island had been declined.
produced a new winner this year. 2008, charged with assaulting a police officer. Initially thinking someone had gotten a hold
Defending champs Team Wild Records show he’s been arrested at least once of her credit card number, she learned, after
Dunes won the first leg on their home every year since then, save 2013, culminating in speaking to her credit card company, that her
course, but Team Seabrook was just his most recent arrest, on Oct. 9. card had been physically swiped through the
too strong over the final two matches, An Isle of Palms resident south of the Wal-Mart card-reader.
claiming the trophy in 2018. connector awoke that morning to a call from a “At that time, the victim walked out to her
Mike Gollobin, president of the Mount Pleasant hotel. A hotel employee found car to get her purse and noticed that her vehicle
Men’s Golf Association at Wild had a concrete statue thrown through her driver
Dunes, who helps coordinate the window…” notes the incident report on file at the
Wild Dunes team, said he knew it IOPPD.
“AT THAT TIME, THE VICTIM WALKED OUT TO “It was a garden gnome,” confirmed Swain.
would be tough to maintain the lead
when they only went up 11 points HER CAR TO GET HER PURSE AND NOTICED Later that same morning, police responded to
after the first match, as playing on THAT HER VEHICLE HAD A CONCRETE STATUE a call from a family visiting from Massachusetts,
one’s home course is an advantage. THROWN THROUGH HER DRIVER WINDOW…” stating their rental car was missing. They’d
Seabrook Island held a comfortable last seen it when they parked it in front of their
edge in points heading into the last rented residence, the night before.
match, played Nov. 14 at Crooked the woman’s purse in their dumpster. (At this “The victim did state that the vehicle was left
Oaks Course, and they maintained point she was unaware her purse, left in her car, unlocked and the keys to the vehicle were left
their lead to claim the trophy, their was missing). In reviewing the security video inside,” states the IOPPD incident report.
second win in the past three years in from the previous night, the hotel employees “We see this pattern every year; usually it’s
the event. noticed a similarity between the man who had ‘kids’ in their 20s, or a couple,” Swain continues.
John Haberern, president of the dumped the purse and one of their guests. This past June, a car was stolen from an open
Men’s Golf Association at Seabrook, A search of his hotel room found not only Josey, garage in the 3700 block of Palm Blvd., in broad
said his team really enjoys the but a host of stolen property, along with heroin. daylight. The owner of the home confirmed
camaraderie of the Three Island The room was purchased using the IOP woman’s that her visiting guests had left the keys to
Challenge and getting together to stolen credit card, resulting in two charges from their unlocked Mercedes inside the vehicle,
play different area courses. IOPPD. Mount Pleasant police added charges of after loading their golf clubs into the trunk in
“It’s just a fun event,” Haberern their own and ultimately made the arrest. anticipation of a day on the links. They went
said. “It all goes back to drugs,” states IOP Police upstairs and ate breakfast; upon returning to
Bill Burnett, treasurer and official Captain Jeffrey Swain. “They need their drugs the garage found the Mercedes gone.
stat keeper for the Kiawah Men’s and they get desperate.” “I’ve had perpetrators tell me, ‘We come over (to
Golf Association, echoed these North of the Connector, two additional Isle of Palms) because it’s good pickins,’” Swain
sentiments. “It’s an enjoyable thing. incidents occurred that same night, Oct. 8. elaborates. “The criminals know people don’t lock
You get to meet a lot of people,” Arrested in connection with both was Mary their cars. I recently had a suspect tell me that
Elizabeth Ham, 37, of North Charleston.
Challenge continues on page 4 Ham’s antics kept IOPPD hopping the next Theft continues on page 3

IOP PARKING VETERAN'S BLESSING FIRST


RULES DAY RESPONDERS
page 3 page 6 page 13
www.islandeyenews.com
CIVIC
2 November 23, 2018

Sullivan’s Island Mayors Message


Dear Island Neighbors, Thank you very much to the Park Foundation, and to all our
I hope you and your family are having a wonderful Thanksgiving residents whose donations to the Foundation have made this possible.
holiday. We certainly have much to be thankful for on the island, This is a fine contribution to our community.
every year, and this year in particular. HOLIDAY SEASON: PART I
Recently I wound up a business trip for my day job and as so Please come out to enjoy one of our great Island holiday traditions:
often happens, I had a number of casual conversations with people the Holiday Lighting Event at the Fire Station and Town Hall. It will
at my professional society meeting or on the plane, in which the other kick off at 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30. As always, we are fortunate
person, often from quite a ways from here, responded to my answer to have the Wando High School Chorus perform holiday favorites.
to “where do you live” with “I’ve been there and it is my favorite place Rumor has it we may also have a special visitor from Way Up North,
around Charleston.” past the Custom House. (Name that tune.) Gather up the family and
Well, mine too…whether or not we are talking about the Charleston get on your way to this Island favorite.
area. I frequently catch myself taking the island for granted in HOLIDAY SEASON: PART II
the course of day-to-day activities, so it’s always good to get those Those of you with kids and/or grandkids will certainly also want
reminders of the abundant blessings we enjoy: wonderful small-town to take them to the Town’s annual Gingerbread House Decorating
place with great neighbors; tremendous natural resources all around event. It will be at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2, at the Island Club. This
us with an amazing array of flora and fauna; a fascinating history that event is hosted by the Town of Sullivan’s Island and is open to all
predates the founding of the country, with lots of historic resources island residents. There will be a performance by “Good Clean Fun”
throughout the island. What’s not to like? including juggling, holiday songs and more.
And as we look back on the last 12 months we likewise can Councilmember Sarah Church, Chair of our Recreation Committee,
count ourselves among the very fortunate, especially in the Mother has this message: “Please bring your preassembled gingerbread house
Nature department. We had an unscheduled January break with the and we will provide the decorations. The performance begins at 2
“snowstorm” (for us) that, like a homework-eating dog, allowed us to p.m., with decorating immediately following. Join us for the loudest,
throttle down and play a bit. (Of course, I realize that folks who had messiest day of the year at the Island Club.”
kids at home on a gazillion-week break were ready to declare the first My message: In the wake of our recent elections, this is a great way
day back at school a national holiday). to remember that “loud and messy” can actually be fun. For more
More significantly, as we near the end of the stated hurricane info: bit.ly/2018Gingerbread.
season (knock on wood) we can really be thankful we were spared the HOLIDAY SEASON: PART III
devastation suffered by our Carolina neighbors up the coast, folks in While enjoying the season, please stay mindful of the simple steps
the Florida panhandle, and elsewhere. you can to keep you and yours (and your stuff) safe and secure: While
Apropos of which, it’s not too late to help those folks. As an example, out and about, keep your valuables in your car out of sight and the
you can make a donation that will go directly to relief for people in vehicle locked. Don’t leave valuables in your car once you are back
the Carolinas who were so terribly affected by Hurricane Florence by home, if possible, and be sure to keep car and home locked. Keep
going to bit.ly/2MNw1YE. the Christmas tree well-hydrated. If you will be away for a time, don’t
WE SHOULD ALSO BE THANKFUL FOR THIS: NEW TOWN SIGN hesitate to ask our Police Department to put your home on a watch
You have likely noted the changes underway on our Town sign on the list for a little more attention. For more information contact Town
causeway. The former sign served us very well but was showing signs Hall at 843.883.3198. You know the drill.
of age. We are very grateful to the Sullivan’s Island Park Foundation See you around the Island!
leadership for their support and continued encouragement of this Pat O’Neil, Mayor
welcome improvement to our primary island gateway. 843 670 9266 | @oneilpm1
November 23, 2018 3

Beach
Lucky Dog Publishing
o f SC, LL C

parking
Publisher of the
The Island Eye News
and The Island Connection

signs, just
in time
STAFF REPORT
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS Lynn Pierotti

J
lynn@luckydognews.com
ust in time for the holidays, publisher
IOP has installed signs
Katy Calloway
clarifying the new parking
katy@luckydognews.com
rules that were approved by City managing editor
Council in June through Ordinance
2018.5 and Ordinance 2018.10 of Jennifer Tuohy
the Managed Beach Parking Plan. jennifer@luckydognews.com
Beach parking, which will be contributing editor

free to the public, with no permit


Swan Richards
required, is limited to cross streets, senior graphic designer
3rd Ave. to 9th Ave., between Ocean
Blvd and Carolina Blvd. and along Alejandro Ferreyros
graphic designer
Palm Blvd between 21st Ave. and
40th Ave., (parallel parking only) Lori McGee 843-614-0901
and on Palm Blvd. between 42nd advertising executive
Ave. and 57th Ave. Be sure that
Christian LeBlanc
your vehicle is at least 4 feet away
christian@luckydognews.com
from the pavement when parking social media
along Palm Blvd.
Residential parking areas are Gregg Bragg
more plentiful and designated by Mimi Wood
new signage, however, you must staff writers

have a parking decal, issued from


the City of IOP to avoid a ticket.
Full-time resident owners, part- •
time resident owners and those
who rent for more than 3 months New parking signs have been installed on IOP. CONTRIBUTORS
are entitled to an annual decal. STAFF PHOTO
Applications are online (IOP.net)
or obtainable at the IOP Public Safety Building. Golf carts must be Colin McCandless
registered as well. Weston Smith
Sorry Santa, but trailer parking (more than 20’ in length) is SC DNR
prohibited along public rights-of-way, unless you are actively loading Jessica Willis
or unloading. The exception is on 41st Ave. between Waterway Blvd. Sarah Vega
and the terminus of 41st Ave., and then it is only applicable to those Kelly Ryan
with a residential parking permit. Dimi Matouchev

Theft continues from cover



he and his accomplice worked next street.”
the streets systematically; the “Josey was a big deal. He’s PUBLISHED BY
accomplice, in a car, would drop part of a ring; there’s more to his Lucky Dog Publishing
him off at the top of a street, story,” Swain confided, unable of South Carolina, LLC
and he’d walk down, flipping to disclose additional details. P.O. Box 837
door handles, helping himself “We’re asking for our citizens’ Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
to the contents of the unlocked help. Property crime can easily 843.886.NEWS
vehicles. If the vehicle was happen, and it does, if people
locked, he’d just move on to the don’t take a few easy steps to Submit your letters to the editor to:
next car. His accomplice would prevent it,” he concludes. info@luckydognews.com
pick him up at the bottom of the
street, and they’d move on to the DEADLINE:
NOV. 28 for our DEC. 7 issue
CIVIC CALENDAR
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned
RECYCLE - THURSDAY, DEC. 5 - RECYCLE subsidiary of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC
LLC, is a free, independent newspaper
City Council Sullivan's Island published every two weeks and is for and
Thursday, Nov. 23 6 p.m. 843.883.3198 about the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island,
Goat Island and Dewees Island. Copies
Thanksgiving Holiday 1207 Palm Boulevard www.sullivansisland-sc.com are mailed free of charge to every active
All city offices CLOSED mailbox in our coverage area and are also
Wednesday, Nov. 28 & Dec. 5 Monday, Nov. 26 available at area businesses. Contribu-
Isle of Palms Municipal Court
tions of information, pictures and articles
Tree Commission are welcomed and are used according to
843.886.6428 3 p.m. 5 p.m. space limitations and news value and can-
www.iop.net 1207 Palm Boulevard not be returned except by special request.
2056 Middle Street
Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do
Tuesday, Nov. 27 Tuesday, Dec. 4 not necessarily reflect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News, or its writers.
Ways and Means Special City Council
5 p.m. All advertising rates are listed at:
6 p.m. www.islandeyenews.com under “advertising”
1207 Palm Boulevard 1207 Palm Boulevard
4 November 23, 2018
Challenge continues from cover magnificent clubhouse,” noted
Gollobin. “Everybody enjoys going
Burnett said. “We’re probably there.”
more in it for the camaraderie There’s a luncheon and
than the winning, but winning’s awards ceremony following the
important too.” completion of the event where
The courses played this year players get the opportunity to
included the aforementioned mingle or say hello to people they
Crooked Oaks Course at Seabrook have played against in the past.
Island, Links Course at Wild While each team had some good
Dunes and Kiawah’s Turtle Point. individual scores for Nines, a game
For the most part, the event that bases scoring around the
went smoothly but inclement largest handicap in a threesome,
weather did interfere with the one of Kiawah’s players reached
first round match, originally 70 points in the final round (50s
scheduled to be played Oct. 10 at and 60s are regarded as a good
Seabrook’s Ocean Winds Course. score) at Crooked Oaks, which is
That match was made up on considered an excellent score.
Nov. 14 and played instead on “That’s always pretty
Seabrook’s Crooked Oaks Course, impressive,” said Gollobin.
a beautiful Robert Trent Jones, In addition to the challenge,
Sr.-designed golf course winding Kiawah and Seabrook also play
through marsh and maritime a head to head match play event
forest. in the spring. Although Kiawah
The match was moved to has suffered a bit of a winning
Crooked Oaks, because it was in drought in the Three Island
better playing condition at that Challenge, Burnett said that they
time then Ocean Winds. When The third scoreboard from the final match at Kiawah. have managed more recent wins
it was initially scheduled on Oct. PHOTO PROVIDED
in this particular competition.
10, Ocean Winds hadn’t been your first match in the Challenge but they do select people from a All three teams will gather as
affected by any fall over seeding you stay on for the second match, list based on a points system that always in December to decide
of the course, whereas Crooked and if you lose you move back involves active participation and on the dates and courses for the
Oaks had. By the Nov. 14 make into qualifying rounds. Thus the winning. following year’s Challenge. The
up date, Ocean Winds had been winners of the third match at Although they didn’t win competition is always played in
over seeded more recently than Crooked Oaks this year qualified this year, Gollobin said the the fall, and Haberern said it’s
Crooked Oaks, so the latter was for the first match in next year’s Three Island Challenge, which typically played on Wednesdays
selected as the event venue. event. originated in 1991 to create since it’s often most convenient
In terms of player selection, Seabrook has this luxury, a spirit of camaraderie and for the players and easier to book
Haberern explained that Haberern said, because they have friendly competition among the the courses that day.
Seabrook holds qualifying a “very active men’s group.” three islands, is a great event to “It’s a great time to get together
matches to determine who plays Kiawah, who finished in second, experience some of the area’s best with people you know and have a
on their Three Island Challenge says they have a lot of the same courses and facilities. competition,” Haberern said.
team. Additionally, if you win names on their team each year, “Seabrook’s got the most

www.islandeyenews.com
November 23, 2018 5
letter to the editor
Town Council likes compromise - but how much?
IOP Holiday
Dear Editor,
For years Sullivan's Island Town Council has indeed successfully
defended, in the South Carolina Courts, the Town's right to protect
Street Festival
and manage the Accreted Land Trust area - the Maritime Forest - for K I C K O F F T H E H O L I D AY S E A S O N
the benefit of all Sullivan's Island residents. Now Town Council is
bending over backwards in a compassionate attempt to implement a S A T U R D A Y, D E C . 1
100 ft. transition zone between adjacent homeowner's property and
the forest. BY WESTON SMITH
Many appreciate the aesthetic value of this green space. Most
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
understand that the protective function of this land is well established

H
and beyond debate. Many do not agree that any transition zone ead down to Front
is necessary. Yet others, myself included, consider themselves Beach on Isle of
conservationists yet support the Transition Zone plan formulated by Palms and help
council in 2016. This plan is a compromise that is in the spirit of the bring in the holiday
good neighbor principle. season island style. The
Unfortunately, some adjacent residents have manipulated their 7th Annual Isle of Palms
own version of a transition zone by cutting vegetation in spite of Holiday Street Festival
Town ordinances that prohibit such actions. Enforcement of the will be held on Saturday,
present restrictions is disappointing at best. And it is with deep Dec. 1 from 2-7 p.m. on
dismay that Council is now poised to possibly adjust the 2016 plan Ocean Blvd.
to the detriment of the protected land. This free event will
Regarding a “right to a view”, with all respect, the right to a view have live music, carnival
through protected, public land has been consistently rejected by rides, local handmade
South Carolina courts. Regretfully, in the future Council may try to gifts, restaurants and even a visit from Beach Santa. Sullivan’s
further manipulate the Maritime Forest to provide view corridors. As Island Elementary Chorus kicks off the event at 2 p.m. followed by
they proceed with planning, I urge Council not to formulate any plan the Shem Creek Boogie Band from 2:30-4:30 p.m. and finishes with
that will unalterably degrade the health and protective value of our the Blackwater Rhythm and Blues Band from 5-7 p.m.
Accreted Land. I sure hope that the obstreperous behavior of some The City of Isle of Palms will officially light the 24’ tree at
who do not agree with these sentiments does not influence Council approximately 5:45 p.m. and Beach Santa will stop by to visit with
to make decisions that we will come to regret. Finding the correct children from 4-6 p.m. Isle of Palms restaurants, food trucks and
compromises should, indeed, be the island-governing norm. other local food and snack vendors will be on site serving up some
Norman Khoury, Sullivan’s Island of the best food in town.
Throughout the event local crafters will be on the street selling
some of their specialty handmade gifts that are great for the holiday
All letters submitted to The Island Eye News must bear a full name, address and
phone number for verification. Only the author’s name and city will be printed. season. In addition to the free carnival rides there will be free jump
Submissions are accepted via email to katy@luckydognews.com or mail to PO. castles, a mechanical bull, face painting, balloon artist and more.
Box 837, Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482. For more information please go to IOP.net/recreation or call the Isle
Letters may be edited for length and readability. The Island Eye News reserves
the right to reject letters that are libelous, unseemly, not individually addressed
of Palms Recreation Department at 843.886.8294.
to The Island Eye News or that have been previously published elsewhere.
6 November 23, 2018 7

Veteran’s Day
Marion Keenan was born near
this spot on Dec. 7, 1888. On Jan.
13, 1889, he was baptized in Stella
Maris Church. A guide to Sullivan’s

wreath laying on IOP Island written 10 years before his


birth refers to a store operated by
his father, Daniel C. Keenan, as
being near the church.
STAFF REPORT We can assume he enjoyed the
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS pleasures of a boyhood growing up
on Sullivan’s Island. At the early

I
sland residents celebrated Veterans Day by remembering age of 5, Marion Keenan’s name
former residents who gave their lives for our country. Honored appeared in the Charleston paper
by Boy Scouts, veterans and community members, the following and the parish records.
remembrances were read aloud at the ceremony that took place on It was in 1894 that the church had
Sunday, Nov. 11. been remodeled after the great storm
of 1893. Father Wright had obtained
Alexander G. Izlar was working as an electrician on Isle of Palms when a bell. In the traditional rubrics,
the draft began for the Great War. The 31-year old was of medium build the blessing of the bells was like
with grey eyes and light brown hair. He registered for the draft on June a Christening, including sponsors.
5, 1917 on Sullivan’s Island. Izlar was drafted later that year to the Father Wright chose four sponsors,
105th Sanitary Train, the 120th Field Hospital, 30th Division. two of the oldest parishioners and
On June 4th, 1918 Alexander Izlar saw the shoreline of the United two of the youngest, Marion Keenan
States for the last time as he and hundreds of others headed for Europe. being one of them.
Izlar would celebrate the abrupt end of the war on Nov. 11. Unlike many By the time the US entered World
of his brothers who would have celebrated in the lines, Izlar would have War I, Marion was already in the
kept working on the wounded as units began to break down and prepare army.
for the return home. Marion died of pneumonia in
Working in medicine did not come without a cost, however. Izlar would France in Oct. 1918. Like so many,
have likely been exposed to serious, contagious illnesses. In February of probably due to the 1918 flu
1919, Alexander Izlar died, waiting to come home. He died just 2 weeks pandemic that spread throughout
before the 120th field hospital would board boats to come home. military camps.
Izlar’s family would have been asked to participate in the Gold Star Here we are today, nearly 125
Mother’s pilgrimages of the 1920s, but as he had no living female years later, tolling the same bell to
relatives, his father Thomas, time and time again, had to reply no. None remember him and all our war dead.
of his family would be making the pilgrimage to see his resting place Read by Monsignor McInerny
abroad.
Read by Marina Conner
STAFF PHOTOS

Veterans Day at
Sullivan’s Island
Elementary
STAFF REPORT
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

S
ullivan’s Island Elementary School celebrated
Veteran’s Day by inviting local vets to attend
breakfast with students. Veterans were
welcomed by kindergarteners offering salutes and

PHOTO PROVIDED
waving flags in their honor. Honorees were invited
to tour the school following the feast. The inaugural
event was organized by the SIES PTA, which they
hope to repeat for years to come.
Sullivan’s Island resident and author and veteran, Leo Fetter with SIES PTA President Alicia Zimov.

www.islandeyenews.com www.islandeyenews.com
November 23, 2018 9

Moultrie students raise money for Crab Bank


BY SC DNR
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

T
eachers and students at
Moultrie Middle School
raised hundreds to help the
Crab Bank renourishment project
in Mount Pleasant.
The only public school in the
county to require uniforms held
a “Dress Down” day on Sept.
27 where students could dress
casually if they donated $1 to the
project.
Sixth grade teacher Kylee
Newkirk and the school’s student
government put together this
fundraiser to show support for
Coastal Expeditions, which has
given tours out of Shem Creek
paddling near and around Crab
Bank to each 6th grade class for
the past 10 years.
Coastal Expeditions is one
group supporting a South
Carolina Department of
Natural Resources program,
the South Carolina Coastal
Bird Conservation Program.
The Coastal Bird Conservation
Program was created under the
Nongame and Natural Areas
Trust Fund (SC Code of Laws
§50-1-280) when SCDNR, Coastal
Expeditions, Audubon South
Carolina, Coastal Conservation Students present check to Coastal Expeditions after raising money for the Crab Bank renourishment project.
League and others came together
PHOTO BY CHRIS CROLLEY
to discuss how Crab Bank could be restored. The creation of the
Coastal Bird Conservation Program will serve to receive funds to
support coastal bird conservation efforts across South Carolina,
restoring and protecting coastal bird habitats, increasing community
awareness and general knowledge about the amazing coastal birds
that call South Carolina home. 
With the help of the school, the total donations raised were
matched to provide a total of $675.25. These funds were donated to
the Coastal Expedition Foundation, who so graciously will provide
these funds to the Coastal Bird Conservation Program to aid in the
Program’s founding project to restore Crab Bank. 
In the past, Crab Bank has provided nesting habitat for as many
as 5,000 birds in a single nesting season, including large colonies of
brown pelicans, terns, black skimmers, egrets and herons, and a few
dozen American oystercatchers. The 6th grade Moultrie class will be
taking a kayaking trip to Shem Creek, but unfortunately won’t be
able to see much activity on Crab Bank. Due to wave erosion and
Hurricane Irma in 2017, all the available nesting habitat on Crab
Bank was washed away, removing any opportunity for nesting birds
during the 2018 season.
“With the general global decline of coastal birds, they need all
the available nesting habitat we can provide,” said Felicia Sanders,
shorebird and seabird biologist for SCDNR.
SCDNR and all the supporting organizations helping to raise funds for
Crab Bank need approximately $1 million more to provide the funding
needed to restore Crab Bank with the beneficial dredge material from
the Post-45 Charleston Harbor Deepening Project. Individuals interested
in supporting or learning more about this important endeavor will find
more detailed information on the Coastal Bird Conservation website at
SCCoastalBirds.org.

www.islandeyenews.com
Fashion forward
thinking
H O L I D AY D R E S S I N G M A D E S I M P L E

SUBMITTED BY SARA CAMPBELL


FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

S
ince fall and holiday fashion attractive, timeless red tones.
shows happen more than Sara Campbell’s boxy cashmere
six months before the first mock neck sweater comes in a
autumn leaf turns yellow, it’s handful of colors, but we love this
easy to forget which motifs graced vibrant red for the holidays and
runways in multiples during beyond. Wear it with your favorite
Fashion Week. When fall apparel dark denim for a night out with
trickles into stores in July, friends or pair it with satin pants
Charlestonians are certainly to attend a social event.
more concerned with taming frizz With the holiday season
and loading up on sunblock than approaching, the phrase "put a
they are with wearing scarves bow on it" never sounded better.
and sweaters, naturally. Think of it like this: you are the
The runways provided plenty gift. Subtle bows are found on
of strong ideas for this season. daywear and dramatic bows
Some prominent themes were adorn eveningwear. Looking for a
patchwork, animal prints, glossy dress that will leave an impression
"wet look" fabrics, and oversized on everyone at the party? Look
suiting. As can be expected with no further than a multi-texture
runway fashion, not every trend chemise with a dramatic silk
can translate seamlessly into bow on the back.
everyday wear. Some are The dark floral print
just too over-the-top and trend started this summer
some are not conducive to and has proven its longevity
remaining cool or warm, into the fall and holiday
depending on the season seasons. Just swap light
and your climate (we’ll cotton for luxe jacquard
pass on that wool suit and these moody prints
in July, thanks!) remain perfectly on-trend.
Alternatively, some Since many of these
fashion trends can wearable trends overlap,
easily migrate into your take notice of dark florals
closet for the holiday with pops of red to really
season and those are shine.
the most fun, because If you’re like the rest
they give us a reason to of us, Fashion Week
go shopping! Rich reds, might seem more like
beautiful bows, and dark an entertainment
florals are three holiday segment than a
apparel trends to be aware source of dressing
of this season to ensure inspiration.
best-dressed status at your Some of the
numerous get-togethers. fashions are extreme
Rich reds are dominating fall and intimidating. The key
and holiday apparel collections to fashion stardom is to
in both rosy and burgundy break down major themes
tones. You’ll see red serving into smaller notes that can
as the main attraction and as be represented in your daily
a featured pop of color on wardrobe. Be prepared to
printed items. If you don’t receive plenty of compliments
think red is right for your this holiday season.
complexion, you’ll easily
find wraps, scarves, totes, Dramatic bows adorn evening
and small leather goods in wear this season.
PHOTOS PROVIDED
November 23, 2018 11

BY MIMI WOOD
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

eemingly, the biggest to maintain independence, and


winners of the IOP Exchange continue to enjoy his love of the
Club’s Marina Fest raffle, outdoors. Thank you for creating
held at the Isle of Palms Marina an environment that everyone
on Sunday, Nov. 4, walked away can fully enjoy.”
with a guitar autographed by “We hope to enhance the
some of country music’s finest, a quality of life for those who may
lakeside vacation, a watersports benefit from the healing nature of
adventure package, and a golf water,” explains Exchange Club
cart. “I’m thrilled to have won the literature. Educational programs
guitar,” exclaimed islander Cindy are also part of the mix, as are
Lee, who bought her raffle ticket plans to enable local scouts to
at the IOP Farmer’s Market. “I utilize the facilities. “I envision
didn’t think I had a chance. I just land-side community events,
wanted to support a good cause!” like ’S’more’s Night’” states
But the real winners are the Ted Kinghorn, Exchange Club
IOP Exchange Club’s Marina Fest, Nov. 4.
veterans, the children of the Director of Development.
Charleston Youth Development “An internal referendum
Corporation, Darkness to Light, resulted in 75% of our
Halo, and the myriad of other membership voting in favor
organizations who benefit of this project,” Kinghorn
from the IOP Exchange Club’s continues. “We’ve got the vote,
benevolent endeavors. we’ve got the plans, we’ve got
The Marina Fest was both the permits from the DNR and
an outreach to the community, the Army Corps of Engineers. All
and the Exchange Club’s latest we need now are the remaining
innovative fundraiser, as it funds,” he concludes, estimating
strives to raise approximately approximately $150,000 is all
$300,000 to build a floating dock that’s needed to complete the
with complementary amenities, funding, and begin construction.
adjacent to it's existing building In addition to the 500 or (left) IOP Exchange members and volunteers. (right) Waterfront Improvement
at 201 Palm Blvd. The event so neighbors and friends who Committee Chairman, Patrick Harrington.
added approximately $36,000 to enjoyed the brisk, overcast PHOTOS BY SHARON ANNICHINO
the dock-designated coffer. day, the local businesses that
Designed for passive waterside participated offered positive
activities, such as fishing feedback.
and crabbing, as well as an “I felt it was not only beneficial
accessible launch for non- in raising funds and awareness
motorized watercraft, the official for the Exchange Club, but also
objective in building the dock created community within the
is “to enhance service to the Marina,” noted Shane Ziegler,
community, Veterans and at- owner of Barrier Island Eco-
risk children by providing access Tours. “We took over 200 people
to our back island waterways,” on our short eco-tour, many of
states Exchange Club literature. whom had never been, and live
Gordon Robertson III, here. Many more residents now
Director of Development for the have a better understanding of
Charleston Youth Development what Barrier Island Eco-Tours
Center, serves a population who does.”
already enjoy some of the fruits Local mom Anna Lonon is
of the Exchange Club’s labors, in excited about the prospect of
the form of funds from the Club’s water access at the Exchange
annual Connector Run. Club. Lonon founded The Lonon
Founded in 1790 as the Foundation after losing her 32-
Charleston Orphan House, the year old husband Mike to cancer
first publically funded orphanage in 2014. The Foundation’s
in the United States, the CYDC primary mission is to help
serves over 900 children and children affected by a parent’s
families “who have been brought cancer diagnosis, as was her son
to our doors because there no Jack, aged 4 at the time of her
longer exists a safe home where husband’s passing. “Being able
they can live,” according to their to get out on the water is such a
mission statement. cathartic experience,” she states,
“Many of our children have “and will benefit our UPLIFT kids
spent little time on or near the so much as they deal with the
beautiful waterways in our region. stress of having a parent with
We would love the opportunity cancer.”
for them to learn water safety, To contribute to the Legacy
kayaking, fishing…experiences Community Service Program, the
that would enrich their lives,” ‘formal’ name of this initiative, go
states Robertson. to IOPExchange.org or gofundme.
Tommy Bishop, the new owner com/embrace-the-waterfront-
of the golf cart, adds his anecdote. project.
“My dad was a disabled veteran,
and I saw first-hand his struggle

www.islandeyenews.com
November 23, 2018 13

STAFF REPORT
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

T
he First Responders
Department and Equipment
Blessing took place at St.
Mark’s Lutheran Church on
Sunday, Nov. 11. Performed by
Pastor Phil Clark, the annual event
marks the beginning of the holiday
season and begs the good Lord’s
protection for those who serve in
and receive services from Sullivan’s
Island’s public safety force.
Pastor Phil Clark with parishioners, first responders and community members participate in the blessing. STAFF PHOTOS

www.islandeyenews.com
14 November 23, 2018

East Cooper Community Outreach benefits


from Sullivan’s Island charity
BY JESSICA WILLIS
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

O
n the chilly morning of Volunteers visited nearly every and household supplies. opportunities, job preparedness,
Nov. 3, in the spirit of home on Sullivan’s Island with a Just over two hundred bags along with many other community
this Thanksgiving season, grocery bags and an invitation to have been collected in a week services. More information
volunteers and island residents participate in the food drive. Over through the overwhelming about ECCO can be found at
from the Church of the Holy Cross the following week, the people of response of the Sullivan’s Island ECCOCharleston.org.
headed around the island station Sullivan’s Island have generously community. This island-wide Thank you to all our neighbors
by station to invite their neighbors flooded the Holy Cross church food drive is part of the ongoing on Sullivan’s Island who joined
to “give back and give hope.” buildings with gifts of groceries partnership of Church of the Holy Cross in serving the poor
Holy Cross and East Cooper and hungry in the East Cooper
Community Outreach. Holy area this Thanksgiving season!
Cross and its church attendees You gave generously and because
realize that even here in the East of that many families will have
Cooper area there are many of food to sustain them. We believe
our own neighbors that face daily there is still much more to do and
hunger and financial needs. we look forward to partnering
ECCO is an incredible together again to serve others, to
community organization that give back and to give hope.
serves many types of needs for
Church of the Holy Cross is
those who live and work in the
East Cooper region. It serves an Anglican church with three
individuals and families with area campuses (Sullivan’s
a range of services including Island, Daniel Island, and I’On).
food, clothing, emergency For location or service times
financial assistance, medical check out HolyCross.net or call
care, counseling, educational 843.883.3586.

Volunteers at Holy Cross Church prepare bags to distribute to Sullivan’s Island residents.

Neighbors were invited to fill a bag with nonperishables to benefit clients of East
Cooper Community Outreach. PHOTOS PROVIDED

www.islandeyenews.com
November 23, 2018 15

At the Rec...
Movie & Dodgeball (5-12 yrs)
843.886.8294 iop.net
FRIDAY, DEC. 28 FROM 12 – 3 P.M.
Register by Dec. 21.
Lunch, movie & dodgeball at the Rec.
Minimum of 15 participants to hold activity. Santa’s Cookie
$10 resident/ $15 non-resident Workshop
THURSDAY, DEC. 13
4 P.M.
Register by Friday, Nov. 30.
FREE Activity.

ACTIVITY GUIDE JAN - MAY


PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY
AVAILABLE BEGINNING OF DECEMBER

www.islandeyenews.com
Holiday Shopping Guide
November 22 Is l a nd E y e C a l e nda r December 15
ONGOING WHEN: 10-11 a.m. WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library WHERE: Wild Dunes Resort Friday, Nov. 30 Saturday, Dec. 8 MORE INFO: Presented by Half- Lane, Johns Island
WHAT: Southbound: MORE INFO: Toddler Day classes WHEN: 1:30-3:30 p.m. WHEN: noon-7:30 p.m. Moon Outfitters, family-oriented, WHEN: 1-4 p.m.
Photographs of and about the are designed for toddlers (18 MORE INFO: Come play with MORE INFO: Local vendors, WHAT: Porkchop Productions: WHAT: Shuckin’ on the Cooper pet-friendly 5k run/walk through MORE INFO: The Lowcountry
New South months – 3 years) and a parent, our games or bring your own. prizes and family activities. “Holly and the Snowman” (family) WHERE: Mt. Pleasant Pier the lower peninsula of downtown Land Trust’s 4th annual event
WHERE: Halsey Institute of grandparent, or friend to play 843.883.3914. Starting at 4:30 p.m. Lowcountry WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library WHEN: 5-8 p.m. Charleston. Over 3,500 runners features a catered oyster roast,
Contemporary Art and explore in The Charleston Oyster roast and buffet, WHEN: 3 p.m. MORE INFO: 2nd annual holiday will raise money for MUSC local brews and spirits, live
WHEN: Oct. 19 - March 2 Museum. With a focus on Third Friday of the Month holiday tree lighting, movie and MORE INFO: How can you make event sponsored by CCPRC. Enjoy Children’s Hospital. For details music, and oyster cup tastings
MORE INFO: An exhibition co- developing fine motor skills, pictures with Santa. For tickets a snowman when it’s 98 degrees view of Charleston’s Parade of and registration visit RunSignup. with Lowcountry Oyster Co. Visit
curated by Mark Sloan, director each program includes four craft WHAT: Homeschool History and detailed schedule visit outside? Join Holly the Elf on Boats that evening. Live music, com and search 28th Annual LowcountryLandTrust.org for
and chief curator of the Halsey projects as well as finger paints, Days DestinationHotels.com/wild- her quest to make a seemingly food and beverages available Reindeer Run. details.
Institute of Contemporary Art, a puppet stage, a sandbox, WHERE: Charleston Museum, dunes/events. impossible holiday wish come for purchase. Admission $8
and Mark Long, professor of and more. $6 Members/$9 360 Meeting St. true. Will Jack Frost be willing in advance or $10 on site if
political science, both faculty of Non-Members. To register visit WHEN: 10-11 a.m. to change his icy ways or will available, but advance ticket Saturday, Dec. 8-9 Saturday, Dec. 15
the College of Charleston. For info CharlestonMuseum.org. MORE INFO: A special program Saturday, Nov. 24 tropical snow be a no-go? Find purchase is recommended.
WHAT: Foundations of Healing WHAT: Santa’s Workshop on
visit SouthboundProject.org. for home schooling families. out in this Porkchop original that Buckets of oysters, provided by
These programs feature one of WHAT: Turkey Trot Family Run is sure to warm even the frostiest Charleston Bay Gourmet, will Touch Class Sullivan’s
Thursdays our field trip classes, a chance WHERE: Wild Dunes Resort WHERE: Roper St. Francis WHERE: The Island Club,
Mondays of hearts. 843.883.3914. be available for $10 each on site.
WHAT: Mah Jongg Nights to go through the Museum, WHEN: 8 a.m. Dave N Dubs Hot Dog Joint will Cancer Center, 2085 Henry Sullivan’s Island
WHAT: Memoir Writing Circle  (adults) and an activity. Free with paid MORE INFO: Scenic 5K fun be selling hot dogs and brats. Tecklenburg Dr. WHEN: 1:30-3:30 p.m.
WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library admission. To register visit run on the beach! $25 per Saturday, Dec. 1 CharlestonCountyParks.com for WHEN: Dec. 8 & 9, 8:30 a.m-6 p.m. MORE INFO: For elves in grades
WHEN: 10:30 a.m. WHEN: 5:30-8:00 p.m. CharlestonMuseum.org. person, includes t-shirt. Visit tickets and info. MORE INFO: Beneficial in 1-5, Huck Finn School presents
MORE INFO: Come and share MORE INFO: Learn to play the DestinationHotels.com/wild- WHAT: Santa’s Workshop on calming anxiety and reducing holiday fun and giftmaking.
your stories. 843.883.3914. fun and fast-paced game of dunes/events for details. Sullivan’s symptoms of depression, Decorate wooden ornaments,
  American Mah Jongg.  Beginners Thursday, Nov. 22 WHERE: The Island Club, WHAT: Live Nativity
WHERE: Sunrise Presbyterian decreasing pain, strengthening create small holiday gifts and
welcome. 843.883.3914. WHAT: Creative Writing Club Sullivan’s Island the immune system, enhancing wrapping. Classes limited to
Tuesdays WHAT: Fried Turkey Glide WHEN: 1:30-3:30 p.m. Church, Sullivan’s Island
(children 6-11) WHEN: 5, 5:30, 6 and 6:30 p.m. recovery from surgery, 16 participants. $25 per child.
WHAT: Toddler Storytime WHERE: Awendaw’s Garris WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library MORE INFO: For elves in grades complementing care for neck Register at HuckFinnSchool.com.
WHAT: Jazz Night Landing MORE INFO: Youth and choir
WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library WHERE: The Refuge, IOP WHEN: 10:30 a.m. 1-5, Huck Finn School presents and spine problems, supporting
WHEN: 10:30 a.m. WHEN: 9:30 a.m. holiday fun and giftmaking. present the Live Nativity
WHEN: 6:30-9:30 p.m. MORE INFO: Do you love to write? complete with live animals. cancer care, deepening spiritual WHAT: Junie B. in Jingle Bells,
MORE INFO: Enjoy picture MORE INFO: No registration Join our monthly writing club to Decorate wooden ornaments, connection, a sense of well- Batman Smells
MORE INFO: The Todd Beals Trio fee, free and easy parking, a Explore Bethlehem Village in the
books, flannel board fun, sing-a- hosts jazz every Thursday night. write and share your work with create small holiday gifts and being, easing acute and chronic WHERE: Dock Street Theater
longs, poetry and activities that pristine scenic route, homemade wrapping. Classes limited to Fellowship Hall with crafts, hot
Traditional swing tunes, ballads friends. 843.883.3914. cocoa, and cookies. Free. conditions. Call to register WHEN: 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.
encourage language skills. (Ages beer, shots of Wild Turkey, and 16 participants. $25 per child. 843.388.1834. MORE INFO: Contemporary
and bossa novas. Singers & horn granola muffins at the finish line.
2-3 with adult) 843.883.3914. Register at HuckFinnSchool.com. holiday classic by Allison Gregory,
players welcome. For info visit Giveaways include free t-shirts, Wednesday, Nov. 28 WHAT: Junie B. in Jingle Bells,
directed by Marybeth Clark.
Wednesdays
CharlestonJazz.com. awards, and snacks. Everyone is
WHAT: A Christmas Carol
WHAT: DIY Crafts (children) Batman Smells
WHERE: Dock Street Theater
Sunday, Dec. 9 First-grader, Junie B. engages in
invited and encouraged to attend. WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library Christmas capers. Suitable for
WHAT: Toddler Days Fridays For details contact Jay Reigart WHERE: Dock Street Theater WHEN: 3 p.m. WHAT: Soul of the Lowcountry
WHERE: Charleston Museum, WHEN: 10 a.m. ages 5 and up, run time is 60
WHAT: Board Game Afternoon at 843.693.4936 or jreigart@ WHEN: 7:30 p.m., Nov. 28-Dec. MORE INFO: Join Mrs. Grace to MORE INFO: Contemporary Oyster Roast
360 Meeting St. 19, dates vary holiday classic by Allison Gregory, WHERE: Sunlean, 3211 Eenjy minutes. Visit CharletsonStage.
(family) wkdickson.com. make fun seasonal paper crafts. com for tickets and info.
MORE INFO: Charleston Stage’s 843.883.3914. directed by Marybeth Clark.
musical adaptation of Dickens's First-grader, Junie B. engages in
Friday, Nov. 23 immortal holiday classic. Adapted WHAT: Pipette Painting with Christmas capers. Suitable for
for the stage and directed by Elizabeth Abel (teens and ages 5 and up, run time is 60
WHAT: Holiday Market and Julian Wiles. For tickets and info
Festival adults) minutes. Visit CharletsonStage.
visit CharlestonStage.com. WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library com for tickets and info.
WHEN: 12 p.m.
WHAT: Santa’s Workshop on

Want to join the


MORE INFO: Learn the art of
painting with alcohol inks to Sullivan’s
create vibrant marbled images. WHERE: The Island Club,
Class size is limited. Reservations Sullivan’s Island

conversation? required. Call 843.883.3914. WHEN: 1:30-3:30 p.m.


MORE INFO: For elves in grades
1-5, Huck Finn School presents
Thursday, Dec.6 holiday fun and giftmaking.
Lucky Dog News is looking for writers in Sullivan’s Island Decorate wooden ornaments,
and Isle of Palms to cover civic and community events. WHAT: Lit After Dark: The create small holiday gifts and
Universe Within (adult) wrapping. Classes limited to
No experience needed, just a genuine interest in community WHERE: CCPL Poe Branch Library
and a curiosity about local politics. 16 participants. $25 per child.
MORE INFO: A discussion of The Register at HuckFinnSchool.com.
Universe Within: Discovering
Contact Katy Calloway, Managing Editor at the Common History of Rocks, WHAT: Reindeer Run
Katy@LuckyDogNews.com Planets, and People by Neil WHERE: Downtown Charleston
Shubin. 843.883.3914. WHEN: 9 a.m.
20 November 23, 2018

USL students predict Cunningham victory


BY SARAH VEGA
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

L
ong before Joe Cunningham was
declared the winner in a tight race
to become South Carolina’s District
1 representative in Congress, University
School students had tabulated data from
approximately 2,000 exit polls showing that
he was expected to win in Charleston County
with a 2-1 margin.
Third through 12th graders from University
School of the Lowcountry spent Nov. 6 polling
voters at Sunrise Presbyterian Church on
Sullivan’s Island, Isle of Palms Recreation
Center, and Isle of Palms City Hall, as well
as 23 additional sites around Charleston
County and two sites on Daniel Island. Many
students were surprised by the long lines they
witnessed and appreciative of how courteous
the voters were that they interacted with.
“At USL, we learn all about connecting
with the community and to use our voice in
the real world. Exit polling is one of the best
ways we demonstrate this,” said 6th grader
Kit Jones-Painter, who conducted exit polls
at the Isle of Palms Recreation Center.
Aside from helping students better
understand civics and the ebb and flow of
turnout rates for different types of elections,
the students also learn valuable lessons
about mathematics and statistics when they
tabulate their data and make predictions
about the election outcomes. The students
have a strong track record of correctly USL students conducting exit polls at Sunrise Presbyterian Church (l-r): Noah Rucquoi, Matthew Wright, Emma
predicting the outcomes of everything from Bluestein and Mary Wade Brewer. PHOTO PROVIDED
referendums to Presidential elections.
In preparation for exit polling, students “Part of our focus at USL is helping our school serving students from third through
heard from guest speakers representing students become engaged and informed 12th grade. USL is a non-sectarian school
many political parties—Katie Arrington citizens,” said founder and head of school, for high-achieving, nice, curious students
(Republican), Melissa Couture (Libertarian), Jason Kreutner. “Hearing from candidates emphasizing individualized academics,
JA Moore (Democrat), and Gregg Jocoy and party representatives whose perspectives
(Green Party). Additional presentations that experiential learning, and a strong sense of
might differ from their own also creates a community. USL is accredited by the South
helped students better understand elections culture of civility and empathy. All of this
and civics were provided by The League of helps our students better connect with our Carolina Independent School Association
Women Voters, Jay Bender, who serves as annual exit polling efforts,” he said. and is celebrating its 12th year of serving
legal counsel to the South Carolina Press children and families throughout the greater
Association regarding the freedom of speech, University School of the Lowcountry is a Charleston area. For more information please
and former Charleston mayor Joe Riley. non-profit, 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt independent visit USLowcountry.org or call 843.884.0902.

www.islandeyenews.com
November 23, 2018 21

Archaeological dig breaks ground Fall 2018


HOTEL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT SET TO MOVE FORWARD

BY KELLY RYAN
THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

O
ne of the South’s most
important historic sites,
The Pinckney Mansion,
is about to be the subject of a
nationally relevant archeological
dig. The Pinckney Mansion,
among the first grand homes
in Charleston, was an early
inhabitant on Charleston’s
colonial waterfront.
“[The Pinckney Mansion] is
arguably the most important site
in colonial Charleston,” according
to architectural historian and
preservationist, Ralph Harvard.
The site could contain remnants
and artifacts from the grand
mansion, as well as valuable
evidence from slave quarters.
Charles Pinckney built a
sprawling mansion in Charleston,
South Carolina around 1746 at
235 East Bay St. The Pinckney
Mansion burned down in 1861,
and the site has since been home
to a coffee shop, a pub and in
the future, Hotel Eliza. Findings
from this historic dig will be
incorporated into the lobby of
the new hotel, as a nod to the
site’s past. Hotel Eliza’s name
was chosen to honor the home’s
historic owner and American
business pioneer, Eliza Lucas
Pinckney. Ruins of the Pinckney Mansion, Charleston, South Carolina, 1865, George N. Barnard.
Eliza Lucas Pinckney single-
handedly changed agriculture
in colonial South Carolina and always wanted to unearth any of early Charleston history,” said The team is also considering
developed indigo as one of its most the hidden pieces of the story it Pearce. the possibility of collaborating on
important cash crops. In 1753, has to tell and to include those Eric Poplin, Senior a documentary about the historic
President George Washington in our hotel to give it a true and Archaeologist & Vice President site.
served as a pallbearer at tangible tie to its beginnings,” of Brockington and Associates, The archeological dig is set to
Pinckney’s funeral. And in the said Dean Pearce, of Pearce will lead this project and break take place fall 2018.
20th century, Pinckney was the Development, the owner of ground on the historic dig this Pearce Development is a
first woman to be inducted into the property on 235 East Bay fall. Poplin has worked on many commercial real estate developer,
South Carolina’s Business Hall St. In spite of no architectural similar projects in the area based in the Lowcountry.
of Fame for her contributions to ordinance, Pearce Development throughout his long tenure in The company develops and
South Carolina’s agriculture. The initiated this pivotal dig out of the Lowcountry. Recent projects owns commercial properties
Pinckney descendants have been commitment and respect for the have involved data recovery throughout the southeast. Hotel
some of South Carolina’s finest city’s rich history. excavations at the 1710s-1920s Eliza is the firm’s first hotel project
statesmen and politicians. “The Pinckney Mansion was Combahee Ferry site in Beaufort/ and honoring The Pinckney
“Part of the allure of this site one of Charleston’s grandest Colleton Counties (South Mansion site and its significance
was the significance of it in our homes in the 1700’s and we Carolina), the 1790s-1850s to the history of Charleston
city and our nation’s history. We, are looking forward to what the Barnett Plantation on Royal remains a commitment.
along with many historians, have findings could unearth about Island (The Bahamas) and more.

www.islandeyenews.com
Acme Lowcountry Kitchen
island eats
week. Delivery available. $ Pizza 450
Specializing in local and 882-8088 Sizable pizza joint serving hefty
sustainable seafood. All Altantic thecoopsi.com pies and housemade ice cream,
Ocean sourced Seafood. $$-$$$ 2019 Middle St, Sullivan's Island plus breakfast & coffee. $$
886-FISH (3474) 2213-B Middle St, Sullivan's
31 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms The Dinghy Island
Laid back Key West Vibe, great 450pizza.com
Beard Cat’s food options, unique beers on 843.789.4107
Gelato made from locally sourced tap, spacious side porch, and live
ingredients, and coffee shop that music. $-$$ Pizza Hut
sits below Obstinate Daughter. $ 242-8310 Now serving Isle of Palms in the
416-5020 dinghyiop.com Harris Teeter shopping center.
beardcatsweetshop.com 8 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms Deliver right to your door or get
2063 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island carryout. $
Ben & Jerry’s Dunleavy’s Pub 886-5759
Set in a cabin like building, this order.pizzahut.com
Enjoy an array of ice cream 1515 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms
flavors, from Chocolate Therapy, Irish bar stages weekly live folk,
to Peach Cobbler on Isle of Palms’ country & acoustic music. $-$$
883-9646 Poe’s Tavern
Front Beach. $ Famous for their gourmet burgers
886-6314 dunleavysonsullivans.com
2213 Middle St., Sullivan's Island and chicken sandwiches, this Poe-
benandjerrys.com inspired eatery also features great
your island hair salon 1009 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms High Thyme deals on fresh fish tacos. $$
A small island bistro, with a wide
843-883-9101 The Boathouse
Fresh, local seafood, and range of dishes, from seafood,
883-0083
longislandcafesc.com
2205 Middle St, Sullivan's Island phenomenal sunset views from tapas on Tuesday, and a Sunday 2210 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
the upper deck on Breach Inlet. brunch. $$-$$$
$$-$$$ 883-3536 Republic Ice Cream
886.8000 highthymecuisine.com Local ice cream shop serving
boathouserestaurants.com 2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island homemade ice cream and local
101 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms Charleston coffee. $
Home Team BBQ republicicecream.com
Not limited to barbeque, this 2120 Middle St., Sullivans Island
Cafe Paname casual eatery also serves salads,
Family owned and operated coffee wraps, tacos, and quesadillas, Saltworks Dockside Deli
shop serving locally roasted coffee. $$ Sunday Brunch. $$ Located inside the Isle of Palms
885-6303 883-3131 Marina Market, come enjoy
www.facebook.com/ teamteambbq.com breakfast, smoothies, and
cafepanameiop 2209 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island sandwiches. $-$$
1202 Palm Blvd., A, Isle of Palms 883-3355
Mex1 saltworkscc.com
Chills 360 Hip eatery serving Mexican
Dallas based shop serving Thai 50 41st Ave, Isle of Palms
favorites, including tacos & tortas,
inspired rolled ice cream. $ with an island vibe. Live music, Seabiscuit Cafe
242-8469 outdoor seating. $$ A bright, cozy cafe with nautical
www.chills360.com 882-8172 touches serving a simple menu of
1515 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms mex1coastalcantina.com homestyle breakfast & lunch. $-$$
Coconut Joe’s & 2205 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island facebook.com/seabiscuitcafeiop
Island Joe’s Coffee Morgan Creek Grill 21 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms
Spectacular views of the Atlantic Relax with a front row seat on Sullivan’s
on the rooftop bar and live music the Intracoastal Waterway while Grab a casual dinner of fried
every night during the summer. enjoying fresh seafood and flounder or crab cakes in a cozy
$-$$. Island Joe’s next door southern hospitality. $$ atmosphere as well as lunch on
featuring coffee and ice cream. $ 886-8980 the weekends. $$
886-0046 morgancreekgrill.com 883-3222
coconutjoes.biz 8040 1st Ave, Isle of Palms saltstation22.com
1120 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms 2019 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
The Obstinate Daughter
The Co-Op Restaurant serving contemporary Windjammer
A gourmet deli specializing in Southern cuisine, pizza & pasta in Lively spot with a bar menu, a deck
breakfast and lunch sandwiches a rustic, coastal-inspired space. overlooking the water, and beach
as well as local coffee. Enjoy $$-$$$ volleyball court out back.$-$$
pantry staples including beer 416-5020 886-8596
and wine along with locally made theobstinatedaughter.com the-windjammer.com
products and house made take 2063 Middle St,Sullivan’s Island 1008 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms
and go meals. Open 7 days a

Bacco
off-island eats
eggsupgrill.com facebook.com/notjustfranksatace
Regional Italian restaurant featuring 2664 Highway 17N, Mt. Pleasant 3008 N Highway 17, Mt Pleasant
fresh pastas, fior di latte mozzarella
and Neapolitan style pizzas from the Ghost Monkey Nano Brewery Rusty Rudder
wood burning oven. $$$ Features a consistent rotation of locally Easygoing hangout offering American
843.884.6969 brewed beer made in Mount Pleasant. eats such as BBQ, seafood & steak,
baccocharleston.com Taproom, live music, food. $$ plus a bar & outdoor seats. $$
976 Houston Northcutt Blvd, Mt. Pleasant 843.352.3462 843.388.3177
ghostmonkeybrewery.com rustyruddermtp.com
Bistro Toulouse 522 Wando Ln, Mt Pleasant 3563 N Hwy 17, Mt Pleasant
Parisian-style nook serving seasonal, H&R Sweet Shop Sewee Restaurant
regional French dishes with a modern Famous redfish and rice, fried Southern-style seafood & other fried
twist, plus global wines. $-$$ chicken, shrimp, bbq ribs. $ fare in a casual joint with checkered
216-3434 843.884.2118 tables & homey decor. $$
bistrotoulouse.com 102 Royall Ave, Mt Pleasant 843.928.3609
1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd, Mt Pleasant seeweerestaurantinc.com
Jack's Cosmic Dogs 4808 N Hwy 17, Awendaw
Bon Banh Mi Kitschy space-themed spot serving
Southeast Asian Cuisine, Rice Bowls, hot dogs topped with creative Stack’s Coastal Kitchen
Noodles, Sandwiches, Small Plates, condiments, plus sides & ice cream. $ Join us for lunch, where we offer
Vegetarian Options $ 884-7677 fresh soup, salads, and sandwiches.
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FINANCIAL FOCUS
November 23, 2018 23

Time to think about year-end


investment moves
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

W
e’ve still got a couple of a child? Or did you change
of months left in 2018, jobs or retire? Any of these events
but it’s not too soon to could lead you to adjust your
start thinking about some year- investment plans, so now may be
end investment moves that the time to do so, possibly with the
might benefit you. Here are a few help of a financial professional.
possibilities (although not all will Review your investment mix.
apply to your situation): At least once a year, it’s a good
Add to your IRA. For the idea to review your investment
2018 tax year, you can put up mix to ensure it’s still suitable
to $5,500 into your traditional for your goals and risk tolerance.
or Roth IRA (assuming you are Sometimes, even without your
eligible), or $6,500 if you’re 50 taking any action, your portfolio
or older. If you haven’t reached might change in ways you hadn’t
this limit, consider adding some expected. For example, suppose
money. You have until April 15, you wanted your portfolio to
2019, to contribute to your IRA contain 60% stocks and 40%
for 2018, but why wait until the last minute? bonds and other investments. After a period of rising prices, though,
Increase your 401(k) contributions. You already may be investing the value of your stocks may have increased so much that they now
in your 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored retirement plan, but occupy 65% of your portfolio – which means you may be taking on
you might be able to bump up your contributions for the rest of the more risk than you had originally intended. Consequently, you may
year, if it’s allowed. Of course, you should always put in enough to need to rebalance your portfolio to get back to your original 60% to
earn your employer’s matching contribution, if one is offered. 40% ratios. (Keep in mind that these figures are just for illustration;
Take your RMDs. If you are 70½ or older, you must start taking everyone’s ideal portfolio mix will depend on their individual
withdrawals – called required minimum distributions, or RMDs – situations.)
from your traditional IRA and your 401(k) or similar retirement plan. These aren’t the only year-end moves you may want to consider,
Generally, you must take these RMDs by December 31 every year. but they can help you close out 2018 on a positive note. Plus, they
But if you turned 70½ in 2018, you can wait until April 1, 2019, can serve as a reminder that you need to be vigilant as you keep
until you take your first RMD. However, you will then have to take working toward your financial goals.
a second RMD (the one for age 71) by December 31, 2019. Taking Dimi Matouchev is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, located
two RMDs in one year could give you an unexpectedly large taxable at 1505 Palm Boulevard, Isle of Palms. For more information, call
income for the year, possibly bumping you into a higher tax bracket 843.886.9229 or visit EdwardJones.com.
and affecting the amount of your Social Security benefits subject to
taxes. So, if you are considering delaying your first RMD, consult
with your tax advisor.
Make changes in response to life events. In 2018, did you
experience a major life event, such as a marriage, divorce or addition

Breac h Inlet Tide Char t


Date High Tide Low Tide
Nov 23 7:23am/7:48pm 1:01am/1:43pm
Nov 24 8:10am/8:35pm 1:47am/2:31pm
Nov 25 8:58am/9:25pm 2:35am/3:21pm
Nov 26 9:50am/10:20pm 3:25am/4:13pm
Nov 27 10:45am/11:19pm 4:19am/5:08pm
Nov 28 11:45am 5:17am/6:06pm
Nov 29 12:24am/12:47pm 6:20am/7:06pm
Nov 30 1:31am/1:50pm 7:26am/8:07pm
Dec 1 2:36am/2:52pm 8:32am/9:05pm
Dec 2 3:38am/3:50pm 9:35am/10:00pm
Dec 3 4:35am/4:44pm 10:34am/10:51pm
Dec 4 5:27am/5:34pm 11:28am/11:39pm
Dec 5 6:15am/6:21pm 12:18pm
Dec 6 7:00am/7:05pm 12:25am/1:05pm

Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the


predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.

Source: www.saltwatertides.com

www.islandeyenews.com
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The Best Move You Can Make


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2205 Middle Stree Suite 203 • Sullivan’s Island, SC • 29482