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Visual Arts

Task 3: Assessment Commentary

TASK 3: ASSESSMENT COMMENTARY


Respond to the prompts below (no more than 10 single-spaced pages, including prompts) by typing your responses within
the brackets following each prompt. Do not delete or alter the prompts. Commentary pages exceeding the maximum will not be
scored. Attach the assessment you used to evaluate student performance (no more than 5 additional pages) to the end of this
file. If you submit a student work sample or feedback as a video or audio clip and you or your focus students cannot be clearly
heard, attach a transcription of the inaudible comments (no more than 2 additional pages) to the end of this file. These pages
do not count toward your page total.

1. Analyzing Student Learning


a. Identify the specific learning objectives measured by the assessment you chose for
analysis.
[The assessment which I have chosen for analysis are vocabulary that I have had them write
down within their journals to show that they comprehended the new vocabulary which I have
given them, a value scale which I had them create in their journal to show that they understand
how to create different values with hatching and cross hatching, a worksheet which I have given
the students to show that they understand how to turn a shape into a form using hatching and
crosshatching, and the final project where they draw an object which they value and have
brought into class from observation using proper hatching and cross-hatching techniques.]
b. Provide a graphic (table or chart) or narrative that summarizes student learning for your
whole class. Be sure to summarize student learning for all evaluation criteria submitted
in Assessment Task 3, Part D.
[Student learning within my class can be classified as a scaffolded experience that builds off of
both prior knowledge and gradually introduces new knowledge to students, building up tasks
and skills slowly and not immediately. To start I asked students to discuss a mixture of things
that they have learned and things which they have yet to learn. As we were discussing value, I
related that to their previous lessons on tint and shade. When I related it to this some students
came to the conclusion that value has to do with light and dark as tints and shades are different
light and dark variants of color. In this way student learning was done gradually and in a
comfortable way where students were led to making connection on their own as opposed to
giving them tasks which were too easy or tasks which were too difficult (they were within
Vygotsky’s proposed Zone of Proximal Development). While I introduced this vocabulary, I
asked students to write down these words within their journals in their own words, or in a way
that they could best understand and refer back to. I did this because I believe that students
should have notes that they can understand, and that their comprehension is more important
than writing down the dictionary (or my own personal) definitions of words. After this I had
students use this new knowledge to create a value scale within their journals to show that they
can use the definitions which they have gone over in a practical application sense. I provided
feedback to students during this step, helping a few students to get the subtle transitions from
light to dark down. This was followed by a worksheet which had 4 3dimensional shapes on them
with no shading. Students were asked to identify a light source on the shape and use
crosshatching and hatching to turn the shapes into forms. I continued to offer help with students
who were struggling with either the idea of turning a shape into a form and the ideas of cross-
hatching. As you can tell I always build lessons off of each other so that students can continue
to test and practice their new techniques and processes in practical ways. After a short
demonstration during the next lesson they moved to the final project which is using everything
they have learned prior (shading via crosshatching, creating a form, identifying a light source) to
illustrate an object which they have brought in from home. In this final project students were
evaluated on if they brought an object they valued, if they had at least 4 identifiable values

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Visual Arts
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

within their piece, and if they were able to name the techniques used. Students were also given
the option of adding color via watercolor pencils and asked to then show 4 tints and 4 shades,
but the focus was on hatching and crosshatching.]
c. Use evidence found in the 3 student work samples and the whole class summary to
analyze the patterns of learning for the whole class and differences for groups or for
individual learners relative to their abilities to create, present, or respond to visual art.
The evidence being analyzed should incorporate learning about at least one of the
following components:
 interpreting art
 developing works of art/design
 relating art to context
Consider what students understand and do well, and where they continue to struggle
(e.g., common errors, confusions, need for greater challenge).
[Using three student samples, which I will refer to and denote as Students 1, 2, and 3, I will
discuss some of the ways in which my students have interpreted hatching and crosshatching as
well as some of the strengths and weaknesses that we ran into when developing their skills at
using these techniques to create shape and form. Student 2 faced an issue which a number of
students faced within the classroom, which is that they were not sure how to shade a sphere in
order to turn it from a circle into a sphere. Although I did leave feedback in a sticky note to show
Student 2 how the entire shape should be shaded, and how light would circle radiantly from the
light source, the student still had issues shading his object (in this case a soccer ball). He did,
however, have success in the technical aspect of crosshatching. For the most part a universal
strength seen from student to student is a grasping and interpretation of the general technique
of hatching and crosshatching. Students did not resort to filling in areas or scribbling in order to
shade, with little exception students crossed and created the lines necessary to create value.
This is seen throughout students 1-3. Student 3 had finished early, and so I had them draw an
object which they had brought inside of their original object (the character was inside of the
sphere, in this case). Although his understanding of a gradual change necessary to create a
form was there, he lacked in the ability of creating a sphere just like Student 2 did. Student 3,
however, brought up another correction I need to fix which is thinking of engaging and relevant
supplemental activities for students. Thankfully Student 3 had a built in one which he was
excited to draw, however this was not the case for some other students within my classes.
Finally, Student 1 is also Student A whom I discussed earlier. Because he is on the spectrum he
had to be accommodated. For example, I let him write in his journal the definitions of words as
well as draw visual examples. While the student at first struggled with the gradual change in
value, after I left him a sticky note he showed improvement (note the difference in the cube and
the cone). He did not get as far as other students with his final project; however, he showed a
general understanding of the interpretation of shape and showed some gradual crosshatching
which is a sign of improvement.]
d. If a video or audio work sample occurs in a group context (e.g., discussion), provide the
name of the clip and clearly describe how the scorer can identify the focus student(s)
(e.g., position, physical description) whose work is portrayed.
[I was not present for group discussion; however, I had put aside time to do so. To make up for
this I had added in extra opportunities for assessment during the creating of their final project
where I can work with students one on one when they required it and left behind sticky notes
that students could refer back to for guidance on what they should work on.]

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Visual Arts
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

2. Feedback to Guide Further Learning


Refer to specific evidence of submitted feedback to support your explanations.

a. Identify the format in which you submitted your evidence of feedback for the
3 focus students. (Delete choices that do not apply.)
 Written directly on work samples or in separate documents that were provided to the
focus students
 In audio files
 In video clip(s) from Instruction Task 2 (provide a time-stamp reference) or in
separate video clips
If a video or audio clip of feedback occurs in a group context (e.g., discussion), clearly
describe how the scorer can identify the focus student (e.g., position, physical
description) who is being given feedback.
[I was not present for group discussion; however, I had put aside time to do so. To make up for
this I had added in extra opportunities for assessment during the creating of their final project
where I can work with students one on one when they required it and left behind sticky notes
that students could refer back to for guidance on what they should work on.]
b. Explain how feedback provided to the 3 focus students addresses their individual
strengths and needs relative to the learning objectives measured.
[The feedback that I have given students 1, 2, and 3 address their individual strengths and
needs because I provided a mix of written feedback and visual feedback tailored to their specific
strengths and weaknesses. For instance, student 1 was more of a visual learner for he was on
the spectrum and oftentimes dealt better with visual reminders rather than more written
reminders. Because of this on his sticky note I simply wrote “gradual changes” so that he had an
idea that when dealing with forms light changes gradually around an object and not
immediately. I could have written that down as well, however I showed him two squares where
on had one value going straight into another value and the other had 4 different values within a
square. I put an x underneath one and a check underneath the other to show what was
expected of him, something that he can glance over at while working and quickly realize where
he should be and what he should be doing. Student 2 had issues shading a sphere, and
particularly with the fact that he was making a soccer ball and did not want to crosshatch over
the blocks that he had already shaded in for the black spots on the ball. I wrote down that he
needed to shade the whole sphere in order to show value on it, with the exception of the
highlighted area/spot closest to the light, and that hatching over hatching would just make his
spots darker. This was helpful to him because it made him realize that even if he drew over
what he had drawn, because he wanted it to be as dark as possible it would only serve to make
it darker. I also drew an example and showed him how crosshatching over dark areas did not
mess them up and left him with that note, so he could be reassured of it. Student 3 had a similar
issue, for he had a line in his object and was not sure how to draw that using hatching or
crosshatching. I could not think of how to write it down in words, so I simply showed him a
drawing of how I would do it. I showed him how small hatching tightly compacted together could
create a line within hatching. However, he ended up simply drawing lines, so I may have to
reevaluate how I would give this advice to another student if the issue came up again.]
c. Describe how you will support each focus student to understand and use this feedback
to further their learning related to learning objectives, either within the learning segment
or at a later time.

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Visual Arts
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

[Each of the feedback which I have provided to these students was feedback given in the middle
of their learning segments. In this sense students were able to use their feedback immediately
instead of sitting on feedback which they may not be able to use in the classroom until they
were given a project that could utilize them again, which may not even happen during that
school year. With each of their feedback I addressed specific issues that I saw students 1, 2,
and 3 facing with either creating value transitions, creating form, addressing anxieties around
messing up crosshatching, and even more individualized issues such as how to make a line
using crosshatching. Because the feedback is given in the middle of their learning segment the
students are also given a chance to continue making changes and realize that the learning
process is fluid and not something that has specific start and stop times, you can always alter
and improve upon your techniques and methodology.]
3. Evidence of Language Understanding and Use
When responding to the prompt below, use concrete examples from the clip(s) and/or
student work samples as evidence. Evidence from the clip(s) may focus on one or more
students.

You may provide evidence of students’ language use from ONE, TWO, OR ALL THREE
of the following sources:
1. Use video clip(s) from Instruction Task 2 and provide time-stamp references for
evidence of language use.
2. Submit an additional video file named “Language Use” of no more than 5 minutes in
length and cite language use (this can be footage of one or more students’ language
use). Submit the clip in Assessment Task 3, Part B.
3. Use the student work samples analyzed in Assessment Task 3 and cite language use.

a. Explain and provide concrete examples for the extent to which your students were able
to use or struggled to use the
 selected language function,
 vocabulary and/or key phrases, AND
 syntax or discourse
to develop content understandings.
[I had a strong focus on vocabulary and language functionality in relation to developing an
understanding of the content and techniques that students would be using within their learning
segments. The beginning of the unit had me introducing the terms value, hatching,
crosshatching, tint, shade, shape, and form to the students. I asked students to define them as
best they could (some of them they knew, some of which were new to them), and then as I
wrote the terms down on the board, I asked the students to write the terms within their journal.
The students journal is something that they will have on them through the entire school year,
and so they will be able to refer back to this at their leisure. Because of this, however, I
encouraged students to write down the definitions of their vocabulary words in a way that is
natural to them. For instance, student 1 wrote down brief descriptions but supplemented them
with pictures which would help him understand the terms better. When discussing his works, he
was able to use the vocabulary terms in a proper way, which I believe is due to the fact that I
allowed him to write down the terms in a way that is natural to him. I have provided examples of

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Visual Arts
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

1, 2, and 3s journals as well as written responses from students 2 and 3 using proper visual arts
vocabulary to describe their final pieces and the processes used to create them.]
4. Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
a. Based on your analysis of student learning presented in prompts 1b–c, describe next
steps for instruction to impact student learning:
 For the whole class
 For the 3 focus students and other individuals/groups with specific needs
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students).
[Taking into consideration the assessments of the whole class, their strengths and weaknesses
with the prompts and activities that I have presented them, and specifically Students 1, 2, and 3,
I would make various changes throughout my teaching of the unit to help students understand
and execute their final projects in a more concise way. As I have discussed multiple students
have had issues with a sphere specifically. While the majority of students actually had brought
in objects that were more organic in shape (stuffed animals, figures, et cetera) there were a
surprising number of students whose objects were geometrical. Although in my demonstration I
discussed blocking in shapes in order to get to a figure to fill the page, in the future I would
actually draw out some general object shapes on the board. One of these shapes would be a
sphere while other shapes would be done on the fly as I observe various trends in objects that
were brought in. I would show how to block them in and the beginning steps of how to shade
them/how light would wrap around the objects. I would also work on having supplemental
actives that are more readily available to students. Although Student 3 was an outlier in the
sense that he finished so early, he was not the only student who had done so. Student 3 was an
outlier as well in the sense that he already had a second object, however I will work to have
objects available in the classroom for students to work with and/or additional activities that build
upon the unit as a whole.]
b. Explain how these next steps follow from your analysis of student learning. Support your
explanation with principles from research and/or theory.
[These next steps follow from my analysis of student learning because although the students as
a whole have an understanding of how to properly hatch and crosshatch, and even have an
understanding of how value should be a gradual change and not an immediate change
(although with students such as Students 1 and 2 I had to point that out to them), they still
struggle with some types of shapes and are lacking continued support due to my own lack of
planning if they finish early. Both of these things can be helped by utilizing Vygotsky’s Zone of
Proximal Development. For instance, I may have given the students a task that was above their
zone by having them draw objects that were more ambiguous as far as their shapes go, such as
sphere or coiling objects that some students have had. Because these objects were slightly
above their zone of proximal development, until I came over and gave them some more
scaffolding, they were getting frustrated and oftentimes refused to attempt to draw their objects.
The way that I got through to them was to demonstrate how a sphere would be properly shaded
with hatching and crosshatching which I left on a sticky note by their drawing. However, if I were
to have this up on the board as a demonstration of how light goes around various types of
forms, not only would it help with universal design as this reminder would be available to all
students, but it would provide students with aid that brings the task closer to the center of their
zone of proximal development. As far as my supplemental materials go, I would utilize the Zone

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Visual Arts
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

of Proximal Development to plan out what my supplemental actives are. I would make sure that
any materials/prompts given to students are not only relevant to the unit as a whole but are
within their own personal zone so that they will get the most out of their lesson. Supplemental
lessons that are simple, like giving students the opportunity to free draw, will not give them any
sense of learning and will not help to support the content being taught during their lesson.
Giving students a task too difficult, such as asking them to draw a photorealistic scene or
portrait using crosshatching, will discourage the students from completing their activity and may
even sour the students on the technique as a whole. While thinking of what supplemental
activities can work for students, I will keep in mind the Zone of Proximal Development. This
being said any supplemental activities may also have room to be slightly fluid from student to
student, as each student’s zone is unique to them, and progresses at different speeds than their
peers. Although I can think of a general idea for supplemental activities, I will keep them fluid
enough to be accommodating for the various skill levels of the students who need them.]

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