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Lesson Plan Template: Math 323 Version

Names: Kyla & Hae In Date: October 22, 2018


Grade Level: 2-3 Subject/ Topic: Shape Sorts - Polygons (Triangle → Hexagon)
Approx. time spent planning this lesson:
*The template will expand as text is added.*

DOMAIN 1: PLANNING & PREPARATION


Main Focus/Essential Questions: Shape Sorts - Quadrilaterals and Triangles
Brief Context: Students will be reviewing about shapes and their different attributes. Students have
already been learning how to recognize shapes and where they see shapes in their daily life. Students
are able to define certain vocabulary--sides, faces, angles. Students will learn also learn the names:
quadrilateral, pentagon, and hexagon. They will explore through the characteristics of these shapes and
find out how triangles can create these shapes.
Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills: What is a shape, what does it look like, what is a side, angle, face, how
to draw shapes with 3, 4, 5, 6 sides.
Lesson Objectives/Learning Targets Aligned Assessments
Consider formative & summative tools

Please number objectives and the aligned assessment measures.

The learner will: I will assess learning by:


1. Review the shapes they learned about in the 1. Asking students to draw the different
previous lesson shapes with certain sides/angles
2. Create other shapes (quadrilaterals, 2. Asking students to explain how one shape
pentagons, hexagons) using triangles. can have different shapes in them.
3. Recognize that one shape can have different 3. Observing students as they work together
shapes in them. to make different shapes using triangles.
4. Learn vocabulary words: quadrilateral, 4. Giving students the opportunity to find the
pentagon, hexagon. characteristics of the shapes they learned
5. Explore through the different characteristics (quadrilateral, pentagon, hexagon).
of the shapes. 5. Giving students a summative assessment,
where they have to sort shapes according to
their own categories and identify shape
names.
Standards Addressed in Lesson: (Include full standard.)
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.G.A.1
Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or
a given number of equal faces.1 Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and
cubes.
Instructional Resources: Field Experience Guide

Consideration of Learners:
How have you responded to your diverse learners? Consider UDL (Multiple means of Engagement,
Representation, Action & Expression) & principles of differentiation. If appropriate, identify individual
accommodations you will make in response to needs or interests of students.
● Can recognize and name, and (start to) describe the characteristics (number of sides, points,
angles, etc.) of a circle, square, and triangle in any size or orientation (See CC standard)
● Can (or start to) compare and sort shapes into specific categories, based on similar
characteristics (See CC standard)--we are asking students to sort shapes into groups and begin
looking and what attributes shapes have.
● Is aware of causes and consequences of various emotions and behaviors (personally and to
others)--we are encouraging students to help each other if they are struggling, or if they cannot
figure out how to solve a problem.
● Is able to communicate/express needs, wants, ideas in a healthy way --we will have students
take turns verbally expressing their ideas.
● Values friendships and can work cooperatively with others--we will have students working
together to solve problems

DOMAIN 2: THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT: Note specific strategies you intend to use to keep students engaged,
redirect off task students, and facilitate procedures/transitions within your lesson.
We are engaging the students through questions and group work. If one student gets off task we will
point out how we like how the other student is participating and listening. If the student constantly gets
off tasks and struggles to pay attention, we will have little breaks where student can get up and move
around--hopefully this will help the student focus when needed.

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT: Note any specific ways you will use the environment to contribute to the
learning.
Students will be working in our designated area for the whole time.

DOMAIN 3: INSTRUCTION

CONTENT MANAGEMENT: YOUR INSTRUCTION


BEFORE: Motivation/Opening/Intro: [Think creatively about how to recruit learning.]
● Students will be given a white board/marker and asked to draw a series of shapes with different
sides/angles. The teacher will provide these instructions and questions:
○ “Draw a shape with three sides”
■ Ask: Explain the shape. How did you draw your angles? What is this angle
called? What are these shapes with this kind of angle called? What is this shape
called? Where can you see this shape? Are there different ways you can draw
this shape?
■ Student answer: “This is a triangle, which has 3 sides. This angles point out, they
are small/big, less than 90 degree/greater than 90 degrees. This angle is an
obtuse/acute angle. This is a convex shape. You can see this shape in mountains,
pizza, the instrument triangle, etc. Yes, you can draw triangles in different ways.
○ “Draw a shape with four sides”
■ Ask: Explain the shape. How did you draw your angles? What is this angle
called? What are these shapes with this kind of angle called? What is this shape
called? Where can you see this shape? Are there different ways you can draw
this shape?
■ Student answer: “This is a square/diamond, which has 4 sides. The angles point
out/in, they are small/big, less than 90 degree/greater than 90 degrees. This
angle is an obtuse/acute angle. This is a convex/concave shape. You can see this
shape in windows, board games, pictures, etc. Yes, you can draw this shape in
different ways.
○ “Draw a shape with five sides”
■ Ask: Explain the shape. How did you draw your angles? What is this angle
called? What are these shapes with this kind of angle called? What is this shape
called? Where can you see this shape? Are there different ways you can draw
this shape?
■ Student answer: “The angles point out/in, they are small/big, less than 90
degree/greater than 90 degrees. This angle is an obtuse/acute angle. This is a
convex/concave shape. You can see this shape in houses, road signs, soccer
balls, etc. Yes, you can draw this shape in different ways.”
○ “Draw a shape with six sides”
■ Ask: Explain the shape. How did you draw your angles? What is this angle
called? What are these shapes with this kind of angle called? What is this shape
called? Where can you see this shape? Are there different ways you can draw
this shape?
■ Student answer: “The angles point out/in, they are small/big, less than 90
degree/greater than 90 degrees. This angle is an obtuse/acute angle. This is a
convex/concave shape. You can see this shape in stop signs, clocks, etc. Yes, you
can draw this shape in different ways.
● Introduce the problem:
○ How can we use triangles to make other shapes?
DURING:Development: [It may help to number your steps with corresponding times.]
● Students are working together with triangles to create a quadrilateral
○ Teacher: “I am going to give you two triangles. I want you to try to make a four-sided
shape with these triangles. You need to work together and involve everyone. If you get
stuck, first ask each other, then you may ask the teachers for guidance.”
○ Students: Working together to figure out how to make a quadrilateral with two
triangles.
○ After completing activity:
■ Teacher: “How did you make the shape?” “How many sides does it have?” “Can
you find any more triangles?” “What name could we give this shape?” (Students
might say square) Challenge students to think about other shapes that do not
have equal sides but also have four sides.
■ Teacher: “What if I tell you that quad means four. Could that help us in naming
four-sided shapes?” Let students guess a bit as how they can incorporate the
word quad into the name, then tell them we call these shapes quadrilaterals.
● Students are given triangles and asked to make a pentagon.
○ Teacher: “I am going to give you a few more triangles, and now we need to make a
shape with five sides.”
○ “I am going to lay out the shapes in front of you, but before you begin, I want each of
you to think silently for a minute of some ways you could make a shape with five sides.”
○ Give students a minute to think, then allow them to work together to make the shape”
Provide guidelines if students are stuck.
○ After completing activity:
■ Teacher: “How did you make the shape?” “How many sides does it have?”
“Could you find anymore triangles?” “What name could we give this shape?”
■ Teacher: “What if I tell you that penta means means. Could that help us in
naming four-sided shapes?” Let students guess a bit as how they can
incorporate the word penta into the name. Then introduce the name pentagon.
● Students are given a number of triangles and asked to make a shape with six sides.The teacher
will provide these instructions and questions.
○ Instruction: “Work as a group to figure out how you can make a shape with 6 sides,
using these triangles.
○ Ask: “What could we name this shape? Are there more than one way to make this shape
using triangles?
■ Student answer: “Hexagon” (or they may not know). Yes, there are more than
one way to make this shape using triangles.
○ If necessary: use the whiteboard to write down the word “hexa”. Ask students, “based
on the shape you made, what could “hexa” mean? Student answer: “6 sides”
AFTER: Closure: (Be creative and consider authentic audiences for the work. Think beyond giving an
assignment or independent practice.)
● Triangle, Quadrilateral, Pentagon, Hexagon are on whiteboard
● Students are listing characteristics of each shape that differentiates it from the other
○ “Someone tell me the number of sides _____ has”
○ “Tell me the number of angles ____ has”
● Give students assessment: they will come up with their own way to sort the shapes. They will
have cutouts of different shapes and will be given a box with two categories. Students will glue
the shapes in their respective box.
○ They will identify quadrilaterals, pentagons, and hexagons

DOMAIN #4: PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

REFLECTION AFTER TEACHING THE LESSON: