Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Welcome to Open House #1
Thursday, October 14, 2010 4:30 to 6:30 pm
Children are welcome!

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Introduction

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

What you can do tonight
• Review the goals and objectives of the Master Plan • Hear about work completed to date on current  conditions and problems • Learn about what goes into a design toolkit • Help the team brainstorm ideas for projects to be  considered • Ask questions of the project team • Fill out a comment form

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Project Background
• The vision of the Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan  is to increase the share of trips Eugene residents make by  walking and bicycling for transportation and recreation by  making walking and bicycling safe, convenient, and  comfortable. • Our efforts begin with the results of the 2008 Eugene  Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Plan, making use of findings  from the Walking and Biking Summits hosted by the City. • This plan will serve as a foundation for the pedestrian and  bicycle chapter of Eugene’s Transportation Plan, which is also  currently being updated. 

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Timeline

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Who is involved?
• You! By coming tonight, visiting the project website 
(www.EugenePedBikePlan.org), and talking to the  project team.

• Project Advisory Committee

• City of Eugene
• Oregon Department of Transportation

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Existing Conditions

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Central Eugene Subarea Key Findings

• Connected streets/grid + many destinations • Access to riverbank path system, Fern Ridge Path, Amazon Path • Lots of bike lanes & signed routes • Auto traffic can be intimidating • Major streets are hard to cross by foot or on bike • Major gaps: South Bank Path, few family‐friendly connections to River Path  Network, Pearl to Amazon connection

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

South Hills Subarea Key Findings

• Hilly, non‐grid, few destinations = hard to walk or bicycle • Many streets missing sidewalks on one or both sides • Current bike facilities: some bike lanes, a few signed routes; recreational ride access beyond city limits • Barriers/busy streets: 29th/30th, 18th • Major gaps: Willamette between 18th & 29th, connection to LCC, missing  bike lanes on Fox Hollow, Dillard, and South Willamette

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

West Eugene/Bethel/Danebo Subarea Key Findings
• Flat, with primarily local destinations  • Development patterns resulted in disconnected streets and high‐speed/‐volume  through streets that are uncomfortable for walking and bicycling • Major barriers: Beltline, Hwy 99/rail yards/NW Expressway, industrial area • Many missing sidewalks on residential streets • Fern Ridge Path is a well‐loved asset but also has some issues • Most major streets have bike lanes but traffic is still high • There are few signed bike routes and low‐traffic streets often don’t connect • Missing sidewalks & bike lanes on W 11th

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

River Road/Santa Clara Subarea Key Findings
• Barriers: NW Expressway, Willamette River, Beltline
• Many unincorporated areas without urban level transportation facilities • River Road defines neighborhood: north‐south travel opportunity, but also  challenge for walking & biking.  • Beltline interchange busy/uncomfortable, sidewalk & 5‐foot bike lane not  comfortable. • Many missing sidewalks – is this a problem on local streets? • Missing sidewalks/shoulders/bike lanes on busier streets • Access to riverfront paths is important • Only 3 bike lane streets (River Road, Maxwell, Irvington)

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

NE Eugene/Willakenzie/Ferry St. Bridge Subarea 

Key Findings

• Bounded by I‐5 & River: internal barriers of Beltline & I‐105, Autzen Stadium &  Eugene Country Club • Suburban development & road patterns • Pedestrian‐only accessways create good connections between residential streets • Coburg Road: sidewalk & bike lane along its distance, not comfortable. • Good bike lane coverage on other streets in this part of town; every Beltline  crossing has bike lanes • Limited potential for low‐traffic bikeways • Notable gaps for biking & walking

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Pedestrian and Bicycle  Design Toolkit

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Overview
• The Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan team will  update the City of Eugene’s design toolkit to reflect  bicycle and pedestrian treatments that could be used  throughout the City. • We are just beginning this process, and want your  input. • Look at various treatments found in other cities’  toolkits and tell us if you think they make sense for  Eugene.

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Element – Standard Treatments
Shared Use Paths
Shared‐use paths can provide a desirable facility  particularly for novice riders, recreational trips, and  cyclists of all skill levels preferring separation from  traffic. Shared‐use paths should generally provide  new travel opportunities.

Countdown Signal
Countdown signals display the number of seconds remaining for a pedestrian to complete a  crossing, enabling users to make their own  judgment whether to cross or wait. The allotted  time can be adjusted to accommodate  pedestrians with lower walking speeds, such as  seniors or school children.

Trail/Greenway Amenities
Amenities such as view points, interpretive  signage/kiosks, and maps make a trail/greenway  system stand out.

Signed Routes
Designated bikeways with regularly placed signs  indication the route.  Can include some  wayfinding

Wayfinding
Directional signage indicating locations of  destinations and travel time/distance to those  destinations increases users’ comfort and  accessibility to the pedestrian and bicycle systems.

Signal Detection
Bicycle‐activated loop detectors are installed  within the roadway to allow the presence of a  bicycle to trigger a change in the traffic signal.   This allows the cyclist to stay within the lane of  travel and avoid maneuvering to the side of the  road to trigger a push button.  

Curb Extensions
Curb extensions reduce the pedestrian crossing distance and improve motorists' visibility of pedestrians waiting to cross the street.  Curb extensions can also serve as good locations for  bike parking, benches, public art, and other  streetscape features.

Bike Lanes 
Marked space along a length of roadway  designated for the exclusive uses of bicyclists

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Element – Standard Treatments
Accessways
These connectors provide direct routes between  residential areas, retail and office areas,  institutional facilities, industrial parks, transit  streets, neighborhood activity centers, and transit  oriented developments. 

Marked Crosswalks 
High‐visibility markings, often consisting of  a“continental" striping pattern, can be effective at  locations with high pedestrian crossing volumes,  near schools, and/or areas where motorist  awareness of pedestrian crossings may be poor.

Curb Ramps Retrofits
Retrofitting ADA‐compliant curb ramps to existing sidewalks greatly improves mobility and  accessibility for mobility‐impaired users. Curb ramps also improve the walking environment for pedestrians with strollers, delivery  carts, and other "wheel" devices.

Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon 
The RRFB is designed encourage greater motorist  compliance at crosswalks. The RRFB is a rectangular  shaped lightbar with two high intensity LED  lightheads that flash in a wig‐wag flickering pattern.  The lights are installed below the pedestrian  crosswalk sign (located on each side of the road near  the crosswalk button) and are activated when a  pedestrian pushes the crosswalk button. 

Sidewalk Infill
Completing sidewalk gaps greatly improves pedestrian connectivity by providing a continuous, barrier‐free walkway easily accessible for all users 

Short‐term Bicycle Parking Parking meant to accommodate visitors, customers 
and others expected to depart within two hours;  requires approved standard rack, appropriate  location and placement, and weather protection.

Pedestrian Refuge
Breaking up the street crossing into multiple  segments, refuge islands enable pedestrians to  concentrate on one direction of traffic at a time.

Long‐term Bicycle Parking
Parking meant to accommodate employees,  students, residents, commuters, and others  expected to park more than two hours. This parking  should  be provided in a secure, weather‐protected  manner and location.

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Element – Bicycle Boulevards
Bicycle Boulevards are low‐volume and  low‐speed streets that have been  optimized for bicycle travel.  Bicycle  Boulevard treatments can be applied at  several different intensities.

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Element – Bikeway Innovations
Place your dot near the innovations that would be helpful in Eugene.
Shared Lane Marking
Also called sharrows, are pavement markings used to indicate shared space for bicyclists and motorists on low volume streets that  don’t have room for bike lanes. • Advantage: Helps bicyclists positions themselves. Mimics the effect of bicycle lanes on streets with very constrained rights of way.  Moves cyclists out the ‘door zone’.  Encourages safe passing by motorists. • Disadvantage: Maintenance.  It is less desirable than a separate facility

Place your dot here
Bike Boxes
A bicycle box requires motorists to stop before reaching the crosswalk at signalized intersections.  The ‘box’ allows a space for cyclists  between the cars and crosswalk. Best when there are lots of cyclists and frequent turning conflicts (or large numbers) • Advantage: Gives cyclists clear priority and makes them more visible. Limits risk of right hook crashes and allows cyclists to get into  position for left turns. • Disadvantage: Maintenance, unfamiliar to motorists, eliminate right turn on red movement for autos.

Place your dot here
Bike Passing Lane
Add a second bike lane directly next to existing lane to provide space for passing, typically on a hill that is a popular bike route. • Advantage: Reduces number of cyclists merging with auto traffic to pass slower cyclists. • Disadvantage: Can be difficult to allocate additional roadway space for the lane

Place your dot here

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Toolkit Element – Bikeway Innovations
Place your dot near the innovations that would be helpful in Eugene.
Buffered Bike Lanes 
Increases the space between the bicycle lanes and auto lane or parked cars, used on high volume or speed roads especially with freight  or large vehicle traffic. • Advantage: Provides space to mitigate potential conflicts with motor vehicles on streets with narrow bikes lanes; provides space for  passing of slower cyclists; creates greater shy distance between large vehicles and the bicycle travel lane  • Disadvantage: Additional space requirements and ongoing maintenance of the striping

Place your dot here
Colored Bike Lanes 
Color helps distinguish the lane and alert motorists of potential conflicts areas. Good on heavy traffic streets, especially at  intersections/bike weaving or areas with a history of crashes. • Advantage: Provides a continuous facility for cyclists while mitigating conflict points.  Provides for safe merging and increases  awareness for cyclists and motorists • Disadvantage: Significant installation/purchase cost and maintenance requirements

Place your dot here
Cycle Tracks
Exclusive bicycle facility adjacent to, but separated from, the roadway. Best on roads with few cross streets and long blocks, particularly  with high volumes and speeds. • Advantage: Creates comfort and separation from traffic in busy areas and provide bicyclists with direct access to major service and  commercial nodes • Disadvantage: Large amount of right‐of‐way required, may require significant trade offs such as removal of parking or auto travel  lanes.  Expensive to build.

Place your dot here

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Ideas to be considered

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Ideas to be Considered
• Later this month, the team will begin to consider projects that  will help to address deficiencies and meet the project goals. • Help inform our process!
– Draw ideas on the bicycle and pedestrian maps – Write a sticky note with your idea – Fill out a comment form with your ideas – Talk to the project team

• We want to gather as many ideas as possible
– We will work with the involved groups to narrow down solutions to  include in the plan

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Pedestrian Map

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Bicycle Map

Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan

Next Steps
• October 22: Attend the Transportation ReMix Panel Discussion • October 25: Project Advisory Committee Meeting  5:30 – 8:00pm Eugene Central Library (meeting open 
to the public)

• January 17, 2011: Project Advisory Committee  Meeting (5:30 – 7:30 pm, location to be determined)
• March 2011: Open House #2 (date not yet confirmed)

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful