Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science, Grades K-6

DRAFT June 2009

Copyright notice No part of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means, including electronic storage, reproduction, execution or transmission without the prior written consent of the Coast Metro Consortium. Proprietary notice This document contains information that is proprietary and confidential to the Coast Metro Consortium. Any reproduction, disclosure or other use of this document is expressly prohibited except as the Coast Metro Consortium may authorize in writing. Permission to copy and use this publication in part, or in its entirety, for non-profit educational purposes within British Columbia and the Yukon, is granted to all staff of BC school board trustees, including teachers and administrators.

Contents

Table of Contents
About the Coast Metro Consortium Science Project The development process Acknowledgements About the Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science, Grades 1-6 Relationship to BC Performance Standards Levels of student performance Using the regional standards Aspects of Science Key components Science in Kindergarten Performance Assessment of Science in Kindergarten Life Science: Characteristics of Living Things Sample Task: Local Finds Chart Physical Science: Properties of Objects and Materials Sample Task: Mystery Boxes Chart Earth and Space Science: Surroundings Sample Task: Winter Walk Chart Science in Grade 1 Life Science: Needs of Living Things Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Design a Habitat for a Slug Physical Science: Force and Motion Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Classify Magnetic Effects Earth and Space Science: Daily and Seasonal Changes Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Identify Aboriginal Seasonal Activities Science in Grade 2 Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Identify the Similarities and Differences Between Bats and Birds

Physical Science: Properties of Matter Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Observe States of Matter of Water in Puddles Earth and Space Science: Air, Water, and Soil Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Observe Soil Samples Science in Grade 3 Life Science: Plant Growth and Changes To come Physical Science: Materials and Structures Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Build a Bridge for a Hot Wheels Car Earth and Space Science: Stars and Planets Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Ask Questions of Aboriginal Elders Science in Grade 4 Life Science: Habitats and Communities Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Impact of Human Choice on the Environment Physical Science: Light and Sound Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Create a Sound Device Earth and Space Science: Weather Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Measure Temperature Science in Grade 5 Life Science: Human Body Rating scale Chart Sample task: Test Your Reflexes Physical Science: Forces and Simple Machines Rating scale Chart Sample task: Design an Experiment Earth and Space Science: Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources To come

Grade 6 Life Science: Diversity of Life Rating scale Chart Sample task: Adaptations to Biotic and Abiotic Factors in the Environment Physical Science: Electricity Rating scale Chart Sample task: Dim the Light Earth and Space Science: Exploration of Extreme Environments Rating scale Chart Sample task: Saving the Penguin Eggs Invitation to participate in the project Instructions and contact information Task write-up template Appendices Appendix 1: Characteristics of performance tasks Appendix 2: Attributes and Dispositions Appendix 3: Making Connections

About the Coast Metro Consortium Science Project
The Development Process
The seeds for Coast Metro Consortium Science Project initiative were sown in 2004 at a Coast Metro Consortium meeting when Delta and Richmond volunteered to be the lead districts in developing performance standards to support the new elementary science curriculum. It was decided that the goals of this work would be: • to facilitate excellence in science instruction • to promote inquiry-based learning through collaboration • to develop science literacy • to support assessment for learning The project has focused on building capacity for the thoughtful and meaningful teaching of science in classrooms, including attention to the ways of knowing and doing in the discipline of science, fidelity to the prescribed curriculum, opportunities for students to do hands-on, minds-on science, the development of performance tasks, and formative assessment. This has been a four-year journey with seven school districts beginning with 39 teachers across grades 1 to 6 and expanding to 53 teachers across Grade 1 to 9. During the 2008-09 school year, grade teams from participating school districts produced a draft document for grades 1-6 for response and feedback from teachers across the province. At the same time, they continued to explore their teaching practice in science and developed performance tasks. It is anticipated that a draft document for grades 7-9 will be available for response and review in the 2009-2010 school year. The Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science describe the professional judgments of participating Lower Mainland educators about standards and expectations in science. They are intended as a resource to support ongoing instruction and assessment. They emphasize criterionreferenced assessment in which students’ performance is compared to explicit criteria. The standards enable teachers, students, and parents to compare student performance to regional standards. The standards focus exclusively on performance assessment, where students are asked to apply the science skills and processes they have developed to complete hands-on tasks. Additional information on the characteristics of performance tasks can be found in Appendix 1.

Acknowledgments
This project has been made possible through • the vision of the Delta and Richmond School Districts • the financial support of the Coast Metro Consortium and nine participating school districts • the leadership, expertise, and facilitation of Anita Chapman • the leadership of the Start-Up Advisory Team • the support of the Coast Metro District Leaders • the hard work of the educators on the Grade Teams • the ministry for sharing the revised front matter for the BC Performance Standards
Startup Advisory Team Wendy Lim, District Administrator Susan Tse, Teacher Consultant Janice Novakowski, Curriculum Coordinator Judith Kootte, Curriculum Coordinator Susan Martin, District Principal Dean Eichorn, Teacher Consultant May Wong, Teacher Consultant Marie Brewer, District Principal Anita Chapman, Project Facilitator School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #44 (North Vancouver) Consultant

with recent additional Advisory Team members: Judy Marshall, District Principal School District #37 (Delta) Favian Yee, Teacher Consultant School District #37 (Delta) Rosalind Poon, Teacher Consultant School District #38 (Richmond) Coast Metro District Leaders Maureen Dockendorf, Assistant Superintendent School District #43 (Coquitlam) Steve Cardwell, Superintendent School District #37 (Delta) Bruce Beairsto, Superintendent School District #38 (Richmond) Kathy Champion, Director of Instruction School District #38 (Richmond) Val Overgaard, Associate Superintendent School District #39 (Vancouver) Alasdair MacKinnon, Director of Instruction School District #36 (Surrey) Pat Horstead, Director of Instruction School District #36 (Surrey) Magy Odofer, District Principal School District #48 (Sea to Sky) Suzanne Hoffman, District Principal School District #35 (Langley) Grade 1 Team Janice Novakowski, Team Leader Linda Araki Michelle Hikida Lisa Schwartz Dee-Ann Wozney Grade 2 Team Selina Millar, Team Leader Patricia Bowers School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #36 (Surrey)

Dave Ellis Dorothy Goodison Gail Hayes Kirsten Rehnby Mary-Ellen Stewart Tammy Stubbings Grade 3 Team May Wong, Team Leader Sharron Cooke Candace Donaldson Fiona Gray Jan Kroeker Ellen Martin Vanessa Morell Leonard Pawer Doug Roch Jacquie Schrier Kevin Tozer Grade 4 Team Jason Hewlett, Team Leader Andrea Mueller, Team Leader Dario Demetlika Kirk Deutschmann Dave King Dawn Lessoway Terry Lindburg John Pringle Rob Seath Theo Towler Grade 5 Team Diane Chretien, Team Leader Dawn Holden, Team Leader Carolyn Johnson, Team Leader Dianne Chretien Angela Davidson Maureen Paterson Kyla Regehr Karen Walsh Grade 6 Team Don Gordon, Team Leader Eric Jones, Team Leader Rob Sidley, Team Leader Susan Tse, Team Leader Terry Borsoff Heather Briske Lorrie Burnham Merle Cuthbert

School District #36 (Surrey) School District #39 (Vancouver) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #37 (Delta) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #37 (Delta) School District #37 (Delta) School District #44 (North Vancouver) School District #43 (Coquitlam) Consultant School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #41 (Burnaby) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #36 (Surrey) School District #35 (Langley) School District #35 (Langley)

Yana Gallagher Marcia Garries Bryan Gidinski Wendy Hibberd Dave Hunt Randall Hunter Susan Johnston Ellen Leroux Kevin Levenstein Matt Parker Laurelei Primeau Marjorie Reimer Shannon Sharp Janice Willcox Kirby Young

School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #44 (North Vancouver) School District #41 (Burnaby) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #37 (Delta) School District #44 (North Vancouver) School District #41 (Burnaby) School District #38 (Richmond) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #43 (Coquitlam) School District #48 (Sea to Sky) School District #44 (North Vancouver) School District #37 (Delta) School District #48 (Sea to Sky)

About the Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science, Grades 1-6
Relationship to BC Performance Standards
The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science should not be confused with the BC Performance Standards in Reading, Writing, Numeracy, and Social Responsibility. Although all have been developed for voluntary use in BC schools and all are intended as resources to support ongoing instruction and assessment, there are also important differences. The BC Performance Standards reflect the participation and collective judgments of thousands of educators and thousands of students, and were subjected to a rigorous validation process. The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science, on the other hand, reflect the participation of four to six teachers per grade in one or two Lower Mainland and Sunshine Coast school districts and a few hundred students at each grade level from the same region. The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science have also not been subjected to a validation study. Like regional adaptations of the BC Performance Standards, they should not be viewed as provincial standards that capture the collective professional judgment of the educators of BC. With those cautions, the Coast Metro Consortium offers these regional standards to teachers across the province for piloting, review, and response.

Levels of Student Performance
The Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science describe levels of achievement in key areas of learning. The performance standards answer the questions: “How good is good enough? What does it look like when a student’s work has met the expectations at this grade level?” The Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science were not designed to reflect outcome-by-outcome matching of curriculum. However, they were developed in relation to the prescribed curriculum that sets out grade level expectations in the form of prescribed learning outcomes. The Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science use the same four levels of student performance as the BC Performance Standards for Reading, Writing, Numeracy, and Social Responsibility. NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS • the work does not meet grade-level expectations • there is little evidence of progress toward the relevant prescribed learning outcomes • the situation needs intervention MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL) • the work may be inconsistent, but meets grade-level expectations at a minimal level • there is evidence of progress toward relevant prescribed learning outcomes • the student needs support in some areas FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS • the work meets grade-level expectations • there is evidence that relevant prescribed learning outcomes have been accomplished EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS • the work exceeds grade-level expectations in significant ways • the student may benefit from extra challenges

Using the Regional Standards
Teachers use a variety of methods to gather the information they need to assess, evaluate, and report on student learning. Possible methods include observations, student work portfolios, conferences, self- and peer assessment, classroom tests, and performance tasks. The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science give teachers one way to assess students’ abilities to apply their learning in realistic performance tasks. Used with other methods, they can be an important part of a comprehensive assessment and evaluation system. Guidelines The standards: • should be used as part of regular classroom learning activities, within the context of ongoing classroom instruction. • provide resources for assessing and evaluating the quality of a specific piece or a collection of student work from various subject areas. They can help to develop a profile of student achievement, typically based on three to seven pieces of work. • assume that in most cases teachers are observing students as they work. Often, some evidence needed to make decisions comes from observations and conversations with students. • allow for teachers to intervene where students are unable to complete a task independently. The level of assistance required is often one of the criteria for determining whether or not a student’s work falls within gradelevel expectations. • may be adapted as needed. For example, this might include creating class-developed rating scales in age-appropriate language, developing IEPs or other tailored evaluation, or adjusting expectations for different times of the year. The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science are intended to support instructional decision-making. Teachers may want to consider the following questions as they plan instruction: • How do these standards match my/our expectations for students at this level? • What kinds of instructional strategies and learning opportunities will help most students develop the skills they need to meet these expectations? • What additional support and interventions will be needed to help all students meet these expectations? • If there are some students for whom these expectations are not appropriate, what expectations should they meet? • What evidence do I/we need to collect to find out if students are making progress towards the expectations?

Adaptations Some students may require adaptations in order to meet the prescribed learning outcomes in the science curriculum for their grade. None of these adaptations should affect how the students’ work is assessed using the rating scales because they are working on the same grade level science learning outcomes as other students. Some adaptations, such as having someone read material aloud to the student, or scribe for the student, would be modifications in the Language Arts curriculum if the learning outcomes being addressed were about reading and writing respectively, but these are always adaptations, not modifications, in the Science curriculum. With the use of adaptations, ESL students will likely be able to work on grade level science learning outcomes before they can work on grade level Language Arts learning outcomes. Very few students, likely students with special needs in low incidence categories, may require modifications to their science program. The work of these students should not be assessed using the grade level rating scales. It should be assessed in relation to the goals set out in the individual student’s Individual Educational Plan (IEP). It is possible that an aspect of a rating scale from a previous grade might be used or modified to assist with this assessment. Purposes How the Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science are used depends on the purpose for which they will be used. The first priority is to improve learning. The chart on the next page provides some examples of purposes and uses.

Assessment for Learning
Formative assessment is ongoing in the classroom • teacher assessment, student self-assessment, and/or student peer assessment • criterion-referenced – criteria based on provincial curriculum, reflecting performance in relation to a specific learning task • involves both teacher and student in a process of continual reflection and review • teachers adjust their plans and engage in corrective teaching in response to what they find out Purpose: Use the Draft Regional Standards to focus and monitor learning, provide feedback and, adjust instruction. Example uses/adaptations: • Design learning activities and assessment tasks to provide evidence of the aspects of learning and the criteria described in the regional standards. • Develop a profile of a class or group of students to support instructional decision-making. • Focus instruction around selected criteria or aspects from the regional standards, based on ongoing assessments. • Use criteria from the regional standards to build shared understanding; make learning intentions explicit. • Use criteria from the regional standards to give students feedback on specific aspects of their learning, and on specific learning tasks.

Assessment as Learning
Formative assessment is ongoing in the classroom • self-assessment • provides students with information on their own achievement and prompts them to consider how they can continue to improve their learning • student-determined criteria based on previous learning and personal learning goals • students use assessment information to make adaptations to their learning process and to develop new understandings Purpose: Use the Draft Regional Standards to engage students in discussing, reflecting on, assessing and shaping their own learning. Example uses/adaptations: • Work with students to develop ‘kid-friendly’ versions of the regional standards that are relevant to learning intentions • Provide copies of the regional standards for student reference and selfassessment. • Work with students to develop class criteria, based on the regional standards, for specific purposes. • Use the regional standards to guide conference and group discussions about learning intentions and evidence of learning. • Use criteria from the regional standards to develop/ use various selfassessment prompts and formats. • Have students use selected criteria from the regional standards to guide peer feedback.

Assessment of Learning
Summative assessment occurs at end of year or at key stages • teacher assessment • in BC this is criterionreferenced, based on provincial curriculum • information on student performance can be shared with parents/guardians, school and district staff • used to make judgments about students’ performance in relation to regional standards

Purpose: Use the Draft Regional Standards to monitor and report on student learning. Example uses/adaptations: • Document individual student progress in key areas of learning. • Use the regional standards to identify students will benefit from intervention. • Adapt the regional standards to guide reporting discussions with parents. Note: The draft and regional nature of the Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science, as well as the lack of a validation study, limit their use for district-wide assessments and plans to improve achievement.

Aspects of Science
The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science describe student achievement in the three broad disciplines of science addressed by the provincial curriculum: • Life Science • Physical Science • Earth and Space Science. The draft regional standards are intended to help teachers assess the extent to which students are able to apply the skills and processes, attitudes and dispositions, and knowledge and understanding of science in purposeful, ageappropriate science tasks related to the provincial curriculum and to make connections among science, technology, society, and the environment. The draft regional standards focus on four aspects of science that are consistent with the goals of the provincial curriculum: Skills and Processes The provincial curriculum defines skills and processes for each grade in prescribed learning outcomes. The skills and processes addressed by the end of grade 6 are: • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting • designing experiments • fair testing • controlling variables • scientific problem solving Students are expected to use the skills and processes taught in previous grades with increasing independence and to gradually build their capacity to choose appropriate skills and processes for specific tasks. Skills and processes that the provincial curriculum prescribes for each grade are indicated in bold on the rating scales. Skills and processes from previous grades are listed as well. Evidence for Skills and Processes in hands-on performance tasks comes largely from teacher observations and conferencing with students, although some may come from the assessment of written work.

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Students will have varying attitudes and dispositions depending on their previous experiences and personal qualities but the development of these can be fostered in classroom science activities. Information on the attributes and dispositions associated with excellence in science can be found in Appendix 2. Personal attributes and dispositions may be observed as attitudes towards science and scientific inquiry. Some of the attributes and dispositions that make good scientists may be construed as undesirable attitudes in school; e.g., questioning, skepticism, tendency to consider multiple alternatives. An assessment of science attitudes and dispositions is quite different from the assessment of attitudes and behaviours at school required for report cards. Evidence for Attitudes and Dispositions in hands-on performance tasks comes largely from teacher observations and conferencing with students. Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Teachers understand the importance of accessing and assessing prior knowledge as a starting point for teaching and learning. Encouraging students to make connections among science, technology, society, and the environment helps them see the relevance of science in their lives and become informed citizens. Evidence for Making Connections in performance tasks comes from teacher questioning, listening, conferencing, written work, and oral presentations. Generic prompts that teachers can adapt to the age and grade-level of their students and particular content are included in Appendix 3. Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts The provincial curriculum sets out the expectations for knowledge and understanding of science concepts in prescribed learning outcomes for Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth and Space Science. The Draft Coast Metro Regional Standards for Performance Tasks in Science include three rating scales at each grade level – Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth and Space Science. These rating scales are identical within each

grade for the first three aspects – Skills and Processes, Attitudes and Dispositions, and Making Connections, and differ only for the fourth aspect – Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts.

Key Components
Rating scale. This scale describes the four levels of performance for each of the four aspects of science.

Chart. This chart has the description of the four “Aspects” from the rating scale in the first column and the description of “Fully Meets Expectations” in the second column. The third column, which is blank, can be used by teachers when they are planning tasks or as a template for making observations as students work.

Sample task. This is a performance task developed by practising teachers to provide opportunities to assess student work in science. Teachers may use the tasks as given or as models. Each sample task identifies the context, the prescribed learning outcomes, both skills and processes and content outcomes, that are addressed, and the process that was used in the class.

Student Samples

1 2 3 4

Level of work. Teacher’s observations. These are additional comments by the teacher and key relevant criteria from the Rating Scale. Rating scale icon. This is a generalized summary of the scale completed by the teacher. Student work. This shows a reproduction of the student’s work. (Names of students and teachers have been deleted.)

Science in Kindergarten
Performance Assessment of Science in Kindergarten Life Science: Characteristics of Living Things Sample Task: Local Finds Chart Physical Science: Properties of Objects and Materials Sample Task: Mystery Boxes Chart Earth and Space Science: Surroundings Sample Task: Winter Walk Chart

Performance Assessment of Science in Kindergarten
Kindergarten students bring varying background knowledge and experiences to the classroom. As is the case with the BC Performance Standards, to honour our youngest students, performance standards for science have not been developed for Kindergarten. Kindergarten students need regular and ongoing science experiences in the classroom, learning what it means to be a scientist. For the most part, these experiences in kindergarten are collaborative in nature, with students often working in small groups, providing opportunities for formative assessment that informs the teacher’s instructional planning. By the end of the school year, kindergarten students may be evaluated in relation to the skills and processes of science, after having a year’s worth of experiences. Content knowledge is best assessed during the time of focused concentration on the particular content, for example, during a study of local plants. When planning classroom experiences, opportunities should be provided for students to apply the skills and processes of science that they have been practicing. The following sections provide examples of performance tasks in Science for Kindergarten classrooms.

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The following prescribed learning outcomes for Kindergarten Life Science are from the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use the five senses to make observations • share with others information obtained by observing Life Science: Characteristics of Living Things It is expected that students will: • describe features of local plants and animals (e.g., colour, shape, size, texture) • compare local plants • compare common animals

Sample Task: Local Finds
Go for a walk outside and have students observe or collect “local finds” such as a bird’s feather, a pinecone or a fallen leaf. Have students work in small groups (3 or 4) to observe on of the objects. Encourage students to use all their senses, except the sense of taste. Have them take turns sharing a characteristic of the object. Use the “say something” strategy so that even repeating someone else’s observation is okay. Students can also observe plants or animals in their natural environment and bring clipboards or science notebooks to draw a local plant or animal. Remind students to wash their hands with soap and water upon return to the classroom.

Chart for Planning or Observations: Kindergarten Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) Fully Meets Expectations • can observe for colour, form, texture, smell, and other features and details • with some prompting, is able to orally describe observations • is able to identify the different senses and associated body parts that can be used to make observations • with some prompting, is able to orally share observations with a classmate, teacher or group of students using learned vocabulary • is able to record observations in a way that can assist the oral sharing of observations with others (drawing, labeling a diagram) • show an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• is able to orally describe and compare features of local plants and animals after experiences involving making observations

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The following prescribed learning outcomes for Kindergarten Life Science are from the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use the five senses to make observations • share with others information obtained by observing Physical Science: Properties of Objects and Materials It is expected that students will: • describe properties of materials, including colour, shape, texture, size, and weight • identify materials that make up familiar objects • describe ways to rethink, refuse, reduce, reuse, and recycle

Sample Task: Mystery Boxes
Using closed boxes or “feely socks”, place a mystery object inside. Have each student only use their sense of touch to reach in and feel the object. This works best in a small group, possibly during centre time. After each student has felt the object, go around the circle and have each student orally describe the properties of the object (size, texture, materials used, weight, shape) before having the students guess what the mystery object is.

Chart for Planning or Observations: Kindergarten Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) Fully Meets Expectations • can observe for colour, form, texture, smell, and other features and details • with some prompting, is able to orally describe observations • is able to identify the different senses and associated body parts that can be used to make observations • with some prompting, is able to orally share observations with a classmate, teacher or group of students using learned vocabulary • is able to record observations in a way that can assist the oral sharing of observations with others (drawing, labeling a diagram) • show an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• is able to identify and sort materials based on their properties (colour, size, texture)

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The following prescribed learning outcomes for Kindergarten Life Science are from the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use the five senses to make observations • share with others information obtained by observing Earth and Space Science: Surroundings It is expected that students will: • demonstrate the ability to observe their surroundings • describe features of their immediate environment

Sample Task: Winter Walk
Students go outside for a winter walk and observe signs of winter using their senses. Have students consider how the environment, weather and local plants and animals may have changed since the fall. Back in the classroom, the students each draw a picture of something they observed outside and tell a partner about it.

Chart for Planning or Observations: Kindergarten Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) Fully Meets Expectations • can observe for colour, form, texture, smell, and other features and details • with some prompting, is able to orally describe observations • is able to identify the different senses and associated body parts that can be used to make observations • with some prompting, is able to orally share observations with a classmate, teacher or group of students using learned vocabulary • is able to record observations in a way that can assist the oral sharing of observations with others (drawing, labeling a diagram) • show an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• is able to orally describe or use drawings to share observations of features and changes in the local environment

Science in Grade 1
Life Science: Needs of Living Things Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Design a Habitat for a Slug Physical Science: Force and Motion Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Classify Magnetic Effects Earth and Space Science: Daily and Seasonal Changes Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Identify Aboriginal Seasonal Activities

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 1 Life Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 1 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • communicate their observations, experiences, and thinking in a variety of ways (e.g., verbally, pictorially, graphically) • classify objects, events, and organisms Life Science: Needs of Living Things It is expected that students will: • classify living and non-living things • describe the basic needs of local plants and animals (e.g., food, water, light) • describe how the basic needs of plants and animals are met in their environment

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 1 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to orally describe observations, experience, or thinking; may not use science vocabulary • needs support to record or organize recording of observations with pictures or words • needs support to compare objects, events, or organisms, often needing language provided • may be able to replicate the classification of a set of objects, events, or organisms that has been modeled • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes uses limited science vocabulary or details in orally describing observations, experiences or thinking drawings or recordings may be limited, with few details; may include unrelated objects (i.e., hearts, human, or cartoon features) focuses on what features are the same when comparing objects, events, or organisms often is able to classify a set of objects, events, or organisms when provided with descriptive labels and criteria attempts to create and label own categories but needs support to explain classification criteria; categories are often unrelated shows some interest and engagement in science activities demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder about some things, perhaps those related to personal interests needs prompting to notice science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science

• often has limited interest in science activities, needs encouragement to engage in activities • may not be curious or express sense of wonder • may have limited awareness of science, may not see science in a situation even when it is pointed out

• •

• may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• if prompted, is able to make some connections to personal experiences • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but may not be able to generate additional examples

• may be able to identify some things as living or non-living, some errors • if prompted, may be able to identify

• is able to identify most things as living or non-living, confused about ‘dead’

Concepts

some needs of living things • may be able to explain or show how some structure of a plant helps meet its needs • if prompted, may rely on previous examples to show how an animal’s needs are met in its environment

• is able to identify some needs of living things, e.g., food, water, air, light • is able to explain or show how some plant structures help plants meet their needs is able to explain or show how some of an animal’s needs are met in its environment

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • is able to independently record observations and communicate thinking clearly • makes drawings, charts, or representations that are realistic and detailed; may be coded or labeled to enhance communication or show movement • is able to accurately compare objects, events, or organisms and make interpretations • when classifying a set, is able to create and label own categories, and to classify a set in more than one way, often using unique attributes

• shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• seeks opportunities to do science activities • wonders, ponders observations, and questions • sees science in many places and wants to share observations and questions with others

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• provides personal examples of similar or related events • makes connections to the world or other science tasks without prompting • suggests ways to apply what has been learned to other situations or tasks

• is able to accurately identify a variety of things as living or nonliving • is able to identify the needs of living things, e.g., food, water, air, light • is able to explain or show how the structure of a plant helps meet its

• is able to explain or why a variety of things are living or non-living • is able to identify and prioritize the specific needs of living things • is able to show how the structures of different plants help them meet their needs in different

needs • is able to explain or show how a given animal’s needs are met in its environment

environments • is able to explain or show how the needs of different animals are met in different environments

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 1 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way • shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• is able to accurately identify a variety of things as living or nonliving • is able to identify the needs of living things, e.g., food, water, air, light • is able to explain or show how the

structure of a plant helps meet its needs • is able to explain or show how a given animal’s needs are met in its environment

Sample Task: Design a Habitat for a Slug
Context As part of a mini-science unit on the needs of living things, the class engaged in brainstorming the needs of living things and classified living and non-living things on a walk outside. Students were read an informational text about slugs and snails to provide some background knowledge. Note: Any small animals could be used for this task – worms, sowbugs, snails, ladybugs, butterflies, etc. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • communicate their observations, experiences, and thinking in a variety of ways (e.g., verbally, pictorially, graphically) Life Science: Needs of Living Things It is expected that students will: • describe the basic needs of local plants and animals (e.g., food, water, light) • describe how the basic needs of plants and animals are met in their environment Process The students were asked to design a habitat to meets the needs of a slug, if the class was going to keep a slug in their classroom for a few days. The students were asked to draw, label and explain their thinking and choices. The teachers interviewed each student for further explanation and connection making.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student created a make-believe house (like a dollhouse) instead of a slug habitat, not considering the needs of the animal. The student seemed to not understand the task being asked her and had no engagement with the science aspect of the task, but instead focused on “decorating” the house she designed. • • • • • uses limited science vocabulary or details when she was discussing her slug house needs support to record and organize her thoughts and drawings shows some interest in the task when prompted, is able to make a personal connections to what a house was in relation to an animal habitat when prompted, is unable to identify the needs of a slug

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was interested in the task and is enthusiastic about science. He was able to identify some basic needs of a slug. Even with prompting, he could not make a personal connection to the animal or its needs. The student: • uses limited science vocabulary or details in describing his thinking • drawings are limited in detail • seeks opportunities to do science activities; very enthusiastic • unable to make a personal connection, even with prompting • able to identify some needs of a slug • able to explain or show how some of the slug’s needs would be met in the habitat he designed

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student approached the task confidently and was eager to explain his thinking. When interviewed, he was able to orally provide examples of how the slug’s needs were met. For example, holes in the habitat for air and carrots for food. The student: • able to record and organize his thoughts about the slug habitat with pictures and words • orally describes his thinking about the slug’s needs • shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiousity while designing his habitat • able to provide a personal example (where he had seen a slug before) • able to identify the needs of a slug • able to show and describe how he slug’s needs would be met in the habitat that he designed

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was very interested in the task and enthusiastic about designing the habitat. She applied background knowledge to the task, considering what aspects of a habitat would be important for a slug. • • • • • able to independently clearly record and organize her thoughts with pictures and words labeled diagram is realistic and detailed shows an interest in science activities able to make a personal connection to her own pet fishes’ needs identifies the needs of a slug, including specific examples

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 1 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 1 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • communicate their observations, experiences, and thinking in a variety of ways (e.g., verbally, pictorially, graphically) • classify objects, events, and organisms Physical Science: Force and Motion It is expected that students will: • demonstrate how force can be applied to move an object • compare the effect of friction on the movement of an object over a variety of surfaces • demonstrate and describe the effects of magnets on different materials

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 1 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to orally describe observations, experience, or thinking; may not use science vocabulary • needs support to record or organize recording of observations with pictures or words • needs support to compare objects, events, or organisms, often needing language provided • may be able to replicate the classification of a set of objects, events, or organisms that has been modeled • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes uses limited science vocabulary or details in orally describing observations, experiences or thinking drawings or recordings may be limited, with few details; may include unrelated objects (i.e., hearts, human, or cartoon features) focuses on what features are the same when comparing objects, events, or organisms often is able to classify a set of objects, events, or organisms when provided with descriptive labels and criteria attempts to create and label own categories but needs support to explain classification criteria; categories are often unrelated shows some interest and engagement in science activities demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder about some things, perhaps those related to personal interests needs prompting to notice science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science

• often has limited interest in science activities, needs encouragement to engage in activities • may not be curious or express sense of wonder • may have limited awareness of science, may not see science in a situation even when it is pointed out

• •

• may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• if prompted, is able to make some connections to personal experiences • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but may not be able to generate additional examples

• shows awareness that a force is a push or a pull but applies this only to forces that involve visible actions

• is able to show how some forces can be applied to change the motion of an object (push/pull)

Concepts

• may not be able to identify invisible forces; may have difficulty generalizing about what materials are magnetic • if prompted, is able increase or decrease speed of motion in a given situation in the ways modelled

• may not be able to identify the invisible forces (magnetism, gravity, friction); may identify the magnet, rather than magnetism, as the force is able increase or decrease speed of motion in a given situation in the ways modelled

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • is able to independently record observations and communicate thinking clearly • makes drawings, charts, or representations that are realistic and detailed; may be coded or labeled to enhance communication or show movement • is able to accurately compare objects, events, or organisms and make interpretations • when classifying a set, is able to create and label own categories, and to classify a set in more than one way, often using unique attributes

• shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• seeks opportunities to do science activities • wonders, ponders observations, and questions • sees science in many places and wants to share observations and questions with others

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• provides personal examples of similar or related events • makes connections to the world or other science tasks without prompting • suggests ways to apply what has been learned to other situations or tasks

• is able to show how forces can be applied to change the motion of an object (push/pull) • is able to identify the invisible forces (magnetism, gravity, friction) acting on particular objects and events, may be some omissions

• is able to show and explain in some detail how a variety of forces can change the motion of an object • is able to identify all the invisible forces (friction, magnetism, gravity) acting on particular objects

• is able to show some ways to increase or decrease speed of motion in a given situation; e.g., slope, texture

or events • is able to show and explain multiple ways to increase or decrease speed of motion in a given situation

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 1 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way • shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• is able to show how forces can be applied to change the motion of an object (push/pull) • is able to identify the invisible forces (magnetism, gravity, friction)

acting on particular objects and events, may be some omissions • is able to show some ways to increase or decrease speed of motion in a given situation; e.g., slope, texture

Sample Task: Classify Magnetic Effects
Context As part of a science study of force and motion, the class explored invisible forces, including magnetism. Students worked on a variety of investigations such as testing to see whether magnets worked through water and testing the strength of different magnets. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • communicate their observations, experiences, and thinking in a variety of ways (e.g., verbally, pictorially, graphically) • classify objects, events, and organisms Physical Science: Force and Motion It is expected that students will: • demonstrate and describe the effects of magnets on different materials Process The students were given a collection of classroom objects such as pencils, erasers, scissors, paperclips, elastic band and coins. The students worked in partners and were given a magnet. Students were asked to sort the objects into groups and then give a name to their groups. Note: The teacher used the term “sort” as this class had a high ESL population and did not seem confident with the term “classify”.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student needed many prompts in order for him to be able to describe one thing he learned and noticed about the task. The student did not understand the concept of putting items in groups and randomly tested each object with the magnet. • • • • • • needs support to orally describe thinking needs support to record and organize his thoughts and drawings unable to compare the objects or see how any were the same enjoys experimenting with the magnet unable to make a personal connections to when he might have used magnets, even with prompting unable to generalize that some materials are magnetic, if they “stick” to the magnet

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was interested in the task but did not ask further questions or extend the task for himself. He sorted the objects into two distinct categories but couldn’t generalize how the objects in each category were similar. • • • • able to orally describe experiences with some support drawings are limited in detail able to sort objects and events into two distinct groups is aware of the force of magnetism but did not have the scientific vocabulary to describe it

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student approached the task confidently but was shy to orally communicate her thinking. She used scientific vocabulary to record how she sorted the objects into two distinct groups. • • • • • • able to record and organize thoughts with pictures and words uses scientific vocabulary able to sort objects into two distinct categories makes connections to previous investigations with magnets able to identify the force of magnetism and how it acts on different objects notices that the materials that were magnetic have common characteristics (metallic)

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student has had many rich science experiences at home and has a very developed vocabulary. He was very engaged in the task and was curious and inquisitive about his findings. • • • • • • able to record and organize thoughts with pictures and words uses scientific vocabulary as a way of communicating his thinking sorts the objects into three distinct categories, with one of the groups overlapping the characteristics in the two other groups makes connections to previous investigations with magnets and to magnetic toys he has at home able to identify the force of magnetism and how it acts on different objects notices that the materials that were magnetic have common characteristics (metallic)

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 1 Earth and Space Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 1 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • communicate their observations, experiences, and thinking in a variety of ways (e.g., verbally, pictorially, graphically) • classify objects, events, and organisms • demonstrate and describe the effects of magnets on different materials Earth and Space Science: Daily and Seasonal Changes It is expected that students will: • describe changes that occur in daily and seasonal cycles and their effects on living things • describe activities of Aboriginal peoples in BC in each seasonal cycle

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 1 Earth and Space
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to orally describe observations, experience, or thinking; may not use science vocabulary • needs support to record or organize recording of observations with pictures or words • needs support to compare objects, events, or organisms, often needing language provided • may be able to replicate the classification of a set of objects, events, or organisms that has been modeled • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes uses limited science vocabulary or details in orally describing observations, experiences or thinking drawings or recordings may be limited, with few details; may include unrelated objects (i.e., hearts, human, or cartoon features) focuses on what features are the same when comparing objects, events, or organisms often is able to classify a set of objects, events, or organisms when provided with descriptive labels and criteria attempts to create and label own categories but needs support to explain classification criteria; categories are often unrelated shows some interest and engagement in science activities demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder about some things, perhaps those related to personal interests needs prompting to notice science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science

• often has limited interest in science activities, needs encouragement to engage in activities • may not be curious or express sense of wonder • may have limited awareness of science, may not see science in a situation even when it is pointed out

• •

• may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• if prompted, is able to make some connections to personal experiences • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but may not be able to generate additional examples

• may have limited awareness of the effects of daily weather and seasonal changes on living things,

• is able to give some examples of how daily weather and seasonal changes have an effect on living

Concepts

but may be able to give personal examples if prompted • may have limited awareness of what seasonal Aboriginal activities are, but can identify own seasonal activities

things and their habits and activities • if prompted, is able to give some basic examples of seasonal activities of Aboriginal peoples

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • is able to independently record observations and communicate thinking clearly • makes drawings, charts, or representations that are realistic and detailed; may be coded or labeled to enhance communication or show movement • is able to accurately compare objects, events, or organisms and make interpretations • when classifying a set, is able to create and label own categories, and to classify a set in more than one way, often using unique attributes

• shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• seeks opportunities to do science activities • wonders, ponders observations, and questions • sees science in many places and wants to share observations and questions with others

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• provides personal examples of similar or related events • makes connections to the world or other science tasks without prompting • suggests ways to apply what has been learned to other situations or tasks

• is able to explain or show how daily weather and seasonal changes have an effect on living things and their habits and activities • is able to explain or show some seasonal activities of Aboriginal peoples

• is able to explain or show how unusual daily weather and seasonal patterns can have a significant effect on living things and their habits and activities • is able to explain or show how a variety of Aboriginal activities differ

during the seasons and in the various seasonal patterns across B.C.

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 1 Earth and Space
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • is able to orally describe observations, experiences, or thinking • is able to record and organize observations using realistic pictures, charts, words and symbols, includes some details • identifies similarities and differences when comparing objects, events, or organisms • is able to classify a set when provided with descriptive labels and criteria • is usually able to create and label own categories and classify a set in more than one way • shows an interest in science activities • demonstrates curiosity and a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• if prompted, can provide personal examples of similar events • if prompted, is able to make some connections to the world or to other science experiences • if prompted, is able to describe other ways to use the materials or results from the task

• is able to explain or show how daily weather and seasonal changes have an effect on living things and their habits and activities • is able to explain or show some

seasonal activities of Aboriginal peoples

Sample Task:

Identify Aboriginal Seasonal Activities

Context This task was a culmination of an ongoing study of seasonal changes and how the traditional Aboriginal way of life was often determined by the seasons. Students had made regular observations of the weather, movement of the wind, and how the trees changed over the seasons. The class discussed how the weather and seasons might affect jobs, activities, clothing, and ceremonies both for themselves and for traditional Aboriginal peoples. Guests to the classroom shared artifacts including Aboriginal blankets, baskets, and tools. The students also observed different foods and how they are preserved, such as dried fruit, and made connections to Aboriginal culture and food preservation. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • classify objects, events, and organisms Earth and Space Science: Daily and Seasonal Changes It is expected that students will: • describe changes that occur in daily and seasonal cycles and their effects on living things • describe activities of Aboriginal peoples in BC in each seasonal cycle Process The students were shown a chart divided into four quadrants, one for each season of the year. The students were asked to create their own chart, labeling each section with a season’s name. The students were asked to draw, label or write about different traditional Aboriginal activities that occur in each season, explaining the importance of each activity. After completion of the four season charts in their science notebooks, the students had an opportunity to share and discuss their work with each other. As an extension to this task, the teacher provided an opportunity to the students to refine their thinking and to represent their understanding of this content in another way. Connecting to the idea of a medicine wheel, the students created large circular posters divided into four parts. There were two layers with the top layer having drawings for each season, with each of the four parts lifting up to reveal word labels and writing underneath. These posters were proudly displayed on a bulletin board in the school. See an example of a student-created poster on the next page.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was able to complete the task with adult support and prompting. An adult scribed his thinking while the student was able to create drawings for each season. The student was able to think of one object or event for each season. • • • • • • • needs support to orally describe thinking needs support to record and organize his thoughts and drawings needs support to replicate the classification of events into seasonal categories did not express curiousity in the task made connections to science experiences leading up to this task had limited awareness of the effects of daily weather and seasonal changes on activities had limited awareness of what seasonal Aboriginal activities are

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student needed some support to generate and record his ideas. The teacher felt the student had some confusion about some of the summer and fall activities, or just recorded his thoughts in a way that was not clear to the reader. The student referred to previous science experiences such as the preserved fruit observations and examining cooking baskets. • • • • • able to orally describe events and experiences with some support drawings are limited in detail able to classify objects and events when provided with seasonal category labels and specific criteria able to make connections to other science tasks able to give some examples of seasonal activities of Aboriginal peoples

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student had been very engaged in the science experiences leading up to this task. She confidently was able to record at least one event or object that related to each season, and also explained why that seasonal activity was important to Aboriginal peoples. • • • • • • • able to record and organize thoughts with pictures and words able to classify events when provided with descriptive seasonal labels and criteria very interested and eager to share what the class has learned demonstrates a sense of wonder by asking thoughtful questions during discussions makes connections to past activities (ie the lady who brought the baskets and how they were used to store food) able to explain how weather and seasonal changes have an effect on living things and daily activities able to explain how seasonal changes affected the traditional activities of Aboriginal peoples

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was very interested in sharing her knowledge that she had acquired in experiences related to this task. The student asked many thoughtful questions and contributed to class discussions. She made connections to her previous knowledge about fishing in ponds and streams. • • • • • • able to independently record her thinking using words able to classify events when provided with descriptive seasonal labels and criteria has lots of thoughtful, wonder questions makes connections to other science tasks able to explain how weather and seasonal changes have an effect on living things and daily activities able to explain how seasonal changes affected the traditional activities of Aboriginal peoples

Science in Grade 2
Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Identify the Similarities and Differences Between Bats and Birds Physical Science: Properties of Matter Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Observe States of Matter of Water in Puddles Earth and Space Science: Air, Water, and Soil Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Observe Soil Samples

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 2 Life Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 2 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use their senses to interpret observations • infer the probable outcome of an event or behaviour based on observations Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes It is expected that students will: • classify familiar animals according to similarities and differences in appearance, behaviour, and life cycles • describe some changes that affect animals (e.g., hibernation, migration, decline in population) • describe how animals are important in the lives of Aboriginal peoples in BC • describe ways in which animals are important to other living things and the environment

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 2 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to interpret observations; may not understand explanations given • may guess or express wishes rather than making inferences from observations • needs support to communicate observations, explanations, and inferences in pictures or words • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) uses some appropriate skills and processes with prompting, interprets some simple observations; explanations often simplistic or inaccurate with prompting, makes inferences about the probable outcomes of events and behaviours; may be only loosely connected to observations, often inaccurate communicates some observations, explanations, and inferences, these may be incomplete and lack scientific vocabulary unless prompted shows some interest and engagement in science tasks with prompting, ponders observations sometimes demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder needs prompting to see science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• needs encouragement to complete task • often has limited awareness or interest in science • seldom demonstrates curiosity or sense of wonder • may have a limited awareness of science, may not see science in situation even when it is pointed out • may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• • • •

• with support, can make simple connections to personal experience or prior knowledge • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but cannot generate additional examples

• identifies simple similarities and differences among familiar animals, may focus on appearance or animals the student prefers • with support, is able to identify some seasonal changes that would affect animals • may identify some animals as important the them, but many be unable to explain why animals are

• with prompting, identifies some similarities and differences in appearance, behaviour, or life cycles for familiar animals • gives some examples of animal adaptations to seasonal changes, all examples may be on one adaptation; e.g., migration • may make a general statement about the importance of animals to

important to Aboriginal peoples • may identify an animal’s importance in personal terms, rather than in terms of its important to other living things and the environment

Aboriginal peoples, without examples • may make a general statement about how a familiar animal is important to other living things and the environment without an example

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • interprets observations accurately • confidently infers the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences effectively using appropriate scientific vocabulary

• shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• looks forward to doing science activities and seeks additional opportunities • often demonstrates sense of wonder, is curious, spontaneously asks questions and ponders observations • tries to use science to make sense of their world • independently makes connections to previous learning and experiences • recognizes and explains connections to their personal lives, or the environment

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• is able to classify familiar animals according to similarities and differences in appearance, behaviour, and life cycles; may be some inaccuracies • is able to give a variety of examples of animal adaptations to seasonal changes (hibernation, migration, coat change); may include some common misconceptions • is able to give some examples of ways in which animals are important to Aboriginal peoples

• is able to classify many animals accurately according to similarities and differences in ways that extend beyond animals’ appearance, behaviour and lifecycles; e.g. environmental adaptations • is able to explain examples of animal adaptations to seasonal changes with clarity and insight, e.g., benefits and risks in migration • is able to explain why many

• is able to explain some ways in which a familiar animal is important to other living things and the environment

animals are important to Aboriginal peoples • may be able to explain the importance of an unpopular animal to other living things and the environment

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 2 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary • shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• is able to classify familiar animals according to similarities and differences in appearance, behaviour, and life cycles; may be some inaccuracies • is able to give a variety of examples of animal adaptations to seasonal changes (hibernation, migration, coat change); may include some common misconceptions • is able to give some examples of ways in which animals are

important to Aboriginal peoples • is able to explain some ways in which a familiar animal is important to other living things and the environment

Sample Task:

Identify the Similarities and Differences Between Bats and Birds

Context The class had read the book Stellaluna in which a bat thinks she is a bird. Students already had background knowledge about bats being mammals and birds being oviparous animals. Learning Outcomes Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes It is expected that students will: • classify familiar animals according to similarities and differences in appearance, behaviour, and life cycles Process Students were asked to compare bats and birds through group discussions of what was similar and what was different. Students were then asked to work individually to do three things: • draw a Venn diagram to summarize the similarities and differences between bats and birds - write about the similarities and differences - draw the lifecycles of a bat and a bird

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student initially focussed on the task but very quickly lost interest. While he demonstrated interest in the story at the beginning, he had great difficulty maintaining focus. Offers of scribing and verbal communication did not enable this student to complete the task.    does not use scientific vocabulary has difficulty focussing on and distinguishing characteristics (behaviours, appearance and life cycles) is unable to identify similarities and differences between bats and birds, even when prompted

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student enjoyed the story but was extremely cautious about approaching and completing the task. She was very hesitant about sharing information even when prompted. Information drawn out through prompting was inaccurate.    does not use scientific vocabulary is able to make some connections if prompted needs support to understand to concepts

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student independently completed the task. She was enthusiastic, curious, asked questions, and demonstrated critical thinking by making personal connections. While completing the task, she related her observations and made inferences. She said she would like to see bats.      willingly shares thinking and questions with others in the group makes a personal connection about seeing the school mascot (stellar jay) in her own back yard gives information that is not completely accurate makes detailed observations identifies similarities and differences related to different aspects of the animals’ lives

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was quiet but eager. She capably demonstrated her knowledge and, if she did not know something, she sought out more information. She asked questions without prompting and made connections to prior learning.      completes the task independently is able to make inferences and connections without prompting uses scientific vocabulary demonstrates curiosity and asks questions accurately draws a diagram to demonstrate live birth in the bat life cycle

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 2 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 2 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use their senses to interpret observations • infer the probable outcome of an event or behaviour based on observations Physical Science: Properties of Matter It is expected that students will: • identify the properties of solids, liquids, and gases • investigate changes to the properties of matter when it is heated or cooled • investigate the interactions of liquids and solids

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 2 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to interpret observations; may not understand explanations given • may guess or express wishes rather than making inferences from observations • needs support to communicate observations, explanations, and inferences in pictures or words • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) uses some appropriate skills and processes with prompting, interprets some simple observations; explanations often simplistic or inaccurate with prompting, makes inferences about the probable outcomes of events and behaviours; may be only loosely connected to observations, often inaccurate communicates some observations, explanations, and inferences, these may be incomplete and lack scientific vocabulary unless prompted shows some interest and engagement in science tasks with prompting, ponders observations sometimes demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder needs prompting to see science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• needs encouragement to complete task • often has limited awareness or interest in science • seldom demonstrates curiosity or sense of wonder • may have a limited awareness of science, may not see science in situation even when it is pointed out • may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• • • •

• with support, can make simple connections to personal experience or prior knowledge • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but cannot generate additional examples

• may be able to distinguish among of solids, liquids and gases, but may be confused about gases, and may not be able to identify any properties • cannot identify the changes to the properties of matter when it is heated or cooled • may be able to show materials sinking, floating, and dissolving

• identifies solids, liquids, and gases fairly accurately, but may need prompting to identify any properties • identifies when a phase change has occurred but may not be able to identify changes to properties, may be confused by phase changes involving gases • is able to show materials sinking,

floating, and dissolving; may have difficulty making generalizations

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • interprets observations accurately • confidently infers the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences effectively using appropriate scientific vocabulary

• shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• looks forward to doing science activities and seeks additional opportunities • often demonstrates sense of wonder, is curious, spontaneously asks questions and ponders observations • tries to use science to make sense of their world • independently makes connections to previous learning and experiences • recognizes and explains connections to their personal lives, or the environment

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• accurately identifies solids, liquids, and gases; is able to identify the main properties of each state, may be a few omissions • is able to show or describe changes in state that result from heating or cooling and identifies changes to properties • is able to show and explain materials sinking, floating, and dissolving; makes some accurate generalizations about sinking and floating

• accurately identifies states of matter and the properties of each • explains changes of state resulting from heating and cooling accurately in terms of changes in properties • makes accurate generalizations about states of matter and sinking and floating

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 2 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary • shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• accurately identifies solids, liquids, and gases; is able to identify the main properties of each state, may be a few omissions • is able to show or describe changes in state that result from heating or cooling and identify changes to properties • is able to show and explain materials sinking, floating, and

dissolving; makes some accurate generalizations about sinking and floating

Sample Task:

Observe States of Matter of Water in Puddles

Context The class was studying states of matter. After classroom activities in which students were asked to identify states of matter and changes in state, they students were taken outdoors on a cold day to apply their knowledge. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use their senses to interpret observations • infer the probable outcome of an event or behaviour based on observations Physical Science: Properties of Matter It is expected that students will: • identify the properties of solids, liquids, and gases • investigate changes to the properties of matter when it is heated or cooled Process Students were asked to observe a puddle. They were then asked to identify the state of matter of water in the puddle. Each student had a clipboard, paper, and a magnifying glass as well as access to thermometers, plastic cups, and rulers.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was not interested in looking at the puddle. He required significant prompting to identify the states of matter and one-to-one support from the teacher to complete the task.      needs significant support to complete the task. is unable to identify reasons for change in states of matter has difficulty identifying states of matter other than solids requires significant support to record ideas is unable to access prior knowledge

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was very reluctant to participate. She would try to move away from the puddle if she thought the teacher was not watching. A significant amount of teacher prompting was required for the student to complete the task.     requires teacher support to make the observations is unable to make personal connections is able to make explanations with prompting makes observations using the sense of sight only

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was excited about the task. She spent a significant amount of time observing and discussing her observations. She recorded personal connections as she made her observations about the states of matter seen in the puddle.      uses scientific vocabulary when making observations uses a variety of senses to make inferences about the states of matter found makes inferences about what would change the states of matter found in the puddle is eager to share her findings with others works independently to identify the states of matter

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was enthusiastic and eager to get started with the task. He wanted to spend more time testing different ideas about the states of matter found in the puddle. He posed many questions that demonstrated “testing” of prior knowledge.     makes inferences as to how the states of matter were created in the puddle orally identifies many states of matter found in the puddle including pebbles, twigs, and air pockets makes personal connections to prior knowledge about changes to states of matter; e.g. skating rink makes observations using a variety of sense and tools

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 2 Earth and Space Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 2 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use their senses to interpret observations • infer the probable outcome of an event or behaviour based on observations Earth and Space Science: Air, Water, and Soil It is expected that students will: • describe physical properties of air, water, and soil • distinguish ways in which air, water, and soil interact • explain why air, water, and soil are important for living things

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 2 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • needs support to interpret observations; may not understand explanations given • may guess or express wishes rather than making inferences from observations • needs support to communicate observations, explanations, and inferences in pictures or words • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) uses some appropriate skills and processes with prompting, interprets some simple observations; explanations often simplistic or inaccurate with prompting, makes inferences about the probable outcomes of events and behaviours; may be only loosely connected to observations, often inaccurate communicates some observations, explanations, and inferences, these may be incomplete and lack scientific vocabulary unless prompted shows some interest and engagement in science tasks with prompting, ponders observations sometimes demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder needs prompting to see science

Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• needs encouragement to complete task • often has limited awareness or interest in science • seldom demonstrates curiosity or sense of wonder • may have a limited awareness of science, may not see science in situation even when it is pointed out • may not be able to make a personal connection to the materials, events or task, even with support • may have difficulty understanding connections that are demonstrated or explained

• • • •

• with support, can make simple connections to personal experience or prior knowledge • usually understands connections that are demonstrated or explained but cannot generate additional examples

• may not be able to identify the properties of air and water • may not be able to identify components of soil, may see soil as one material • may have limited understanding of water cycle • may not make connections between classroom demonstrations of erosion and

• if prompted, is able to identify some properties of air and water; may be some inaccuracies • may be able to identify the components of soil if there has been a hand-on experience of making soil • with support, may be able to identify the basic elements of the water cycle on a diagram

natural occurrences • with support, may be able to give simple examples of how air, water, or soil is personally important

• is able to show ways that soil can be eroded, perhaps in ways demonstrated in class • may be able to identify simple examples of how air, water, or soil is important to living things

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • interprets observations accurately • confidently infers the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences effectively using appropriate scientific vocabulary

• shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• looks forward to doing science activities and seeks additional opportunities • often demonstrates sense of wonder, is curious, spontaneously asks questions and ponders observations • tries to use science to make sense of their world • independently makes connections to previous learning and experiences • recognizes and explains connections to their personal lives, or the environment

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• is able to identify the properties of air (expands/contract, usually invisible) and water (changes state, shaped by container), may be some omissions • is able it identify to main components of soil (sand, clay, humus) • is able to draw and explain the basic elements of the water cycle (precipitation, evaporation, condensation) • is able to give some accurate

• accurately identifies the properties of air and water • lists and explains many components of soil, including air and water • explains the water cycle accurately and in detail • is able to give accurate examples of how soil can be eroded by wind, water, and ice; may make connections to water cycle or human actions • provides detailed and insightful

examples of how soil can be eroded • gives some accurate examples of ways living things depend on air, water, soil

examples of ways living things depend on air, water, soil

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 2 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • interprets observations; some explanations may be inaccurate • makes logical inferences about the probable outcomes of events or behaviours based on observations • communicates observations, explanations, and inferences using some appropriate scientific vocabulary • shows interest and enthusiasm for science activities • demonstrates curiosity or a sense of wonder • sees science in many places

• makes some connections to previous learning and experiences • can make some connections to other science knowledge, their personal lives, or the environment

• is able to identify the properties of air (expands/contract, usually invisible) and water (changes state, shaped by container), may be some omissions • is able it identify to main components of soil (sand, clay, humus) • is able to draw and explain the basic elements of the water cycle (precipitation, evaporation,

condensation) • is able to give some accurate examples of how soil can be eroded • gives some accurate examples of ways living things depend on air, water, soil

Sample Task: Observe Soil Samples
Context The class was doing a unit on air, water, and soil. This was an introductory and exploratory lesson on soil. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • use their senses to interpret observations • infer the probable outcome of an event or behaviour based on observations Earth and Space Science: Air, Water, and Soil It is expected that students will: • describe physical properties of air, water, and soil • distinguish ways in which air, water, and soil interact Process Students were given three different soil samples and asked to use their senses of sight, touch, and smell to make and record observations. They could also draw a picture of each sample if they wished. Students were then asked to make and record observations and inferences about what was in each soil sample, and to make inferences about where each sample may have come from.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was very interested in the activity but needed significant teacher support to stay on task. The student was not able to make personal connections even with significant teacher prompting. He did not complete the task,  is able to make record some observations when prompted  is unable to draw a relevant diagram  is not able to make personal connections to prior experiences  is unable to make inferences

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was attentive, engaged and enthusiastic. Teacher support was required for the student to make limited observations. The student was reluctant to use senses other than sight. She could not make any personal connections to prior learning or experience about soil.     is able to make some observations using sight only uses limited science vocabulary to describe the soil samples is able to identify a few differences between the samples has difficulty making inferences about what is in each sample inferences, repeats her list of descriptive words

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was enthusiastic and completed the task independently. While completing the task, she wondered aloud, posing many questions about the sample soils. Her conversations included many personal connections to prior knowledge and experiences.      makes inferences while recording observations and descriptions is able to provide explanations of inferences uses scientific vocabulary is able to pose questions that could lead to further investigations and to finding more differences in soil samples is able to clearly identify the differences between the soil samples

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was constantly engaged while completing the task. As she made her observations, she made personal connections. After completing the task, she extended the activity by looking for similarities and differences in the soils in her backyard. She also extended the activity to look at sans in her backyard.      makes many observations using many senses uses scientific vocabulary is able to independently make some accurate inferences orally bases some inferences on prior knowledge makes clear descriptions with comparisons between the soil samples

Science in Grade 3
Life Science: Plant Growth and Changes To come Physical Science: Materials and Structures Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Build a Bridge for a Hot Wheels Car Earth and Space Science: Stars and Planets Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Ask Questions of Aboriginal Elders

Life Science
To come

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 3 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 3 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • ask questions that foster investigations and explorations relevant to the content • measure objects and events Physical Science: Materials and Structures It is expected that students will: • describe shapes that are part of natural and human-built structures (e.g., domes, arches, pyramids) • compare the effects of different materials, shapes, and forces on the strength and stability of different structures • conduct investigations into ways to improve the strength and stability of structures

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 3 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • with support, may be able to ask some simple questions that they know the answers to, these are often not related to topic • needs support in order to make measurements; often makes no attempt to record • needs support to record information on a template or chart • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes if prompted, is able to ask questions that make some connection to the topic, may be simple, vague, or very concrete measures in way modeled, measurements may be inaccurate, inconsistent or incomplete if prompted, able to record some simple information on a template or chart

• •

• demonstrates little or no interest in science activities • lacks tendency to consider any alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • usually does not see the science in situations or use science to make sense of their world

• demonstrates some interest in science activities, topics or phenomena • considers one plan or idea rather than exploring other views, or generate multiple options • with prompting, may see the science in a situation, or attempt to use science to explain something in their world • with prompting, makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of some science concepts; connections may be simple or vague • may not be able to give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology but may understand some examples given

• may not be able to articulate connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning, but may understand connections that are explained and examples given • has difficulty understanding the connections between scientific knowledge and practical applications

• needs support to identify basic shapes in structures, and prompting to apply them to own projects • may focus efforts on selecting materials for strength and ignore other factors • may give up on own structure if it lacks strength or stability

• identifies some basic shapes typically used in structures and applies them to own projects • makes some comparisons of the effects of some different materials, shapes, and forces on the strength and stability of structures • may rely on trial and error to improve strength and stability or own structures

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • asks logical questions relevant to the content that can be investigated and explored • measures and objects and events using appropriate units, may be some inaccuracies or omissions • is able to record information on a template or chart, may be some errors or omissions

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • poses thoughtful and insightful questions, may suggest how they can be investigated or explored • measures and records objects and events accurately, completely, and in appropriate units, may independently develop appropriate templates or charts

• demonstrates an active interest in science activities and wonder about the world • if prompted, will consider alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world • makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of science concepts • if prompted, can give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology

• demonstrates a sustained interest and curiosity in the world and in learning science • independently considers alternatives, explores views, and generates options • recognizes science in a wide range of situations and often attempts to use science to make sense of their world • makes detailed and relevant connections between task and personal experience and/ or prior learning of science concepts; able to give personal examples • recognizes and explains how technological progress and inventions are a result of scientific knowledge; able to give detailed examples • identifies many shapes used in structures and applies them to own projects in unique ways • makes accurate generalizations about the effects of different materials, shapes, and forces on the strength and stability of structures • modifies the design of own structures in ways that greatly increase strength and stability, design may be innovative

• identifies most of the basic shapes typically used in structures and applies them to own projects • is able to make accurate comparisons of the effects of some different materials, shapes, and forces on the strength and stability of structures • is able to modify the design of own structures to improves strength and stability

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 3 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • asks logical questions relevant to the content that can be investigated and explored • measures and objects and events using appropriate units, may be some inaccuracies or omissions • is able to record information on a template or chart, may be some errors or omissions

• demonstrates an active interest in science activities and wonder about the world • if prompted, will consider alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of science concepts • if prompted, can give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology

• identifies most of the basic shapes typically used in structures and applies them to own projects • is able to make accurate comparisons of the effects of some different materials, shapes, and

forces on the strength and stability of structures • is able to modify the design of own structures to improves strength and stability

Sample Task:

Build a Bridge for a Hot Wheels Car

Context During a study of structures, students were asked to build bridges and test their strength. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • measure objects and events Physical Science: Materials and Structures It is expected that students will: • compare the effects of different materials, shapes, and forces on the strength and stability of different structures • conduct investigations into ways to improve the strength and stability of structures Process Students were provided with two blocks, one sheet of paper and a Hot Wheels car. They were asked to construct a bridge that would support the weight of the car. They worked in pairs to design and build a bridge, test it, and suggest modifications and improvements.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student lacked engagement with the task and did not persevere with process of testing and modifying his design. • • • • needs support making measurements and comparisons lack of interest in task has difficulty making connections between science concepts and practical applications such as building bridges, playing with toys did not modify his structure, was not interested in improving its strength

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student lacks confidence and relied heavily on her partner to complete the task. • • • • • needs measuring to be modeled able to record some information on the provided template only considers one plan/way of designing her bridge makes limited connections to background scientific knowledge utilizes only one technique (folding/doubling of paper) to strengthen her structure

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student persevered with the task and considered alternative techniques. • • • • • • measures events accurately able to record information on a template demonstrates an interest in science considers alternatives and different options for constructing her bridge makes some connections between personal experiences and science concepts able to modify her bridge to improve its strength and stability

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student is naturally inquisitive, particularly about science, and transferred what he was learning at school about structures to his play-based constructions at home. The student orally explained his reasoning and design changes but his recording skills were limited. • • • • • • accurately measures and records objects and events demonstrates a passion for construction and science in general works independently and perseveres as he considers alternative designs and techniques makes relevant connections between the task and his science knowledge as well as to other science construction tasks done in class identifies the triangle as a strong shape and utilized it in his design modifies his own structures to increase strength and stability

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 3 Earth and Space Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 3 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • ask questions that foster investigations and explorations relevant to the content • measure objects and events Earth and Space Science: Stars and Planets It is expected that students will: • describe characteristics and movements of objects in our solar system • compare familiar constellations in seasonal skies • demonstrate awareness of the special significance of celestial objects for Aboriginal peoples

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 3 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • with support, may be able to ask some simple questions that they know the answers to, these are often not related to topic • needs support in order to make measurements; often makes no attempt to record • needs support to record information on a template or chart • • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes if prompted, is able to ask questions that make some connection to the topic, may be simple, vague, or very concrete measures in way modeled, measurements may be inaccurate, inconsistent or incomplete if prompted, able to record some simple information on a template or chart

• •

• demonstrates little or no interest in science activities • lacks tendency to consider any alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • usually does not see the science in situations or use science to make sense of their world

• demonstrates some interest in science activities, topics or phenomena • considers one plan or idea rather than exploring other views, or generate multiple options • with prompting, may see the science in a situation, or attempt to use science to explain something in their world • with prompting, makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of some science concepts; connections may be simple or vague • may not be able to give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology but may understand some examples given

• may not be able to articulate connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning, but may understand connections that are explained and examples given • has difficulty understanding the connections between scientific knowledge and practical applications

• needs support to make a basic drawing of the solar system • may not understand that the Sun is a star or distinguish between planets and stars • is able to identify a common and easily seen constellation in the night sky • is able to identify the celestial objects in an Aboriginal story

• is able to draw a diagram of the solar system that includes the sun and planets, may be omissions • may not understand that the Sun is a star • is able to identify a common and easily seen constellations in the night sky • is able to identify how an Aboriginal story explains

something about a celestial object

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • asks logical questions relevant to the content that can be investigated and explored • measures and objects and events using appropriate units, may be some inaccuracies or omissions • is able to record information on a template or chart, may be some errors or omissions

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety of situations • poses thoughtful and insightful questions, may suggest how they can be investigated or explored • measures and records objects and events accurately, completely, and in appropriate units, may independently develop appropriate templates or charts

• demonstrates an active interest in science activities and wonder about the world • if prompted, will consider alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world • makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of science concepts • if prompted, can give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology

• demonstrates a sustained interest and curiosity in the world and in learning science • independently considers alternatives, explores views, and generates options • recognizes science in a wide range of situations and often attempts to use science to make sense of their world • makes detailed and relevant connections between task and personal experience and/ or prior learning of science concepts; able to give personal examples • recognizes and explains how technological progress and inventions are a result of scientific knowledge; able to give detailed examples • is able to draw a detailed map of the solar system that includes asteroids, comets, moons, etc, and explain different orbits; may worry about scale of drawing • is able to identify several constellations in the night sky and can identify seasonal changes in their position

• is able to draw a diagram of the solar system that includes the sun and planets • identifies the Sun as a star • is able to identify a couple of common and easily seen constellations in the night sky • identifies examples of the cultural significance attached to celestial objects in Aboriginal stories

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 3 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating (sharing) • communicating (recording) • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • asks logical questions relevant to the content that can be investigated and explored • measures and objects and events using appropriate units, may be some inaccuracies or omissions • is able to record information on a template or chart, may be some errors or omissions

• demonstrates an active interest in science activities and wonder about the world • if prompted, will consider alternatives, explore views, generate multiple options • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• makes some connections between task and personal experience and/or prior learning of science concepts • if prompted, can give examples of connections between scientific knowledge and technology

• is able to draw a diagram of the solar system that includes the sun and planets • identifies the Sun as a star • is able to identify a couple of common and easily seen constellations in the night sky • identifies examples of the cultural significance attached to celestial

objects in Aboriginal stories

Sample Task:

Ask Questions of Aboriginal Elders

Context This task was a culmination of an ongoing science study of space with a focus on the sun, moon and stars. A teacher who would be visiting an Aboriginal community visited the class and took the students’ questions with her for elders and educators to respond to. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • ask questions that foster investigations and explorations relevant to the content Earth and Space Science: Stars and Planets It is expected that students will: • demonstrate awareness of the special significance of celestial objects for Aboriginal peoples Process The students brainstormed how they used the sun, moon and starts to help them and what importance they had to them. The students reviewed important aspects of Aboriginal culture and beliefs that they had been introduced to. The students were asked to create questions for First Nations elders to answer so that we could better understand the special significance of celestial objects, both traditionally and currently. Many students wrote their questions in letter format as the questions were being taken to elders to read. The responses to the questions were shared with the class at a later time and many powerful connections were made.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was able to complete the task with adult support and prompting. • • • • • needs adult support to pose questions demonstrates an interest in the task has difficulty making connections between his background knowledge and prior learning about space and the task of asking questions demonstrates some misconceptions about science content shares some knowledge of Aboriginal culture but had difficulty connecting to the task

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was able to complete the task with some adult and peer support. This student has a designation as ESL level 2. • • • • bases her questions on her peer’s questions demonstrates an interest in the task makes limited connections between her background knowledge and prior learning about space and the task of asking questions demonstrates some misconceptions about who Aboriginal peoples were, even with multiple examples and questions

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student was able to complete the task independently and confidently shared his questions with his peers. • • • • asks logical questions, connected to his understanding of Aboriginal culture demonstrates enthusiasm for the task, and was genuinely interested in the potential of finding out answers to his questions makes some connections between his background knowledge and prior learning about the science of space and the task of asking questions shares some knowledge of Aboriginal culture and was very aware and interested in the role of elders within an Aboriginal community

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student made connections between culture and science and was able to create complex questions independently. The student’s fine motor skills (printing) are weak, so the teacher re-wrote his questions so that they could be shared with others. • • • • • • • asks thoughtful and insightful questions with the purpose of writing for an elder uses different types/levels of questions is very curious about science and has vast background knowledge around science concepts and vocabulary makes relevant connections and connects science to the world around him thorough understanding of relevant science concepts strong understanding of significance of Aboriginal peoples within a Canadian context connects the significance of celestial objects in his own life as he thought of questions to ask the elders

Transcription: 1. 2. 3. 4. Do you have special names for the sun and the moon? Do you use the moon to tell days? What is the most useful – the sun, the moon, or the stars? Do you have sun celebrations?

Science in Grade 4
Life Science: Habitats and Communities Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Impact of Human Choice on the Environment Physical Science: Light and Sound Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Create a Sound Device Earth and Space Science: Weather Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Measure Temperature

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 4 Life Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 4 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content • use data from investigations to recognize patterns and relationships and reach conclusions Life Science: Habitats and Communities It is expected that students will: • compare the structures and behaviours of local animals and plants in different habitats and communities • analyse simple food chains • demonstrate awareness of the Aboriginal concept of respect for the environment • determine how personal choices and actions have environmental consequences

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 4 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations

• needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • may have collected no data or may have recorded an incomplete set of data • may not interpret the data or interpretation does not match the data; often does not use science terminology
• provides no prediction or prediction may be illogical

• • •

• • may not show interest in science concepts or topics • demonstrates little curiosity; does not ask questions • usually does not see the science in situations or use science to make sense of their world

• • •

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes may have collected or reported a partial or incomplete set of data with prompting and support, can find simple patterns and relationships in data and provide simple interpretations, may use some scientific terminology with support, is able to make some reasonable interpretations based on the data; may not consider all data; may use little science terminology with support, is able to make a logical prediction, may be simple or vague and lack explanation shows some interest in class science activities sometimes shows curiosity; may respond to peer’s questions with prompting, may see the science in a situation, or attempt to use science to explain something in their world

• may not be able to make connections to prior experience or knowledge; if prompted, may simply restate observations • may have difficulty giving examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment, but may understand simple examples provided

• makes some general connections to prior learning or experience, but with little or no explanation or explanations are not specific to context • with prompting, is able to give some simple examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• may be able to give examples of adaptations but may not be able to explain how they help plants and animals survive in their habitats • with support, can construct a simple food chain with familiar organisms

• gives some accurate examples plant or animal adaptations, explanation of how each adaptation helps the organism survive in its habitat may be vague or incomplete • is able to construct or analyze simple food chains containing

producers, consumers, and decomposers, may be some inaccuracies or missing connections

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety or situations • collects and records an accurate and complete set of data • seeks patterns and connections in data, makes reasonable and perhaps insightful interpretations that consider all the data, uses appropriate science terminology • makes thoughtful predictions and supports them with detailed explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• demonstrates a high level of interest in science, often expresses a desire to learn beyond the activity • values questions, has an appreciation of evidence • recognizes science in a wide range of situations and often attempts to use science concepts to explain or make sense of their world • makes personally relevant connections to prior experience and knowledge with specific explanations • is able to give insightful examples of ways in which personal choices and actions may affect the environment

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• gives some accurate examples plant and animal adaptations, and explains how each adaptation helps the organism survive in its habitat • is able to construct or analyze simple food chains containing producers, consumers, and decomposers

• is able to explain a wide variety of structural adaptations in plants and animals and behavioural adaptations in animals • is able to construct or analyze fairly complex food webs

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 4 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

gives some accurate examples plant and animal adaptations, and explains how each adaptation helps the organism survive in its habitat is able to construct or analyze simple food chains containing producers, consumers, and decomposers

Sample Task:

Impact of Human Choice on the Environment

Context The class was doing a unit on habitats. Students learned basic vocabulary (habitat, adaptation, population, community, organism, living, nonliving, extinct, endangered, conservation, etc.) prior to going out on a habitat walk. Students had recently found out that new schools will be built in their community. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content Life Science: Habitats and Communities It is expected that students will: • determine how personal choices and actions have environmental consequences Process Students were asked to create a class web showing how human choices and actions impact the environment (e.g. oil spills, garbage, cutting trees, etc.) reviewing key vocabulary. They then went on a habitat walk where they drew individual webs followed by detailed pictures and written explanation of how the local environment has been affected by human choice. After the walk, there was a class discussion to develop a “How Humans Impact the Environment” web on the board. Students were asked to complete a Making Connections question before proceeding. They were then asked to use their knowledge of how humans impact the environment to draw and explain their plan for a new school that they predict would have minimal impact on the environment. Throughout the task, the teacher observed and recorded students’ attitudes using the “Attitudes and Dispositions” checklist.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student designed his future school but it was based on imagination with no consideration of realistic effects of human impact on the environment. • • • • prediction is illogical; it is based on imagination rather than the context of the task (e.g.; “the cruise school”) shows some interest in the task but mostly due to social reasons is not able to make a personal connection gives simple examples of human choices but omits effect on the environment

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations Based on the human impact nature walk the student was able to draw a school that had minimal impact on the environment. The student illustrated many examples but did not explain them clearly. • • • • prediction is logical but lacks explanation (e.g.; picture has many ideas but no explanation) at times shows some interest in the task makes general connections but provides no explanation (e.g.; no effect of personal choice) gives simple examples of human choices but does not identify effects on the environment

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations Based on the human impact nature walk, the student drew a school that had minimal impact on the environment. The student explained his choice for the school design. The student showed an increased level of interest in this task compared to other learning activities. • • • • prediction is logical and is supported with relevant explanation shows some interest in the task; e.g., teacher observed increased written output connections were personal and relevant to task with explanation how his actions affect environment gives simple examples of human choices and impacts on the environment

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations Based on the human impact nature walk, the student drew a school that had minimal impact on the environment. The student’s design and explanations were insightful. The student was curious during the task and asked many questions. The student’s questions clearly showed a high level of thought regarding the task. • • • prediction is insightful and is supported with some relevant explanations shows a high interest in the task because she asks valuable questions (e.g.; asked the teacher “Aren’t there toilets that you can change the flush?”) makes general connections but does not explain the effects on the environment

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 4 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 4 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content • use data from investigations to recognize patterns and relationships and reach conclusions Physical Science: Sound and Light It is expected that students will: • identify sources of light and sound • explain properties of light (e.g., travels in a straight path, can be reflected) • explain properties of sound (e.g., travels in waves, travels in all directions)

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 4 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations

• needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • may have collected no data or may have recorded an incomplete set of data • may not interpret the data or interpretation does not match the data; often does not use science terminology
• provides no prediction or prediction may be illogical

• • •

• • may not show interest in science concepts or topics • demonstrates little curiosity; does not ask questions • usually does not see the science in situations or use science to make sense of their world

• • •

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes may have collected or reported a partial or incomplete set of data with prompting and support, can find simple patterns and relationships in data and provide simple interpretations, may use some scientific terminology with support, is able to make some reasonable interpretations based on the data; may not consider all data; may use little science terminology with support, is able to make a logical prediction, may be simple or vague and lack explanation shows some interest in class science activities sometimes shows curiosity; may respond to peer’s questions with prompting, may see the science in a situation, or attempt to use science to explain something in their world

• may not be able to make connections to prior experience or knowledge; if prompted, may simply restate observations • may have difficulty giving examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment, but may understand simple examples provided

• makes some general connections to prior learning or experience, but with little or no explanation or explanations are not specific to context • with prompting, is able to give some simple examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to identify some common sources of light, may not include any natural sources unless prompted • may need support to use hands-on materials to show that light travels in a straight line • may not be able to identify the

• is able to identify some sources of light • is able to show some properties of light (travel in straight line, can be reflected) with hand-on materials • may need support to identify properties of sound, and what is vibrating in sources of sound

properties of sound or may have misconceptions; e.g., that sound causes vibrations • is able to draw a simple diagram showing how sound travels from a source to an ear; may show straight line rather than waves

• is able to draw a diagram showing how sound travels from a source to an eardrum

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety or situations • collects and records an accurate and complete set of data • seeks patterns and connections in data, makes reasonable and perhaps insightful interpretations that consider all the data, uses appropriate science terminology • makes thoughtful predictions and supports them with detailed explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• demonstrates a high level of interest in science, often expresses a desire to learn beyond the activity • values questions, has an appreciation of evidence • recognizes science in a wide range of situations and often attempts to use science concepts to explain or make sense of their world • makes personally relevant connections to prior experience and knowledge with specific explanations • is able to give insightful examples of ways in which personal choices and actions may affect the environment

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to identify both natural and artificial sources of light • is able to identify some properties of light (travel in straight line, can be reflected) • clearly identifies properties of sound, identifies vibrations when explaining how a source produces sound

• is able to clearly explain the reflection and refraction of light • is able to explain relationship between size of vibrations and volume of sound, and the relationship between frequency and pitch • is able to explain the effect of different material on light and

• is able to identify some properties of sound (travels in waves, travels in all directions)

sound

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 4 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to identify both natural and artificial sources of light • is able to identify some properties of light (travel in straight line, can be reflected) • clearly identifies properties of sound, identifies vibrations when

explaining how a source produces sound • is able to identify some properties of sound (travels in waves, travels in all directions)

Sample Task: Create a Sound Device
Context The class was doing a unit on sound using exploratory methods to inquire about the various principles of sound (vibration of objects produce sound(s); large vibrations produce louder sounds/smaller vibrations produce quieter sounds ~ volume; faster vibrations produce higher sound/slower vibrations produce lower sounds ~pitch). Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content • use data from investigations to recognize patterns and relationships and reach conclusions Physical Science: Sound and Light It is expected that students will: • identify sources of light and sound • explain properties of sound (e.g., travels in waves, travels in all directions) Process After exploring how sound is created, and how volume and pitch are altered, students were asked to apply their knowledge to create their own sound device. The device had to be able to produce a sound, alter the volume, and alter the pitch, and had to be an original design (not a copy of something seen elsewhere). Students came up with their idea and drew a detailed diagram. They were asked to predict how their device would work, based on existing knowledge, before building their device. Materials were brought to school by the students who then made their devices. Once built, students partnered up to share, then had to give a full, written explanation of how their device worked. After sharing with the whole class, students were asked to make some connections about how sound applies to their lives, and comment on the extent to which they enjoyed the task.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student created a sound device but her diagram and explanations demonstrated some confusion about the properties of sounds. The student did not make connections about the properties of sound to her life. • • • • prediction is incomplete shows a social interest in learning but not specific to the science activity connections are simple lists of sound examples (e.g.; watching TV, listening to music, kettle whistling) confusion about properties of sound (e.g.; “shake it hard and you get a higher sound”)

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student created a sound device with a clear diagram. His explanations showed some confusion or were incomplete. The student did not make connections about the properties of sound to his life but simply listed examples. • • • • prediction is simple or vague (e.g.; “It can alter the volume by the way you shake it.”) shows interest in hands-on learning but not specific to the science activity connections are not specific to the context of the task (e.g.; volume, pitch, vibration) needs support to identify properties of sound (e.g.; teacher prompts to clarify between concepts of volume and pitch)

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student created a sound device with a clear diagram. Her explanations demonstrated an understanding of most properties of sound. The student was very enthusiastic during the task and was eager to share her design with the teacher and others. • • • • makes relevant predictions with explanations shows interest in exploring science topics (Eg. teacher observed student excited to build and experiment) makes personal connections that are specific to the context of the task (e.g.; “We used this knowledge when we were training our dog.”) clearly identifies properties of sound (e.g.; “If I shake it less it makes a quieter sound and a smaller vibration.”)

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student created a sound device with a detailed diagram. His explanations demonstrated an understanding of all properties of sound. As the student was building his sound device he stopped to explain his reasons for choosing specific materials and their effect on the sound of his device. • • • • makes thoughtful predictions with detailed explanations shows interest in learning and teaching science topic by explaining to other students how materials in his sound device will alter pitch. makes connections that are specific to the context of the task (e.g.; “I can use pitch when I am singing.”) identifies all properties of sound including the relationship between vibration and pitch

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 4 Earth and Space Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 4 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content • use data from investigations to recognize patterns and relationships and reach conclusions Earth and Space Science: Weather It is expected that students will: • measure weather in terms of temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, wind speed and direction • analyse impacts of weather on living and non-living things

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 4 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations

• needs support to use appropriate skills and processes • may have collected no data or may have recorded an incomplete set of data • may not interpret the data or interpretation does not match the data; often does not use science terminology
• provides no prediction or prediction may be illogical

• • •

• • may not show interest in science concepts or topics • demonstrates little curiosity; does not ask questions • usually does not see the science in situations or use science to make sense of their world

• • •

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) is able to use some appropriate skills and processes may have collected or reported a partial or incomplete set of data with prompting and support, can find simple patterns and relationships in data and provide simple interpretations, may use some scientific terminology with support, is able to make some reasonable interpretations based on the data; may not consider all data; may use little science terminology with support, is able to make a logical prediction, may be simple or vague and lack explanation shows some interest in class science activities sometimes shows curiosity; may respond to peer’s questions with prompting, may see the science in a situation, or attempt to use science to explain something in their world

• may not be able to make connections to prior experience or knowledge; if prompted, may simply restate observations • may have difficulty giving examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment, but may understand simple examples provided

• makes some general connections to prior learning or experience, but with little or no explanation or explanations are not specific to context • with prompting, is able to give some simple examples of ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to use familiar weather instruments independently, but may need support to select and use unfamiliar ones • if prompted, may be able to identify simple examples of erosion • is able to give some examples of the effects on living things of

• is able to select and use appropriate instruments to measure temperature, participation, air pressure, and wind speed and direction • is able to give examples of weather causing erosion • is able to give examples of some

weather events, but may not be able to explain them

effects of both seasonal weather and extreme weather events, but explanations may be vague or incomplete

Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

Exceeds Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes effectively in a variety or situations • collects and records an accurate and complete set of data • seeks patterns and connections in data, makes reasonable and perhaps insightful interpretations that consider all the data, uses appropriate science terminology • makes thoughtful predictions and supports them with detailed explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• demonstrates a high level of interest in science, often expresses a desire to learn beyond the activity • values questions, has an appreciation of evidence • recognizes science in a wide range of situations and often attempts to use science concepts to explain or make sense of their world • makes personally relevant connections to prior experience and knowledge with specific explanations • is able to give insightful examples of ways in which personal choices and actions may affect the environment

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to select and use appropriate instruments to measure temperature, participation, air pressure, and wind speed and direction • is able to give examples of weather causing erosion • is able to describe some effects of both seasonal weather and extreme

• uses weather measurement tools efficiently and accurately; is able to make reasonable estimates of cloud cover • gives detailed explanations of erosions • gives detailed explanations of the effects of seasonal and extreme weather events on living things;

weather events

may distinguish between short term and long term effects

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 4 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Fully Meets Expectations • uses appropriate skills and processes • collects and records appropriate data • is able to find some patterns and relationships in data, makes reasonable interpretations of data using some appropriate science terminology • is able to make relevant predictions and support them with relevant explanations

• demonstrates some interest in exploring science concepts and topics • asks questions, shows interest in investigating and exploring • often sees the science in a situation and sometimes uses science to make sense of their world

• makes some relevant connections to personal experience or prior learning; may use examples to explain • is able to explain some ways in which personal choices and actions affect may the environment

• is able to select and use appropriate instruments to measure temperature, participation, air pressure, and wind speed and direction • is able to give examples of weather causing erosion • is able to describe some effects of

both seasonal weather and extreme weather events

Sample Task: Measure Temperature
Context Students were engaged in a science study about weather. After understanding what weather is, students learned how to read a thermometer and collected data on temperature. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • make predictions, supported by reasons and relevant to the content • use data from investigations to recognize patterns and relationships and reach conclusions Earth and Space Science: Weather It is expected that students will: • measure weather in terms of temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, wind speed and direction • analyse impacts of weather on living and non-living things Process Students were shown how to read and record the temperature using a thermometer located outside the classroom. For five straight days, students collected and recorded the temperature both in the morning and afternoon, then created line graphs of the temperature. The teacher measured and recorded the temperature at each specified time in order to be able to check the accuracy of the students’ measurement and recording. Students used the temperature data to make up three questions and to provided reasonable answers based on the patterns they observed. The teacher observed students while they were collecting, recording, and interpreting the data, with particular attention to science attitudes. After completing the recording and interpretation of the data, students were asked the following questions: • Have you ever used the measurement/knowledge of temperatures in your life? Explain. • In your family’s life? Explain? • How is your environment (where you live, your school, etc.) affected by the measurement/knowledge of temperatures? Explain. Note: In rating the student’s work as NY, MM, FM or EE, the teachers placed the most emphasis on the skills and processes aspect as that was the focus of the task (measuring and recording).

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student recorded temperatures over a five day period and graphed data. The student’s questions were based on prior knowledge, not the data collected. • • • • does not use or refer to the recorded temperature (data) while generating questions for interpretation shows some interest in the task makes general connections (e.g.; referring to the Weather Channel) uses thermometer appropriately to measure temperature

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student recorded temperatures over a five day period and graphed data. The student asked simple questions but did not look at all data when making interpretations. • • • • makes simple interpretations of data, but only considers data for single days. shows some interest in the task makes general connections with no explanation (e.g.; “If it is cold outside I would have to wear a jacket.”) records temperature appropriately

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student recorded temperatures over a five day period and graphed data. The student recorded several questions based on collected data. Note: The teacher asked this student to look for and record general trends before asking their interpretive questions. This student was not observed got Attitudes and Dispositions. • • • considers data collected over several days to make reasonable interpretations in the form of questions does not make any connections. records temperature appropriately

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student recorded temperatures over a five day period and graphed data. Showing a high level of interest, the student developed several questions based on collected data. The student provided interpretations that were insightful. • • • • • uses collected data over several days to make reasonable and insightful interpretations (e.g.; “There were more clouds near the end of the week. Heat bounced down with clouds.”) uses appropriate science terminology (e.g.; “hotter, heat, warmed up”) demonstrates a high level of interest by frequently asking questions makes specific connections (e.g.; If it was going to be really cold and it might snow, you would know not to wear a T-shirt and shorts.”) records temperature appropriately.

Science in Grade 5
Life Science: Human Body Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Test Your Reflexes Physical Science: Forces and Simple Machines Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Design an Experiment Earth and Space Science: Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources To come

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 5 Life Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 5 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • identify variables that can be changed in an experiment • evaluate the fairness of a given experiment • describe the steps in designing an experiment Life Science: Human Body It is expected that students will: • describe the basic structure and functions of the human respiratory, digestive, circulatory, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems • explain how the different body systems are interconnected

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 5 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting

Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to choose and use appropriate skills and processes • may not be able to identify any variables • does not show a scientific understanding of fair testing • may be unable to identify steps in designing an experiment but may be able to follow steps if provided • able to communicate some basic information orally or in writing, may be accurate and confusing with little scientific terminology •

• • •

• identifying variables • fair testing • designing experiments Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) needs support to choose appropriate skills and processes but is able to use some independently with prompting, is able to identify some variables attempts to explain fair testing, may be confused identifies some of the steps in designing an experiment, but needs support to design an experiment communicates basic information, may be incomplete and include inaccuracies

• may not show interest in science concepts or topics • may not ask questions, or questions may be unrelated to topic • may be reluctant to consider other options or points of view • with support, may attempt to use science to explain something in their world • may not make connections to prior experience or knowledge or may only use connections given • with support, may identify the personal relevance of some scientific information • may not understand provided examples of how scientific knowledge has been used to develop technologies • with support, can identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to identify some body structures and their functions but may not be able to identify them as parts of body systems • may be unable to give an examples of how two body systems are interconnected

• shows some interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant questions without hypothesizing • may consider other options but not know how to follow through (or unwilling) • if prompted, is able to use science to explain some things in their world • may refer to some prior knowledge, but may show an uncertainty about how to use it, or uses it incorrectly • if prompted, is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to explain some links between science and technology, may contain some inaccuracies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • shows some understanding of the basic structure and function of various human body systems • if prompted, can give an example of a way in which two body systems are interconnected

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them independently • accurately identifies variables, may miss some • shows understanding of a fair test as controlling all variables except the one being tested • is able to identify the steps of an experiment, and to design and experiment, may be some omissions in the design • communicates information clearly using most of the appropriate scientific terminology, may be minor omissions or inaccuracies • shows interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant “what if…?” questions and hypothesizes about what might happen • considers other options and may attempt to explore them • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world • uses some prior knowledge or experience in explorations or explanations • is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to give examples of how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • can identify different points of view and the impact of personal actions on society and/or environment

Exceeds Expectations • is able to choose and apply appropriate science skills and processes independently • accurately identifies all variables and provides some explanation • clearly explains fairness of experiment using relevant examples • clearly identifies the steps of an experiment and can design a complete and workable experiment • accurately and precisely communicates information using appropriate scientific terminology

• actively looks for ways to engage in science and extend learning • asks relevant questions and generates hypotheses; seeks and values evidence • sees value in exploring different options • independently uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world • offers explanations from a store or previous scientific knowledge and relevant experience • is able to give detailed and insightful examples of how scientific knowledge is personally relevant; may seek relevance if not immediately apparent • is able to explain how scientific knowledge is used to in particular technologies • gives insightful examples of specific impacts of personal actions on the environment, may independently take personal action • is able to give clear and detailed explanations of the basic structure and function of various human body systems • is able to give clear and detailed examples of how the different body systems are interconnected

• is able to identify and describe the function of most of the main parts of the human respiratory, digestive, circulatory, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems; may be some errors and omissions • is able to give some accurate

examples of how body systems are related

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 5 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them independently • accurately identifies variables, may miss some • shows understanding of a fair test as controlling all variables except the one being tested • is able to identify the steps of an experiment, and to design and experiment, may be some omissions in the design • communicates information clearly using most of the appropriate scientific terminology, may be minor omissions or inaccuracies • shows interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant “what if…?” questions and hypothesizes about what might happen • considers other options and may attempt to explore them • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world

• identifying variables • fair testing • designing experiments Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• uses some prior knowledge or experience in explorations or explanations • is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to give examples of how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • can identify different points of view and the impact of personal actions on society and/or environment • is able to identify and describe the function of most of the main parts of the human respiratory, digestive, circulatory, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems; may be some errors and omissions • is able to give some accurate examples of how body systems are related

Sample Task: Test Your Reflexes
Context The class had been learning about the various body systems. This was the second performance task done with the class. They had learned about variables, controls and scientific fair testing. The class is largely ESL (English as a second language). Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • identify variables that can be changed in an experiment • evaluate the fairness of a given experiment Life Science: Human Body It is expected that students will: • describe the basic structure and functions of the human respiratory, digestive, circulatory, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems • explain how the different body systems are interconnected Process Students worked with a partner to test each other’s reflexes. One partner sat in a chair with their hand sideways and open wide ready to catch a ball after the first bounce. The other partner counted to three then dropped the ball. The students were asked to evaluate the scientific fairness of the task based on the understanding of keeping all variables the same except the one being tested, in this case the ability to catch the ball or not (reflexes). The students were then asked to evaluate their results and apply their knowledge of the nervous system.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was enthusiastic and focused. His English is developed enough that he should be have been able to perform this task. He was engaged in the activity, but required much direction and redirection to complete the experiment. He understood that the experiment involved catching a ball but was unable to link it to the function of the nervous system and the concept of fair testing. • • • • • attempts to make sense of science experiments and information shows perseverance and interest, but comments are often irrelevant requires one-to-one support from teacher or peer to complete tasks experiences difficulty understanding concepts and expressing acquired knowledge in oral or written form requires frequent explanation of basic concepts and multiple examples to acquire understanding

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was able to provide basic information about the controls in the experiment, but was did not understand the concept of a variable. His responses to questions were very personalized rather than scientific. His understanding of “fair test” is emerging but he could not explain why this experiment was fair. • • • • • • • understands the definition of fair testing, but is not able to apply the definition to experiments able to make a prediction based on prior knowledge explanations were simple and incomplete able to understand controls and give example but was unable to identify the variable in the experiment requires scaffolding to link prior knowledge to new information and activities shows interest in science explanations are simple, incomplete and, in some cases, inaccurate

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student does not usually complete classroom work without support and encouragement. He completed this experiment with his partner. He showed great interest and completed the written work independently. He followed the procedure independently, recorded accurately and provided good explanation for his thinking. He was able to explain and identify variables, and controls. He was able to link his knowledge and processes to his personal life. • • • • • able to make a prediction based on personal experience and prior knowledge explanations are mostly complete and accurate able to identify the variables and controls in the experiment uses scientific language in his explanations able to identify factors that could impair reflexes

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was able to complete the experiment independently and guide classmates, as needed. She correctly concluded that the experiment was fair and explained why. • • • • • • identifies and explains the concept of fair testing, including variables and controls follows scientific procedure independently and efficiently work is clear, detailed, and logically organized using appropriate scientific language able to synthesize knowledge of reflexes and apply it to personal life able to identify potential factors that could impair reflexes frequently asks questions and formulates hypotheses

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 5 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 5 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • identify variables that can be changed in an experiment • evaluate the fairness of a given experiment • describe the steps in designing an experiment Physical Science: Forces and Simple Machines It is expected that students will: • demonstrate how various forces can affect the movement of objects • demonstrate mechanical advantage of simple machines, including lever, wedge, pulley, ramp, screw, and wheel • design a compound machine • describe applications of simple and compound machines used in daily life in BC communities

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 5 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting

Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to choose and use appropriate skills and processes • may not be able to identify any variables • does not show a scientific understanding of fair testing • may be unable to identify steps in designing an experiment but may be able to follow steps if provided • able to communicate some basic information orally or in writing, may be accurate and confusing with little scientific terminology •

• • •

• identifying variables • fair testing • designing experiments Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) needs support to choose appropriate skills and processes but is able to use some independently with prompting, is able to identify some variables attempts to explain fair testing, may be confused identifies some of the steps in designing an experiment, but needs support to design an experiment communicates basic information, may be incomplete and include inaccuracies

• may not show interest in science concepts or topics • may not ask questions, or questions may be unrelated to topic • may be reluctant to consider other options or points of view • with support, may attempt to use science to explain something in their world • may not make connections to prior experience or knowledge or may only use connections given • with support, may identify the personal relevance of some scientific information • may not understand provided examples of how scientific knowledge has been used to develop technologies • with support, can identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to sue simple machines in the ways demonstrated • may need support to show the mechanical advantage of a simple machine • attempts to design a simple machine but may not be for a

• shows some interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant questions without hypothesizing • may consider other options but not know how to follow through (or unwilling) • if prompted, is able to use science to explain some things in their world • may refer to some prior knowledge, but may show an uncertainty about how to use it, or uses it incorrectly • if prompted, is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to explain some links between science and technology, may contain some inaccuracies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to show how some forces affect the movement of objects • is able to show the mechanical advantage of some simple machines • attempts to designs a compound machine for a specific purpose,

specific purpose • if prompted, can give a few examples of applications of simple and compound machines that were discussed in class

may be flawed • is able to give a few examples of ways simple and compound machines are used in daily life; may rely on examples used in class

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them independently • accurately identifies variables, may miss some • shows understanding of a fair test as controlling all variables except the one being tested • is able to identify the steps of an experiment, and to design and experiment, may be some omissions in the design • communicates information clearly using most of the appropriate scientific terminology, may be minor omissions or inaccuracies • shows interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant “what if…?” questions and hypothesizes about what might happen • considers other options and may attempt to explore them • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world • uses some prior knowledge or experience in explorations or explanations • is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to give examples of how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • can identify different points of view and the impact of personal actions on society and/or environment

Exceeds Expectations • is able to choose and apply appropriate science skills and processes independently • accurately identifies all variables and provides some explanation • clearly explains fairness of experiment using relevant examples • clearly identifies the steps of an experiment and can design a complete and workable experiment • accurately and precisely communicates information using appropriate scientific terminology

• actively looks for ways to engage in science and extend learning • asks relevant questions and generates hypotheses; seeks and values evidence • sees value in exploring different options • independently uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world • offers explanations from a store or previous scientific knowledge and relevant experience • is able to give detailed and insightful examples of how scientific knowledge is personally relevant; may seek relevance if not immediately apparent • is able to explain how scientific knowledge is used to in particular technologies • gives insightful examples of specific impacts of personal actions on the environment, may independently take personal action • is able to show and explain how various forces affect the movement of objects • is able to demonstrate and explain the mechanical advantage of various simple machines • designs an efficient compound

• is able to show how various forces affect the movement of objects • is able to show the mechanical advantage of various simple machines • designs a compound machine for a specific purpose

• gives examples of ways simple and compound machines are used in daily life

machine for a specific purpose • provides examples of how simple and compound machines are used in daily life that show insight

DRAFT Chart: Grade 5 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them independently • accurately identifies variables, may miss some • shows understanding of a fair test as controlling all variables except the one being tested • is able to identify the steps of an experiment, and to design and experiment, may be some omissions in the design • communicates information clearly using most of the appropriate scientific terminology, may be minor omissions or inaccuracies • shows interest in science concepts or topics • asks relevant “what if…?” questions and hypothesizes about what might happen • considers other options and may attempt to explore them • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world

• identifying variables • fair testing • designing experiments Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• uses some prior knowledge or experience in explorations or explanations • is able to identify some ways in which scientific knowledge is personally relevant • is able to give examples of how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • can identify different points of view and the impact of personal actions on society and/or environment • is able to show how various forces affect the movement of objects • is able to show the mechanical advantage of various simple machines • designs a compound machine for a specific purpose • gives examples of ways simple and compound machines are used in

daily life

Sample Task: Design an Experiment
Context The task was done as the opening to a unit on Forces and Machines. While the class was comfortable doing experiments, this was the first time that students had been asked to design their own experiment. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • identify variables that can be changed in an experiment • evaluate the fairness of a given experiment • describe the steps in designing an experiment Physical Science: Forces and Simple Machines It is expected that students will: • demonstrate how various forces can affect the movement of objects • demonstrate mechanical advantage of simple machines, including lever, wedge, pulley, ramp, screw, and wheel Process Students were asked to work individually to design an experiment to test which substance would act as the best lubricant on a ride. The proposed ride had sliders that would go down an incline plane. The goal was to make the ride as fast as possible. Students were given a variety of substances to use as potential lubricants: vegetable oil, water, body wash, lotion, water, honey, syrup, and yogurt. They were given cookie sheets, tin foil and pennies to build the ride. Students designed the experiments one day and then tested them the next. They were presented with the possibility that they might have to test each otherʼs experiments so they should include as much detail as possible in their procedure. All students did their own experiment. As an extension, some students later exchanged procedures and replicated each otherʼs experiments.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student was given additional prompting and support to complete the task. He was also encouraged to use full sentences when answering questions and explaining his thinking. The student included a step in the procedure that was not possible with the supplies provided, the timing of the pennies. He did not realize this and then did not adjust while doing the experiment. The student attempted to make explanations when prompted but his explanations were often those provided in class or included inaccuracies. attempts to explain fair testing, but is confused requires additional one-to-one support to complete parts of the task • has little interest in science and does not question • needs support to identify impacts of personal actions on the environment • showed little interest in the task and no interest in the science behind the task • uses limited scientific terminology in his explanations • •

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student enjoys the hands-on tasks and is interested in science concepts. He made reference to prior knowledge but was uncertain how to use it. The student was able to identify some variables with prompting. He required support to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment. He was able to show how some forces affect the movement of objects. The student asked relevant questions but did not hypothesize about possible outcomes. • • • • • • is able to show understanding of a fair test as controlling all variables except the one being tested shows real interest in science concepts and topics asks relevant questions without hypothesizing requires prompting to use science to explain things in their world makes use of prior knowledge some of which may be used incorrectly shows how some forces affect the movement of objects

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations This student shows a keen interest in science concepts. He asked relevant questions and hypothesized about possible outcomes. He made use of prior knowledge in his explanations and explorations. The student was able to give examples of ways simple and compound machines are used in daily life but relied on examples used in class. He was comfortable explaining how various forces affect the movement of objects. • • • • • • needs prompting to choose appropriate skills and processes and apply them independently able to identify the steps of an experiment, and to design an experiment with minimal omissions in the design has an interest in science topics and concepts accesses prior knowledge and experience in explorations and explanations able to show how various forces and affect the movement of objects identifies the mechanical advantage of various simple machines

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student actively looks for ways to engage in science and extend his learning. He asked relevant questions, hypothesized about possible outcomes, and offered explanations from a store scientific knowledge. He has a well-developed understanding and could explain how various forces affect the movement of objects. The student was able to demonstrate and explain the mechanical advantage of various simple machines. He is inquisitive by nature and regularly uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world. • • • • • • independently chooses and applies appropriate science skills and processes identifies ways simple and compound machines are used in daily life is extremely interested in science and seeks ways to engage in science and extend learning gives explanations from a store of prior scientific knowledge and relevant experience has the ability to show and explain how various forces affect the movement of objects able to demonstrate and explain the mechanical advantages of various simple machines

Earth and Space Science
To come

Earth and Space Science
To come

Science in Grade 6
Life Science: Diversity of Life Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Adaptations to Biotic and Abiotic Factors in the Environment Physical Science: Electricity Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Dim the Light Earth and Space Science: Exploration of Extreme Environments Rating Scale Chart Sample Task: Saving the Penguin Eggs

Life Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 6 Life Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 6 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • manipulate and control a number of variables in an experiment • apply solutions to a technical problem Life Science: Diversity of Life It is expected that students will: • demonstrate the appropriate use of tools to examine living things that cannot be seen with the naked eye • analyse how different organisms adapt to their environments • distinguish between life forms as single or multi-celled organisms and belonging to one of five kingdoms: Plantae, Animalia, Monera, Protista, Fungi

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 6 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting • designing experiments • fair testing • controlling variables • scientific problem solving Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to choose and apply appropriate skills and processes • with support, is able to identify some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment • with support, is able to draw some conclusions from results, may be inaccurate or incomplete • needs support to identify problem to be solved and criteria for success • needs support to outline a plan to test, gather evidence to find a solution, may be incomplete or unworkable • with support, may attempt to communicate results or ideas but these are often inaccurate, incomplete or confusing • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) may need support to choose appropriate strategies but is able to apply some of them independently identifies some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may not be able to distinguish between independent or dependent variables is able to draw conclusions from results but may not link results to independent variable clearly identifies problem to be solved but may not establish criteria for success is able to develop a plan to test and gather evidence to find a solution but plan may be incomplete may require some support to communicate results and ideas, some may be confusing

• •

• •

• may not demonstrate a desire to learn science • if prompted, may ask some questions, but may show little curiosity • with support, may exchange ideas with others, but may be reluctant to change opinions; has difficulty considering alternate views or generating multiple options • with support, may attempt to use science to explain something in their world • with support, may be able to identify relevant connections to personal experiences or prior knowledge • with support, can identify ways science uses technology, but may not understand provided examples of how scientific knowledge has been used to develop technologies • with support, can identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to use a magnifying glass, may need support to use a microscope • if prompted, may give examples of adaptations but cannot explain • may not be able to distinguish between plant and animal cells • may be able to classify plants and animals only into kingdoms

• demonstrates some desire to learn science, may vary by topic • asks questions, but may not exhibit much intellectual curiosity • with prompting, exchanges ideas with others but may not show a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world • is able to make some connections to prior experiences or knowledge, these may be vague or inaccurate • is able to explain some links between science and technology, may contain some inaccuracies • if prompted, is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to use a magnifying class effectively, may need some support to use a microscope • if prompted, gives simple examples of adaptations, explanation may be incomplete • is able to identify some similarities and differences between plant and animal cells • is able to classify some familiar organisms into correct kingdom, may have difficulty distinguishing single-

celled from multi-celled organisms

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked

Exceeds Expectations • is able to choose and apply appropriate science skills and processes independently • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment and correctly identifies independent and dependent variables • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions and considers experimental fairness in conclusions • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes clear and specific criteria for success • clearly outlines a plan to test and find solution; evaluates results and makes modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can elaborate on thinking if asked • demonstrates a strong desire to learn science, takes initiative • asks and values questions, exhibits a sustained intellectual curiosity, and a strong appreciation of evidence • initiates exchanges of ideas, shows a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate view, and generate multiple options • independently uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world • makes relevant connections to prior experiences and knowledge, examples often show insight • is able to explain how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge is used in particular technologies • gives insightful examples of specific impacts of personal actions on the environment, may independently take personal action • uses microscope effectively • explains a variety of adaptations clearly and in detail • is able to explain the similarities and differences between plant and animal cells in detail • is able to accurately differentiate single-celled and multi-celled organisms • classifies a wide variety of organisms into five kingdoms accurately, is able to use a key effectively for Monera, Protista, and Fungi, is able to describe

• demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world • makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

• uses magnifying glass and microscope correctly • gives examples of adaptations, explanations may be somewhat incomplete • is able to identify the main similarities and differences between plant and animal cells • is able to explain the difference between single-celled and multi-celled organisms but may have difficulty determining which a microscopic organism is

• classifies some organisms into five kingdoms, may need support to use keys for Monera, Protista, and Fungi

the characteristics of each kingdom

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 6 Life Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting designing experiments fair testing controlling variables scientific problem solving

Fully Meets Expectations
• if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked • demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world • makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

Attitudes and Dispositions
• has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science

Making Connections
• connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• uses magnifying glass and microscope correctly • gives examples of adaptations, explanations may be somewhat incomplete • is able to identify the main similarities and differences between plant and animal cells • is able to explain the difference between single-celled and multi-celled organisms but may have difficulty determining which a microscopic organism is • classifies some organisms into five kingdoms, may need support to use keys for Monera, Protista, and Fungi

Sample Task: Adaptations to Biotic and Abiotic Factors in the Environment
Context As part of a study of biomes, students were studying the adaptations of organisms that help them survive in their environment. This assignment was an opportunity for students to apply their knowledge to designing adaptations for imaginary animals in imaginary environments. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • apply solutions to a technical problem Life Science: Diversity of Life It is expected that students will: • analyse how different organisms adapt to their environments Process The students were asked to design an environment and define its temperature, altitude, precipitation, latitude and other features (e.g., vegetation, volcanoes, mountains, water sources). Students were then asked to design an animal that was suited to this environment. The animal was required to have 3 adaptations to nonliving factors in its environment (e.g., temperature) and 3 adaptations to living (biotic) factors in its environment (e.g., food supply, predators). Students were asked to identify each adaptation, label it as related to living or non-living factors in the environment, and explain its how it helps the animal survive in this environment.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • needs support to communicate ideas • gives some simple examples of adaptations to biotic factors only; many are not linked to biome features

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • needs some support to communicate idea • gives simple examples of adaptations, some are fanciful, or not linked to biome features • has some difficulty distinguishing between adaptations related to abiotic versus biotic factors

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • gives clear explanations for the her ideas • explains all adaptations but some explanations are incomplete or not explicitly linked to biome features • demonstrates an excellent understanding of adaptations related to biotic factors • has some difficulty distinguishing between adaptations related to abiotic versus biotic factors; all adaptations identified relate to biotic factors

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • gives clear, detailed explanations for the their ideas • uses scientific evidence to make sense of world, connecting all adaptations to the appropriate biome features • explains all adaptations clearly in detail • is able to accurately distinguish between adaptations related to abiotic and biotic factors in the environment

Physical Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 6 Physical Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 6 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • manipulate and control a number of variables in an experiment • apply solutions to a technical problem (e.g., malfunctioning electrical circuit) Physical Science: Electricity It is expected that students will: • evaluate various methods for producing small electrical charges • test a variety of electrical pathways using direct current circuits • demonstrate that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, and magnetic effects • differentiate between renewable and non-renewable methods of producing electrical energy

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 6 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes • observing • communicating • classifying • interpreting observations • making inferences • questioning • measuring and reporting • interpreting data • predicting • designing experiments • fair testing • controlling variables • scientific problem solving Attitudes and Dispositions • has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science Making Connections • connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts Not Yet Within Expectations • needs support to choose and apply appropriate skills and processes • with support, is able to identify some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment • with support, is able to draw some conclusions from results, may be inaccurate or incomplete • needs support to identify problem to be solved and criteria for success • needs support to outline a plan to test, gather evidence to find a solution, may be incomplete or unworkable • with support, may attempt to communicate results or ideas but these are often inaccurate, incomplete or confusing • Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) may need support to choose appropriate strategies but is able to apply some of them independently identifies some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may not be able to distinguish between independent or dependent variables is able to draw conclusions from results but may not link results to independent variable clearly identifies problem to be solved but may not establish criteria for success is able to develop a plan to test and gather evidence to find a solution but plan may be incomplete may require some support to communicate results and ideas, some may be confusing

• •

• •

• may not demonstrate a desire to learn science • if prompted, may ask some questions, but may show little curiosity • with support, may exchange ideas with others, but may be reluctant to change opinions; has difficulty considering alternate views or generating multiple options • with support, may attempt to use science to explain something in their world • with support, may be able to identify relevant connections to personal experiences or prior knowledge • with support, can identify ways science uses technology, but may not understand provided examples of how scientific knowledge has been used to develop technologies • with support, can identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • is able to give examples of static and current electricity but may not be able to explain the difference • may not be able to identify a closed and open circuit • may not be able to identify that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, or magnetic effects • may not be able to differentiate between a renewable and nonrenewable source of electricity

• demonstrates some desire to learn science, may vary by topic • asks questions, but may not exhibit much intellectual curiosity • with prompting, exchanges ideas with others but may not show a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world • is able to make some connections to prior experiences or knowledge, these may be vague or inaccurate is able to explain some links between science and technology, may contain some inaccuracies if prompted, is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

• •

• is able to explain the difference between static and current electricity without reference to electrons • given examples of circuits, can identify a closed and open circuit. • Is able to identify when electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, or magnetic effects but explanation may be absent or confusing • is able to give an example of a renewable and a non-renewable

source of electricity

Fully Meets Expectations • if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked

Exceeds Expectations • is able to choose and apply appropriate science skills and processes independently • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment and correctly identifies independent and dependent variables • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions and considers experimental fairness in conclusions • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes clear and specific criteria for success • clearly outlines a plan to test and find solution; evaluates results and makes modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can elaborate on thinking if asked • demonstrates a strong desire to learn science, takes initiative • asks and values questions, exhibits a sustained intellectual curiosity, and a strong appreciation of evidence • initiates exchanges of ideas, shows a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate view, and generate multiple options • independently uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world • makes relevant connections to prior experiences and knowledge, examples often show insight • is able to explain how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge is used in particular technologies • gives insightful examples of specific impacts of personal actions on the environment, may independently take personal action • can explain how static electricity can become current electricity due to electron flow • given examples of circuits, is able to accurately identify a closed, open circuit, series and parallel circuits and can label the path electrons will follow • may explain how electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, or magnetic effects • is able to identify the pros and cons of various methods of electricity production

• demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world • makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

• can explain the difference between static and current electricity in terms of electrons • given examples of circuits, is able to identify closed, open, series and parallel circuits • is able to explain that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, or magnetic effects • is able to give examples of renewable and non-renewable sources of electricity

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 6 Physical Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting designing experiments fair testing controlling variables scientific problem solving

Fully Meets Expectations
• if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked • demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world • makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

Attitudes and Dispositions
• has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science

Making Connections
• connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• can explain the difference between static and current electricity in terms of electrons • given examples of circuits, is able to identify closed, open, series and parallel circuits • is able to explain that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, or magnetic effects • is able to give examples of renewable and non-renewable sources of electricity

Sample Task: Dim the Light
Context The class was working on a unit on electricity. Students had previously worked with direct circuits using batteries and insulated wire. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • manipulate and control a number of variables in an experiment • apply solutions to a technical problem (e.g., malfunctioning electrical circuit) Physical Science: Electricity It is expected that students will: • test a variety of electrical pathways using direct current circuits • demonstrate that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion, and magnetic effects Process The students were asked to recreate a direct circuit using a battery, switch, bulb, and insulated wires and observe the amount of light created. Then they were asked to insert non -insulated wire in the form of steel wool into the circuit and observe the amount of light created, then reduce the amount of steel by half, and then again, each time noting the amount of light created. Students are asked to explain their results. In the second part, students are asked to propose what else they could investigate using the steel wool. They are expected to design an experiment to test their proposal, conduct the experiment, record results, and offer explanations.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • needs support to identify a problem and possible variables, and to create a plan for testing • communicates results but these are incomplete and confusing • is not able to pose questions to test • is able to make vague connections to prior knowledge; may just be using known vocabulary • is able to identify the transformation of electricity into light and heat but cannot explain it

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL) NY MM FM EE Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts Teacher’s Observations The student: • identifies material (steel wool) as a possible variable to test • has an incomplete plan for testing • is able to communicate results but they are incomplete and lack explanation • asks good questions to follow up the experiment • is able to make vague connections to prior knowledge • is able to explain that electricity is transformed into light and heat

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • identifies material as a possible variable • has a complete plan for testing both materials, drawing on prior knowledge • communicates results clearly (but needs definition of ‘sturdy’) • asks good questions to follow up the experiment • is able to ask questions that show curiosity and connections to prior knowledge • is able to explain that electricity is transformed into light and heat

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • identifies length as a variable that will affect the outcome of the experiment and identifies that width must be held constant in the two samples • has a clear plan for testing the identified problem and evaluating the results • communicates the results clearly and goes beyond to discuss brightness as well • is able to ask questions that show depth of curiosity and connections to prior knowledge • explains why and how electricity is transformed into light and heat

Earth and Space Science
Prescribed Learning Outcomes The BC performance standards for Grade 6 Earth and Space Science reflect the following prescribed learning outcomes from Grade 6 of the Science K to 7 Integrated Resource Package (2005). Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • manipulate and control a number of variables in an experiment • apply solutions to a technical problem Earth and Space Science: Exploration of Extreme Environments It is expected that students will: • explain obstacles unique to exploration of a specific extreme environment • assess technologies used for extreme environments • describe contributions of Canadians to exploration technologies

DRAFT Rating Scale: Grade 6 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting designing experiments fair testing controlling variables scientific problem solving

Not Yet Within Expectations
• needs support to choose and apply appropriate skills and processes • with support, is able to identify some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment • with support, is able to draw some conclusions from results, may be inaccurate or incomplete • needs support to identify problem to be solved and criteria for success • needs support to outline a plan to test, gather evidence to find a solution, may be incomplete or unworkable • with support, may attempt to communicate results or ideas but these are often inaccurate, incomplete or confusing

Meets Expectations (Minimal Level)
• may need support to choose appropriate strategies but is able to apply some of them independently • identifies some variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may not be able to distinguish between independent or dependent variables • is able to draw conclusions from results but may not link results to independent variable • clearly identifies problem to be solved but may not establish criteria for success • is able to develop a plan to test and gather evidence to find a solution but plan may be incomplete • may require some support to communicate results and ideas, some may be confusing • demonstrates some desire to learn science, may vary by topic • asks questions, but may not exhibit much intellectual curiosity • with prompting, exchanges ideas with others but may not show a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • if prompted, uses science evidence to make sense of the world • is able to make some connections to prior experiences or knowledge, these may be vague or inaccurate • is able to explain some links between science and technology, may contain some inaccuracies • if prompted, is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

Attitudes and Dispositions
• has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science

• may not demonstrate a desire to learn science • if prompted, may ask some questions, but may show little curiosity • with support, may exchange ideas with others, but may be reluctant to change opinions; has difficulty considering alternate views or generating multiple options • with support, may attempt to use science to explain something in their world • with support, may be able to identify relevant connections to personal experiences or prior knowledge • with support, can identify ways science uses technology, but may not understand provided examples of how scientific knowledge has been used to develop technologies • with support, can identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment • may be able to give an example of an extreme environment but may not accurately identify any characteristics that make it extreme • may not be able to assess a suggested technology • with prompting, is able to give an example of technology used in the exploration but may not be able to match it to a particular environment

Making Connections
• connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• gives examples of extreme environments but may identify only the most obvious characteristics • may need support to assess the effectiveness of a suggested technology • is able to give an example of technology used in the exploration of a particular extreme environment

Fully Meets Expectations
• if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked • demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world

Exceeds Expectations
• is able to choose and apply appropriate science skills and processes independently • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment and correctly identifies independent and dependent variables • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions and considers experimental fairness in conclusions • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes clear and specific criteria for success • clearly outlines a plan to test and find solution; evaluates results and makes modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can elaborate on thinking if asked • demonstrates a strong desire to learn science, takes initiative • asks and values questions, exhibits a sustained intellectual curiosity, and a strong appreciation of evidence • initiates exchanges of ideas, shows a willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate view, and generate multiple options • independently uses scientific evidence to make sense of the world • makes relevant connections to prior experiences and knowledge, examples often show insight • is able to explain how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge is used in particular technologies • gives insightful examples of specific impacts of personal actions on the environment, may independently take personal action • is able to make generalizations about the characteristics that make an environment extreme for humans but perhaps not other species • is able to assess the effectiveness of suggested technologies and offer suggestions • gives detailed examples of technologies scientist use to explore extreme frontiers; may describe the scientific value of this exploration

• makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

• is able to identify characteristics of an environment that make it extreme (extremes of temperature, pressure, gravity, etc.) • is able to assess the effectiveness of suggested technologies • gives some examples of technologies that help scientists explore extreme environments, including Canadian or Aboriginal contributions

Chart for Planning or Observation: Grade 6 Earth and Space Science
Aspect Skills and Processes
• • • • • • • • • • • • observing communicating classifying interpreting observations making inferences questioning measuring and reporting interpreting data predicting designing experiments fair testing controlling variables scientific problem solving

Fully Meets Expectations
• if prompted, is able to choose some appropriate skills and processes and apply them • identifies variables that will affect the outcome of an experiment, may incorrectly identify either independent or dependent variable • links results to independent variable when drawing conclusions, but may not consider experimental fairness • clearly identifies problem to be solved and establishes criteria for success • clearly outlines plan to test and find solution but may not evaluate the results or make modifications where necessary • clearly communicates results or ideas and can describe thinking if asked • demonstrates a desire to learn science • asks and values questions, exhibits intellectual curiosity • exchanges ideas with others, shows some willingness to change opinions, consider and explore alternate views, or generate multiple options • sometimes uses science to make sense of the natural world • makes some relevant connections to prior experiences or knowledge • is able to give examples of how science uses technology, and how scientific knowledge has led to technologies • is able to identify some impacts of personal actions on the environment

Attitudes and Dispositions
• has a positive attitude towards science • demonstrates the habits of mind of science • recognizes and uses science

Making Connections
• connections to personal experience and prior knowledge • connections among science, technology, society, and the environment

Knowledge and Understanding of Science Concepts

• is able to identify characteristics of an environment that make it extreme (extremes of temperature, pressure, gravity, etc.) • is able to assess the effectiveness of suggested technologies • gives some examples of technologies that help scientists explore extreme environments, including Canadian or Aboriginal contributions

Sample Task: Saving the Penguin Eggs
Context The class was working on an Extreme Environments unit. Students had previously been working on Diversity of Life unit in which they discussed adaptations. This task was designed to link learning from the two units. Learning Outcomes Processes and Skills of Science It is expected that students will: • manipulate and control a number of variables in an experiment • apply solutions to a technical problem Earth and Space Science: Exploration of Extreme Environments It is expected that students will: • assess technologies used for extreme environments Process The students were asked to watch the Planet Earth video on penguins and the Antarctic to learn about environmental conditions and the difficulties in conducting research there. Students were given the task in the form of a fictional letter outlining the requirements for their designs. They were all given the same set of materials to choose from for their task of designing an insulating container for an egg to keep it from freezing. Students were asked to develop a design, then seek teacher approval prior to building and testing the design. Groups needed to conduct two tests to keep their eggs from freezing with the second test using fewer supplies for insulating the egg. Results were assessed and discussed.

NOT YET WITHIN EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • needs support to identify criteria for success and to create a plan for testing; plan is confusing in parts • communicates results but these are incomplete and incldue little explanation • shows little curiosity • is able to makes vague connections to prior knowledge • tries to assess the effectiveness of the technology but provides a very brief explanation

MEETS EXPECTATIONS (MINIMAL LEVEL)
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • identifies the problem and criteria for success but these are somewhat confusing • communicates results briefly with little explanation or assessment • shows little curiosity • is able to makes connections to prior knowledge although these are not always relevant • is able to make some vague links between science and technology • tries to assess the effectiveness of the technology; explanation is very brief

FULLY MEETS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • clearly identifies problem and criteria for success • develops a clear plan for testing • evaluates results • communicates results clearly but briefly • shows curiosity by asking relevant scientific questions • makes connections to prior knowledge both from class and home • makes some links between science and technology • is able to assess the effectiveness of the suggested technology

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
NY Skills and Processes Attitudes and Dispositions Making Connections Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts MM FM EE

Teacher’s Observations The student: • clearly identifies problem and criteria for success • develops a plan for testing that is clear and • evaluates results • communication of results is clear and detailed • shows strong curiosity, asking relevant scientific questions based on results • makes connections to prior knowledge both from class and home • makes strong links between science and technology explaining how they interact • assesses the effectiveness of the technology and makes additional suggestions

Invitation to participate in the project
The Coast Metro Consortium Science Project invites teachers across the province to participate in piloting these draft regional standards for performance tasks in Science K-6 during the 2009-2010 school year. Teachers are invited to try the tasks in this document with their classes or to develop other performance tasks. In either case, participating teachers are invited to send the Project a task write-up and class set of student work. We may use some of these examples in the final document.

Instructions and contact information
If you choose to participate in the project, here are some instructions for proceeding. Developing a performance task:

Avoid using copyrighted materials This project is unlikely to use copyrighted materials as we do not have the resources to get permissions. At any rate, many published tasks do not have a good match to the BC curriculum and are not performance tasks. Teachers in our project are now typically developing better activities than those in many commercially published materials. If you do use copyrighted materials, please note that and indicate the source. Address prescribed learning outcomes for both skills & processes and content Focus on the prescribed learning outcomes, not the achievement indicators, etc. in the IRP. Provincial curriculum is defined as the PLOs and teachers are required to teach to them; the additional materials are suggestions only and teachers have professional autonomy. Ask yourself: Is it a performance task? You can refer to Characteristics of Performance Tasks in Appendix 1, but if the task has students applying grade level skills and processes to grade level content, it’s a good start. We have found that simple tasks are often more effective than complex “projects”. Address all or most of the four aspects on the scale – Skills & Processes, Attitudes & Dispositions, Making Connections, and Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts Use the draft charts to help you think about how you could collect information about student performance in relation to each of the four aspects on the scale - Skills & Processes, Attitudes & Dispositions, Making Connections, and Knowledge & Understanding of Science

Concepts. Some Skills and Processes, for example, recording, are easily seen in written work, but most require teacher observation. Attitudes and Dispositions are best ascertained by teacher observation and listening. Questions on Making Connections and Knowledge & Understanding of Science Concepts can be built into the task but teachers can listen and observe and question to elicit additional information. Please consider recording observations and/or what students said in conferencing or in response to questioning and prompts. These can be recorded on post-it notes and attached to the student samples. Writing up the task:

❑ ❑ ❑

Name of Task Do not agonize over this; we simply need something to call it. Teacher’s name and contact information In case we have questions and need to contact you. Context Use the form “The class was working on a unit on…” or something similar to describe the context in the past tense. If there is anything quite extraordinary about the class, it could also be noted here; e.g., and ESL reception class. In deciding on the voice and amount of information, remember that your audience is your teacher colleagues. Learning outcomes Use the prescribed learning outcomes verbatim, even if whole outcome does not apply. Do not revise the outcome, add additional outcomes, or use achievement indicators. Process Use the form “Students were asked to…” to describe the task in the past tense. Again, remember that your audience is teachers.

Sending student samples:

A highlighted scale Highlight a draft scale for each student sample and staple the highlighted scale to the student sample. Send a signed permission form for each student The originals of the permission forms should be retained by your school or district depending on local procedures; copies should be stapled to the student samples that you send to us.

Mail to the Coast Metro Science Project The package you send to the Project should include a task write-up, student samples, each with a permission form and a highlighted draft scale, and your comments on the draft scale. Mail the package to: Coast Metro Science Project c/o Wendy Lim School District #38 (Richmond) 7811 Granville Avenue Richmond, BC, V6Y 3E3 Questions: Contact Anita Chapman at anitachapman@shaw.ca Deadline for submissions: March 15, 2010

Task write-up template

Grade: _____    Name of task: _________________________________________________________ 
Name of teacher: _______________________________________________________ School/District: ________________________________________________________ Phone and/or e-mail: ___________________________________________________ Context: e.g., The class was doing a unit on…

Learning Outcomes: i.e., verbatim from the IRP • • • Process: e.g., The students were asked to…

Appendix 1:

Characteristics of Performance Tasks

Essential and valid • task based on identified learning outcomes in grade-level curriculum • task focuses on key concepts, skills and processes, in curriculum, NOT tangential • task deals with "big ideas", big issues in the curriculum and subject discipline • task stimulates students to make connections and generalizations that will increase their understanding of the important concepts and processes Authentic "hands-on" application • task is active • students are the "mathematicians" and use the skills and process of mathematics • task involves students in real applications of their skills and knowledge, NOT contrived activities for activities' sake • task grounded in real-world contexts - real-life problems, real-world applications • task has specific purpose and audience • task uses processes appropriate to the subject discipline • task assessment answers the question "Can you use it?" rather than the question "Do you know it?" Open-ended • students have some choice selecting or shaping the tasks • task provides opportunities for decision-making • task has a variety of acceptable approaches • task is equitable, allows for a variety of learning styles • task allows for a broad range or performance • task leads naturally to extensions • task has a variety of acceptable solutions, NOT one right answer or set of answers • requires complex performance beyond what could be assessed by a typical pencil and paper assessment • extended task that involves sustained work and often takes several days • task is "freeing", it encourages students to be divergent thinkers and thoughtful risk takers Engaging, valued • task is meaningful to students • task is interesting and engaging for students, it promotes persistence • students value the outcome of the task • task stimulates and sustains their thinking • task is thought-provoking • task fosters persistence

Appendix 2:

Attributes and Dispositions

Attitudes and Dispositions Chart: Teachers can use this chart as they develop performance
tasks or as a template for taking notes while observing students.

Has a positive attitude towards science • looks forward to doing science • demonstrates a desire to learn science • desires to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) • sees value and usefulness of a store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge • uses the language of science Demonstrates the habits of minds of science • is curious, has a sustained intellectual curiosity • has a sense of wonder • ponders observations • asks questions, values questions • is open to new ideas • has a tendency to consider alternatives, explore alternate views, generate multiple options • seeks understanding • has an appreciation of evidence • has an awareness of assumptions, questions the given • has a healthy, informed skepticism • suspends judgment • seeks pattern and connections • has willingness to change opinion • has an aversion to superstition Recognizes and uses science • uses science to make sense of their world • is sensitive to opportunities to apply science skills and processes • is inclined to apply science skills and processes • uses science to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) • offers explanations from store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge

Attributes and Dispositions Checklist #1
Never or Rarely Sometimes Often Almost always

Has a positive attitude towards science • • • looks forward to doing science demonstrates a desire to learn science desires to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) values, sees usefulness of a store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge uses the language of science

Demonstrates the habits of minds of science • is curious, has a sustained intellectual curiosity • has a sense of wonder • ponders observations • asks questions, values questions • is open to new ideas • has a tendency to consider alternatives, explore alternate views, generate multiple options • seeks understanding • has an appreciation of evidence • has an awareness of assumptions, questions the given • has a healthy, informed skepticism • suspends judgment • seeks pattern and connections • • has willingness to change opinion has an aversion to superstition

Recognizes and uses science • is inclined to apply science skills and processes • uses science to make sense of their world • is sensitive to opportunities to apply science skills and processes • uses science to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) • offers explanations from store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge

Attributes and Dispositions Checklist #2
Student
Never or rarely Sometimes Often Almost always Never or rarely

Teacher
Sometimes Often Almost always

Has a positive attitude towards science • looks forward to doing science • demonstrates a desire to learn science • desires to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) • values, sees usefulness of a store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge • uses the language of science Demonstrates the habits of minds of science • is curious, has a sustained intellectual curiosity • has a sense of wonder • ponders observations • asks questions, values questions • is open to new ideas • has a tendency to consider alternatives, explore alternate views, generate multiple options • seeks understanding • has an appreciation of evidence • has an awareness of assumptions, questions the given • has a healthy, informed skepticism • suspends judgment • seeks pattern and connections • has willingness to change opinion • has an aversion to superstition Recognizes and uses science • is inclined to apply science skills and processes • uses science to make sense of their world • is sensitive to opportunities to apply science skills and processes • uses science to make sense of the natural world (qualitatively and quantitatively) • offers explanations from store of scientific knowledge, previous scientific knowledge

Appendix 3:

Making Connections

Teachers can use the following prompts when looking for evidence that students are making connections to personal experience and prior knowledge, as well as among science, technology, society, and environment. Prior knowledge • Have you ever seen this before?…where?…when? • Where else might you find something like this? • How is this like something you already know? Personal experience • Have you ever used this information?…has your family? • How does this affect people? …you?…your family?…people who live in other places? Technology • How have people used this scientific understanding to invent things? • What technology has arisen as a result of this scientific understanding? • What scientific knowledge is this technology based on? • How has this technology affected you?…individual people?…society? …the environment? Environment • How does your environment affect you? • How does your environment affect the science you need to know? • How does your environment affect the technology you are interested in? Society • Why do you think scientists study this? • How can people use this information in their lives? • How has this scientific understanding helped society? • How does our society decide what science is studied? …what technology is developed? …how we use the environment?

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