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Annual Report 2016 – 2017

Securing a shared future for wildlife and people

celebrating
1�� years
2 ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 3

A share�
future 
wildlife
 pe�ple
At Taronga Zoo and Taronga Western Plains Zoo,
we believe that wildlife and people can share
this planet.
We believe that all of us have a responsibility to
protect the world’s precious wildlife, not just in our
lifetimes, but for generations of the future.
Our Zoos create experiences that delight and inspire
lasting connections between people and wildlife. We
aim to change lives and create conservation champions
eager to engage with their communities to value the
wildlife in their care, and around the world.
Our activities range from resolving human-elephant
conflict in Mozambique, to successfully breeding
critically endangered Bellinger River turtles and
transforming Australian school children into
conservation champions.
Our conservation breeding programs for threatened
and priority wildlife help a myriad of species, from tiny
vibrant Corroboree Frogs to Australasia’s first Greater
One-horned Rhino calf.
We work in partnerships to support 44 research and
conservation projects across Australia, and a further
25 programs around the globe.
Our Zoos are not-for-profit organisations. We pay no
dividends, and any surplus is put straight back into
support, care and conservation of wildlife.

Sumatran Rhino
Photo: Paul Fahy
4 ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 5

Overview Table � Contents
Taronga Conservation Society Australia (Taronga) operates Taronga Zoo in Sydney and
Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo. Taronga is a leader in the fields of conservation, Our Strategic Direction���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
research and environmental education. Our Organisation��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8
Taronga is constituted under the Zoological Parks Board Act 1973 as a statutory authority
Our Board�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������10
owned by the people of New South Wales (NSW) and administered by the Minister for the
Bradleys Head Road, Mosman Environment and Heritage.
NSW 2088
Chairman’s Report �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12
PO Box 20, Mosman NSW 2088 Amended legislation in 1992 defined Taronga’s responsibilities in education, conservation, Executive Director and Chief Executive’s Report���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������14
research and recreation (see Appendix 1). A minor amendment to the Act was undertaken
Tel: 02 9969 2777
Fax: 02 9969 7515
in 2008 to formally recognize Taronga Conservation Society Australia as the official name, Conservation Science in Australia��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������16
to better describe the work of the organisation.
Open 9.30–5.00pm (Sept–Apr) Conservation and Community Programs Worldwide�������������������������������������������������������������������������������18
Open 9.30–4.30pm (May–Aug)
taronga.org.au Visitation Snapshot������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20
Financials Snapshot�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������22
Conservation Outcomes���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������24
Wildlife in Our Care�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������28
Excellence in Conservation Education������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������32
Transformational Guest Experiences��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������36

The Hon. Gabrielle Upton MP Engage and Influence�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������40
Obley Rd, Dubbo NSW 2830
Minister for the Environment and Heritage
People and Organisational Strength���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������44
Parliament House
PO Box 831, Dubbo NSW 2830
6 Macquarie St Financial and Environmental Sustainability�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������50
Tel: 02 6882 5888 SYDNEY NSW 2000
Fax: 02 6884 1722 Centenary Capital Plan�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������58
Open 9.00–4.00pm
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
taronga.org.au Dear Minister
Statutory Financial Statements – Taronga���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������62
It is with great pleasure that we present the 44th Annual Report
of the Taronga Conservation Society Australia, which includes ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
the statement of accounts, for your presentation to the NSW
Parliament. This report covers in full the Taronga Conservation Appendices�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 114
Society Australia’s activities for the year ended 30 June 2017 in
accordance with Section 20 and 37 of the Zoological Parks Board
Act 1973 (NSW) (as amended) and the Annual Report Statutory
Bodies Act 1984 (NSW) (as amended).
Yours sincerely,

Steve Crane
Chairman

Cameron Kerr
Executive Director and Chief Executive

Marine Turtle
6 ABOUT TARONGA CONSERVATION SOCIETY AUSTRALIA — OUR STRATEGIC DIRECTION ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 7

�ur Strategic Our vision is to secure a shared
future for wildlife and people
Directi�n Our strategic plan defines our unique role,
and the way we contribute to wildlife
conservation, science and learning.

OUR VISION
Securing a shared future
for wildlife and people

OUR ROLE
As leaders in conservation,
we protect wildlife and empower
people to secure a sustainable
future for our planet
Conservation Engage and
Outcomes Influence

Wildlife in Excellence in
Our Care Conservation
STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS Education

Transformational
Guest Experiences

People and
Centenary
Organisational
Strength KEY ENABLERS Capital Plan

Financial and Environmental
Sustainability

Symbol Symbol
Platypus Giraffe
(Ornithorhynchus anatinus) (Giraffa camelopardalis)
Opened Opened
October 1916 February 1977
Site Site
28 hectares 788 hectares
Animals Animals
Asian Elephant Calf Number of Animals: 4,363 Number of Animals: 883
Photo: Rick Stevens Species/sub-species: 359 Species/sub-species: 114
8 ABOUT TARONGA CONSERVATION SOCIETY AUSTRALIA — OUR ORGANISATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 9

Our �RGANISATION Minister for Environment and Heritage
The Hon Gabrielle Upton MP

Taronga Conservation Society Australia Board
Chairman Mr Steve Crane

Executive Director and Chief Executive
Mr Cameron Kerr BSc (Hons), MCom, GAICD

executive team
Bettina Sammut – Human Resources Narelle Beattie – Finance
BA, Cert (PR), Grad – Payroll BCom, MA, CA – Information Technology
– Work Health and Safety – Records
Cert (HRM), Grad. Director,
– Industrial Relations – Procurement
Cert Change Mgt – Volunteer Programs Corporate – Legal
AGSM – Training and Development Services and – Governance
Director, – Taronga Institute of Governance – Audit
People, Culture Science & Learning – Risk Management
– Taronga Training Institute – Insurances
and Learning

Paul Maguire – Guest Operations Matthew Fuller – Facilities & Asset Management
BEd (PE & Sci) – Guest Experience Fellow, Winston – Site Operations
– Education – Commercial Operations
Director, Churchill Memorial
– Community Conservation – Guest Operations
Guest Experience, – Roar and Snore
Trust, MAICD – Guest Experience
Education and – Aboriginal Programs Director, – Zoofari Lodge
Community – Interpretations & Site Taronga Western – Billabong Camp
Programs Coordination Plains Zoo – Savannah Cabins

Tim Bain – Asset and Facilities Management Libby Hodgson – Admissions
BConstruction – Sky Safari BA (Hons) – Fundraising
– Cleaning – Sponsorship
Management Director,
– Security – Zoo Friends Memberships
and Economics – Environmental Sustainability Marketing, – Marketing
Director, – Horticulture and Browse Commercial – Tourism
Property, – Capital Program Development & Fundraising – Communications, Media and PR
Infrastructure – Capital Contracts Management – Commercial Operations
– Waste Management – Business Development
and Operations
– Heritage Management – Events and Twilight Concerts
– Retail

Simon Duffy – Conservation Programs
– Animal Care & Welfare
BTeach, BEd
– Science
(Hons), GAICD – Veterinary Care & Biosecurity
Director, – Recovery Programs
Wildlife, – Pathology
Conservation – Curatorial & Records
– Wildlife Rehabilitation
and Science
– Nutrition & Food Preparation
– Pest Management
– Behaviour Enrichment

Sumatran Tiger
Photo: Rick Stevens
10 ABOUT TARONGA CONSERVATION SOCIETY AUSTRALIA — OUR BOARD ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 11

Our b�ard
Appointed Board Board Committees
Section 6 of the Zoological Parks Board Act 1973 (NSW) stipulates
the criteria under which the members are appointed to the Board.
The Board met six times during the year and the number of meetings
attended by each member is shown in brackets.

Mr Steve Crane Ms Nancy Fox Ms Susan Doyle Corporate Services, Wildlife Committee Animal Ethics Committee
Ministerial appointee. Chairman of Taronga Ministerial appointee. Chair of the Ministerial Appointee. Deputy Chair of Audit & Risk Committee Chair – Dr Ian Roth Statutory committee through which
Conservation Society Australia. Mr Crane Corporate Services, Audit and Risk Taronga Conservation Society Board and Chair – Ms Nancy Fox Monitors collection management, all research projects involving animal
is Chairman of nib Holdings Limited and Committee. Ms Fox is on the Board of Chair of the Marketing Committee. Ms Monitors financial performance, including wildlife conservation, research and research must be approved. Constituted
Global Valve Technology, and a Director of Perpetual Limited, a Director of HCF Life Doyle has had an extensive executive work health and safety, environmental veterinary services. in accordance with the Animal Research
Australian Pipeline Limited (APA Group). and Ethane Pipeline Ltd (resigned October career in the funds management industry, sustainability, human resource Act 1985 and consists of the following
Consists of selected Board members
(Term expires 30th June 2018) 2016), and a Trustee Director of Kinetic particularly in the equities and fixed interest management, capital works programs representatives:
plus the following external contributors
Superannuation. She is also a Director of sectors, working with Commonwealth and asset management. Monitors and
Clr Roy Bendall from appropriate specialist fields: •  Dr Rebecca Spindler, Chair (Researcher)
the Australian Theatre for Young People. Funds Management, Suncorp Metway covers issues relating to internal control
Representing Mosman Council. Member •  Dr Monique Van Sluys (Researcher)
(Term expires 30th June 2018) and Insurance Australia Group. She is a systems, risk management systems, • Ms Jen Cowley
of the Corporate Services, Audit and Risk
Director of the Stock Exchange Guarantee financial reporting and other financial •  Prof Richard Kingsford, •  Dr Jo Day (Wiszniewski) (Researcher) –
Committee. He has broad experience Mr John Walkom
Corporation, the Lawcover Insurance Pty responsibilities. Consists of selected (University of NSW) approved by DPI in July 2016
working in international financial and Representing Dubbo City. Member of
Ltd and Lawcover Pty Ltd and a member Board Members with representatives from •  Dr Frances Hulst (Veterinarian)
capital markets, and project management the Marketing Committee. Mr Walkom is •  Prof Chris Dickman,
of the Treasury Corporation NSW, Board the NSW Audit Office and independent
specialising in the trade and maritime Chair of Regional Development Australia – (The University of Sydney) •  Dr Michelle Campbell (Veterinarian)
Investment Committee. auditors Ernst and Young.
infrastructure sector. Clr Bendall is also Orana, Chair NSW Regional Development • Ms Brooke Taylor •  Mr Brendon Neilly
(Ms Doyle resigned from the Board
a legal practitioner with experience in Advisory Committee and Chair and • Mr Roy Bendall (Animal welfare representative)
on the 29th June 2017) • Mr Paul Sinclair
regulatory reform and the provision of NSW representative to the Australian • Ms Penny Bingham-Hall
regulatory advice to corporations and the Government Regional Development Dr Ian Roth •  Mr Steve Coleman •  Mr Tony Gregory
• Mr Graham Wackett (RSPCA NSW) (Animal welfare representative)
Government in Papua New Guinea. Reference group. He is an active and highly Ministerial Appointee. Chair of the Wildlife
(Term expires 31st December 2017) regarded member of the local community Committee. Member of the Australian Meets 7 times per year. Meets 6 times per year. •  Mr David Roden
in Dubbo, having worked closely with a and New Zealand College of Veterinary Marketing Committee (Independent representative)
Ms Penny Bingham-Hall
broad range of stakeholders including Scientists and Australian Veterinary Chair – Ms Susan Doyle •  Mr Harold Eagleton AM
Ministerial Appointee.
community, business and local government Association, Board member of the NSW (Until 31/12/2016) (Independent representative)
Member of the Corporate Services, Audit
representatives. Branch RSPCA and a graduate of the Ms Robyn Parker
and Risk Committee. Ms Bingham-Hall The Committee reviewed 14 new projects,
(Term expires 31st December 2018) Australian Institute of Company Directors. (01/01/2017–present)
spent 23 years with Leighton Holdings, all of which were approved. The Committee
Until January 2016, Dr Roth was the Monitors all marketing activities including
including as Executive General Manager Mr Graham Wackett also approved 15 ongoing projects and six
NSW Chief Veterinary Officer, Director communications, Taronga Foundation,
Strategy and Executive General Manager Representing Taronga’s volunteer amendment applications.
of the Animal Welfare Unit within NSW customer service and tourism development,
Corporate. She is a Director of BlueScope community. Member of the Corporate
Department of Primary Industries and a Education and Guest Experience. Meets 6 times per year.
Steel Ltd, Fortescue Metals Group, Services, Audit and Risk Committee and
Director of Wildlife Health Australia. He Consists of selected Board Members.
Macquarie Specialised Asset Management, the Marketing Committee. Mr Wackett
has worked in the areas of animal health
DEXUS Property Group, Port Authority has been an active volunteer at Taronga • Ms Robyn Parker
and animal welfare for 35 years and was
of NSW. Zoo in Sydney since 2006 and has a
honoured in the 2016 Australia Day Awards • Mr Graham Wackett
(Term expires 31st December 2020) strong background in hotel, resort and
to receive a Public Service Medal award "For • Mr John Walkom
attractions ownership and management.
Ms Jennifer Cowley outstanding public service to veterinary
Previous executive roles include Managing • Ms Jen Cowley
Representing the local community in science, particularly animal welfare and
Director and CEO of Southern Pacific
Dubbo. Member of the Marketing and biosecurity in NSW." Meets 6 times per year.
Hotel Corporation, and Managing Director
Wildlife Committees. Ms Cowley is an (Term expires 30th June 2020)
Travelodge Australia and Travelodge
active member of the local community
Developments. Mr Wackett also has The Hon. Robyn Parker
in Dubbo, where she sits on a number of
strong tourism industry experience, having Ministerial Appointee. Member of the
advisory boards. She runs her own media,
previously served as a member of the Board Marketing Committee. Ms Parker has
community development and training
of Tourism NSW, Tourism Training Australia over 30 years of public sector experience
consultancy, and is Editor of regional
and the Tourism Task Force. which began with roles in child and family
commentary and news magazine the
(Term expires 31st December 2019) services across a number of disadvantaged
Dubbo Weekender. Ms Cowley is an award
communities. She was a specialist TAFE
winning journalist, a published children's
teacher for over 14 years before moving
book author and a regular media and
into the political arena, spending 12 years
current affairs commentator on ABC Radio
as an MLC, MP and Cabinet Minister in the
(Western Plains).
NSW Parliament. Ms Parker was the CEO of
(Term expires 30th June 2018)
Delphis Australia until March 2017.
(Term expires 30th June 2020)
12 YEAR IN BRIEF — CHAIRMAN’S REPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 13

Chairman’s Rep�rt
TARONGA ACHIEVED ITS HIGHEST ADMISSIONS
ON RECORD AND SUPPORTED WILDLIFE, HABITATS
AND COMMUNITIES ACROSS THE GLOBE.
It was a great honour and privilege to be the chairman of
Taronga in its centenary year and to see how this historic
organisation has evolved and matured since its inception
100 years ago.
Over 1.9 million guests attended our two Zoos during the
year, including an unprecedented number of international
guests. These record attendances are testament to
Taronga’s growing reach, popularity and reputation
throughout NSW, Australia and the world.
Taronga’s expanding digital assets and online services have
been important factors in our success this year. Online ticket
sales increased by more than 140% over the twelve months, enabling us to grow our community
and providing new opportunities to engage with guests before and after their zoo visits.
Our conservation science and breeding programmes also achieved some significant milestones
during the year. Taronga continued its decade-long involvement in the recovery of the
endangered Regent Honeyeater. Following one of the program’s best breeding seasons ever,
we  celebrated the release of 101 zoo-bred birds into the iron-bark forests of northern Victoria.
The birth of the first Asian Elephant Calf at Taronga Western Plains Zoo was cause for great
excitement. Dubbo also welcomed a female Southern Black Rhino calf, three cheetah cubs,
four lion cubs, a Przewalksi Horse and a healthy hippopotamus calf.
For the first time in almost 30 years, Taronga Zoo in Sydney celebrated the birth of three short
beaked Echidna puggles at its new Echidna breeding centre. Other notable births included
a pygmy hippo and an elephant calf, the fourth to be born at the Sydney site. Both of these
births play a vital role in the national and global breeding programs to protect their species.
Taronga continued its global field work, supporting conservation projects in 21 countries.
Our resourcing of wildlife protection programs in countries such as Indonesia protected animals
from poaching and illegal logging activities and enabled vital ecosystem assessments to be
conducted in Sumatra’s national parks.
The illegal wildlife trade is the second biggest threat to species survival. Taronga’s Wildlife
Witness smartphone app was featured at leading conservation conferences around the world
during the year. The app has had over 11,000 downloads, resulting in direct interventions to
protect many species across Southeast Asia.
Meanwhile, Taronga’s world-class work in conservation science achieved significant outcomes
in Australia. We were privileged to save a small colony of critically endangered Bellinger River
Snapping Turtles from almost certain extinction due to an unknown and devastating virus.
Whilst our research scientists collected 643 billion coral sperm from the Great Barrier Reef this
year as we continue to hold the world’s largest bank of frozen coral cells and gametes.
Taronga made major headway this year in terms of our own environmental footprint. A solar
power system was installed at the Dubbo site to help reduce energy consumption in the new
Savannah Visitor Plazaand upgrades to water systems and pumping equipment are expected
to  reduce water usage across both sites by up to 30%.
I recognise the contribution and support of the Hon. Gabrielle Upton, Minister for Environment
and Heritage and her predecessor, The Hon. Mark Speakman MP. I would like to thank the
members of the Taronga Board for their support and assistance over the past 12 months
and, of course, all our dedicated employees and volunteers at Taronga who have so many
accomplishments to be proud of this year.

Steve Crane Taronga Zoo 100th Birthday 
Chairman Photo: Rick Stevens
14 YEAR IN BRIEF — EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 15

EXECUTIVE �irectOr 
Chief Executive’s Rep�rt
The 2016/17 year was one for the history books.
Taronga celebrated its centenary milestone in style with
all its supporters and the people of New South Wales.
It was a spectacular year across Our purpose as educators was a major focus for Taronga this year
all pillars of the organisation, with the development of quality education facilities and experiences.
most notably the areas of The Taronga Centenary Theatre opened in March to provide valuable
community engagement and insights into our field programs and promote behaviour change.
education. Construction commenced on the Taronga Institute of Science and
Learning which looks likely to be completed on time in 2018 and
Taronga Zoo marked its 100th
finished to the highest standards.
birthday on 7th October 2016,
serving up surprises for its giraffes, Educational value on site was further increased with the opening
elephants and more than 6,000 of the Savannah Safari at Taronga Western Plains Zoo in December
guests who attended the Zoo 2016. We will soon be providing Zoo guests with more of these
free-of-charge at what was dubbed enriching experiences as work on the new Taronga Tiger Trek in Sydney
the ‘party of the century’. Then one week later the Taronga Centenary nears completion.
Parade re-enacted the historic journey when zoo staff moved Taronga’s
The release of the Taronga Zoo App was a major step forward in guest
animals through the streets of Sydney to relocate from its original site
engagement. This mobile tool not only helps people navigate the zoo,
at Moore Park to Mosman 100 years ago. The parade brought central
but also inspires and involves children in wildlife conservation through
Sydney to a standstill as ten giant sculptures representing Taronga’s
the Wild Squad program. Safari Live provided another valuable online
ten legacy species, 450 staff and volunteers, and 700 dancing children
experience, connecting 3000+ students to the field in South Africa
retraced the footsteps of one hundred years ago and shone a light on
where they tracked and learnt about the animals of the savannah.
Taronga’s future pledge for the wild.
Our achievements did not go unnoticed this year with Taronga
Another historic journey took place in September as fifteen young
receiving many awards for its products and projects. Both Zoos were
indigenous Australians walked 490 kilometres from Dubbo to Sydney.
awarded gold partnership status under the NSW Office of Environment
The Shoulder to Shoulder walk allowed these young people to
and Heritage’s ‘Sustainable Advantage’ program. Taronga is only the
reconnect with country and find strength in the knowledge of what
second government institution to have achieved this leading status.
they can achieve. The walk reinforced and celebrated the close links
Taronga Western Plains Zoo won gold at the NSW Tourism Awards,
between Taronga’s Burbangana and Walanmarra youth programs
taking out the Best Attraction and Unique Accommodation categories.
and the NSW Department of Family and Community Services.
To me, however, the real champions of our Centenary year were the
Other major events during the year included the first Taronga Eid
people of NSW, including Taronga’s many members, sponsors and
Festival, the Zoofari 100 Fundraising Dinner, Dreamnight, Vivid Sydney
supporters. I would like to thank you all for your unwavering support
at Taronga, Access Taronga, the Taronga CEO Sumatra Challenge
which made all the year’s achievements possible.
and Twilight at Taronga. Reflecting our mission to bringing wildlife
and people together, these events have been critical in building and I would especially like to thank our dedicated Board, employees, and
broadening Taronga’s community and supporter base for the next volunteers for celebrating Taronga’s Centenary year with us. I hope you
100 years. all have lasting memories of a fantastic year.
We continue to respond to the changing expectations of how good
zoos should be caring for and presenting wildlife. As a leader in this
space, Taronga has developed an ethical framework for displaying
the animals in our care with dignity and respect. Animal Welfare
remains our highest priority and numerous activities were undertaken Cameron Kerr
to embed best practice throughout the organisation. Executive Director and Chief Executive

From left
Cameron Kerr Photo: Rick Stevens  VIVID Parade 2016 Photo: Quentin Jones
16 YEAR IN BRIEF — CONSERVATION SCIENCE IN AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 17

Christmas Island
Christmas Island Flying
Fox health, ecology and
conservation Cardwell
Cassowary conservation
with Girringun Aboriginal
Corporation

Great Barrier Reef
Preserving and growing
coral for future restoration

conservati�n
science  Bellinger River
Recovery of the Bellinger
River Snapping Turtle

australia
Taronga’s work in conservation science encompasses the
Strzlecki Desert
Development of scent-based
management tool for Dingoes
Sydney
Nutrition balance
and glider behaviour
key disciplines of wildlife health, nutrition and behaviour,
conservation biology, ecology and population viability. and other wild dogs in Australia

Since 2011, the Taronga Conservation Science Initiative has
leveraged over $1.2 million in philanthropic donations to garner
almost $7 million in scientific grants.
This has enabled our scientists to address knowledge gaps in the
science of biodiversity and increase understanding of the biology
of wild species and their role in ecosystem health and resilience.
Western NSW
Taronga is also leading investigations into zoo animal welfare
Key Greater Bilbies protection
science and in situ crises affecting threatened species and their
Research with support for predator-
habitats and assessing the impact of its education initiatives on Kosciusko National Park Sydney Oceans
Conservation Program free sanctuary with Australian
community conservation actions. Southern Corroboree Frog Satellite tracking of marine
Wildlife Conservancy
breeding and re-introduction turtles released from
From left Taronga Wildlife Hospital
Flying Fox Photo: Jane Hall  Dingo Photo: Unknown  Greater Bilby Photo: Paul Fahy  Corroboree Frog Photo: Paul Fahy  Feathertail Glider Photo: Rob Dockerill
Southern Cassowary Photo: Rick Stevens  Great Barrier Reef Coral Photo: unknown  Bellinger River Snapping Turtle Photo: Paul Fahy  Marine Turtle Photo: unknown
18 YEAR IN BRIEF — CONSERVATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS WORLDWIDE TARONGA 100 19

Monitor and track
Przewalski horse
harems and model
their habitat use

Mongolia

Nepal

Pangolin protection Population Assessments
Vietnam
Nicuragua with Save Vietnam’s and Conservation Genetics
Wildlife of Fijian Iguanas

Uganda
Conservation of Black- Republic of Sumatra
the Congo
handed Spider Monkeys Conservation of the
Kenya
through increased critically endangered South East Asia
Papua New Guinea
habitat connectivity Peru San Martin Titi Tanzania Java
and the education of Monkey through
local communities community initiatives Fiji
and wildlife rangers Southern Africa Conservation Partnership
for Lion, Zebra, Giraffe,
African Elephant in Wildlife Witness - Combating
Zimbabwe
Kenya with Northern illegal wildlife trade for greater
Rangelands Trust Australia protection of wildlife around
the world, including Sun Bears,
Brazil
rhinoceros and elephants
Rhino protection with
South Africa International Rhino
Foundation

C�NSERVATION New Zealand

 COMMUNITY Conservation
Brazil Nepal Tanzania

PROGRAMS
Protecting Tapir with Intituto de Pesquisas Ecologicas Monitoring Fishing Cat population numbers Monitoring African vulture populations

Costa Rica New Zealand Vietnam
Conservation of the Costa Rican Sawfish Protection of Fiordland Penguins with Tawaki Coalition Pangolin protection with Save Vietnam’s Wildlife
and its critical habitat
Nicuragua Zimbabwe
Guatemala Conservation of Black-handed Spider Monkeys through Support anti-poaching units for painted dog

WORLDWI�E
Conservation of the critically endangered alligator lizard increased habitat connectivity and the education of conservation in Hwange National Park
Abronia campbelli through habitat restoration and local communities and wildlife rangers
community forest management Community Conservation Program
Papua New Guinea
Indonesia, Java Monitoring the effectiveness of protecting the Australia
Monitoring Silvery Gibbon populations and educating Matschie's Tree Kangaroo in YUS Conservation Area Wildlife Witness - Combating illegal wildlife trade for
local communities on their conservation with the Silvery greater protection of wildlife around the world, including
Gibbon Project Peru Sun Bears, rhinoceros and elephants
Taronga’s conservation science programs support wildlife, Conservation of the critically endangered San Martin Titi
habitats and communities across the globe. Indonesia, Sumatra Monkey through community initiatives Uganda
Rhino protetion with International Rhino Foundation Beads for Wildlife - Supporting people and wildlife in
Republic of Congo Northern Kenya through alternative incomes and anti-
Each year, we directly contribute over $500,000 to conservation Supporting Wildlife Protection Units in Bukit Tigapuluh Conservation Partnership for Chimpanzees poaching patrols
partnerships and field grants, while our overall commitment to field National Park with Australian Orangutan Project (Tchimpounga Sanctuary) with Jane Goodall Institute
From left conservation in terms of staff time, facilities and support exceeds
Conservation Partnership for Asian Elephants in Way South Africa
Research
Black-Handed Spider Monkey Photo: Ally McMillan $4 million annually. Kambas National Park (Sumatran Elephant Sanctuary) Testing the exclusion capabilities and durability of the Fiji
San Martin Photo: Ally McMillan Sharksafe Barrier
Giraffe Photo: Rick Stevens This work is vital to the identification and reduction of key threats Kenya
Population Assessments and
Conservation Genetics of Fijian Iguanas
Prezewalski Horse Photo: Mandy Turner to endangered and priority species, the protection of important Conservation Partnership for Lion, Zebra, Giraffe, African South East Asia
wildlife habitat, and the support of healthy communities. From Elephant in Kenya with Northern Rangelands Trust TRAFFIC - Stopping wildlife trade with TRAFFIC
Sumatran Rhino Photo: Paul Fahy
Pangolin Photo: Unknown Papua New Guinea to Vietnam, and Zambia to Indonesia, Taronga Mongolia Southern Africa
Sun Bear Photo: Bobby Jo Clow works with global conservation experts in the field to secure a Monitor and track Przewalski horse harems Conserving Southern Africa’s free ranging cheetah
Fijian Banded Iguana Photo: Gary Ramage shared future for people and wildlife. and model their habtiat use through Farmer: Predator Conflict Mitigation.
20 YEAR IN BRIEF — VISITATION SNAPSHOT ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 21

VISITATION
snapsh�t Guest ticketing mix

Total Visitation
Total visitation (million people) Guest ticketing mix

11% General Admission
12/13 1.706m 3%
Zoo Friends
11% Paid Education*
13/14 1.687m
Free of Charge Total
14/15 1.716mFree of charge total (excluding zoo friends) 5% (excluding Zoo Friends)

15/16 1.839m Overnight Stays**
56% Other***
16/17 1.931m 14%
*Includes ‘paid’ and ‘other’ education
m 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 ** Roar and Snore, Zoofari, Billagong Camp
***Twilight, Vivid, Wild Ropes, Functions
Origin - TZ

Origin of guests – Taronga Zoo Origin of guests – Taronga Western Plains Zoo
1%

7% NSW – Sydney NSW – Sydney
International International
15
%
Interstate 25% Interstate
NSW – Other NSW – Other
41%

44%

38%
30%

Guest attendance
2015/16 2016/17 Variance Variance %
Consolidated result Paid attendance (1) 1,437,784 1,463,996 26,212 1.8%
Paid and FOC* attendance (2)(3) 1,838,992 1,931,258 92,266 5.0%
Taronga Zoo Paid attendance(1) 1,211,406 1,267,546 56,140 4.6%
Paid and FOC attendance(2) 1,578,890 1,667,891 89,001 5.6%
Taronga Western Plains Zoo Paid attendance(1) 226,378 228,092 1,714 0.8%
Paid and FOC attendance(3) 260,102 263,367 3,265 1.3%
* FOC - Free of charge
1. Includes Zoo Friends, paid education and overnight stays.
2. Includes function guests and Twilight Concert and Vivid attendees at Taronga Zoo.
3. Includes function guests at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

VIVID Tasmanian Devil
Photo: Anders Alexander
22 YEAR IN BRIEF — FINANCIALS SNAPSHOT ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 23

Total Assets

FINANCIALS
Total Assets

12/13 432.23m

snapsh�t
13/14 485.50m

14/15 489.50m

15/16 498.93m

16/17 552.71m
Sources of income for Taronga programs
m 300 400 500 600
Admissions Income $43,006 - 33%
Trading Sales and Franchise Revenue $13,374 - 10%
NSW Government Recurrent Grant $14,770 - 11%
NSW Government Capital Allocation $15,053 - 12%
Other (including Sponsorship and Foundation) $42,955 - $33%
Total Income
Total income Sources of income for Taronga programs

Admissions Income $43,006m
12/13 86.45m Trading Sales and Franchise
33% 33% Revenue $13,374m
13/14 89.90m
NSW Government Recurring
14/15 98.67m
Grant $14,770m
NSW Government
15/16 106.33m Capital Allocation $15,053m

16/17 129.16m Other (incl Sponsorship
12% 10% and Foundation) $42,955m
m
Recurrent resources 0.25 0.5 1.0 1.5 11% Wildlife... 146.03 = 26.58%
employees - Taronga
Marketing... 79.02 = 14.38%
People.. 21.72 = 3.95%
Corporate...25.23 4.59%
Property... 90.97 19.56%
TWPZ 142.89 26.01%
Guest... 43.54 7.93%

total 549.40 100%
Allocation of recurrent resources to expense types Allocation of employees by Taronga division*

EmployeeExpenses, 7.93% Wildlife Conservation
including Superannuation and Science 146.03
26 % $45,960m Marketing Commercial
26.58%
Depreciation Write Down and Fundraising 79.02
of Assets $21,152m People, Culture
42% 26.01%
Trading cost of sales and Learning 21.72
1% $3,765m Corporate Services
7% Marketing Expenses and Governance 25.23
$4,023m Property Infrastructure
4%
Maintenance $7,615m 14.38% and Operations 90.97
2% FinanceCosts $860m 16.56% Taronga Western
19% 4.59% 3
.95%

All Other Expenses Plains Zoo 142.89
$26,887m Guest Experience
Policy
Education and Community
Programs 43.54

Expenditure on capital development and maintenance
Expenditure on capital development and maintenance Total cost of Social Policy Program activities

Conservation and Preservation
12/13 12.52m 23% of Threatened and Endangered
26 % Species $2.817m
13/14 16.76m Conservation and Preservation
of Biodiversity $2.305m
14/15 14.75m Public Education and
Awareness Programs $3.104m
15/16 20.63m Collaborative Species
Conservation and Management
16/17 45.17m 29% 22% $2.450m
m 10 20 30 40 50

Greater Bilby 
Photo: Rick Stevens
24 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — CONSERVATION OUTCOMES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 25

C�nservation
Outc�mes
Actively participate in wildlife conservation Clockwise from left

initiatives that ensure the long-term security
Bellinger River Snapping Turtle 
Photo: Paul Fahy

of wildlife in sustainable eco-systems and habitats
Plains-wanderer chick 
Photo: Corrine Symons
Short-beaked Echidna
Photo: Gary Ramage

Key achievements
Recovery of the Regent Honeyeater Taronga’s Wildlife Witness program Endangered Fijian Crested Iguana New Sanctuary at Birth of First Asian Elephant Calf
Taronga continued its decade-long Taronga’s Wildlife Witness program Taronga completed a hugely successful Taronga Western Plains Zoo The birth of the first Asian Elephant calf
involvement in the recovery of the was featured at the IUCN Conservation 18-year-long project to conserve the Work began on a new Sanctuary at Taronga at Taronga Western Plains Zoo caused
Regent Honeyeater, a flagship species Conference in Hawaii, the US Association critically endangered Fijian crested iguana. Western Plains Zoo to be dedicated to the great excitement. The Zoo also welcomed
for woodland biodiversity that is bred at of Zoos and Aquariums annual conference This has seen the eradication of goats conservation of endangered native species. a female Southern Black Rhino calf, the
the Zoo and released to the wild every in San Diego and the World Association and Pacific rats from Monuriki Island in With funding from Taronga’s Legacy 13th Black Rhino calf born as part of the
second year. This year was one of our best of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) annual Fiji and the relocation of iguanas to a Species commitment and $1.6m in donor Zoo’s internationally renowned breeding
breeding seasons ever and, in April 2017, we conference in Mexico. This promotion led captive breeding program in Kula Eco Park. support, the 110-hectare site will house program for this critically endangered
celebrated the release of 101 zoo-bred birds to zoos pledging over $100,000 to support Taronga’s Terrestrial Ecologist was the recovery programs for endangered NSW species. Meanwhile, Dr Benn Bryant, Senior
into the box iron-bark forests of Chiltern Mt TRAFFIC South East Asia’s enforcement studbook keeper for the program. In 2017, species such as the Plains-wanderer, Regent Veterinarian of Taronga Western Plains Zoo,
Pilot National Park in Victoria. program, the backbone of the Wildlife the last 38 captive-bred iguanas and all the Honeyeater and Greater Bilby. is working with a team from Cincinnati Zoo
Witness program. original founders were successfully released on an assisted reproduction program for
Bellinger River Snapping Turtles
on the island. Sumatran Rhinos.
In 2016, the entire insurance colony Corals from the Great Barrier Reef
of critically endangered Bellinger River Taronga continues to drive initiatives for Botswana Predator Conservation Trust
Snapping Turtles was transferred to a the cryopreservation of corals from the Taronga and the Botswana Predator
newly-built, quarantined facility at Taronga Great Barrier Reef. Our research biologists Conservation Trust ran a five-month pilot Performance Indicators
Zoo to protect it from a virus. Four of the collected 643 billion coral sperm during the study to test whether painting eye patterns Target Definition 2016/17
five mature females produced eggs in the most recent spawning season, representing on cattle could deter attacks by lions
first year, resulting in 22 hatchling turtles. 60 individual coral colonies and nine coral and other ambush predators. The iCow Wildlife Conservation 100% Percentage is assessed via the 50%
species. Four of these species were new to project aims to develop a cost-effective, Wildlife in Taronga’s care has an Animal Population Assessment
The Australian Wildlife Registry of Health,
identified and communicated role Tool.
based at Taronga, continues to investigate our bank, making it the world’s largest bank non-lethal means of preventing livestock in conservation.
the cause of the virus and monitor the of coral cells and gametes. predation and retaliatory attacks on wildlife
remaining turtles in the Bellinger River by farmers. The technique proved 100%
catchment system. successful with no painted cows being killed
by predators during the testing period.
26 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — CONSERVATION OUTCOMES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 27

success of seabirds. This is essential to the potential translocation of critically Australian Shark Attack File (ASAF) Through its partnership with Taronga, over the last five years. In 2016 alone, the
Conservation our understanding of the consequences endangered Blue-tailed Skinks to the The Australian Shark Attack File (ASAF) the Ugandan-based New Nature combined efforts of patrol scouts, the

Science Programs of climate change on marine food webs
and the implementation of strategies to
Cocos-Keeling atoll. An audit of reptile
health in potential translocation sites and
has maintained a high profile in 2016/17 as
Australia’s leading source of shark attack
Foundation has continued its work
in education, capacity-building and
canine unit and over 430 hours of aerial
surveys have resulted in the removal
Through its world class work in improve ecosystem resilience. We used in some of the atoll’s populated islands has data. A cluster of attacks off the mid-north technology-sharing with communities of 308 snares from the park, the
conservation science, Taronga aims unique prey capture signatures from been undertaken. More than 362 invasive coast of NSW during this period resulted around the Kibale National Park. It apprehension of 69 suspected poachers
to increase our understanding of the accelerometers (using Little Penguins at reptiles were examined and sampled and in a higher number of data requests, the provides sustainable fuel alternatives and the confiscation of ivory and firearms.
natural environment and enhance Taronga as digital translators), together further surveillance data were collected on installation of nets across Ballina beaches, and a diversified income stream for local
Species Specific Protection
efforts to protect it. with advanced movement models from the previously reported bacterial infection and a Senate inquiry into the ethics of communities through the manufacture
With Taronga’s support, BirdLife in
satellite locations, to determine the found to be emergent in Christmas shark-netting. In June 2017, Taronga’s and selling of biomass briquettes.
Western Australia has successfully liaised
characteristics of fish schools necessary Island’s reptiles. Pathology Assistant presented a talk at
From studying individual animals to Building on our previous work with with farmers to install artificial hollows
for predator foraging. This approach has a Shark Attack Workshop coordinated by
investigating whole species, habitats and In Africa, Taronga and colleagues at the endangered Fishing Cats in Nepal’s Koshi as additional breeding sites for Carnaby’s
allowed us to distinguish how animals Surf Life Saving Australia during which
ecosystems, our scientists continue to Botswana Predator Conservation Trust have Tappu Reserve, Taronga has supported a Black Cockatoos. Two properties recorded
respond to changing resource availability she summarised the work done by the
forge new paths and discoveries to realise conducted a pilot program to test whether project by Charles Sturt University and the breeding in the newly installed ‘cockatube’
as a result of climate change, relative to ASAF and presented the data around the
Taronga’s vision of a shared future for painting eye patterns on cattle can deter National Trust for Nature Conservation artificial hollows.
other human impacts. Trends strongly recent cluster of attacks in northern NSW.
people and wildlife. attacks by ambush predators (lions and to raise awareness and develop
indicate that warmer waters driven by the The ASAF continues to compile unbiased The Queensland-based Girringun
leopards) by ‘tricking’ the predator into capacity-building programs to pre-empt
The development of the Taronga Institute strengthening East Australian Current are shark attack statistics, advise State and Aboriginal Corporation has worked with
thinking it has been seen by the cow and conflict between Fishing Cats and local
of Science and Learning, scheduled for leading to reduced foraging success. It is Federal authorities and the general public community groups to collect, propagate
so abandon the hunt. So far, the technique communities. The findings from the project
completion in mid-2018, will strengthen clear from this research that implications about shark attack risks, and report to the and plant 400 Cassowary food plants in
has proven to be 100% successful: no are now being incorporated into an overall
Taronga’s education initiatives and for the breeding success and, ultimately, International Shark Attack File based in priority areas to help restore the habitat of
painted cows having been killed during the management plan for the Reserve being
university partnerships to nurture the next the survival of seabirds like the Little the USA. these iconic rainforest birds.
five-month study while four cows from the developed by the Department of National
generation of scientists and further cement Penguin are of concern. Cumulative
unpainted control group have been killed There was a total of 21 unprovoked shark Parks and Wildlife Conservation of Nepal. Taronga has planted tens of thousands
Taronga’s role as a regional and global findings from this ongoing program
by lions during the same period. If shown attacks recorded for the year (July 1, 2016 of habitat trees and released hundreds of
leader in conservation science. will form part of future discussions with Taronga’s recent partnership with Save
to be successful in future larger-scale trials, – June 26, 2017) resulting in one fatality. Regent Honeyeaters over the last decade.
management authorities. Indonesian Endangered Species will see the
The pillars of this initiative are Taronga’s this would be a cost-effective, non-lethal Information and educational material on Our scientists are now examining the
development of a food farm around the
expertise in the fields of wildlife health and Like other apex predators, sharks play a tool to prevent both livestock predation and sharks and shark attacks is available at genetic contribution of the released birds to
Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra.
welfare, conservation biology, population crucial role in maintaining the health of our retaliatory killings of wildlife by farmers. www.taronga.org.au/ASAF. the wider population.
viability, ecology, nutrition and behaviour oceans. Taronga is working with Macquarie To be managed by local communities,
2017 marked the end of Taronga’s 18-year- The long-term monitoring and
which, combined with the generous and University to examine the movement the farm will produce food for rescued
long project to conserve the critically management of released Przewalski’s
critical support of our donors, help us
deliver tangible conservation outcomes.
patterns and behaviour of Port Jackson
sharks (PJs) to understand their habitat use,
endangered Fijian Crested Iguana. Begun
in 1998, the project involved the eradication
Field Based Conservation elephants. The project aims to reduce
human-elephant conflict by changing
horses into Mongolia is providing Taronga
and its partners with invaluable information
To this end, Taronga has leveraged just over energy requirements and their role in the Taronga has achieved significant community perceptions of the species and
of goats and Pacific rats on Monuriki about the horses’ activity at natural
$1 million donor funds to garner almost ecosystem. The use of accelerometers as a conservation outcomes for species, providing local villagers with an alternative
Island in western Fiji and the relocation water sources which will inform future
$7m in scientific grants since 2011. Peer- way of measuring the activity patterns and habitats and communities over the and sustainable source of income.
of its endangered iguanas to a breeding management strategies.
reviewed publications by Taronga scientists behaviours of PJs was tested at Taronga past year.
facility in Fiji’s Kula Eco Park. Taronga’s Keeping the Wild Wild
and partners have consistently increased Zoo, using a novel attachment method. Globally, the illegal wildlife trade is the
Terrestrial Ecologist was the studbook Taronga continues to support anti-
over the past five years and reflect our The sharks were found to be nocturnal, with second greatest threat to species survival.
keeper for the program. As the vegetation Conservation through poaching patrols undertaken by rangers
growing and indelible footprint in the the increased activity of males late in the Once again, Taronga is supporting
on Monuriki recovered, the first 32 captive- Community Innovation in the Biliqo-Bulesa Conservancy in
conservation arena. season corresponding to the timing of the ‘Breaking the Brand’ in the creation
bred Crested Iguanas were returned to the Taronga continues to support Wildlife Kenya which have reduced the number of
PJs’ southerly migration. Accelerometry and implementation of a ‘demand
In the Water wild. In February 2017, the last 38 zoo-bred Protection Units (WPUs) across Sumatra elephants poached within its area to zero.
data also clearly differentiated four reduction program’ aimed at influencing
Taronga continues to drive a strong Iguanas and all of the original relocated that provide key information about species The rangers also participate in peace-
important behaviours that are associated and reducing Rhino horn consumption
collaboration with the Smithsonian lizards were returned to the island and occurrence in the Way Kambas and Bukit keeping workshops that bring together
with feeding and migration. The techniques in Vietnam.
Institute and Australian Institute of released, completing this long and highly Tigapuluh National Parks. The WPUs different ethnic communities in order to
developed here will be integrated with
Marine Sciences to establish and apply successful conservation project. have also been very successful in reduce conflicts and improve land use. Taronga has also established a partnership
genetic analyses to classify and understand
the science around the cryopreservation detecting and deterring poaching with Save Vietnam’s Wildlife to improve
behaviours in free-ranging sharks that Parks Australia and Taronga are re- With Taronga’s support, Wildlife Asia has
of Great Barrier Reef corals. and illegal logging activities. success rates in the return of rescued
cannot be directly observed. populating Booderee National Park purchased and protected an additional
Pangolins to their habitat and the
In late 2016, our team of research biologists near Jervis Bay in NSW with a variety With Taronga’s support, the South 50 hectares of rainforest increasing the
The fatal virus afflicting the Bellinger River protection of wild Pangolin populations.
collected 643 billion sperm representing of terrestrial mammals that have been African organisation Cheetah Outreach buffer area around the Supayang Reserve
Snapping Turtle is another compelling
60 individual coral colonies and nine coral extirpated for more than 100 years. With has successfully expanded its Livestock in Sumatra. Vultures play a critical role in maintaining
example of Taronga’s impact on the
species, four of which were new to the bank. funding from the Threatened Species Guarding Dog Project. This project places habitat health through disease control and
survival of species. At the request of the In Papua New Guinea, the Tree Kangaroo
This brings our species total to 12 Great Commission, 54 Long-nosed Potoroos guard dogs on farms and seeks to reduce waste removal. However, African vulture
OEH, Taronga Zoo’s Australian Registry Conservation Program team is working
Barrier Reef coral species – the largest and 24 Southern Brown Bandicoots were livestock losses by predation and the populations have declined significantly in
of Wildlife Health has helped to identify with local communities to manage the YUS
bank of coral cells anywhere in the world. successfully translocated to the park farmer-Cheetah conflict that results. recent years, primarily due to poisoning.
the disease and its root causes, and has Conservation Area. The community rangers
New collaborations with Great Barrier Reef from Eden, NSW. Intensive post-release Cheetah Outreach estimates that 25,500- Recent research partially funded by
established a world-first captive breeding have received training in standardised
Marine Park Authorities have increased monitoring continues for four weeks after 34,000 hectares of additional habitat has Taronga established that White-backed
program for the turtles at Taronga’s monitoring and reporting techniques to
the likelihood of these cells being used in each release and then on a quarterly basis. been safeguarded through the elimination Vultures in Tanzania can travel over
quarantine facility. The Registry is now improve the consistency and efficacy of
a strategic approach to reef restoration in This monitoring has identified the first of lethal predator controls and the 2000km in a month. Sadly, many of these
preparing to further investigate the wildlife monitoring.
the near future. Booderee-born pouch young in a female implementation of this predator-friendly birds forage in hunting concessions where
disease to determine the best methods
translocated last year. Additional field trips initiative. The program now has a waiting Sadly, Zambian wildlife under the watch they are poisoned by lead from spent
A marine ecology team from Taronga, of repopulating the Bellinger River with
are now planned with permits in place for list for guard dogs, demonstrating strong of the Conservation South Luangwa (CSL) ammunition. This information is critical
Macquarie University, University of turtles bred and reared at Taronga and
the translocation of up to 45 Bandicoots. buy-in from local communities. has had another tough year with the to developing strategies to ensure the
Technology Sydney (UTS), NSW Office other institutions.
park continuing to experience high levels survival of these species.
of Environment and Heritage (OEH) and Meanwhile, Taronga’s Behavioural Studies
On the Land of poaching and snaring. However, with
Department of Primary Industries (DPI) Unit (BSU) and the Population Health and
In line with a long-term conservation Taronga’s support, CSL’s anti-poaching
continued to work at Montague Island to Welfare Team have been working towards
plan for threatened species on Christmas program has had some notable successes
integrate information on oceanographic the development of an animal tracking tool
Island, Taronga’s Australian Registry
conditions and fish distributions with to monitor the welfare of all animals
of Wildlife Health Registry has started
the foraging patterns and breeding in Taronga’s Zoos.
work on a disease risk assessment for
28 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — WILDLIFE IN OUR CARE TARONGA 100 29

Key achievements WILDLIFE CARE
Echidna Breeding Facility New Squirrel Monkey Taronga Zoo
For the first time in nearly 30 years, three Walkthrough Experience Taronga’s Wildlife Conservation and
Short-beaked Echidna puggles were Science Division continued to focus on
A new Squirrel Monkey walkthrough providing inspiring and transformational
successfully hatched at Taronga. Thanks
experience was built by Taronga’s trades experiences for zoo guests and on the
to the generous gift of a donor, we were
staff, with design and documentation breeding of recovery and ambassador
able to build an echidna breeding facility
provided by internal stakeholders. This species in line with Taronga’s
for the puggles, two of which survived
project was a great opportunity to conservation goals.
to adulthood. The youngest was born
showcase the skills, capacity and dedication
to mother ‘Pipta’, the last Short-beaked
of our in-house teams. The new exhibit
Echidna to be hatched at Taronga in 1987.
has been well received by the public who
Significant Births are now enjoying the closer viewing of our
Other significant births at our Zoos this Squirrel Monkeys.
year included the first elephant calf to be
New Experiences
born at the Taronga Western Plains Zoo,
Construction of our new Tiger Trek
an Asian Elephant calf in Sydney, three
Experience is nearing completion and will
Cheetah cubs, four male lion cubs, a female
be operational in August 2017. At Taronga
Przewalski’s Horse foal, and a healthy
Western Plains Zoo, work commenced on
hippopotamus calf to experienced mother
our new Lions Exhibit and the Taronga
Cuddles at Dubbo.
Institute of Science and Learning. The Lion
Successful Marine Life Rehabilitation project is forecast to open in late 2017 and
Taronga’s Wildlife Hospital, Sydney, the Institute in mid-2018. Taronga also
successfully rehabilitated and released completed extensive repairs to one of the
multiple marine animals affected by containment moat structures at the Tiger
anthropogenic and natural events this exhibit while a number of animal exhibits at In February 2017, Taronga welcomed a
year. Species included: green turtles; Taronga Western Plains Zoo received new Pygmy Hippopotamus calf. The female,
hawksbill turtles; loggerhead turtles; little standoff fencing and landscaping. Kamina, is the first hippopotamus calf to be
penguins; northern Rockhopper penguins; born at Taronga since her mother Kambiri
Paid Nutrition Consulting Services
red-tailed tropic birds; Australian pelicans; in 2010. Both dam and sire are first-time
This financial year, Taronga offered parents and Kambiri is doing an exceptional
black-winged petrels; Australasian gannets;
paid nutrition consulting services for the job raising her calf. This successful birth
red-footed boobies; white terns; sooty
first time and entered into a contract is highly significant for this endangered
terns; white-bellied sea-eagles; and a long-
with Vetafarm Manufacturing Pty Ltd species. Pygmy Hippos are found in only
nosed fur-seal. Nineteen marine turtles
to formalise the collaboration between four countries in Western Africa, with only
were admitted to the hospital: six were
our organisations. This agreement 2,000-3,000 remaining in the wild and a
successfully rehabilitated and released to
entitles Taronga to discounted prices regional insurance population of only
the ocean and seven remain in care.
on all products and a licensing fee on five individuals.

Wildlife
Dignity and Respect collaborative products sold to any third
In May 2017, Taronga celebrated a new
We continue to see changes in community party. Vetafarm has been working with
addition to Sydney’s Asian Elephant herd
expectations of how good zoos should be Taronga’s Nutritionist for over three years with the successful birth of a male calf to
caring for and presenting wildlife. Taking a on collaborative products such as rodent mother Pak Boon. This male is the cow’s
lead role in this space, Taronga has developed breeder cubes, rodent worm-out cubes, second calf following the birth of female

 �ur care
an ethical framework for displaying the echidna mix and floating bird pellets. Tukta in 2010. A textbook birth followed
animals in our care with dignity and respect. a brief labour: the calf was on his feet
Taronga’s CEO was invited to present within half an hour and suckling within
on this subject this year at the regional two hours. The calf’s name, Jai Dee, is
zoo association workshop and the World Thai for ‘good heart’ and was chosen
Association of Zoo and Aquarium Welfare by a long-term donor to Taronga’s Asian
Symposium at Detroit Zoo in the USA. Elephant breeding program. Jai Dee is the

Be a leader in the care fourth calf born at Taronga Zoo and is a
very important addition to the region’s

and presentation of wildlife, Performance Indicators
conservation breeding population of this
endangered species.

providing positive welfare,
Metric Definition 2016/17 The Corroboree Frog program had a
Positive Animal Welfare 100% Assessment is conducted of the 97% productive year with a successful breeding
season for both the Northern and Southern
dignity and respect for all
Wildlife at our Zoos are wildlife on site. ZAA accreditation
independently assessed as being will be used until the Taronga Tool varieties of the critically endangered
in a positive welfare state. is created and implemented. amphibian. In the first half of 2017,
Taronga Zoo undertook two reintroductions
Positive Animal Welfare 5 Incident is assessed as avoidable 6
Number of avoidable anmal by the Taronga Animal Welfare of Southern Corroboree Frogs to Kosciuszko
welfare incidents. Committee. National Park as part of the species
recovery program. In March, 300 juvenile
Positive Animal Welfare 100% Actions are implemented within 100% Southern Corroboree Frogs were released
Animal welfare incidents are 24 hours to begin to address into 12 disease-free enclosures in the
remediated within 24 hours. a welfare incident or negative
welfare assessment is addressed.
park. Eight of these were part of the 16
enclosures recently constructed by the NSW
From left Wildlife Rehabilitation 1000 Number of cases treated at TZ and 954 National Parks and Wildlife Service with
Gorilla mother and infant Photo: Rick Stevens Number of wildlife TWPZ. funding obtained by Taronga Zoo from
rehabilitation cases. the Federal Department of Environment.
Meerkat mother and pup at Taronga Photo: Bobby Jo Clow
30 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — WILDLIFE IN OUR CARE ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 31

An additional 700 Taronga-bred frog eggs In August 2016, three Short-beaked them some very significant milestones. Rhinoceros, gave birth to a female calf Some of the many births at our Zoos
were released in Kosciuszko National Park
in May 2017 in collaboration with Zoos
Echidna puggles hatched at Backyard to
Bush – the first such hatchings at Taronga in
August saw the birth of 11 African Wild
Mesi in April. Sired by Kwanza, one of
the Zoo’s breeding bulls, Mesi’s birth is
this year required substantial veterinary Wildlife Rehabilitation
input through pregnancy diagnosis, pre-
Victoria and NSW OEH. Dogs, four males and seven females, taking Taronga Wildlife Hospital (TWH) received
nearly 30 years. This breeding success was significant as the first third generation partum reproductive management, birth
the pack to 23 dogs. The large pack has 607 sick, injured and orphaned native
attributed to the newly completed breeding female calf born at the zoo. Globally, she management and neonatal care.
The status of the Plains-wanderer, a become an impressive sight at feeding time, animals for treatment and rehabilitation
facility, designed in consultation with was one of only two births this year in the
significant bird from the arid regions displaying the dogs’ natural behaviours and Among the significant research projects during the year. These included 349
keeping staff at Taronga and other wildlife international Southern Black Rhinoceros
of NSW, was upgraded to critically pack communication. undertaken by the Veterinary team were: birds, 178 mammals, 76 reptiles, three
facilities. Almost a year on, two of the three conservation breeding program partnered
endangered in 2015. A pioneering Port Jackson Shark social preferences and amphibians and one cephalopod (blue-
puggles have survived to adulthood and are Twelve Eland calves were born from through the International Rhinoceros
conservation and research program is spatial strategies; marine turtle satellite ringed octopus). Admissions were made
thriving. The team at Backyard to Bush has September to February. This was a large Foundation. Both mother and calf are doing
now being undertaken at Taronga Zoo, in by government wildlife authorities, wildlife
also continued the successful breeding of number for one season and likely due to very well and are expected to be displayed tracking; the development of DNA markers
partnership with the NSW OEH. This year,
the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat with the the significant rainfall experienced over to visitors during August. for Short-beaked Echidnas; Koala retrovirus rescue groups and community members.
for the first time, Taronga’s Australian
emergence of a female from the pouch of the winter period. During October, the transmission analysis using Koala pedigrees;
Fauna Precinct has successfully raised a Taronga Western Plains Zoo commenced We fitted 33 birds with Australian Bird
four-time mother Kora in June 2017. Zoo welcomed five male and three female development of a forensic tool to identify
second generation of zoo-bred chicks. a number of capital expansion projects and Bat Banding Scheme metal bands
Taronga is also leading the way in species Ring-tailed Lemurs. The group now makes illegally trafficked animals using fur, quills,
The Marine Mammal team has extended during the year, with the African Lion at the time of release to enable
management including the development a great display on the island which was feathers and scales; The establishment
its commitment to plastic-free oceans by Pridelands exhibit now halfway through post-release monitoring.
of husbandry guidelines and nutritional recently refurbished with improvements to of a unique osteopathology collection at
instigating regular beach cleans at Athol construction. This exceptional exhibit will
research. The Plains-wanderer program climbing structures and visitor viewing. Taronga complements our already world- Two heavily oiled birds were admitted
Bay on Sydney Harbour near the Taronga include 3.5 hectares of drive-through area
will soon be extended to Taronga Western Zoo site. In November, 16-year-old Asian Elephant where visitors can take a safari tour in a renowned Australian Registry of Wildlife for specialist treatment: a Red-tailed
Plains Zoo with the ultimate aim of Thong Dee gave birth to male calf Sabai, custom-made vehicle. Health pathology repository. Tropicbird in breeding plumage found
After 20 years, Taronga’s iconic Free at Rushcutter’s Bay, and a Black-winged
breeding for release. the first elephant calf to be born at Taronga
Flight Bird Show was reviewed and Taronga Western Plains Zoo has started Taronga Wildlife Hospital’s nutritional
Western Plains Zoo. Now seven months Petrel from Lord Howe Island. Two juvenile
A notable innovation from the Wildlife team revamped to ensure that it remains the process of redeveloping the Australian geometry, microbiome and stable isotope
old, Sabai weighs 382kg and is a great gift Northern Rockhopper Penguins were found
was the transformation of a storeroom relevant and delivers appropriate and Native Fauna Sanctuary as an exciting studies in partnership with University
in the Australian Nightlife back of house to the zoo’s 40th anniversary celebrations at Coogee and Lord Howe Island and
effective conservation messaging. addition to the Zoo’s native animal recovery of Sydney, Macquarie University and
into an immersive space where guests can which commenced in February. November admitted to TWH. The birds, although a
programs. The 110 HA habitat will have University of NSW have led to a greater
experience nocturnal Australian mammals. Taronga Western Plains Zoo also saw African Lion, Maya, give birth little underweight, were in good health and
up to 30 aviaries for the breeding of the understanding of the needs of many native
This room offers a unique behind-the- The Wildlife Conservation and Science to four healthy male cubs. The four cubs were DNA sexed as males. They were the
critically endangered Plains Wanderer and exotic species including gliders, seals,
scenes experience for Zoo Adventure guests team at Taronga Western Plains Zoo – Karoo, Bakari, Sharu and Virunga – are first of this species to be recorded in New
as part of the NSW Government’s Save Plains-wanderers and echidnas.
and VIPs. The secure surrounds mean is responsible for planning and managing currently living with their mother, aunties South Wales.
Our Species initiative. Construction is
that species such as Feather-tail Gliders up to 63 species, a number of these listed and father Lazarus. The eight-strong pride Nutrition information was disseminated
well underway and the Zoo anticipates The 30 endangered marine turtles
and Ring-tail Possums can exhibit natural as endangered. The past year has been will form the nucleus of the new African in two published scientific papers, three
the arrival of the first cohort of birds in admitted during the year included
behaviours and feed while guests observe an exciting time for Taronga Western Plains Lion Pridelands development scheduled
Spring 2017. The Sanctuary will also be chapters in animal care manuals, and
Zoo, as we welcomed a number of new for opening at the end of 2017. 23 Greens, four Hawksbills and three
and learn about their conservation from home to programs for Bilbies and Regent presentations at various symposia. For
accompanying keeping staff. additions to key species programs, among Loggerheads. An unprecedented number
First-time mother Kufara, a Black Honeyeaters, as well as programs for the first time, Taronga offered nutrition
habitat restoration and improvement. of hatchling marine turtles were brought
consulting services to other zoos.
to TWH after being washed ashore by
Conservation Program and Population Management Program Taronga Western Plains Zoo heavy seas. A Green Turtle found at Lake
The Taronga Western Plains Zoo Wildlife Macquarie required a flipper amputation

Species
Held at Held at
TZ TWPZ Coordinator

Species
Held at Held at
TZ TWPZ Coordinator
Taronga Wildlife Hospital had a busy year providing a after a severe fishing line injury. She was

Addax
African Lion X
X
X
C Magner/L Elliot*
L Ginman*
Noisy Pitta
Orange-bellied Parrot
X
X


E Schmelitschek*
A Everaardt
Hospitals comprehensive veterinary health service
to the Zoo’s diverse animal collection.
successfully rehabilitated and released
with a satellite tag to monitor her survival
Taronga Zoo and movements as part of Taronga’s
The Zoo continued to invest significant
African Wild Dog X D Noble Plains-wanderer X M Sheils*
Taronga’s Veterinary team played a pivotal Marine Turtle Satellite Tracking Project.
resources in the region’s Asian Elephant
Asian Elephant X X A Embury Plains Zebra X X L Jolly role in our animal care and conservation All turtles released are also flipper
program, with elephant reproductive and
Australian Little Penguin X N Boyle* Przewalski’s Horse X F Cameron* programs this year and is becoming tagged and microchipped.
medical management being a particular
Bellinger River Turtle X A Skidmore* Pygmy Hippopotamus X R Moss* increasingly involved in research. focus for the Wildlife Hospital this year. Other interesting cases included: White-
Black-and-white Ruffed Lemur X S Barlow Quokka X X B Turner
Plains-wanderers continue to present Their work included a dental intervention bellied Sea-eagles, Yellow-bellied Gliders,
Black-handed Spider Monkey X L Grossfeldt Red Panda X C Hibbard significant health challenges and the for one of the Zoo’s breeding females, Feathertail Glider, Australasian Grebe,
Black-winged Stilt X V Wilson Regent Bowerbird X M Shiels* finalisation of a Disease Risk Assessment coordinating the artificial insemination of Little Penguins, Peregrine Falcon, a Gould’s
Bongo X X P Benoit* Regent Honeyeater X M Van Sluys/M Sheils/ was a key milestone for this program. another cow and overseeing the Zoo’s first Wattled Bat, New Zealand (Long-nosed)
Broad-headed Snake X D Gilbert E Schmelitschek* Preparations for the breeding of elephant birth. Fur-seals and a Two-clawed Worm Skink.
Brolga X C Srb Ring-tailed Lemur X X D Noble endangered Bellinger River Turtles Our Wildlife Hospital also plays a critical role The Taronga Western Plains Zoo Wildlife
Brush-tailed Bettong X V Wilson Rose-crowned Fruit-dove X N Atchison involved the ultrasonographic monitoring in managing the health of older animals Hospital also runs a fully-funded Wildlife
Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby X A Elphinstone* Sacred Kingfisher X C Srb of female reproductive changes which at Taronga’s Western Plains Zoo. Health Service to meet a need in Central Western
Cheetah X S Eyre Scimitar Oryx X D Burgoyne culminated in ovulation, egg production information gathered by Zoo veterinarians NSW for high level veterinary expertise in
Siamang X L Laurenson
and successful hatchings. Taronga’s is used as part of Taronga’s Aged Animal the assessment, treatment, rehabilitation
Chimpanzee X M Finnigan
Veterinary Pathologist was called on to Assessment mechanism to ensure animal and release of sick, injured and orphaned
Cook Strait Tuatara X S Eyre Small-clawed Otter X X L Booth
investigate the unfortunate death of welfare is optimal. Australian native animals.. The hospital is
Cotton-Top Tamarin X A Embury Southern Black Rhinoceros X N Boyle* a Sumatran rhinoceros in Kalimantan, well situated to monitor significant wildlife
Eastern Whipbird X M Tantini* Southern Cassowary X Vacant further cementing our contribution Our hospital team sees a diverse caseload
disease issues and, in partnership with
Eland X L Elliot* Squirrel Monkey X L Grossfeldt to the conservation of this critically in its day-to-day work, providing a unique
the Australian Registry of Wildlife Health
Sumatran Orang-utan X A Embury endangered species. opportunity for the workplace education of
Fijian Crested Iguana X P Harlow* based at Taronga Zoo, contributes wildlife
veterinary students. The Taronga Western
Ghost Bat X J Hollamby Sumatran Tiger X X C Hibbard health data to the national Zoo Biosecurity
Plains Zoo Wildlife Hospital is a Partner
Giraffe X X L Jolly Tasmanian Devil X X C Goldstone-Henry Surveillance database.
in Veterinary Education with Sydney
Goodfellow’s Tree-kangaroo X M Richardson Waterbuck X L van der Sande
University and hosted numerous veterinary
Greater Bilby X J Buchecker Western Lowland Gorilla X E Walraven*/ L Grossfeldt students on extramural training placements
Greater One-horned Rhinoceros X N Boyle* White Rhinoceros X N Boyle*/Catherine Nichols this year.
Helmeted Honeyeater X K Cartwright White-browed Woodswallow X V Wilson
Hippopotamus X Y Pauligk White-cheeked Gibbon X H Thompson
Meerkat X X S Eyre
*Staff member
32 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — EXCELLENCE IN CONSERVATION EDUCATION TARONGA 100 33

ExcelLence 
Conservation
E�ucation
Increase participation
and inspire action
for the wild through
innovative and authentic
education programs

Shoulder to Shoulder 
Photo: Rick Stevens

Key achievements
Education Taskforce Convened New Accredited Tourism Courses with education professionals, and position Project Habitat Builds Awareness for its protection such as tree planting,
An Education Taskforce was convened The Taronga Training Institute (TTI) Taronga as a trusted source of educational and Drives Behaviour Change nest box building, habitat clean-up
as part of the detailed operational delivered several new accredited tourism resources and inspiration. TTA members Project Habitat commenced in 2015 and bush regeneration. An integral part
planning for the new Taronga Institute courses at major NSW tourist facilities such have access to events, resources and with support from Boeing Australia. The of the Taronga Education strategic plan,
of Science and Learning. Comprising as the Royal Botanic Gardens and the Art opportunities for professional learning in program targets NSW communities to build Project Insitu has had a tangible impact
senior members of the school, vocational Gallery of NSW. The courses contributed the areas of Science and Technology, STEM, awareness and drive behaviour change for on communities across the state,
education and training and university to the development of more than 300 Geography and the cross-curriculum areas habitat restoration and wildlife protection. generating action and support for
sectors, the Taskforce worked with Taronga volunteers across the industry and provided of Sustainability and Aboriginal Histories This has been successfully achieved through 13 threatened species.
team members to identify opportunities valuable guidance on transitioning to paid and Cultures. an increase in community participation led
to increase student engagement with employment in the tourism and community by our Zoomobile through attending over
National Geographic WildEarth TV
Taronga, and develop quality education service sectors. 12,000 tree planting days, running bush
Taronga Education partnered with National Performance Indicators
programs for delivery by the new institute. regeneration days resulting in the removal
Certificate III in Captive Animals Geographic WildEarth TV to connect over
of two hectares of exotic weeds and 2015/16 2016/17
First Series of Student Workshops Following a successful pilot program in 4000 students from NSW schools to the
educating approximately 43,000 people in
Taronga staff developed and delivered 2016, the TTI continued its interstate wilds of South Africa. Through a captivating Total visitation* 1,838,992 1,931,000
the Greater Sydney region on how to care
workshops to complement undergraduate delivery of the Certificate III in Captive stream hosted by Taronga’s Hayden Turner,
for our wildlife and their environments. Students visiting on a school excursion
university study in anticipation of the Animals in partnership with Zoos Victoria the students experienced a ‘real time’ jeep Taronga Zoo 98,018 96,627
opening of its new institute in 2018. Some and Perth Zoo. This program contributes to ride searching for wildlife, learned about Taronga’s Project Insitu reached Taronga Western Plains Zoo 9,650 8,926
256 students participated in the first series skills development and in the Animal Care animal trails and faecal samples and had more than 10,000 Students
of workshops with a further 37 students and Management industry. their questions answered by the WildEarth Taronga’s Project Insitu reached more than People participating in Public /
Outreach education programs 44,733 51,621
completing work placements at Taronga. team. Feedback from this educational 10,000 students across metropolitan and Taronga Zoo & Taronga Western Plains Zoo
Taronga Teachers Association
Another 30 postgraduate students experience showed high satisfaction. remote New South Wales. Participants
Taronga Teachers Association (TTA)
undertook Masters and PhD research undertake a common task of raising *Total Visitation (Paid admissions and FOC) includes the following:
Membership was reconfigured at the end (1) Z
 oo Friends, paid education and overnight stays.
projects at our two Zoos with co-supervision awareness in their local community for
of 2016 in order to capture and connect (2) F
 unction guests and Twilight Concert attendees at Taronga Zoo.
by Taronga staff. a chosen species and taking direct action (3) Function guests at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.
34 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — EXCELLENCE IN CONSERVATION EDUCATION TARONGA 100 35

Key to Taronga’s education programs is the The Zoomobile also visits many special to Shoulder, the 490km walk provided Wildlife Workshops
Education and provision of inspiring animal connections needs schools and juvenile justice facilities, Community and each young person with the strength of This high value education program for

Community Programs and experiences that enhance student
learning and align with the Australian
achieving excellent student outcomes
and engagement. Aboriginal Programs knowledge that they can complete any
challenge ahead. The journey launched
overseas students focuses on English
language skills and conservation outcomes.
Some 140,000 students, teachers and National Curriculum. These experiences Burbangana and Walanmarra Programs Taronga’s Centenary celebrations and The program experienced strong growth
The Zoomobile program is running to
carers participated in Taronga’s formal have proved highly engaging for students Burbangana and Walanmarra are our reinforced the strong relationship between this year with a 29% increase in student
capacity in the Sydney region, catering not
or community (informal) education of all ages and backgrounds. Classrooms award-winning Family and Community our Burbangana and Walanmarra numbers. A total of 1,350 overseas students
only to students with access challenges,
programs during 2016/17. These in the new Taronga Science and Learning Services partnership programs. They programs and the NSW Dept of Family participated, including new groups from
but also to our partners with environmental
programs are delivered on various Institute will build on this key element, cater for children at risk, helping them and Community Services. Indonesia and China.
education centres such as the Australian
platforms both onsite at our two showcasing heavily themed habitat rooms build their self-esteem and confidence,
Museum and the Royal Botanic Gardens. Project Habitat Zoo Adventures
Zoos and as outreach programs to enhance the student animal experience. and develop interpersonal relationships
This year 13,500 people participated in a Supported by Boeing Australia and run This “wild” holiday program had a very
within the community. Taronga Western Plains Zoo maintained Zoomobile program. and communication skills within the safe through our Zoomobile program, Project successful year, effectively navigating
its strong focus on community outreach environment of our Zoos. The programs Habitat operates at the community level the impacts of the Education Centre’s
Project In-situ have now extended their reach and impact
Formal Learning Programs through programs like GoMad (Go Make to build awareness and drive behaviour demolition. Children participated in special
This award-winning program continues to to work with children within their local area,
All Taronga education programs are a Difference) for youth and the Regional change for habitat restoration and wildlife tours, workshops, craft activities and games
go from strength to strength as a true assisting them to make connections and
delivered by fully qualified teachers, Sustainability Outreach Program. protection. The Zoomobile ran bush to learn about animals and conservation.
example of the power of student-directed access opportunities within the context
including onsite staff provided by the This year, 8,816 students visited the zoo regeneration days resulting in the This year, 1,585 children enjoyed a Zoo
learning in a project-based model of their own lives. More than 20 children
NSW Department of Education and with 3,269 participating in curriculum- planting of over 12,000 trees and the Adventure at Taronga Zoo while another
environment. Students become the participated in these specialised programs
Catholic Education. These skilled educators related workshops. removal of two hectares of exotic weeds. 250 participated at Taronga Western
change agents for an endangered species over the course of the year.
work with various teams at Taronga to As part of the same program, some 43,000 Plains Zoo.
The Education team at Taronga Zoo by first gaining an in-depth knowledge
deliver cutting edge programs in science, Shoulder to Shoulder people in the Greater Sydney region
has had a more challenging year. The of the animal and its environment and Keeper for a Day
conservation, geography and other key In September 2016, fifteen young people learned how to care for our wildlife and its
demolition of the Education Centre and then designing programs to inspire Participation in this engaging program
learning areas. A big focus this year has who have suffered severe trauma and environment. A record 70 primary schools
classrooms required the modification community action for its protection. grew by nearly 10% over the year, with
been on teacher professional development neglect in their lives undertook a walk to from around New South Wales entered our
of most of its programs and workshops. Insitu means working in the animal’s 1,200 children and adults working under
with over 250 teachers undertaking our reconnect with country and ignite within NAIDOC banner competition and 2,000
Nevertheless, some 96,000 students environment or habitat, so the impacts the guidance of our keepers to care for
courses on project-based learning and themselves a sense of belonging, pride students participated in a Taronga-led
participated in education programs, of the program directly benefit the target Taronga’s animals.  
Aboriginal Education. and cultural responsibility. Called Shoulder cultural activity.
including formal workshops in three species. Conservation experts provide
Our well-used Education Centre was learning sites and new programs in rich information and inputs for the
demolished during the year to make geography, Aboriginal education and students with school mentors guiding
way for the new Taronga Science and business studies. Tertiary students engaged primary students to design multi-media
Learning Institute. An Education Taskforce, with Taronga educators and researchers interpretation and communications
comprising key influencers from the to explore issues at the heart of Taronga’s materials. This year, over 1,500 students
education sector, was convened to help mission using problem-based learning participated in Project Insitu across New
identify opportunities to increase student methodologies. Work placements were South Wales, targeting the Little Penguin,
access and engagement with Taronga, and provided for 37 tertiary students and Grey Crowned Babbler, Yellow Bellied Glider,
develop quality education programs for 30 postgraduate students undertook Regent Honeyeater and Port Jackson Shark.
delivery by the new institute. Masters and PhD research projects at our
Safari Live
Zoos with co-supervision by Taronga staff.
Members of the Education Piloted in partnership with National
Taskforce included: ZoosnooZ Geographic, this new program connected
It was a year of transition for Zoosnooz 4,100 students with a Taronga Education
• Prof. David Wilkinson, Macquarie at Taronga Zoo with the demolition of Officer in South Africa as he explored the
University, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, the old Education Centre. The program country’s wildlife reserves. Students and
Corporate Engagement and was relocated to the stage and concert teachers experienced amazing visuals
Advancement lawns to become an exciting tent-sleeping in real time and watched the Education
• Prof. Merlin Crossley, University of experience. The night walk and early Officer track animals, interpret their
New South Wales, Deputy Vice- morning behind-the-scenes elements were behaviour and decipher their diet from
Chancellor, Education maintained and proved extremely popular their droppings.
with the 5,705 students who participated
• Prof. Ann Brewer, University of Work Experience and Meet a Keeper
in the program during the year.
Newcastle, Dean of Sydney These oversubscribed vocational
Campus (Academic Division) At Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Zoosnooz programs continue to deliver strong
takes place in the immersive Billabong learning outcomes for students at both
• Margy Osmond, Tourism and Transport Camp, an authentic bush camp where our Zoos. Some 290 students undertook
Forum, CEO (past Chair, TAFE NSW) the students sleep and undertake an work experience with Taronga this year,
• Susan Hartigan, past Director, TAFE NSW enriching program of educational activities. shadowing and working with keepers across
— Western Sydney Institute This year, 2510 students participated in this the different divisions to get a realistic
popular program. perspective of their role. Meet a Keeper
• Cheryl Best, Department of Education, is an expo style day where students are
Executive Director Learning and Business Zoomobile
exposed to a diversity of careers in zoos,
Systems Zoomobile is an equity outreach program,
attending presentations and undertaking
providing an educational and animal
• Gary Carey, Sydney Catholic Schools, special tours. This year, 400 students
experience for those students who face
Education Officer: Secondary Science participated in the program across
challenges in visiting Taronga’s sites. This
both sites.
• Rob Randall, Australian initiative supports the NSW Department of
Curriculum, Assessment Education’s Regional and Remote strategy
and Reporting Authority, CEO to ensure equity for all students.

• Darryl Buchanan, Association of
Asian Elephant Shoulder to Shoulder
Independent Schools, Director
Photo: Rick Stevens Photo: Rick Stevens
Professional Learning
36 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — TRANSFORMATIONAL GUEST EXPERIENCES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 37

Key achievements

Transf�rmational
Record Guest Admissions Taronga’s Youth at the Zoo Program
Both Zoos saw record guest admissions Taronga’s Youth at the Zoo (YATZ)
this year (over 1.9 million) thanks to program also focuses on diversity and
our Centenary promotions, successful inclusion, providing volunteering and social
accommodation products and our largest opportunities for special needs youth. Our

Guest Experiences
Twilight and Vivid attendances ever. YATZ mentors were crucial to the success
International guest numbers at Taronga of this initiative, providing quality
Zoo were also unprecedented. leadership and support for these young
people. YATZ members also played an
Taronga Zoo’s New Guest App
important role in our campaign activation,
Taronga Zoo introduced a new guest
holiday programs, Vivid events and as
experience app, helping guests navigate
ambassadors within their schools and
Attract an increasing number of the Zoo more easily, notifying them of
daily events and incorporating interactive
communities. They assisted with the launch
of the Wild Squad program and worked

guests to our Zoos and inspire action
activities for children. Some 10% of
closely with our Bird Division on its largest
visitors installed the app on their phones
release of Regent Honeyeater.
(compared to industry norms of 5%).
through experiences that increase Wild Squad App Launched
We launched Wild Squad, a new initiative
Digital Infrastructure Upgrade
We began the complex process of

knowledge and change people’s to engage, inspire and involve children in
wildlife conservation. Our new Taronga App
upgrading Taronga’s digital infrastructure
as part of our transition to cloud-based

attitudes and behaviours includes fun, educational and interactive
Wild Squad Missions featuring our 10
Legacy Species.
IT systems. Tenders were sought for our
Ticketing Replacement Project which will
be a game-changer for Taronga, impacting
on how we do business and engage with
Taronga Centenary Theatre Opens our customers. Overall, the technology
In March, the Taronga Centenary Theatre upgrade will increase our bandwidth and
opened with a screening of Wild Squad online capabilities in line with industry
Adventures, a bespoke film for children and standards. Taronga’s online Zoo shop was Clockwise from left
their families highlighting some of our key also moved to a cloud-based web host
Echidna and Student
conservation activities, including breeding during the year, improving online security Photo: Rick Stevens
and release programs and the treatment and the customer experience.
Centenary Theatre
of injured wildlife.
Award-Winning Photo: Anders Alexander
200 Families Participate Taronga Western Plains Zoo won gold in VIVID at Taronga Zoo Sydney 2017
in Taronga Access Initiative two categories at the NSW Tourism Awards Photo: Rick Stevens
Taronga Access is a special day in November 2016, taking out the Best
developed for children with autism and Attraction and Unique Accommodation
their families. The zoo opens early for categories. The Zoo and its famous Zoofari
participants, minimising the impact of Lodge also won coveted accommodation
noise and enabling a more achievable categories at the 2016 Qantas Australian
and meaningful experience for all. Special Tourism Awards and the LUX 2016 Hotel
activities and calm zones are some of the and Spa Awards.
strategies implemented by Taronga and our
partner Autism Spectrum Australia. Over
200 families have now participated in the
initiative for which the feedback has been
overwhelmingly positive.

Performance Indicators
2015/16 2016/17
Satisfied guests as measured through satisfaction surveys
Taronga Zoo 92% 91%
Taronga Western Plains Zoo 79% 82%
Complaints per 1,000 guests(1)
Taronga Zoo 0.19 0.14
Taronga Western Plains Zoo 0.49 0.62
(1) Calculation excludes event and function guests at both Zoos.
38 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — TRANSFORMATIONAL GUEST EXPERIENCES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 39

Staff carefully monitor and action their positive engagement with wildlife
Guest Services all feedback received via the guest and wild spaces now and into the future.
satisfaction surveys, across online review The opening of the Taronga Centenary
Taronga strives to deliver the highest
sites, including Trip Advisor where both Theatre featured Wild Squad Adventures,
standard of customer service with
Zoos are ranked with the very high 4.5 star a bespoke film for kids and their families
a highly engaged team of guest
recognition, through written feedback and highlighting some of our key conservation
experience staff and volunteers
also via external, post visit surveys. activities, including breeding and release
dedicated to achieving this outcome.
programs and the treatment of injured
Guest Learning and Interpretation
Our admissions and ticketing processes wildlife. The new Taronga App also includes
Taronga’s Centenary celebrations were
have been a focus for us this year, with transformative education experiences for
a priority for our Interpretation team this
collected data and feedback indicating kids, both on-site and online.
year. To coincide with our 100th birthday,
significant improvements in this area. The a new Guest Experience Plan was Zoo Friends
increased presence of staff and volunteers introduced with a focus on celebration, The Zoo Friends annual pass remains
at Taronga Zoo’s arrival zones at the emotional engagement and inspiration a popular option for families, offering
wharf and car park is providing our guests to action. Each month, we showcased one excellent value for money for those who
with real time information about shows of our 10 Legacy Species, with Keeper are regular guests to Taronga’s Zoos.
and attractions and providing upfront Talks, trails, tours, spot guiding and
assistance with GPS navigation tools. The Zoo Friends membership base grew
targeted kids’ activities. These activities
to over 86,000 members over the year, an
Our guest experience teams have were led by our dedicated team of
increase of more than 14%. At Taronga
worked hard to mitigate the impacts of ‘Taronga 100’ volunteers who played
Western Plains Zoo, the local take-up
construction work on our guests, providing a key role in engaging guests with our
of Zoo Friends membership has reached
clear and up-to-date information about Centenary celebrations.
record levels, with almost 11,000
the programs and offering alternative high We also installed updated and new active members.
value experiences such as additional keeper interpretive signage and collateral,
talks and animal encounters. The Squirrel This strong growth is expected to continue
featuring Taronga’s heritage, our 10
Monkey walk-through was developed to over the coming year thanks to changes
Legacy Species, Eid Festival, Vivid Sydney,
enhance the guest experience and offset to the Zoo Friends pricing structure in May
the Port Jackson Shark Research Project
the impacts of the capital plan. During the 2017. The overall cost of membership
and significant animal births. Larger scale
year, Taronga Zoo received 455 complaints, has been reduced and accessibility
projects for the Interpretation Team in
(0.19 per 1000 guests), most of them increased with the inclusion of two free
Sydney included the development of
pertaining to the lack of big cats on display child memberships with every paid adult
experiences like the Squirrel Monkey
while the Tiger Trek is under construction. membership. The changes brought an
walkthrough exhibit and Bee Hive exhibit.
immediate and positive response from
Taronga Western Plains Zoo has introduced In Dubbo, major interpretation projects
existing and previous Zoo Friends members
new way-finding tools to help guests included the new Meerkat exhibit and play
and should ensure that the program
navigate the site. This year, the Zoo space, and the roll-out of a $120K way-
remains a vital revenue stream for the
received 94 complaints (0.14 complaints finding and interpretative signage package.
operation of both Zoos and their science
per 1000 guests), the majority of which Other interpretive projects under the and conservation programs.
related to the cost of admission and lack of Centenary Capital Plan include: the delivery
way finding signage. In total, Zoo Friends made over 237,000
phase of Tiger Trek and Lion Pride Lands
visits during the year, with many members
Guest satisfaction surveys interpretations, and the development
attending exclusive events such as the
A variety of techniques are used to assess of guest learning and behaviour change
Zoo Friends Christmas night and a special
guest’s satisfaction with their visit to Taronga narratives and resources for upcoming
preview of Vivid Sydney at Taronga Zoo.
Zoo and Taronga Western Plains Zoo, projects such as the Wildlife Retreat,
Members also received three editions
including guest satisfaction surveys. Despite Savannah & Congo precinct and the
of our popular Wildlife magazine during
major construction developments impacting Institute of Science and Learning.
the year.
the guest experiences at both sites across the The launch of Wild Squad was another
year, overall satisfaction, (as measured via Dreamnight
highlight of 2016/17. This important new
the overall satisfaction with value for money Dreamnight is held on the first Thursday
platform has been designed as part of our
rating) remained high at 4.6 for Taronga Zoo of December each year and is a special
mission to inform our youngest Zoo guests
and 4.1 at Taronga Western Plains Zoo. free of charge evening for children who
about conservation issues and inspire
are facing serious health challenges or
are disabled. At Taronga Zoo 22 charities
were involved allocating tickets to over
Visitor customer satisfaction levels; 12 month average
3850 amazing children and their families.
TZ TWPZ A total of 190 staff and volunteers gave
14/15 15/16 16/17 14/15 15/16 16/17 these children the night of their lives with
Overall satisfaction with value for money 4.6 4.6 4.6 4 4.1 4.1
amazing surprises and animal experiences.
At Taronga Western Plains Zoo working
Educational value 4.6 4.5 4.5 4 4.1 4.2 with 20 charities a total of 400 children
Ease of moving around 4.4 4.3 4.4 4.1 4.3 4.2 and their family had a memorable night
of animal feeds and encounters. Staff and
Visibility of animals 4.4 4.2 4.3 3.7 4.1 3.9
volunteers at both zoos love delivering this
Welfare of animals 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.3 amazing night.
Variety of animals 4.7 4.5 4.4 4 4.4 4.3
Helpfulness of staff 4.6 4.7 4.6 3.9 3.8 4.1
Shows and keeper talks 4.4 4.4 4.4 3.9 4.1 4.1
Cleanliness of grounds/facilities 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.3 4.5 4.1 Taronga Access Day
12 month average converted to an average out of 5.0 = very satisfied. 1 = very dissatisfied. Photo: Quentin Jones
40 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — ENGAGE AND INFLUENCE TARONGA 100 41

Engage  Key achievements
100th Birthday Celebrations Taronga Foundation’s
Annual Fundraising Ball

Influence
Taronga Zoo celebrated its 100th birthday
on October 7 2016, serving up surprises for With the theme ‘Zoofari 100 – Celebrating
its giraffes, elephants and more than 6,000 a Centenary’, the Taronga Foundation’s
guests to mark a century of bringing people annual fundraising ball was a huge success,
and wildlife together. The lucky guests raising over $700,000 for Taronga’s
won their free tickets to the ‘party of the Australian Legacy Programs. Over 450
century’ via a ballot which attracted more supporters attended the sold-out event.

Engage, grow and mobilise than 100,000 entries. NSW Environment
Minister Mark Speakman and Governor of
They had the opportunity to meet some of
Taronga’s friendly Australian animals in the

our members, supporters and NSW joined Taronga CEO Cameron Kerr
at the Zoo’s historic entrance building to
Backyard to Bush precinct before enjoying
an evening of dancing and celebration.

networks to achieve positive cut the ribbon and officially launch the
birthday festivities.
ANZ Support and
Continued Commitment

outcomes for wildlife The Centenary Parade Highlight Event
The Centenary Parade was a highlight of
the Centenary year. Taronga recreated
ANZ supported Taronga’s celebrations in
the second half of 2016 as the Presenting
Partner of Taronga Zoo’s centenary year.
the historic journey taken by zoo staff and This support included sponsorship of
animals from the original site at Moore the Wild Bunch collectibles series which
Park to the new site at Mosman a century featured in The Daily Telegraph and
ago. The Parade brought central Sydney Sunday Telegraph, the 100th Birthday
to a stand-still as 15,000 people gathered Party and the Centenary Parade. ANZ
to watch 10 giant sculptures representing further extended its financial support
Taronga’s 10 Legacy Species, 450 staff to the 2017 Twilight at Taronga concert
and volunteers and 700 dancing children series, demonstrating this partner’s
retrace the footsteps of one hundred years continued commitment to Taronga’s
ago, culminating at the steps of the Sydney conservation endeavours.
Opera House. The event received significant
Vivid Sydney and Twilight
coverage, generating more than 1,000
Evening Events
media stories.
2017 has seen Taronga increase its
Two-Day Eid Festival community engagement via evening
Taronga Zoo joined with community events. This second year of participation
partner Crescent Wealth to host its first in Vivid Sydney saw a host of new
Eid Festival in 2016, celebrating the end sculptures and lighting creations installed
of the Ramadan fasting period. The two- at the Zoo and an increase in overall
day festival featured international food attendances of 20%. Meanwhile, the 2017
offerings, information stalls, entertainment Twilight at Taronga concert series achieved
and presentations of Taronga’s community the greatest number of ticket sales in its
conservation programs, attracting more 22-year history with over 31,000 guests
than 7,000 members of Sydney’s Islamic coming through the gates.
communities.
Raise Your Palm Program
Online Ticket Sales Continue to Grow Taronga developed Raise your Palm, a
Taronga recorded its highest number community conservation program aimed at
of online ticket sales with an increase leveraging community action and support
of more than 140% on the previous year. for a sustainable palm oil industry. The
Online sales continue to grow Taronga’s new Sumatran Tiger precinct will include
community and provide opportunities a digital supermarket, informing Zoo guests
to better engage with guests before and about specific supermarket products, their
after their zoo visit. manufacture and retail, in order to promote
Certified Sustainable Palm Oil.

VIVID Parade 2016 
Photo: Quentin Jones
42 STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS — ENGAGE AND INFLUENCE ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 43

For the Oceans
Community Promoting a Corporate
Conservation programs healthy future for
our marine life Communications
Taronga’s conservation programs aim
to inspire and motivate individuals
by encouraging
sustainable
and Media Relations
and businesses to choose, champion seafood choices and plastic free oceans. Our Media team continued to employ
and change their everyday behaviours the full mix of traditional, digital and
Taronga’s seal show encourages Australians
to support wildlife conservation social media, to communicate Taronga’s
to choose MSC Certified sustainable
and environmental sustainability. conservation messages and vision, and
seafood. Of the 750,000 guests attending
Both Taronga’s Zoos provide highlight our events and campaigns.
these shows each year, 81% recalled the
transformational experiences that conservation messages presented.
empower guests to alter their attitudes The birth of ‘Jai Dee’, a healthy Asian
and behaviours to achieve positive Grants to the value of $92,000, through the
Elephant calf at Taronga Zoo was one of
outcomes for wildlife. NSW Environment Trust Education program
the biggest stories of the year, reaching
($72,000) and the Australian Ethical
a wide local and international audience.
Community grants program ($20,000),
Wildlife Witness The story had a strong presence online
were awarded to Taronga’s Plastic Free
Combating illegal wildlife and across mainstream TV and radio
Oceans to create an educational toolkit
trade for greater protection news outlets and syndicates, and featured
for schools and communities to reduce
of wildlife around the heavily in metropolitan, regional and local
single- use plastics.
world including Sun Bears, print media. Images and footage of our
elephants and rhinoceros. Ray of Light, a stingray made from first successful hatchings of Short-beaked
3000 recycled milk bottles, featured at Echidnas in nearly 30 years and the birth
The Wildlife Witness smartphone app has Vivid, alongside a provocative display of of our Pygmy Hippo, Kamina, also received
had over 11,000 downloads, resulting in jellyfish and other sea creatures made from excellent local and international coverage,
the reporting and intervention of sales of single-use plastics. as did the celebrations of Taronga Zoo’s
species such as pangolins, hornbills and 100th anniversary.
slipper orchids across Southeast Asia. Beads for Wildlife
Supporting people and The popularity of Taronga’s Asian
Wildlife Witness was featured globally at wildlife in Northern Kenya Elephants was re-enforced at Taronga
leading conservation conferences during through alternative incomes Western Plains Zoo where the biggest story
the year, including the International Union and anti-poaching patrols. of the year was the arrival of Dubbo’s first
for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Asian Elephant calf, Sabai in November
the US Association of Zoos and Aquariums The sale of beadwork through the Zoos’
2016. Social media posts achieved high
(AZA) and the World Association of Zoos retail outlets provides communities in
engagement, with the first video following
and Aquariums (WAZA). Northern Kenya with an alternative source
the birth reaching an audience of over half
of income, reducing the competitive
Taronga’s ongoing partnership with a million. The Zoo’s other major arrivals,
pressure on wildlife. This year, our retail
TRAFFIC Southeast Asia provides support including Cheetah cubs, Lion cubs and a
team sold over 9,664 bead products on
for their enforcement program and the Black Rhino calf, also received positive and
behalf of the people and wildlife of Kenya.
Wildlife Crime Analyst. This partnership extensive media coverage. The launch of
led to international scrutiny and action in Raise Your Palm the Zoo’s newest experience, Savannah
response to the burgeoning illegal trade Driving the transition Safari late in 2016 generated strong local
in the Bornean Earless Monitor Lizard, towards a truly responsible and regional coverage, as did the Zoo’s
with TRAFFIC working with the Malaysian palm oil industry. 40th birthday in February 2017. A major
government to have the species listed as highlight of the year occurred in June when,
Taronga has been
threatened by trade through CITES with the support of Destination NSW,
developing a new program
in 2016. the entire Channel Nine Today Show was
to leverage community action to support
broadcast from Taronga Western Plains
They’re Calling on You the transition towards a responsible and
Zoo. The national broadcast attracted a
Recycling mobile sustainable palm oil industry. Our new
They’re cumulative audience of over 1.2 million,
phones to reduce Sumatran Tiger precinct will include
calling winning its ratings timeslot.
landfill and support a digital supermarket, raising public
on you!
primate conservation. awareness of habitat destruction and
allowing manufacturers and retailers
Taronga has recycled over 50,000 mobile to promote the shift to 100% Certified
phones since 2009, raising over $80,000 Sustainable Palm Oil. Taronga Digital
to support primate conservation in the
June YoY
Maiko-Tanya Kahuzi-Beiga region in the Snapshot 2017 Growth
Democratic Republic of Congo through the
Jane Goodall Institute. TZ Facebook 201,289 25%

TWPZ Facebook 63,734 24%

Performance Indicators Instagram 118,000 16%
2016/17 Twitter 19,100 13%
Number of community campaign actions for the wild 31,884 YouTube 4,159 17%

Keeper with fur-seal
Photo: Paul Fahy
44 KEY ENABLERS — PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONAL STRENGTH ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 45

Key achievements

pe�ple 
Fostering Workforce Diversity Learning and Development Team
Taronga continued to foster diversity The Learning and Development team
in its workforce, working with the OEH to provided 201 new Taronga employees
improve our Aboriginal Employment and with a holistic induction as part of our new
Multicultural Strategies, and our Disability eLearning onboarding program. This covers

�rganisational
Action Plan. We were finalists in the safety, sustainability and animal welfare
Indigenous Employment category of the at Taronga zoos and includes face-to-face
Australian Human Resource Institute (AHRI) orientation sessions with the Executive
Awards. We delivered Aboriginal Cultural team. Another 223 Taronga employees
Awareness Training to 284 employees to completed the Animal Welfare at Taronga

Strength
increase their understanding of the complex eLearning module during the year, and
history, culture and challenges within the we launched Leading the Wild, a new
Indigenous Australian community. management development program for our
current and aspiring leaders.
Volunteer Recruitment
Taronga recruited the highest number of Enterprise Risk Management Policy
volunteers in the history of its volunteering Our Enterprise Risk Management Policy

Support and enable our people program, including 241 Keeper volunteers
and another 668 for Vivid Sydney at
Taronga Zoo and our Centenary Parade.
was revised in line with key government
risk management policies, principles and
guidelines to help safeguard Taronga’s
to achieve Taronga’s vision and Safety Performance
financial and organisational strength. This
involved the review of Taronga’s major

strategic objectives
We continued to measure and monitor
strategic risks, and the identification of
our safety performance during the year,
appropriate controls and risk plans.
in line with legislation, best practice and
key deliverables outlined in Taronga’s Development of an Information
2016-2020 Strategic Plan. Elements and Digital Technology Strategy
included health, mental health and safety Progress was made on the development
training, safety in design, and hazard and of an Information and Digital Technology
risk management. We saw a 43% decrease strategy to align with the Taronga Strategic
in the frequency of lost time injuries in the Plan 2016-2020. A new Head of IDT
2016/17 financial year with zero lost time position was created in late 2016 and
injuries recorded by contractors onsite. the IT team was restructured to include
No safety improvement or infringement Delivery (Projects) and Operational (IT Ops)
notices were imposed on Taronga during teams. Urgent infrastructure projects were
the financial year. commenced and support provided for new
business system implementations. A broad
Transition to New GSE Legislation
IDT strategy is now being developed for
Taronga was required to achieve full
roll-out, with engagement workshops due
Government Sector Employment (GSE)
for completion by end of September 2017.
Act compliance in February 2017, at
the end of the 3-year transition period Implementation of a New IT
to the new legislation. This included Service Desk Management System
compliance in recruitment, temporary A new IT Service Desk management
contract engagement rules, performance system was implemented to streamline
Top down
management, management of misconduct troubleshooting and enhance prioritisation
and the installation a new approved and end-user support. We also delivered Engaging Guests
Executive structure. As part of the process, a a new online collaborative project Indigenous Interps
new Performance Development Framework management tool for use by teams across Marine Mammals Team
was developed for the implementation of all Taronga’s non-capital works projects.
employee agreements and performance
reviews as well as the provision of skills
training and work performance workshops
for employees.

Performance Indicators
2015/16 2016/17
Severity Rate
Lost time injury frequency / workplace accidents for both zoos 5.99% 3.88%

Staff Turnover
Taronga Zoo 10.70% 9.03%
Taronga Western Plains Zoo 10.90% 3.26%

Taronga 100th Birthday
Photo: Rick Stevens
46 KEY ENABLERS — PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONAL STRENGTH ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 47

Volunteer Statistics All employees are now required to have a •T
 he launch of Leading for the Wild, our Indigenous Education, Community Taronga’s emergency procedures also
Volunteer Programs Taronga Zoo
Performance Agreement in place and to a new leadership and management and Guest Experience programs, as well include significant consideration for staff
and guests with disabilities. For example,
undergo a Performance Review at least development program to assist our as our initiatives in Indigenous Keeper
Taronga’s volunteer program
People, Culture & Learning 6 annually. Ongoing training via e-Learning current and aspiring leaders to become Traineeships and Aboriginal Cultural our warden training prepares our people to
had one of the busiest years in
and face-to-face monthly workshops leaders of the future. Awareness Training. be able to safely attend to all stakeholders
its 42-year history with over 1000 Guest Experience, Education
are now in place to support employees onsite should an emergency arise.
volunteers contributing to the and Community Programs 245 • S upport for 286 Taronga employees and Complementing this, Taronga was also
and managers. Role Descriptions were
smooth running of our Zoos, guest 102 Taronga managers to develop their nominated for the NSW Government
Marketing, Fundraising & Commercial 16 re-issued to all employees as per the Public
tours and special events.
Wildlife, Conservation and Science 227
Service Commission requirements and
the NSW government job site, I Work for
skills under the new NSW Public Sector
Performance Development Framework
Harmony Champion Awards, in recognition
of our efforts with our Stretch Reconciliation Work Health and Safety
Programs team assisted with the following through the delivery of Managing for Action Plan and commitment to Aboriginal In 2016/17, Taronga developed and
Property, Infrastructure & Operations 17 NSW. In close consultation with the Office
key recruitment programs during the Performance eLearning modules and the employment and engagement. Taronga implemented a series of WHS divisional
of Children’s Guardian and the Office of
2016/17 financial year: Corporate Services & Governance 1 facilitation of Managing for Performance also received an award for the successful plans in accordance with Taronga’s Work
Environment and Heritage, Taronga also
workshops. Multicultural Eid Festival & Fair we hosted Health and Safety (WHS) Management
Life Science Recruitment Youth at The Zoo 348 formalised its commitment to being a
for our community. Framework. Part of this planning involved
We recruit our keeper volunteers for “Child Safe Organisation” by ensuring all •T
 he coordination of Mental Health and
Total TZ Volunteers 860 employees and volunteers undergo Wellbeing training for 98 employees and We marked International Women’s Day the development of an organisation-wide
a 12-month experience, assisting in operational WHS risk register and action
one of nine divisions including Marine a validated Working With Children 21 managers at both zoos. in March with an inspiring presentation
Taronga Western Plains Zoo Check as an essential requirement and inclusive morning tea, led by two of plan to assist Executive and Divisional
Mammals, Bird Show and the Taronga •T
 he development and delivery of managers to better understand their
Wildlife Hospital. This year we received of all Role Descriptions. our employees who participated in the
Guest Experience and e-learning and face-to-face training to the operational WHS risk and control actions.
864 applications from 330 individuals inaugural Homeward Bound voyage to
Life Sciences Volunteers 77 The People Matter Employee Survey is a Guest Experience team on how to support To supporting this, a WHS training matrix
(each candidate can apply for up to three Antarctica in December/January as a
whole of NSW government survey that people on the Autism spectrum. was developed identifying all mandatory
divisions). Candidates met with divisional TWPZ Youth Volunteers 50 groundbreaking leadership, strategic and
assesses levels of employee engagement and specific WHS training requirements.
representatives at an interview day, at the •T
 he scoping and development science initiative for women.
Total TWPZ Volunteers 127 and satisfaction with their workplace
conclusion of which 157 candidates were of programs for delivery in 2017/18 A full review of Taronga’s Emergency
experiences. Taronga’s 2016 survey Taronga’s commitment to the promotion
offered volunteer roles. including the Social Media e-learning procedures was undertaken with a response
Total Adult Volunteers 589 achieved a 73% response rate and showed of Equal Employment Opportunity is set
module, Taronga WHS essentials plan developed in accordance with
New keeper volunteer recruits an overall positive level of engagement to increase in 2017/18 with the formal
Total Youth Volunteers 398 e-learning module, WHS mini AS3745:2010 - Planning for Emergencies
by division: from respondents from both zoos. The appointment of an HR resource as
e-learning modules and ICT mini in Facilities. A schedule of emergency drills
Total Active Volunteers 987 survey defines engagement as employees Taronga’s Diversity Coordinator. Diversity
Australian Fauna 29 e-learning modules. across both sites was completed, along with
having “a sense of personal attachment strategies in Aboriginal Employment,
to their work and organisation; they are Staff Recognition Disability and Women will be put in place, emergency response training, to ensure
Backyard to Bush 25 staff are equipped with the appropriate
National Volunteer Week motivated and able to give their best to The HR team was proud to work behind the as well as appropriate workplace support
Bird Show 8 Taronga celebrated this annual help the organisation to achieve”. Taronga’s scenes on many of Taronga’s Centenary to ensure all internal and external skills in the event of an emergency. Specific
volunteering event with a special lunch engagement index this year was 76% (78% celebrations throughout the year, including stakeholders can enjoy the benefits emergency plans were also implemented
Birds13 for events such as Twilight and Vivid
at the Taronga centre attended by 112 in 2014), with its collective results exceeding events recognising the contribution of our of a diverse Taronga workforce.
Carnivores15 volunteers and 70 employees from across the sector’s average engagement score people today and throughout Taronga’s at Taronga. In addition to this, first aid
all divisions. The lunch included an award Taronga Disability Action Plan arrangements throughout Taronga were
by 11%. An Organisational Development history. Events included a Family and
Herpetofauna15 ceremony to recognise the dedication and With the appointment of a Diversity reviewed, ensuring adequate first aid officer
action plan is now being implemented to Friends Picnic day with jumping castles,
contribution of Taronga’s volunteers. Many Coordinator in the Human Resources team coverage and the availability of first aid
Marine Mammals 14 address areas of opportunity. Taronga will entertainers and games on the Taronga
nominations was received and the winners in 2017, Taronga will be committing to a equipment across both zoos.
measure the success of initiatives driven by concert lawns for all staff, volunteers, 20
Primates & Ungulates 15 in each of the categories were presented full review and relaunch of our Disability
HR in internal communication, performance Year Club members and their families. The Taronga also reviewed its systems for
with a certificate and gift. Taronga Action Plan, originally developed in 2011
Taronga Wildlife Hospital 23 management and processes/systems/ Silver Shovels Centenary Gala Evening was chemical classification during the year to
participates in a reciprocal complementary to address requirements set out in the
resources, as well as team culture and held in November in the glamorous Zoofari ensure they are fully compliant with the
Total new recruits 157 access arrangement with other Sydney Disability Services Act 1993. This will build
engagement via responses from the Marquee. The 2016 Award categories were new international Global Harmonisation
Volunteer network organisations such as in the work we have to promote a workplace
2017 survey. aligned with the new strategic plan and System (GHS) for chemical classification.
the Maritime Museum, the MCA and the free from all forms of discrimination,
Vivid Sydney at Taronga Zoo saw the introduction of new categories
Powerhouse Museum. 52 volunteers from Learning and Development including disability, in partnership with our Notifiable Incidents
Volunteers from across the Zoo assisted such as Outstanding Contribution to
these organisations attended Taronga Organisational capability development Employee Assistance Program and the Anti- There were no reportable incidents to
Taronga’s Vivid celebrations, with an Science, Outstanding Partnership,
during National Volunteer Week. continues to be a key focus for Taronga. The Discrimination Board SafeWork NSW and no improvement
average of 18 volunteers helping each night Outstanding Community Engagement
organisation’s increased investment in this notices or infringement penalties
in areas like wrist banding, way finding, Initiative and Centenary Capital Plan: Accessibility issues remain a priority for
area has facilitated the development and imposed on Taronga.
lantern interpretation and crowd control. Outstanding Site Improvement. Recipients Taronga and are actively considered in all
delivery of the following initiatives:
The Vivid volunteer group also included
ANZ employees, Taronga Training Institute Human Resources • A new blended induction and on-boarding
for the Directors Awards included Emma
Pollard at Taronga Zoo, Nanette Clark
our capital works projects. We invite regular
feedback from staff, volunteers and guests
Students and others from the Sydney Taronga was required to achieve full program composed of eLearning modules from Taronga Western Plains Zoo and the on the accessibility of our current facilities
Volunteer Network. Government Sector Employment (GSE) and a face-to-face meet and greet Shoulder to Shoulder Team. and their maintenance. This has resulted in
Act compliance by 23 February 2017, the orientation session with the Executive the following provisions being made:
Centenary Parade Other events supported by the HR team
end of the three-year transition period team. The program focuses on safety,
The Volunteer Programs team helped to included the Shoulder 2 Shoulder trek, New •A
 ccessible walkways as alternatives to
to new legislation for employment in the sustainability and animal welfare
recruit over 400 volunteers for the Taronga Year’s Eve ticketing and the Long Service heritage outdoor stairways
NSW Public Service. Human Resources were at Taronga.
Zoo’s Centenary Parade in Sydney. These Awards which welcomed eight inductees
tasked to ensure compliance in recruitment, • Staff and student wheelchair facilities
volunteers helped with crowd control, route • Implementation of the Animal Welfare into the 20 Year Club.
supervision, marching and banners. temporary contract engagement rules, at Taronga eLearning module to help • Public disabled amenities
performance management, management Equal Employment Opportunity
our people develop their knowledge and
of misconduct and the implementation of Taronga was a finalist in the 2016 • Staff and student disabled amenities
understanding of Taronga’s commitment
a new approved Executive structure. As part Australian Human Resource Institute
to the welfare of wildlife in our care. • Modified equipment and golf carts
of this process, Taronga launched a new (AHRI) awards in the Workplace Diversity
Performance Development Framework, category for Indigenous Employment. • P olicies and procedures for
including policy and processes for Taronga’s nomination “Our People, Our service animals
Performance Agreements and review. Place” highlighted our commitment to
48 KEY ENABLERS — PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONAL STRENGTH ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 49

Injury Management Causation Factor 2016/17
There were 173 reported work-related
incidents and near-miss incidents report
in 20116/17 of which 27 resulted in minor 3.2 % 3.2 %
worker’s compensation claims for medical Falls, Trips & Slips of a Person
9.7%
expenses. This represented a decrease Body Stressing
on the previous year’s figures when 198 Hitting Objects with a Part of the Body
29 %
reports were made. Analysis of the workers’
compensation claims accepted in 2016/17 9.7% Being Hit by Moving Objects
shows the majority of injuries (29%) were Vehicle Incidents and Other
due to slips, trips and falls rather than body
Chemicals and Other Substances
stressing which was the major cause for
claims the previous year. Effective injury Heat, Electrical and Other
management continues to be reflected in 12.9% Environmental Factors
reduced worker’s compensation premiums Mental Stress
with the recorded lost time frequency
19.4%
rate at a record low of 3.88 compared to 12.9%
last year’s LTIFR of 5.92. There were no
reportable incidents to SafeWork NSW and
no improvement notices or infringement
penalties imposed on Taronga.

• Wild Leadership: The new non-accredited Taronga Institute of Science
Vocational Training Wild Leadership workshop was officially and Learning
launched. Wild Leadership is a unique Construction and detailed operational
Taronga Training Institute
experience that delves into the team work planning for the Taronga Institute of
Programs team assisted with the following
and leadership styles of wild animals and Science and Learning commenced in
key recruitment programs during the
explores how we, as humans, have evolved 2016/17 with the new facility scheduled
2016/17 financial year:
over time. The program is offered to the to open in 2018.
• I nterstate Delivery: After a successful first general public, and also in partnership with
An Education Taskforce was convened,
year in 2016, TTI launched the second intake the Association of Independent Schools.
comprising senior members of school
of students in the Certificate III in Captive
• Delivery of VET Courses to Secondary education, vocational education and
Animals at Zoos Victoria and Perth Zoo.
Students: TTI has delivered accredited training and university sectors, to identify
The delivery model replicates the successful
training to high school students for several opportunities to increase student access
program at Taronga Western Plains Zoo,
years. This training is recognised by NSW to and engagement with Taronga,
with five intensive theory/classroom weeks
Board of Studies which allows students to and develop innovative and authentic
delivered by TTI trainers through the year.
receive credit towards their Year 10 and Year education programs for delivery from the
Students also undertake practical placement
12 certificate. In 2016, the NSW Department Taronga Institute. (For full details of the
onsite at Zoos Victoria or Perth Zoo and
of Education required RTOs to respond to a Taskforce, see Appendices.)
complete independent study online.
Request-for-Tender to establish a panel of
During the year, Taronga delivered its
•U
 pdated Tourism Qualifications: TTI approved providers for delivery of accredited
first undergraduate workshops, providing
successfully transitioned to the new Tourism training to school students from 2017. TTI
opportunities for tertiary students to
training package which includes updated successfully obtained a contract to deliver
engage with Taronga educators and
versions of the Certificate I, II and III in the Certificate I in Tourism, Certificate II in
researchers and explore issues at the heart
Tourism. This process included an application Tourism and Certificate II in Animal Studies
of Taronga’s mission using problem-based
to the Australian Skills Quality Authority to to secondary students for the next 4 years.
learning methodologies. A total of 256
add the new versions to the TTI scope of
• Compliance and Risk Management: students participated in the first series of
registration.
TTI is a Registered Training Organisation workshops. A further 37 university students
•S
 mart and Skilled Funding: TTI was (RTO) and therefore required to completed work placements at Taronga
granted Smart and Skilled funding to adhere to the VET Quality Framework. for which they received credit toward their
expand the delivery of accredited tourism The framework consists of national degree and 30 postgraduate students
training under the ‘Part Qualifications guidelines and legislation including the were co-supervised by Taronga staff to
Program’. Training was approved for Standards for NVR Registered Training undertake Masters and PhD research
delivery to over 300 volunteers at the Organisations. TTI commenced a review projects on-site at both Taronga and
Royal Botanic Gardens, Powerhouse of risks and controls, including policies and Taronga Western Plains Zoos.
Museum, Transport Heritage NSW, procedures, to ensure practices are high
Sydney Harbour Trust, ANZAC Memorial, quality and compliant with the standards.
Sydney Living Museums, Youth at the Zoo
Program Taronga and Taronga Western Legal Changes
Plains Zoo, Taronga Zoo Keeper Program During the 2016/17 year, there were no
and Art Gallery NSW. changes to the Zoological Parks Board of
Act 1973 or the Zoological Parks Board
Regulation 2009. There are no other acts
or regulations administered by the Taronga
Conservation Society Australia.
Sun Bear
Photo: Bobby Jo Clow
50 YEAR IN BRIEF — FINANCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 51

FINANCIAL � Key achievements
Record-Breaking Year
for Taronga’s Retail Operations
Workshop and Zoofari Lodge. This will
help Taronga achieve its strategic goals

ENVIR�NMENTAL
Taronga’s retail operations had a and 2020 sustainability targets (a 10%
record-breaking year, achieving sales of reduction in carbon footprint and a 20%
over $5.85m.In addition to achieving reduction in electricity consumption)
these strong financial results, the Retail and help us achieve our 2025 target of
carbon neutrality.

SUSTAINABILITY
team focussed on staff development,
demonstrating Taronga’s values through
New Solar Photo Voltaic System
its stock selection and the provision of
A solar photo voltaic system was installed
exceptional guest service and support.
at the Dubbo site in December 2016 to
Zoos Awarded Gold help reduce energy consumption in the
In 2017, Taronga Zoo and Taronga Taronga Western Plains Savannah Visitor

Continuous improvement Western Plains Zoo were both awarded
gold partnership status under OEH’s
‘Sustainable Advantage’ program,
Plaza. The solar panel system spans 456m²
and will provide an estimated 150,000kWh
a year, with estimated annual savings of
and integration of financial in recognition of our environmental
achievements, leadership and strong
around $20,000.

and environmental
Water Usage Reduction
commitment to operating in a manner
Upgrades to water pumping equipment,
that is environmentally attuned. Taronga
mains and irrigation systems at Taronga
sustainability is the 11th organisation, and the second
government institution, to achieve this
leading status.
Western Plains Zoo this year are expected
to reduce water usage across the site by up
to 30%, while achieving a 20% reduction
Waste Diversion Target in the electricity used for water pumping
Taronga continues to strive for its target purposes. An integrated control system
of 90% waste diversion by 2025. To allows staff to control the pumps and
this end, Taronga Western Plains Zoo water levels remotely, supplying river
has entered into a new waste contract water for all non-potable uses in the Zoo
with Cleanaway to come into effect including moats, wash downs, fire services
in September 2017. Opportunities for and irrigation.
additional waste diversion have been
Strategic Procurement Initiatives
identified along with a need for greater
During the year, Taronga commenced
education and improved reporting and
strategic procurement through Category
accountability. Food waste constitutes up
Management Principles. Procurement
to 20% of the overall waste generated at
supported the development and
both sites and its diversion from landfill will
implementation of sourcing strategies for
be given increased emphasis in the new
the Catering Services contract (due to be
financial year.
awarded in July 2017), major sponsorship
2020 Sustainability Targets tenders including icecream and banking
A recent energy audit identified that services, and other contracts across the
voltage optimisation (VO) at Taronga broad spectrum of Taronga’s operations,
Western Plains Zoo would reduce both including production services for the
electricity consumption and financial second year of Vivid and major IT
costs, and mitigate Taronga’s carbon projects. Sustainable Procurement
dioxide emissions. It is estimated that initiatives have also been initiated
its implementation will result in a 77% as part of Taronga’s commitment to
electricity/carbon saving at the Admin/ environmental sustainability.

Performance Indicators
2015/16 2016/17

Direct Government support per visitor
(including contribution for capital development) (1)
Taronga Zoo $10.31 $14.62
Taronga Western Plains Zoo $18.59 $33.40
Operating expenses per visitor (Excluding Taronga Foundation)
Taronga Zoo $53.66 $55.72
Taronga Western Plains Zoo $72.71 $83.93
Capital expenditure per visitor
Taronga Zoo $9.56 $22.36
Taronga Western Plains Zoo $12.50 $31.48
Taronga Foundation fundraising revenue $12.96m $21.07m
(1)
Calculation excludes Twilight concert attendees at Taronga Zoo and function guests at both Zoos.
VIVID Regent Honeyeater
Photo: Anders Alexander
52 YEAR IN BRIEF — FINANCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 53

consumption and financial costs, and the Partnerships continue to play a critical
Environmental mitigation of Taronga’s carbon dioxide Financial Sustainability Marketing and role. During the summer, the Zoo worked

Sustainability emissions. Its implementation is expected
to result in an estimated 77% electricity/
Admissions – Taronga Zoo
Taronga Zoo received a record number of
Promotional Activities closely with Dubbo Regional Council on
a television campaign which featured
Net Zero Carbon Strategy by 2025 carbon saving at the Admin/Workshop Taronga Zoo Taronga Western Plains Zoo as the region’s
paying guests* this year, and its highest
Taronga is working with the OEH to develop and Zoofari Lodge. This will help Taronga In addition to our traditional holiday anchor product.
total attendance** ever. The 1.67 million
its Net Zero Carbon Strategy. This strategy achieve its strategic goals and 2020 campaigns and promotion, several
visitors to the Sydney site represented an Paid media and public relations activity
outlines a clear pathway for achieving sustainability targets (10% reduction Centenary-themed marketing campaigns
increase of 5.6% on the previous year’s around new arrivals also continued to
Taronga’s previously established target in carbon footprint, 20% reduction in were used to celebrate Taronga Zoo’s
record figures and helped Taronga achieve drive admissions from the local area.
of becoming carbon neutral by 2025. The electricity consumption) and help us 100th birthday. More than 100,000 people
its five year strategic goal of a combined Mates Rates visitation continued to drive
priority is to reduce emissions through achieve our target of carbon neutrality entered a ballot to win 5,000 free tickets
Zoo attendance of 1.9 million guests, three overall attendances and local Zoo Friends
energy efficiency, onsite renewable energy by 2025. to the Zoo on October 7 2017 and join the
years in advance of the 2020 target. memberships increased by almost 10% to
generation, waste reduction, sustainable Renewable Energies birthday celebration. Events included a almost 11,000 members.
procurement and appropriate emission This outcome is attributed to a newly grand parade down Macquarie Street to
A new 100kW solar PV system has been
offset schemes. The Strategy also includes deployed marketing strategy, the the Sydney Opera House, recreating the Digital Marketing
installed at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.
objectives to integrate sustainability into continuing rise in international guest historic moment 100 years ago when the Taronga continued to optimise its new
The installation is predicted to generate
systems and processes while mitigating numbers, another highly successful animals crossed the city to reach the new digital marketing strategy focused on
up to 150,000 kWh of renewable energy
and controlling environmental risk. Twilight concert series and record-breaking Taronga site. driving Zoo visitation through performance
per year, resulting in annual savings of
attendances at Roar and Snore and Vivid and acquisition digital media channels.
Sustainable Procurement and Contracts approximately $20,000. Further expansion Taronga Zoo hosted Vivid Sydney for the
Sydney at Taronga Zoo. Admission revenue This approach, combined with a new online
Taronga continues to improve performance of our onsite power generation through second time, attracting a record 102,000
was also strong with yield tracking ahead ticket price structure, achieved significant
in sustainable procurement of office solar PV is planned across both sites to people over the 23 nights of the festival.
of target throughout the year. Except growth for our online ticket sales. Online
products, construction materials and mitigate against known and anticipated The event was promoted with the help of
from very poor weather in March, Sydney redemptions, as a proportion of paid
whitegoods. In the last few months, there electricity price increases. We are currently Destination NSW together with Taronga’s
experienced 26% fewer weather-affected general admissions, more than doubled
has been a strong push to further embed in the process of registering Taronga own and paid social media.
days than in the 2016/17 financial year. compared to the prior year.
sustainability principles and strategies in Western Plains Zoo as a renewable power
station under the Renewable Energy * Includes all Paid Admissions and International visitation enjoyed another Taronga’s social media channels also
all our major contracts that might have
Certificates scheme. Zoo Friends, Paid Education and Overnight Stays. strong year, growing by 12% over the 12 saw considerable growth during the year.
positive environmental impacts onsite **Paid and free of charge attendance including function months to constitute 38% of the total Facebook friends for both zoos increased
or at source. GreenStar Developments guests at both Zoos and Twilight Concert attendees paid attendance at Taronga Zoo. China by 25% to 265,000, Instagram followers
at Taronga Zoo at Taronga Zoo.
Taronga is also in the early phase of continues to be our largest overseas reached 118,00 and Twitter followers,
investigating how sustainable procurement New developments at Taronga Zoo, Admissions – Taronga market, thanks to the evolution of our local 19,000. Taronga’s website remained an
can be improved to make it more holistic, including the Taronga Institute of Science Western Plains Zoo and Chinese marketing strategies. important communication platform with
consistent, scientifically-based and and Learning and the Taronga Wildlife More than 250,000 guests visited
Taronga Western Plains Zoo over 4.4 million visits, up 12% on last year.
aligned to the new ISO20400 standard. Retreat, are aiming to be GreenStar Taronga Western Plains Zoo, representing
Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s marketing Our database grew by 34%, including over
As part of this objective, a sustainability Design and as Built 5 Star certified. To an increase of 4% on last year despite
activities focussed on driving both 260,000 email subscribers, as a result of
scorecard is being developed to ensure obtain these certifications, buildings must unseasonally wet weather during spring
admissions and overnight experiences. campaigns such as Vivid, Twilight, $1 On
that sustainability principles are considered have a smaller environmental footprint and extreme temperatures during late
For the first time, these activities were Your Birthday, competitions and online
and, where possible, applied throughout and be less resource intensive to operate summer. For the first time ever, the Zoo
conducted almost entirely via digital ticket purchases. All of these channels
Taronga’s supply chain. than conventional buildings. By meeting made the decision to close for one day
channels including digital display, search play a critical role in furthering Taronga’s
these mandatory requirements, we and two evenings due to the extreme heat
Waste Diversion and social media. Video remained a strong objectives to network, influence and build
hope to minimise our carbon footprint and fire conditions in February 2017. Guest
Taronga Western Plains Zoo has entered medium for conveying the multifaceted an online advocacy community of more
and demonstrate Taronga’s strong numbers were boosted by the strong and
into a new waste contract with Cleanaway Zoo experience. Traditional media channels than 1 million supporters.
commitment to sustainable development. repeated attendance of local Zoo Friend
to help achieve Taronga’s 90% waste were also utilised via partnerships and
Taronga Mini Grants members, and total admission revenue of
diversion target by 2025. This contract public relations.
will come into effect in September 2017. The common practice of removing dead
and damaged trees has led to a decline in
over $4.2 million represented only a slight
decrease on the previous year. An “always on” advertising layer across the
Retail
Opportunities for additional waste Top down
the hollows that act as natural shelter and year was another first for the Zoo. It proved Taronga Zoo
diversion have been identified along with Overnight experiences featured heavily
nesting sites for wildlife. In March, 18 nest effective in driving off-peak bookings and 2016/17 was another successful year Sustainability Awards
a need for greater education and improved in the Zoo’s marketing and promotions
boxes were installed at Taronga Western enquiries as well as early enquiries for the for Retail Operations which grew by VIVID at Taronga Zoo
reporting and accountability. Food waste throughout the year, resulting in a record
Plains Zoo to mimic these natural hollows coming school holiday periods. Search was more than 6% to achieve record sales
constitutes up to 20% of the overall waste 36,000 overnight visitations. For the second Twilight at Taronga
and provide shelter and breeding sites for the best performing conversion channel of over $5.85 million. A strong focus on
generated at both sites and its diversion consecutive year, Taronga Western Plains
free ranging birds and animals. Funded and helped increase our online ticket sales staff development, coupled with the
from landfill will be given increased Zoo won Best Unique Accommodation at
through Taronga’s Mini Grants scheme, by 175% on the previous year. streamlining of the management team,
emphasis in the new financial year the Australian Tourism Awards. Efforts to
the ‘Hollows as Habitat’ project included a increased efficiency across the board. The
maintain and increase local Zoo Friends The Wake up in the Wild campaign
Voltage Optimisation forum on the causes of habitat loss and the introduction of permanent part-time sales
membership and attendance resulted in material featuring hero product Zoofari
A recent energy audit at Taronga Western engineering of habitat alternatives, as well positions led to increased staff stability,
almost 27,000 visits by Zoo Friends. There Lodge remained our market leader,
Plains Zoo identified that voltage as the installation of the boxes. motivation and a high quality customer
was also a substantial upswing in online however new creative was also introduced
optimisation (VO) would be a suitable service. Our strategic retail buying and
ticket purchases, with a year on year around major new arrivals and experiences
avenue for the reduction of electricity visual merchandising plan focused on
increase of 175%. at the Zoo, including the birth of its first social, conservation and environmental
Asian Elephant calf. Further highlights messaging to further enhance Taronga’s
The 40th anniversary of Taronga Western
included the opening of Savannah extensive retail offering and customer
Plains Zoo in February 2017 marked a
Safari, the arrival of a litter of Lion cubs experience. Successful retail strategies
significant milestone for Australia’s first
and the Zoo’s 40th birthday celebration included the cross-promotion of campaigns
open range zoo.
in February. such as the Centenary celebrations and
A new offer was introduced as part of the Vivid Sydney at Taronga Zoo, all of
birthday celebrations, inviting everyone to which combined to deliver strong
spend their birthday at the Zoo, following financial returns.
the success of this offer at Taronga Zoo the
prior year.
54 YEAR IN BRIEF — FINANCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 55

Pangolin

Taronga Western Plains Zoo from all in-grounds outlets was another rolling course improvement program. unprecedented 12,000 visitors enjoyed the demand through peak seasons and address Governors and Patrons
Taronga Western Plains Zoo Retail also notable achievement and will be followed School student bookings grew well and facilities and Zoofari commercial trading fluctuations in availability due to animal
Taronga Foundation
saw solid results during the year, with by the removal of single serve sauce resulted in many families returning to do revenue increased commensurately. husbandry requirements. The immersive
Executive Patrons
overall net sales of $820,000. The team sachets and plastic food packaging. the course together. Savannah Safari proved a popular addition
Savannah Cabins accommodated over Mr Maurice L Newman AC (Chair)
worked hard to deliver improvements in to the Zoo, exceeding revenue expectations
Taronga Western Plains Zoo Twilight at Taronga 15,000 guests, with many attracted by Mr Nigel Adams
stock control, with the annual stocktake in its first seven months.
Catering income totalled $1.4m, thanks in Twilight at Taronga saw the greatest an expanded range of package deals
realising its best ever result. Improvements Mr Guy Cooper PSM
part to regular promotions for daily specials number of tickets sold in its 22-year and rates. This focus on dynamic pricing,
were also made to merchandising with the Ms Lisa Ho
and special events including Mothers history, with over 31,000 guests coming packaging and marketing will continue in
introduction of new product lines including
the “Beads for Wildlife” range.
Day Breakfast and Lunch, Valentine’s
Day Dinner, Fathers Day Lunch and
through the gates. Artists included Peter
Garrett, The Living End, Jet, Kurt Vile
the coming year. TARONGA FOUNDATION Ms Terry Kaljo
Mr Thomas O’Donnell
Over 8,000 guests enjoyed a unique Now in its seventeenth year, the Taronga
event catering for the Dubbo Stampede. and the Rubens. Ms Gretel Packer
camping experience at Billabong Lodge Foundation’s continued growth and
While Functions saw a marginal decline Mr Harold Shaprio
Catering and Functions in wedding guest numbers over the year,
there was an increase in the number of
Vivid Sydney at Taronga Zoo
Vivid Sydney at Taronga Zoo built on
during 2016/17. While commercial trading
revenue fell by 8% on the previous year,
the generous support of its donors has
enabled the expansion of Taronga’s field
Mrs Nikki Warburton
the success of last year’s event, bringing the results were reasonable considering the conservation grants program; in-situ Taronga Foundation Patrons
Taronga Zoo conference guests and functions revenue impact of weather-affected days.
over 102,000 guests through the gates, conservation partnerships, education and
Although Catering at Taronga Zoo overall was consistent with 2015/16. Mr Frank Brennan
a growth of 20% on the previous year. Guest Services research projects as well as supporting
saw a slowing of financial growth in major re-developments at both zoos Mr John Cleese
2016/17, there were some very positive Eid Festival Our Guest Services Supervisor oversaw
ensuring high standards of animal care Ms Collette Dinnigan
achievements. Weddings at the Taronga
Functions Centre were a continued focus
Inground As part of Taronga’s Centenary
Celebrations, the zoo hosted its first Eid
the development of guest experiences
in the new Savannah Safari as well as and improving visitor experience and
enjoyment. Once again the Taronga
Mr Bradley Trevor Greive
this year and were supported by two
successful wedding fairs. Vivid at Taronga
Commercial Operations Festival in July with community partner
Crescent Wealth. The two-day event
the planning of experiences for the Lion
Pridelands still under construction. An Foundation celebrates a record breaking
Mr Justin Hemmes
Mr Graham Humphrey
attracted more than 7,000 members of extensive site-wide signage project was year successfully exceeding the prior year’s Mrs Sandra Humphrey
Zoo saw the concert lawns being utilised revenue and once again setting a new
for the first time. This enabled the pre- Taronga Zoo Sydney’s Islamic communities. commenced in cooperation with Taronga Mrs Skye Leckie
Interpretation and Design. record for funds raised from trusts and
selling of tables at The View restaurant, Roar and Snore foundations, individuals and corporate Mr Justin Miller
which proved a success from both a guest The Roar and Snore glamping experience Taronga Western Plains Zoo Bikes and Carts achieved sales in excess partners, all supporting Taronga’s Mr Richard Morecroft
experience and commercial perspective. at our Sydney site attracted over 12,000 of $860,000. The marginal revenue fall on commitment to a shared future Mr PJ Shanmugan
Twilight at Taronga continues to bring new Overnight Programs
guests in 2016/17, achieving positive the previous year’s result was influenced by for wildlife and people. Ms Deborah Thomas
audiences to the Zoo to enjoy new food For the second consecutive year, Taronga
revenue growth and operating over 336 delays in the delivery of new electric carts
and beverage offerings including a cocktail Western Plains Zoo’s range of overnight Mr Peter Young AM
nights, including every night of June. and renovations at the hire centre.
bar. 2017 also saw the completion of a guest experiences won the Best Unique Mr George Wang
significant WHS project with the renovation Wild Ropes Accommodation category at the 2016 Animal Encounters performed well with The Taronga Foundation pays its respects
of the in-grounds kitchen floors. This was a Wild Ropes continues to be a popular Qantas Australian Tourism Awards. total sales exceeding last year’s sales to the late Mr John Armati AM, Taronga
major logistical operation but the work was addition. Almost 24,000 climbers by 5%. This sound result was buoyed by Foundation Patron and longterm supporter.
Our multi-award winning Zoofari Lodge
completed successfully and on schedule. conquered new challenges as part of the offers of additional encounters to meet
had another year of strong growth. An
The removal of plastic straws and cutlery
56 YEAR IN BRIEF — FINANCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 57

$750,000 from the Ian Potter Foundation Direct Marketing
PHILANTHROPY for the Taronga Institute of Science and The Taronga Wildlife Defender regular
Learning with contributions of a further giving program has grown by 35% within
Taronga Foundation Events
$750,000 committed for the coming years. the year, attracting new supporters
and Community Fundraising
through face to face, telemarketing and
The Foundation’s fundraising events raised We would like to acknowledge the following
direct mail programs, with supporters
over $1.2million surpassing all prior years generous supporters who donated $10,000
generously donating almost $1.15 million
for event’s fundraising. In July a group of or more this financial year.
this year. Fundraising appeals were aligned
10 supporters joined Cameron Kerr on the
inaugural CEO challenge, developed as
Ms Gretel Packer to Taronga’s Centenary commitment to the The Taronga Foundation
part of Taronga’s centenary celebrations,
a group of Taronga’s supporters journeyed
Mr and Mrs Alan and Lynne Rydge
The Ian Potter Foundation
Legacy species, raising funds of $720,000.
Zoo Parent
Chairman’s Report
into the heart of Sumatra, learning about The Paradice Family Foundation Zoo Parents have generously contributed
Taronga’s commitment to save critically The Maple-Brown Family Foundation Ltd an income of $470,000 during the year, This financial year the Foundation raised a net total of $13.1M* making it the Taronga
endangered Sumatran Species and The Sir James McNeil Trust an increase on last financial Foundation’s most successful year to date.
raising more than $157,000 for Taronga’s The Denton Family year’s contributions.
The Foundation’s 2016/17 program of fundraising was geared towards Taronga’s
Centenary commitment to save ten
The Ottomin Foundation Corporate Partnerships commitments to the coming 100 years, both in raising funds for the ten legacy species
Legacy Species.
Vonwiller Foundation The Foundation has achieved a great and also for Taronga’s ambitious conservation programs, including the establishment of
The pinnacle event of the year was Zoofari Mr Steven Crane level of partnership support with revenue the Taronga Institute of Science and Learning.
100, the Foundation’s annual gala dinner of over $4.5 million received in cash and
Mr and Mrs Andy and Prue Kennard Over the year the total funds generously donated and pledged to the Taronga Institute
enjoyed its most successful ever outcome contra donations. Taronga secured $3
Mrs Ingrid Kaiser of Science and Learning by individuals, trusts and foundations were $6.4million.
as 450 people came together to celebrate million in cash contributions this year
The Caledonia Foundation Particular thanks and acknowledgements go to Gretel Packer for her continued support
Taronga Zoo’s centenary and raise funds as well as contra support exceeding
Mr Robert Albert of Taronga’s Science Endeavours, The Ian Potter Foundation, the Paradice Family,
for the five Australian Legacy species. It $1.5 million which provided significant
Alan and Lyn Rydge and the Denton Family for their unwavering support.
was a spectacular evening that not only The Skipper-Jacobs Charitable Trust cost savings towards the operations
achieved a very generous fundraising The Hill Family Conservation Foundation of Taronga’s two Zoos. The success of I would like to thank all our Patrons for their continued support and advocacy. We are
outcome with over $700,000 in donations Mrs Jessica Hore Taronga’s Corporate Partnerships program fortunate to have such a dedicated group.
but raised awareness of the work that is attributed to the continuous support
Mrs Roslyn Packer It is with deepest regret that I note the recent passing of Patron Mr John Armati AM, who
Taronga is doing to protect and restore of over 60 long-term partners. Taronga’s
Australian Ethical Investment was a very generous supporter of Taronga Western Plains Zoo. He will be missed.
populations of critically endangered native on-going Centenary celebrations as well
Australian species in the wild. Participatory The Clark Family Foundation as the 2017 Twilight Concert Series were I also note with sadness the passing of Ms Janice Salisbury last year. She was a true
fundraising also grew in value and scale Professor Fred and Claire Hilmer supported by Presenting Partner, ANZ with ambassador for Taronga and much loved supporter. Janice’s legacy at Taronga lives on
through the 2017 financial year with Ms Catherine Reed all Principal Partners - QBE, The Star, Coca in the newest addition to the Asian Elephant herd, Jai-Dee, whose name
more than 80 people raising $88,000 The Late James Fairfax AC Cola Amatil and Streets continuing their Janice chose prior to her passing.
through their participation in a number of Mr Jeff Conen and Ms Kerry Spence enduring commitment. Taronga engages
events including the City to Surf and Cole Not least I would like to thank all of our corporate partners and donors.
Mrs Judith Pirie with over 60 long-term partners who are
Classic and Edge Pledge. New Years Eve all integral to the financial sustainability Finally our thanks to Taronga Executive Director and Chief Executive, Mr Cameron Kerr,
at Taronga was once again a resounding The Lin Huddleston Charitable Foundation
of the organisation. the Chairman, Board members and the dedicated staff at Taronga Zoo and Taronga
success, with over 2000 guests enjoying Ms Ruth Kleibert Western Plains Zoo for their leadership and tireless support in this our centenary year.
the entertainment and incredible views of Fitzpatricks Financial Group Foundation
the harbour. Tickets for the event sold out Mr Stefan Schonell We greatly appreciate Cameron and his team’s outstanding work and take much pride in
well before the event generating $400,000. Taronga’s position as a world leading zoo, dedicated to preservation, conservation and
Ms Susan Doyle
scientific research.
Major Gifts and Bequests Mr Harry Triguboff
Thanks to a number of supporters AIMS Home Loans Pty Ltd We look forward to continuing support from all those who value Taronga’s contribution
leaving gifts in their Wills bequest income to the wild.
Anthony Suters and Associates Pty Ltd
exceeded $1.7 million. Generous gifts
from donors raised more than $6 million Friends of the Future Income (Funds
providing support for a range of projects received from estates 2016-2017)
both here in Australia and for in-situ The Estate of the Late Mr Jacobus
projects overseas. This includes support Neelemaat,
for the Taronga Institute of Science and Maurice Newman AC
The Estate of the Late Helen Thorburn, Chairman
Learning, which commenced construction
The Estate of the Late Beth Grainger, Taronga Foundation
during the year, and a very generous
donation and future commitment for the The Estate of the Late Wallace Newlyn,
*before grant distributions
establishment of The Sanctuary at Taronga The Estate of the Late Douglas Webb,
Western Plains Zoo, a semi-wild space The Estate of the Late Marie Thompson,
where Taronga will breed the Greater Bilby The Estate of the Late Gilbert Docking,
with the long-term objective to release The Estate of the Late Joyce Sproat,
them into the wild, re-establishing a wild The Estate of the Late Barry Moore,
population following their extinction
The Estate of the Late Dolores O’Hara,
in NSW many years ago. Trusts and
Foundations played a significant role in The Estate of the Late Eric Douglas.
the success of the 2017 financial year,
a particular highlight was a contribution of
58 KEY ENABLERS — CENTENARY CAPITAL PLAN ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 59

Pridelands African Lion Adventure Taronga created an outstanding animal
Capital Works Our exciting new lion exhibit is under experience this year with the construction

and Project Planning construction and is scheduled for of our new walkthrough Squirrel Monkey

centenary
completion towards the end of 2017. The exhibit, built largely by Taronga’s in-house
new precinct will include a Massai Village, facilities teams.
Taronga Zoo a unique range of animal encounters and
Taronga Western Plains Zoo
Centenary Theatre Development an exciting ranger-led tour into the Lion
Taronga Western Plains Zoo saw the
The new Centenary Theatre was Exhibit in a purpose-built safari vehicle.
completion of major infrastructure

capital plan
completed and opened in March 2017 by Wild Herds projects during the year. These included
NSW Premier, The Hon. Gladys Berejiklian Plans for the new Wild Herds exhibit are upgrades to the river pumping mains water
MP and Environment Minister, The Hon. progressing well, with the project due for lines and irrigation controller system to
Gabrielle Upton MP. The NSW Premier told delivery in latter half of 2017. The new reduce water and electricity consumption.
the audience at the opening that adding exhibit will offer ungulate encounters and Work continued on projects to enhance
the theatre would provide visitors with a deer feeding and improve visitor circulation our security and safety systems,

Deliver the Centenary Capital Plan valuable insight into Taronga’s behind-the-
scenes conservation and field work.
through the precinct.
The African Waterhole
including our onsite security and fire
management practices.

on time and on budget to secure Tiger Trek
Taronga’s new Tiger Exhibit opened
and Overlook Cafe
Design development has commenced on
Asset upgrades projects included
improvements to exhibits, back-of-house

Taronga’s position as a leading in August 2017. This major exhibit will
deliver a strong choreographed message
on Taronga’s role in conserving the
a major upgrade of the existing food and
beverage facility located at the halfway
point on the zoo circuit. The project will
areas and landscaping at Zoofari Lodge.
The proactive upgrades of our animal

conservation and nature endangered Sumatran Tiger population.
Taronga Institute
include the construction of a new cafe,
visitor amenities, picnic facilities, children’s
stand-off visitor fences continued with the
Cheetah and Tiger fences now replaced.

tourism organisation of Science and Learning
Construction commenced on the Taronga
waterplay, landscaping and carparking. Heritage Asset Management
The extensive capital works program at the
Sydney site has required the coordinated
Institute of Science and Learning after
its approval as a State Significant
Development in 2016. The institute
Facilities and management of the Zoo’s heritage values
as a cultural landscape. Our Design teams
will be a global centre of excellence in
conservation science and learning.
Infrastructure are working with our Heritage Project
Manager to retain heritage items and

Taronga Wildlife Retreat
Asset Maintenance heritage values in areas affected by
the works.
and Australia Habitat
Taronga Zoo The Zoo’s heritage items are managed in
The Taronga Wildlife Retreat and Australia line with the Heritage and Conservation
Asset Management
Habitat project will revitalise the existing Register and a suite of conservation
An upgrade of Taronga’s computerised
Australia Habitat precinct and give visitors management documents. These
asset management system is underway to
a new immersive experience of Australia’s documents continue to be reviewed in
streamline the reporting and classification
native fauna, flora and the local Indigenous line with maintenance activities and the
of maintenance activities, and assist with
culture. The Taronga Wildlife Retreat will capital works program. Several items on
forward planning and response to reactive
wrap around a native wildlife sanctuary. the heritage register have recently been
maintenance requests.
The State Significant Development demolished or removed as part of the
Application has been approved by the NSW Critical Infrastructure capital works. An archival record of this
Department of Planning and Environment, New hydrant system elements were structure was prepared and is being lodged
with construction scheduled to commence installed to meet future requirements. The in public repositories. Taronga archives
in late 2017. design was also completed for additions were also relocated as part of this project.
and improvements to emergency paging
African Savannah and Congo Horticulture
and CCTV systems.
To be jointly funded by the NSW The end of Taronga’s centenary
Savannah Safari TWPZ Government and Taronga, this New automation systems were installed for celebrations saw floral displays in full
Photo: Rick Stevens development will include extensive the seawater and freshwater life support bloom at the Lower Entrance, the Moore
improvements to existing exhibits and systems at the Great Southern Ocean and Park Aviary and the famous Floral Clock.
public areas. The revitalised exhibit will Wild Asia precincts, as well as for the Water
deliver multi-species habitats, including a Treatment Plant. Bush Regeneration works continued with
new lion breeding facility and an expanded help from Corporate Volunteers, Bushcare
Sky Safari groups and Horticulture staff in several
Key achievements savannah for giraffes and zebras. The
main construction works are scheduled to Additional safety and risk reviews were
undertaken for the Sky Safari cable
areas of the Zoo and along the foreshore.
commence in early 2018. A second phase The team continued its busy schedule
Savannah Safari Tour and Taronga Centenary Theatre Taronga Institute of this project will involve the construction car, including a structural review of the
towers and cable car safety by Taronga’s of grounds maintenance, responding
Pridelands African Lion Adventure Taronga completed the construction of of Science and Learning of a lush forest exhibit for our growing
independent engineer. to the changing conditions created by
Capital works continued at Taronga the Taronga Centenary Theatre in early The Taronga Institute of Science and Learning gorilla family. construction works.
Western Plains Zoo. Launched in December, 2017 showcasing our own immersive short commenced construction in late 2016. Animal Exhibit Works
2016, the Savannah Safari Tour features film to engage people around wildlife The project is forecast to open in mid 2018. Routine maintenance and preventative
purpose-built safari trucks that carry conservation issues. Taronga Western Plains Zoo
Completion of Extensive Repairs compliance inspections of animal exhibits
visitors through the Zoo’s African Savannah Savannah Safari continued throughout the year, along
Tiger Trek Experience Taronga completed extensive repairs of one
exhibit. The $9 million Pridelands African The Savannah Safari project was with upgrades to improve the welfare
Construction of the new Tiger Trek of the containment moat structures at the
Lion Adventure will also offer guests a successfully delivered in late 2016. It of Taronga’s animals and enhance the
Experience is nearing completion and will Taronga Western Plains Zoo Tiger exhibit.
heart-pumping safari-like experience when includes the Savannah Safari experience, visitor experience.
be operational in August 2017. Installation of new standoff fencing and
it opens in late 2017. a safari vehicle tour of the exhibit,
landscaping was completed to a number
of animal exhibits at Taronga Western featuring giraffes and various species
Plains Zoo. of antelope and ostrich.
60 KEY ENABLERS — CENTENARY CAPITAL PLAN ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 61

Taronga Zoo and Taronga Western
Plains Zoos’ Partners in Conservation
Sponsorship supports The Taronga Foundation’s contribution to conservation

Principal Sponsors

Crown Sponsors

Presidential Sponsors

Primary Sponsors
APA Group Carlton United Brewers SC Johnson WHYBIN\TBWA
arcserve Centaman Systems Treasury Wine Estates 3M Nexcare
Brookfield ELO Digital Australia

Champion Sponsors
ARA Group BAYER Ernst & Young Minter Ellison
ASX Burt’s Bees FUJIFILM Pace Farm
Baby Jogger Compass Group Hulsbosch SUEZ environnement
Lavazza Troy Laboratories

Champion Sponsors
Another Colour Elam Communications NSW Fire Brigades Valley Industries
Anthony Suters & Associates Harris & Co Solicitors Relief and Welfare Virbac
Aspen Pharmacare Henry Davis York Pest Control Waterlogic Australia
BPAY Group Technologies Int.
Kelato Animal Health Wet & Forget
Buds & Bowers Lindblad Expeditions REM Systems
Winterhalter
Burwood Press Mandylights Signwave Newtown
Zoetis
CA (Pacific) Mercedes Benz North Shore Tourism and
Transport Forum
Cerrone

Regent Honey Eater
Photo: Dean Ingwerson
62 FINANCIALS — STATUTORY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS : TARONGA ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 63

Statutory Financial Table � Contents

Statements – Taronga 1. Independent Auditor’s Report ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 64
2. Income Statement������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 67
3. Statement of Comprehensive Income���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 68
4. Statement of Financial Position����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 69
5. Statement of Changes in Equity���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 70
6. Statement of Cash Flows������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 71
7. Notes to the Financial Statements����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 72
8. Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements����������������������������������������������������� 73
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
9. Appendices�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������114

Platypus
Photo: Gary Ramage
64 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 65

The Board’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements
The members of the Board are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial
statements in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the PF&A Act, and for such
internal control as the members of the Board determine is necessary to enable the preparation and fair
presentation of the financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud
or error.

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT In preparing the financial statements, the members of the Board must assess Taronga’s ability to
continue as a going concern except where Taronga will be dissolved by an Act of Parliament or
Taronga Conservation Society Australia otherwise cease operations. The assessment must disclose, as applicable, matters related to going
concern and the appropriateness of using the going concern basis of accounting.

To Members of the New South Wales Parliament
Auditor’s Responsibility for the Audit of the Financial Statements
My objectives are to:
Opinion
• obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from
I have audited the accompanying financial statements of Taronga Conservation Society Australia
material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error
(Taronga), which comprise the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2017, the statement of
comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then • issue an Independent Auditor’s Report including my opinion.
ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory
Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but does not guarantee an audit conducted in
information.
accordance with Australian Auditing Standards will always detect material misstatements.
In my opinion, the financial statements: Misstatements can arise from fraud or error. Misstatements are considered material if, individually or in
aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions users take based
• give a true and fair view of the financial position of Taronga as at 30 June 2017, and of its on the financial statements.
financial performance and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Australian
Accounting Standards A description of my responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements is located at the Auditing
and Assurance Standards Board website at: www.auasb.gov.au/auditors_responsibilities/ar4.pdf.
• are in accordance with section 41B of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1983 (PF&A Act) and
the Public Finance and Audit Regulation 2015. The description forms part of my auditor’s report.
My opinion should be read in conjunction with the rest of this report. My opinion does not provide assurance:

Basis for Opinion • that Taronga carried out its activities effectively, efficiently and economically
I conducted my audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under the • about the security and controls over the electronic publication of the audited financial
standards are described in the ‘Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements’ statements on any website where they may be presented
section of my report. • about any other information which may have been hyperlinked to/from the financial statements.

I am independent of Taronga in accordance with the requirements of the:

• Australian Auditing Standards
• Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 ‘Code of Ethics for
Professional Accountants’ (APES 110).

I have fulfilled my other ethical responsibilities in accordance with APES 110.

Parliament promotes independence by ensuring the Auditor-General and the Audit Office of
New South Wales are not compromised in their roles by:
Reiky Jiang
• providing that only Parliament, and not the executive government, can remove an Auditor- Director, Financial Audit Services
General
• mandating the Auditor-General as auditor of public sector agencies 26 September 2017
• precluding the Auditor-General from providing non-audit services. SYDNEY

I believe the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my
audit opinion.
66 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 67

TARONGA CONSERVATION SOCIETY AUSTRALIA (TARONGA) INCOME STATEMENT
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND NOTES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017
2017 2016
Notes $’000 $’000
Statement Revenue
Admissions 43,006 40,555
Pursuant to section 41C of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1983 and in accordance with a Trading and Franchise Revenue 2 13,374 12,966
resolution of Taronga, we being members of the Board state that: Corporate Sponsorship 3,106 4,057
Government Grants 3 29,823 19,102
a) in our opinion the financial statements and notes thereon exhibit a true and fair view Investment Revenue 4 2,090 2,135
of the financial position and transactions of Taronga for the year ended 30 June Donations and Bequests 12,692 6,377
2017; Other Income 5 25,046 22,558
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Assets 6 21 (1,423)
b) the financial statements have been prepared in accordance with authoritative Total Revenue 129,158 106,327
pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board which includes the
requirements of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1983 and Public Finance and Audit Expenses
Regulation 2015; Personnel Services 7(a) 45,960 49,624
Trading Cost of Sales 2 3,765 3,547
c) we are not aware of any circumstances which would render any particulars included
Marketing Expenses 7(b) 4,023 3,101
in the financial statements to be misleading or inaccurate; and
Depreciation and Amortisation 7(c) 21,152 20,222
Maintenance 7(d) 7,615 6,224
d) we are of the opinion that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the
Finance Costs 7(e) 860 929
organisation will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.
Other Expenses 8 26,887 23,036
Total Expenditure 110,262 106,683
NET RESULT 18,896 (355)

The accompanying notes form part of these Financial Statements.

Chair of the Board Member of the Board

Sydney
25 September 2017

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68 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 69

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 AS AT 30 JUNE 2017

2017 2016 2017 2016
Notes $’000 $’000 Notes $’000 $’000
NET RESULT 18,896 (355) ASSETS

Current Assets
Other comprehensive income:
Cash and Cash Equivalents 23(a) 14,099 11,793
Items that will not be reclassified to net result in
Trade and Other Receivables 9 4,338 3,576
subsequent periods
Inventories 10 1,318 1,273
Net increase/(decrease) in property, plant and Other financial assets 11 68,502 67,502
equipment revaluation surplus 24 32,115 - Total Current Assets 88,257 84,144

Items that may be reclassified subsequently to net Non-Current Assets
result Property, Plant and Equipment 12 463,292 414,583
Intangible Assets 13 1,158 205
Available for sale financial assets: Total Non-Current Assets 464,450 414,788
-Transferred to net result on disposal 24 - 913
Total Assets 552,707 498,932
Other comprehensive income for the year 32,115 913

Total comprehensive income for the year 24 51,011 558 LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities
The accompanying notes form part of these Financial Statements. Trade and Other Payables 15 29,626 27,909
Other Liabilities 16 4,023 2,918
Borrowings 17 1,854 5,907
Total Current Liabilities 35,503 36,734

Non-Current Liabilities
Borrowings 17 14,040 10,044
Total Non-Current Liabilities 14,040 10,044

Total Liabilities 49,543 46,778
Net Assets 503,164 452,154

Equity
Reserves 24 281,258 249,143
Accumulated Funds 24 221,906 203,011
Total Equity 503,164 452,154

The accompanying notes form part of these Financial Statements.

3 4
70 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 71

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

2017 2016
Accumulated Reserves Total Notes $’000 $’000
Funds
$’000 $’000 $’000
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Balance at 1 July 2016 203,011 249,143 452,154
Receipts
Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 18,896 - 18,896
Receipts from Customers and Sponsors (inclusive of GST) 104,994 91,283
Interest Received 1,889 2,111
Other comprehensive income:
Dividends Received 1 74
Gain/(Loss) on revaluation of land, buildings and infrastructure - 32,115 32,115
Total other comprehensive income - 32,115 32,115
Government Capital Grant 15,053 4,700
Government Recurrent Grant 14,770 14,402
Total comprehensive income for the year 18,896 32,115 51,011 Total Receipts 136,707 112,570
Balance at 30 June 2017 221,907 281,258 503,165 Payments
Payments to Suppliers and Personnel Services (inclusive of GST) (95,418) (83,236)
Interest and Finance Costs Paid (924) (924)
Total Payments (96,342) (84,160)

Net Cash inflow from Operating Activities 23(b) 40,365 28,410
Balance at 1 July 2015 203,366 248,230 451,596

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year (355) - (355) CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Payments for Property, Plant and Equipment (37,114) (13,720)
Other comprehensive income:
Transfers on disposal of available-for-sale financial assets - 913 913 Purchases of Other Financial Assets (1,000) (18,000)
Total other comprehensive income - 913 913 Proceeds from Sale of Property, Plant and Equipment 55 -
Proceeds from Sale of Available-for-sale financial assets - 1,237
Total comprehensive income for the year (355) 913 558
Net Cash outflow from Investing Activities (38,059) (30,483)
Balance at 30 June 2016 203,011 249,143 452,154

The accompanying notes form part of these Financial Statements. CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from Borrowings - -
Repayment of Borrowings - -
Net Cash flow from Financing Activities - -

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 2,306 (2,073)

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year 11,793 13,866

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year 23(a) 14,099 11,793

The accompanying notes form part of these Financial Statements.

6

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72 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 73

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

Note Contents 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
1 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements
2 Trading and Franchise Revenue are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented,
3 Government Grants unless otherwise stated.
4 Investment Revenue
5 Other Income a) Reporting Entity
6 Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Assets
7(a) Personnel Services Taronga is a NSW Government Trading Enterprise constituted under the Zoological Parks
7(b) Marketing Expenses Board Act 1973. Taronga is a not-for-profit entity as profit is not its principal objective. The
7(c) Depreciation and Amortisation Expenses reporting entity is consolidated as part of the NSW Total Sector Accounts.
7(d) Maintenance
7(e) Finance Costs Taronga comprises the activities of Taronga Zoo, Taronga Western Plains Zoo and the
8 Other Expenses Taronga Foundation. Taronga’s commercial activities, namely retail, catering, experience
9 Trade and other receivables activities and accommodation are also included.
10 Inventories
11 Other Financial Assets These financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2017 have been authorised for issue
12 Property, Plant and Equipment by Taronga on 25 September 2017.
13 Intangible Assets
14 Fair Value Measurement of Non-Financial Assets b) Basis of Preparation
15 Trade and Other Payables
15(a) Personnel Services The entity’s financial statements are general purpose financial statements which have been
16 Other Liabilities prepared in accordance with:
17 Borrowings
18 Superannuation i. the Australian Accounting Standards including the Australian Accounting
18(a) Defined Benefit Plans Interpretations;
19 Financial Instruments ii. the Public Finance and Audit Act 1983 and Public Finance and Audit Regulation
20 Restriction on Revenue – The Taronga Foundation 2015;
21 Remuneration of Auditors iii. specific directions issued by the Treasurer.
22 Related Party Disclosures
23 Notes to the Cash Flow Statement Historical Cost Convention
24 Reserves and Retained Surplus
25 Commitments for Expenditure The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, modified
26 Contingent Assets and Liabilities by the revaluation at fair value of land and buildings, plant and equipment, infrastructure
27 Subsequent Events systems and available for sale financial assets.
28 Divisional Information
Critical Accounting Estimates

The preparation of financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting
estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying
Taronga's accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or
complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to financial statements
are disclosed in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Rounding

All amounts are rounded to the nearest one thousand dollars and are expressed in
Australian currency.

7
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74 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 75

c) Comparative Figures control over the assets comprising the contributions. Control over grants is normally obtained
upon the receipt of cash.
The comparative figures in Note 7(a) Personnel Services have been amended to exclude a
credit of $211,490 for workers compensation insurance refund received in 2016 as a result v. Donations and Bequests
of prior year hindsight adjustment. This amount is included in Note 5 Other Income as
Insurance Premium Hindsight Adjustments. To enhance comparability a few items in this The Taronga Foundation’s pledged donations including bequests are not recognised as
note are amended in respect of the changes in current year. Term deposits with maturity income until received.
greater than 90 days from the date of acquisition have been reclassified as other financial
assets from cash and cash equivalents. Term deposits are now classified by the length of vi. Sponsorship
maturity from the date of acquisition, as a result the Cash and Cash Equivalents in Note
23(a) excludes $24,502,000. This amount is now included in Note 11 Other Financial Assets. All sponsorships and non-reciprocal contributions from the public are included in Taronga’s
All other comparative information is presented for the preceding financial year that revenue on receipt.
corresponds to the disclosures specified for the current financial year, except where an
Australian Accounting Standard permits or requires otherwise. The value of goods and services received by way of sponsorship was included in Taronga’s
revenue for the year as sponsorship income. The respective goods and services related to
d) Statement of Compliance this income are reflected in the appropriate expense or asset accounts. The values of such
sponsorships are brought to account on the proviso that a fair value for the sponsorship
Taronga's financial statements and notes comply with Australian Accounting Standards, could be ascertained.
which include Australian Accounting Interpretations.
f) Acquisition of Assets
e) Revenue Recognition
The cost method of accounting is used for the initial recording of all acquisitions of assets
Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Amounts controlled by Taronga. Cost is the amount of cash or cash equivalents paid or the fair value
disclosed as revenue are net of returns, trade allowances, rebates and amounts collected by of the consideration given to acquire the assets at the time of its acquisition plus the costs
third parties. incidental to the acquisition.

Taronga recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is Assets acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration are initially recognised at their fair
probable that the future economic benefits will flow to the entity and specific criteria have value at the date of acquisition.
been met for each of Taronga's activities as described below. Taronga bases its estimates
on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, type of transaction and Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset in an orderly transaction
the specifics of each arrangement. between market participants at measurement date.

Revenue is recognised for major business activities as follows: g) Capitalisation Thresholds

i. Sale of Goods Property, plant and equipment and intangible assets costing $2,000 and above individually
(or forming part of a network costing more than $2,000) are capitalised.
Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised as revenue when Taronga transfers the
significant risks and rewards of ownership of assets. h) Revaluation of Property, Plant and Equipment

ii. Rendering of Services Physical non-current assets are valued in accordance with the ‘Valuation of Physical Non-
Current Assets at Fair Value’ (TPP 14-01). This policy adopts fair value in accordance with
Revenue is recognised when the service is provided. This includes Admissions at gate, AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement and AASB 116 Property, Plant and Equipment.
Trading and Franchise Revenue, Ropes Course and Accommodation.
It further clarifies that fair value is determined by reference to its ‘highest and best use’ by
iii. Investment Revenue market participants taking into account the existing physical, legal, financial and socio-
political environment in which the entity operates and which results in the highest value.
Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139
Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement. Dividend revenue is recognised in Property, plant and equipment is measured on an existing use basis, where there are no
accordance with AASB 118 when the entity’s right to receive payment is established. feasible alternative uses in the existing natural, legal, financial and socio-political
environment. However, in the limited circumstances where there are feasible alternative
iv. Government Grants uses, assets are valued at their highest and best use.

The grants received from the NSW Government i.e. the social policy payment for the Fair value of land, infrastructure, buildings and plant and equipment is determined based on
conduct of Taronga’s recurrent non-commercial activities, together with the asset the best available market evidence, including current market selling prices for the same or
maintenance and capital grants are generally recognised as income when Taronga obtains similar assets. Where there is no available market evidence, the asset’s fair value is

9 10
76 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 77

measured at its market buying price, the best indicator of which is depreciated replacement i) Revaluation Increments/Decrements
cost.
Revaluation increments are recognised in other comprehensive income and credited directly
Non-specialised assets with short useful lives are measured at depreciated historical cost as to the asset revaluation reserve, except to the extent that an increment reverses a
an approximation of fair value. Taronga has assessed that any difference between fair value revaluation decrement in respect of that class of asset previously recognised as loss in net
and depreciated historical cost is unlikely to be material. result, the increment is recognised immediately as revenue in the net result.

Taronga revalues each class of property and plant and equipment except plant and Revaluation decrements are recognised immediately as expenses in the net result, except
equipment in accordance with TPP14-01. This requires a comprehensive revaluation at least that, to the extent that a credit balance exists in the asset revaluation reserve in respect of
every three years for Land using the market approach as the most appropriate valuation the same class of assets, they are debited directly to the asset revaluation reserve.
technique for that asset under AASB 13. Buildings and Infrastructure assets are re-valued
using the cost approach and under AASB 13 will be re-valued at least every five years. As a not-for-profit entity, revaluation increments and decrements are offset against one
another within a class of non-current assets, but not otherwise. When revaluing non-current
Interim Revaluations assets the gross amount and the related accumulated depreciation are separately restated.

At the reporting date, Taronga consults Government Property NSW (PNSW) a division of Where an asset that has previously been re-valued is disposed of, any balance remaining in
The Department of Finance, Services and Innovation for an indexation advice to determine if the asset revaluation reserve in respect of that asset is transferred to the accumulated funds.
the carrying value of its assets differs materially from the fair value. In the event the carrying
value of assets differs materially from fair value, Taronga performs a revaluation based on j) Impairment of Property, Plant and Equipment
the advice of PNSW and updates its asset values.
As a not-for-profit entity with no cash generating units, impairment under AASB 136
Details of the most recent comprehensive revaluation for all classes of assets are as follows: Impairment of Assets is unlikely to arise. As property, plant and equipment is carried at fair
value or an amount that approximates fair value, impairment can only arise in the rare
i. Land circumstances such as where the costs of disposal are material. Specifically, impairment is
unlikely for not-for-profit entities given that AASB 136 modifies the recoverable amount test
The value of the Taronga's land at the reporting date is based on a comprehensive for non-cash generating assets of not-for-profit entities to the higher of fair value less costs
revaluation conducted by FPV Consultants and Aspect Property in March 2017 for Taronga of disposal and depreciated replacement cost, where depreciated replacement cost is also
Zoo and Taronga Western Plains Zoo respectively. The land has been valued at fair value fair value.
having regard to current use as indicated by the zoning, heritage restrictions and other
controls over the property. Taronga has formed the opinion that there was no change to the k) Depreciation and Amortisation
valuation for the period to 30 June 2017. The next comprehensive revaluation for land is due
to be performed during FY 2019-2020. Taronga has adopted a policy whereby depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis for
all depreciable assets so as to write off the depreciable amount of each asset as it is
ii. Infrastructure consumed over its useful life. Details of depreciation rates and methods are as follows:

Valuation of the infrastructure includes all site works which are considered to add value to Category of Asset Rate of Depreciation
the site as used and not already valued as individual fixed assets (such as buildings). This Motor Vehicles 10.0%
includes all services, roads and landscaping, etc. The value for infrastructure was split IT Equipment 33.3%
between the major categories of roads, services and landscaping and its value to the site Other Items 20.0%
expressed at Written-Down Replacement Cost. The last comprehensive revaluation was Infrastructure The rate being determined by
conducted by PNSW in March 2014. In the interim period up to March 2017 management the estimated life of the asset
has annually assessed the indexation rates in consultation with PNSW and in March 2017 (3-40 years as appropriate)
Taronga has adjusted these assets to reflect indexation increments. Taronga has formed the Building, Enclosures and Improvements The rate being determined by
opinion that there was no change to the valuation for the period to 30 June 2017. The next the estimated life of the asset
comprehensive revaluation for infrastructure is due to be performed during FY 2018-2019. (1-50 years as appropriate)

iii. Buildings, Enclosures and Improvements Taronga’s intangible assets are amortised using the straight line method. Details of
amortisation rates are as follows:
The last comprehensive revaluation of Taronga's buildings, enclosures and improvements
was conducted by the PNSW in March 2014. In the interim period up to March 2017 Category of Asset Rate of Depreciation
management has annually assessed the indexation rates in consultation with PNSW and in Computer Software and Other Intangible 10.0% - 33.3%
March 2017 Taronga has adjusted these assets to reflect indexation increments. Taronga Assets
has formed the opinion that there was no change to the valuation for the period to 30 June
2017. The next comprehensive revaluation for buildings, enclosures and improvements is These rates are consistent with those used in the previous year.
due to be performed during FY 2018-2019.

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78 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 79

l) Maintenance ii. Long Service Leave and Superannuation

The cost of day-to-day servicing or maintenance is charged to expenses as incurred, except The liability for long service leave is recognised as payables under personnel services and
where they related to the replacement of a part or component of an asset, in which case the measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of
costs are capitalised and depreciated. services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

m) Leased Assets Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee
departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market
A distinction is made between finance leases which effectively transfer from the lessor to the yields at the reporting date on Government bonds with terms to maturity that match as
lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of the leased assets, closely as possible the estimated future cash flows.
and operating leases under which the lessor does not transfer substantially all the risks and
rewards. Superannuation expense is determined using the formulae specified in the Treasurer’s
Directions. All employees are entitled to superannuation benefits under one of the
Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the superannuation schemes, namely First State Superannuation Scheme (FSS), State
lease term. Authorities Non-Contributory Superannuation Scheme (SANCS), State Authorities
Superannuation Scheme (SASS), and State Superannuation Scheme (SSS). All funds are
n) Intangible Assets administered by the Superannuation Administration Corporation trading as Mercer
Administration Services (Australia) Pty Ltd.
Taronga recognises intangible assets only if it is probable that future economic benefits will
flow to Taronga and the cost of the asset can be measured reliably. Intangible assets are The superannuation schemes SSS, SASS and SANCS are all defined benefit schemes; at
measured initially at cost. Where an asset is acquired at no cost or nominal cost, the cost is least a component of the final benefit is derived from a multiple of member salary and years
its fair value as at the date of acquisition. of membership. All three schemes are closed to new members. Employees who are not
members of an associated scheme and were covered by the State Authorities Non-
The useful lives of intangible assets are assessed to be between three and ten years. Contributory Scheme (Basic Benefit) are automatically transferred into FSS. Employees also
have the choice of using other superannuation schemes and some have opted to do so.
Intangible assets are subsequently measured at fair value only if there is an active market.
As there is no active market for some of Taronga’s software classified as intangible assets, iii. Consequential on-costs
these assets are carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and impairment losses.
The outstanding amounts of payroll tax, workers’ compensation insurance premiums, and
In general, intangible assets are tested for impairment where an indicator of impairment fringe benefits tax, which are consequential to employment, are recognised as either
exists. If the recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount the carrying amount is liabilities or expenses depending on where the employee benefits to which they relate have
reduced to the recoverable amount or the reduction is recognised as an impairment loss. been recognised.

o) Personnel Services p) Animal Collection

Since the Administrative Arrangement Order 2014 all employees are under the employment The animal collection managed by Taronga is reflected in Taronga’s accounting records at
of OEH, therefore salaries and wages, annual leave and on-costs are classified as personnel one dollar. This is consistent with worldwide industry practice. Taronga regards the animals
services expenses and provisions for annual leave, long service leave and defined benefit as part of a regional and international collection and not the specific property of the
superannuation plans are recognised as payables. institution.

i. Salaries and Wages, Annual Leave, Sick Leave and On-Costs q) Accounting for Goods and Services Tax

Liabilities for salaries and wages that fall due wholly within 12 months of the reporting date Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where:
are recognised and measured in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date at
undiscounted amounts based on the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are  The amount of GST incurred by Taronga as a purchaser that is not recoverable from
settled. the Australian Taxation Office is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of an
asset or as part of an item of expense.
Unused non-vesting sick leave does not give rise to a liability as it is not considered probable  Receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included. The net
that sick leave taken in the future will be greater than the benefit accrued in the future. amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the Australian Taxation Office is
included with other receivables or payables in the Statement of Financial Position.
All accrued annual leave is treated as a current liability with the expectation that annual
leave will be taken when due. The on-costs i.e. payroll tax, worker’s compensation insurance Cash flows are included in the Statement of Cash Flows on a gross basis. The GST
premiums and superannuation which are consequential to employment have been taken into components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable
account in calculating annual leave provisions. from, or payable to, the Australian Taxation Office are presented as operating cash flows.

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80 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 81

r) Trade and Other Receivables  Liquidity risk
 Market risk
Trade receivables, which generally have 30 day terms, are recognised and carried at original
invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts. Short-term receivables with This note presents information about Taronga's exposure to each of the above risks, its
no stated interest rate are measured at the original invoice amount where the effect of objectives, policies and processes for measuring and managing risk, and the management
discounting is immaterial. of capital. Further quantitative disclosures are included throughout these financial
statements.
An allowance for impairment is raised when there is objective evidence that Taronga will not
be able to collect amounts due. The credit risk is the carrying amount of the financial assets The Board of Directors has overall responsibility for the establishment and oversight of the
(net of any allowance for impairment). Debts which are known to be uncollectible are written risk management framework.
off. No interest is earned on trade debtors. The carrying amount approximates fair value.
Taronga’s Audit and Risk Committee is responsible for developing and monitoring risk
s) Inventories management policies. The Committee reports regularly to the Board of Directors on its
activities.
Inventories held for distribution are stated at the lower of cost and current replacement cost.
Inventories (other than those held for distribution) are stated at the lower of cost and net Risk management policies are established to identify and analyse the risks faced by
realisable value. The cost is calculated using the weighted average cost method. Current Taronga, to set appropriate risk limits and controls, and to monitor risks and adherence to
replacement cost is the cost Taronga would incur to acquire the asset on the reporting date. limits. Risk management policies and systems are reviewed regularly to reflect changes in
Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less the market conditions and Taronga's activities. Taronga, through its training and management
estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale. standards and procedures, aims to develop a disciplined and constructive control
environment in which all employees understand their roles and obligations.
t) Other Financial Assets
The Audit and Risk Committee oversees how management monitors compliance with
Other financial assets include short term deposits that are due to mature between 3 and 12 Taronga's risk management policies and procedures and reviews the adequacy of the risk
months from the reporting date. Term deposits due to mature within 3 months from the management framework in relation to the risks faced by Taronga.
reporting date are classified as cash and cash equivalents.
i. Credit Risk
u) Borrowings
Credit risk is the risk of financial loss to Taronga if a customer or counterparty to a financial
Loans are not held for trading or designated at fair value through the profit or loss but are instrument fails to meet its contractual obligations and arises principally from Taronga's
recognised at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method. Gains or losses are receivables from customers. The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the
recognised in the income statement on de-recognition. carrying amount of the financial assets (net of any allowance for impairment).

v) Trade and Other Payables Credit risk arises from the financial assets of Taronga, including cash, receivables and
authority deposits. No collateral is held by Taronga. Taronga has not granted any financial
Payables are initially recognised at fair value, usually based on the transaction cost. Trade guarantees.
accounts payable are generally settled within 30 days.
Credit risk associated with Taronga’s financial assets, other than receivables is managed
w) Finance Costs through the selection of counterparties and the establishment of minimum credit standards.
Authority deposits held with NSW Treasury Corporation (TCorp) Hour-Glass are guaranteed
Finance costs are recognised as expenses in the period in which they are incurred in by the State.
accordance with Treasury’s Mandate to not-for-profit general government sector entities.
Cash
x) Insurance
Cash comprises cash on hand and bank balances at call with ANZ Banking Corporation,
Taronga’s insurance activities are conducted through NSW Treasury Managed Fund Westpac Banking Corporation, National Australia Bank and TCorp which have been rated
Scheme of self-insurance for government agencies. The expense (premium) is determined “AA-“, “AA-“,“AA-“ and “AAA” by Standard and Poor's respectively. Interest is earned on daily
by the Fund Manager based on past claims experience. bank balances. At balance date the cash deposits were earning an average interest rate of
2.75% (2015/2016 2.74%), the weighted average interest rate for the period was 2.85%
y) Financial Risk Management (2015/2016 3.01%). None of these balances are past due or impaired.

Taronga has exposure to the following risks from its use of financial instruments: Receivables - Trade Debtors

 Credit risk All trade debtors are recognised as amounts receivable at balance date. Collectability of
trade debtors is reviewed on an ongoing basis.
15
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82 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 83

An allowance for impairment is raised when there is objective evidence that Taronga will not z) Equity and Reserves
be able to collect all amounts due. This evidence includes past experience, and current and
expected changes in economic conditions and debtor credit ratings. No interest is earned on i. Revaluation Surplus
trade debtors. Sales are made on 30 day terms.
The revaluation surplus is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of
Taronga is not materially exposed to concentration of credit risk to a single trade debtor or non-current assets. This accords with Taronga’s policy on the revaluation of property, plant
group of debtors. and equipment as discussed in note 1(h).

Quantitative disclosures in relation to the ageing and demographics of debtors are made in ii. Accumulated Funds
Note 19(b) to these accounts.
The category 'Accumulated Funds' includes all current and prior year retained funds.
ii. Liquidity Risk
aa) Fair Value Hierarchy
Liquidity risk is the risk that Taronga will not be able to meet its financial obligations as and
when they fall due. Taronga’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure, as far as possible, A number of Taronga’s accounting policies and disclosures require the measurement of fair
that it will have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when they fall due under both normal values, for both financial and non-financial assets and liabilities. When measuring fair value,
and stressed conditions. the valuation technique used maximises the use of relevant observable inputs and minimises
the use of unobservable inputs. Under AASB 13, Taronga categorises, for disclosure
Taronga continuously manages risk through monitoring future cash flows and maturities purposes, the valuation techniques based on the inputs used in the valuation techniques as
planning to ensure adequate holding of high quality liquid assets. During the current and follows:
prior years, there were no defaults or breaches in any loans payable. No assets have been
pledged as collateral.  Level 1 - quoted prices in active markets for identical assets / liabilities that the entity
can access at the measurement date.
Liabilities are recognised for amounts due to be paid in the future for goods or services  Level 2 – inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable,
received, whether or not invoiced. either directly or indirectly.
 Level 3 – inputs that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).
An analysis of the maturity profile of Taronga financial liabilities is in Note 19(c) of the
accounts. Taronga recognises transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy at the end of the
reporting period during which the change has occurred.
Taronga maintains a direct payments facility of $1.4m. This was unused at 30 June 2017.
Refer Note 19 and Note 14 for further disclosures regarding fair value measurements of
iii. Market Risk financial and non-financial assets.

Market risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will bb) Changes in Accounting Policy, Including New or Revised Australian Accounting
fluctuate because of changes in market prices. Standards

Taronga has no exposure to foreign currency risk and does not enter into commodity Australian Accounting Standards effective in 2016-17
contracts.
The accounting policies applied in reporting period are consistent with those of the previous
Taronga's financial instruments comprise trade receivables and payables which do not financial year except the additional disclosure requirements as per AASB 124 Related Party
earn/incur interest and fixed interest treasury loans which are not subject to interest rate Disclosures that have been applied for the first time in 2016-17– refer Note 22. All other new
fluctuations. or revised Australian Accounting Standards mandatory for 2017 Financial Statements are
either not relevant to the operations of Taronga or do not have any impact on Taronga’s
Cash deposited at the bank earns interest at a variable rate. A sensitivity analysis of the results or disclosures.
impact of an interest rate rise or fall of 100 basis points is included in Note 19(a) to these
accounts. Australian Accounting Standards issued but not yet effective

Cash held in TCorp Hour-Glass facilities is exposed to other price risk, a possible impact on NSW public sector entities are not permitted to early adopt new AAS, unless Treasury
profit/loss due to changes in unit price is included in Note 19(a). determines otherwise.
 AASB 9 and AASB 2010-7, AASB 2013-9 (Part C), AASB 2014-1 (Part E), AASB
2014-7 and AASB 2014-8 regarding financial instruments – mandatory for 2018
Financial Statements

17
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84 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 85

 AASB 2016-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Disclosure 2. Trading and Franchise Revenue
Initiative: Amendments to AASB 107 – mandatory for 2018 Financial Statements
2017 2016
 AASB 2016-4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Recoverable
$’000 $’000
Amount of Non-Cash Generating Specialised Assets of Not-for-Profit Entities –
i) Catering Sales 2,311 2,249
mandatory for 2018 Financial Statements
Less: Cost of Sales (896) (878)
 AASB 2017-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Further Annual Gross Profit 1,415 1,371
Improvements 2014 - 2016 Cycle – mandatory for 2018 Financial Statements
ii) Souvenir Sales 7,258 6,956
 AASB 2016-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Deferral of AASB
Less: Cost of Sales (2,869) (2,669)
15 for Not-for-Profit Entities – mandatory for 2018 Financial Statements
Gross Profit 4,389 4,287
 AASB15, AASB 2014-5, AASB 2015-8 and AASB 2016-3 regarding Revenue from
Contracts with Customers – mandatory for 2019 Financial Statements – mandatory iii) Catering Franchise Commissions 3,805 3,761
for 2018 Financial Statements Total Sales 13,374 12,966
 AASB 16 regarding accounting of Leases – mandatory for 2019 Financial Statements Less total Cost of Sales (3,765) (3,547)
 AASB 9 Financial Instruments, AASB 2014-7 and AASB 2014-8 Amendments to Total Gross Profit 9,609 9,419
Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9 – mandatory for 2019 Financial
Statements
 AASB 2014-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Sale or 3. Government Grants
Contribution of Assets between an Investor and its Associate or Joint Venture–
mandatory for 2019 Financial Statements 2017 2016
$’000 $’000
 AASB 2015-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Effective Date of
Amendments to AASB 10 and AASB 128 – mandatory for 2019 Financial Statements Capital grant 15,053 4,700
Recurrent grant 14,770 14,402
 AASB 2017-1 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Transfers of Total Government Grants 29,823 19,102
Investment Property, Annual Improvements 2014–2016 Cycle and Other
Amendments – mandatory for 2019 Financial Statements
 AASB 2016-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Applying AASB 9 4. Investment Revenue
Financial Instruments with AASB 4 Insurance Contracts – mandatory for 2019
Financial Statements 2017 2016
$’000 $’000
 AASB 1058 Income of Not-for-Profit Entities – Provides a more comprehensive model Dividend Income - 70
for accounting for NFP entities – mandatory for 2020 Financial Statements Term Deposits and Bank Interest 2,090 2,065
 AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards– Australian Total Investment Revenue 2,090 2,135
Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities (“AASB 2016-8”) - Provides
authoritative implementation guidance when applying AASB 15 to those
arrangements of a NFP which are identified as contracts with customers. – mandatory
for 2020 Financial Statements

When the above Accounting Standards and amendments become mandatory additional
disclosures may be required in the notes to Taronga’s Financial Statements.

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86 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 87

5. Other Income the Statement of Comprehensive Income. In 2017 a defined benefit superannuation actuarial
gain of $2,504,157 is included in defined benefit superannuation expense ($2,410,812 loss
2017 2016 in 2015/2016).
$’000 $’000
Accommodation 8,868 8,874 Employee related costs amounting to $1,237,947 have been capitalised during the year
Animal Sponsorship 472 431 ($1,158,127 in 2015/2016) and $151,839 ($168,668 in 2015/2016) have been transferred to
Animal Encounters 1,017 968 maintenance expenses. These employee related costs are excluded from the above.
Bike and Cart Hire 862 863
Car Parking 2,002 1,828 b) Marketing Expenses
Consultancy Fees 90 150
Educational and Recreation Activities 1,661 1,736 2017 2016
Event Income 1,167 987 $’000 $’000
Insurance Premium Hindsight Adjustments 972 211 Advertising 2,436 1,969
Research Project Income 121 93 Promotions 625 414
Ropes Course 731 711 Other Marketing 961 718
Sponsorship of Goods and Services 1,570 1,252 Total Marketing Expenses 4,023 3,101
Taronga Training Institute 1,447 1,116
Twilight Concert Ticket Sales 1,904 2,045
Zoo Friends Joining and Event Fees 169 194 c) Depreciation and Amortisation Expenses
Sundry Income 1,993 1,099
Total Other Income 25,046 22,558 2017 2016
$’000 $’000
Depreciation
6. Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Assets Land and Buildings 16,683 15,716
Plant and Equipment 946 973
2017 2016 Infrastructure 3,451 3,488
$’000 $’000 Amortisation
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Plant & Equipment 21 - Intangible Assets 72 45
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Financial Assets - (1,423)
Total Depreciation and Amortisation Expenses 21,152 20,222
Total Gain/(Loss) on Sales of Assets 21 (1,423)

d) Maintenance
7. Expenses
2017 2016
$’000 $’000
a) Personnel Services
Contracted labour and other (non employee related) 7,463 6,055
Employee related maintenance expenses (Asset
2017 2016 152 169
Maintenance Grant)
$’000 $’000
Total Maintenance Expenses 7,615 6,224
Salaries and Wages (including annual leave) 40,634 39,042
Long Service Leave 627 990
Payroll Tax 2,508 2,431
Workers Compensation Insurance 498 593
e) Finance Costs
Superannuation Guarantee Contribution 3,836 3,661
2017 2016
Defined Benefit Superannuation Expense* (2,147) 2,875
$’000 $’000
Fringe Benefits Tax 5 31
Total Personnel Services 45,960 49,624
Interest on Borrowings 917 925
The personnel services is the expense incurred by Taronga on personnel services provided Amortisation of premiums relating to borrowings (57) -
by OEH due to the Administrative Arrangements Order 2014. Amortisation of discounts relating to borrowings - 4
Total Finance Costs 860 929
*As the employment is undertaken by OEH, the defined benefit superannuation actuarial
gain/loss is included in Personnel Service Expenses in the Income Statement rather than in

21 22
88 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 89

8. Other Expenses 10. Inventories
2017 2016
$’000 $’000
2017 2016 Held for Distribution
$’000 $’000 Food for Animals 214 182
Accommodation Expenses 1,865 1,689 Stores and Spare Parts 203 188
Animal Husbandry & Research Support 2,428 2,820 417 370
Animal Transport 54 250
Audit Fees – Audit of Financial Statements 100 98 Held for Resale
Bank Charges & Fees 473 405 Catering 67 68
Board Honoraria 198 198 Souvenirs 834 835
Carrying Value of Assets Written Off:
901 903
– Infrastructure 140 -
– Intangibles 10 - Total Inventories 1,318 1,273
– Land and Buildings 1,725 -
– Plant and Equipment 20 -
– Work-in-Progress - 2,162 11. Other Financial Assets
Catering 425 486
Communication Costs 569 491 2017 2016
Concert Artist Fees 672 634 $’000 $’000
Consultancy 122 51 Term deposits:
Contract Services 7,042 4,874 91 - 180 Days - 10,000
Contingent Labour 1,441 769 181 - 270 Days 31,000 29,000
Energy Costs 1,135 1,177 Over 270 Days 37,502 28,502
Hire Expenses 326 259
Information Technology Costs 379 383 Total Other Financial Assets 68,502 67,502
Insurance 557 498
Internal Audit Fees 60 58
Legal Fees 129 131
Minor Equipment & Stores 1,836 758 12. Property, Plant and Equipment
Postage & Couriers 280 329
Printing & Stationery 583 630
Protective Clothing 242 249 Work in Land and Plant and
Recruitment Fees 134 162 Progress Buildings Equipment Infrastructure Total
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
Signage and Interpretation Expenses 252 186 At 1 July 2016 - fair value
Staff Development & Training 116 150 Gross carrying amount 19,011 481,230 10,663 83,200 594,103
Ticket Sale Commissions 919 529 Accumulated Depreciation - (146,461) (7,252) (25,807) (179,520)
Travelling Expenses 452 400 Net carrying amount 19,011 334,769 3,411 57,393 414,583
Vehicle Costs and Leasing Expenses 397 400
At 30 June 2017 - fair value
Water & Sewerage 448 444 Gross carrying amount 43,720 522,803 12,466 92,804 671,793
Sundry Expenses 1,358 1,365 Accumulated Depreciation - (169,711) (7,688) (31,102) (208,501)
Total Other Expenses 26,887 23,036 Net carrying amount 43,720 353,092 4,778 61,702 463,292

9. Trade and Other Receivables

2017 2016
$’000 $’000
Debtors 3,737 2,848
Less: Allowance for impairment - -
3,737 2,848
Prepayments 601 728
Total Trade and Other Receivables 4,338 3,576

23 24
90 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 91

Reconciliation Land

Reconciliations of the carrying amount of each class of property, plant and equipment at the Mosman – Taronga Zoo (28.1 hectares)
beginning and end of the current financial year is set out below:
Zoning: Special Activities 1 – Zoological Gardens under Mosman Local Environment Plan
Work in Land and Plant and 2012.
Progress Buildings Equipment Infrastructure Total
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
As per FPV Consultants valuation in March 2017, based on comparable values for open
Year ended 30 June 2017 recreation land, $68,800,000. Taronga has formed the opinion that there was no change to
Net carrying amount at 1 July 2016 19,011 334,769 3,411 57,393 414,583 the valuation for the period to 30 June 2017.
Additions 38,892 7 1,703 26 40,629
Transfers (14,183) 9,037 664 3,447 (1,034)
Disposals - (7,558) (564) (580) (8,702)
Revaluation increment - 27,687 - 4,428 32,115 Dubbo – Taronga Western Plains Zoo (758.3 hectares)
Depreciation expense - (16,683) (946) (3,451) (21,080)
Depreciation on disposals - 5,833 510 440 6,783
Zoning: SP3 Tourist under the Dubbo Local Environment Plan 2011.
Net carrying amount at 30 June 2017 43,720 353,092 4,778 61,702 463,292 As per Aspect Property valuation in March 2017, based on comparable zoning values
$2,850,000. Taronga has formed the opinion that there was no change to the valuation for
the period to 30 June 2017.
Work in Land and Plant and
Progress Buildings Equipment Infrastructure Total
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
At 1 July 2015 - fair value
Gross carrying amount 5,871 482,808 10,119 83,082 581,880
Accumulated Depreciation - (133,395) (6,441) (22,319) (162,156)
13. Intangible Assets
Net carrying amount 5,871 349,413 3,678 60,763 419,724

At 30 June 2016 - fair value Software and
Gross carrying amount 19,011 481,230 10,663 83,200 594,103
other Intangibles
Accumulated Depreciation - (146,461) (7,252) (25,807) (179,520)
Total
Net carrying amount 19,011 334,769 3,411 57,393 414,583
$’000
At 1 July 2016
Cost (gross carrying amount) 761
Reconciliation
Accumulated Amortisation and Impairment (556)
Net carrying amount 205
Reconciliations of the carrying amount of each class of property, plant and equipment at the
beginning and end of the previous financial year is set out below:
At 30 June 2017
Work in Land and Plant and Cost (gross carrying amount) 1,756
Progress Buildings Equipment Infrastructure Total Accumulated Amortisation and Impairment (598)
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Net carrying amount 1,158
Year ended 30 June 2016
Net carrying amount at 1 July 2015 5,871 349,413 3,678 60,763 419,724
Additions 16,520 10 683 - 17,213 Year ended 30 June 2017
Transfers (1,218) 1,061 24 118 (15)
Net carrying amount at 1 July 2016 205
Disposals - (2,649) (163) - (2,813)
Expensed (2,162) - - - (2,162) Additions (acquisitions) -
Depreciation expense - (15,716) (973) (3,488) (20,177) Transfers 1,034
Depreciation on disposals - 2,649 163 - 2,812 Disposals (39)
Net carrying amount at 30 June 2016 19,011 334,768 3,411 57,393 414,583 Amortisation (72)
Amortisation on disposals 30
Net carrying amount at 30 June 2017 1,158

25 26
92 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 93

Software Total (b) Valuation Techniques, Inputs and Processes
$’000
At 1 July 2015 The Fair value of land, buildings and infrastructure was determined by FPV Consultants,
Cost (gross carrying amount) 759 Aspect Property and PNSW. Taronga’s land has been valued using the direct comparison
Accumulated Amortisation and Impairment (524) approach and classified as level 2, under this valuation method transactions of land acquired
Net carrying amount 235 for special uses and open space purposes are analysed and considered for comparison
purposes.
At 30 June 2016
Cost (gross carrying amount) 761
Fair value of buildings is measured by its depreciated replacement costs, as the current
Accumulated Amortisation and Impairment (556)
market buying prices cannot be observed. Therefore buildings are classified as level 3. In
Net carrying amount 205
determining the fair value of buildings and infrastructure current and historical costs were
considered as these assets are highly specialised and unique.
Year ended 30 June 2016
Net carrying amount at 1 July 2015 235 (c) Reconciliation of Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements
Additions (acquisitions) -
Transfers 15
Disposals (13)
Amortisation (45) 2017
Amortisation on disposals 13 Recurring
Net carrying amount at 30 June 2016 205 Level 3 Fair
value
$’000
14. Fair Value Measurement of Non-Financial Assets Fair Value as at 1 July 2016
Buildings and Infrastructure 327,411
(a) Fair Value Hierarchy Additions 12,517
Revaluation increments/(decrements) recognised in Net result -
2017 Revaluation increments/(decrements) recognised in other comprehensive
income 25,215
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total Fair
Transfers from Level 2 -
Value
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Transfers to Level 2 -
Disposals (1,865)
Property Plant and Equipment Depreciation (20,134)
Land and Buildings - 71,650 281,442 353,092
Fair Value as at 30 June 2017 343,144
Infrastructure - - 61,702 61,702

- 71,650 343,144 414,794

2016
2016 Recurring
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total Fair
Level 3 Fair
Value value
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
Fair Value as at 1 July 2015
Property Plant and Equipment Buildings and Infrastructure 345,425
Land and Buildings - 64,750 270,018 334,768
Additions 1,190
Infrastructure - - 57,393 57,393
Revaluation increments/(decrements) recognised in Net result -
- 64,750 327,411 392,161 Revaluation increments/(decrements) recognised in other comprehensive
income -
There were no transfers between Level 1 or 2 during the year. Transfers from Level 2 -
Transfers to Level 2 -
Disposals -
Depreciation (19,204)
Fair Value as at 30 June 2016 327,411

27 28
94 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 95

15. Trade and Other Payables 18. Superannuation
2017 2016
$’000 $’000 Taronga is liable for superannuation benefits of employees provided by OEH. All employees
Operating Expense Creditors 3,335 2,838 are entitled to superannuation benefits under one of the superannuation schemes, namely
Capital Creditors 7,495 3,981 First State Superannuation Scheme (FSS), State Authorities Non-Contributory
Accruals and Other Creditors 2,005 2,099 Superannuation (SANCS) Scheme, State Authorities Superannuation Scheme (SASS), and
Personnel Services 16,791 18,991 State Superannuation Scheme (SSS). All funds are administered by the Superannuation
Total Trade and Other Payables 29,626 27,909 Administration Corporation trading as Mercer Administration Services (Australia) Pty Ltd.

The superannuation schemes SSS, SASS and SANCS are all defined benefit schemes; at
least a component of the final benefit is derived from a multiple of member salary and years
(a) Personnel Services
of membership. All three schemes are closed to new members. Employees who are not
members of an associated scheme and were covered by the State Authorities Non-
2017 2016
Contributory Scheme (Basic Benefit) are automatically transferred into FSS. Employees also
$’000 $’000
have the choice of using other superannuation schemes and some have opted to do so.
Current Liabilities
Salaries and Wages Payable 941 1,107
Annual Leave Provision 2,791 2,813 (a) Defined Benefit Plans
Long Service Leave Provision 6,468 6,214
Defined Benefit Superannuation 6,591 8,857 i. Nature of the benefits provided by the fund
Total Personnel Services 16,791 18,991
The Pooled Fund holds in trust the investments of the closed NSW public sector
superannuation schemes:
16. Other Liabilities
 State Authorities Superannuation Scheme (SASS)
2017 2016  State Superannuation Scheme (SSS)
$’000 $’000  Police Superannuation Scheme (PSS)
Unearned Income 4,023 2,918  State Authorities Non-contributory Superannuation Scheme (SANCS).
Total Other Liabilities 4,023 2,918
These schemes are all defined benefit schemes – at least a component of the final benefit is
derived from a multiple of member salary and years of membership. Members receive lump
sum or pension benefits on retirement, death, disablement and withdrawal. All the Schemes
17. Borrowings
are closed to new members.
2017 2016
ii. Description of the regulatory framework
$’000 $’000
NSW Treasury Corporation 15,894 15,951
The schemes in the Pooled Fund are established and governed by the following NSW
These loans are due to mature as follows:
legislation: Superannuation Act 1916, State Authorities Superannuation Act 1987, Police
Not later than one year 1,854 5,907
Regulation (Superannuation) Act 1906, State Authorities Non-Contributory Superannuation
Later than one year but not later than two years 5,998 1,905
Act 1987, and their associated regulations.
Later than two years but not later than five years 8,042 8,139
Later than five years - -
The schemes in the Pooled Fund are exempt public sector superannuation schemes under
15,894 15,951 the Commonwealth Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 (SIS). The SIS
Legislation treats exempt public sector superannuation funds as complying funds for
concessional taxation and superannuation guarantee purposes.
Face Value and Capital Value of Loans
Under a Heads of Government agreement, the New South Wales Government undertakes to
2017 2016 ensure that the Pooled Fund will conform with the principles of the Commonwealth’s
$’000 $’000 retirement incomes policy relating to preservation, vesting and reporting to members and
Face Value of Loans 15,075 15,899 that members’ benefits are adequately protected.
Add Unamortised Premium 819 53
Capital Value of Loans 15,894 15,951 The New South Wales Government prudentially monitors and audits the Pooled Fund and
the Trustee Board activities in a manner consistent with the prudential controls of the SIS
legislation. These provisions are in addition to other legislative obligations on the Trustee
29
30
96 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 97

Board and internal processes that monitor the Trustee Board’s adherence to the principles of Reconciliation of the Net Defined Benefit Liability/(Asset)
the Commonwealth’s retirement incomes policy.
SASS
Financial SANCS
Financial SSS
Financial SASS
Financial SANCS
Financial SSS
Financial
Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to
An actuarial investigation of the Pooled Fund is performed every three years. The last 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 30 June 2016
actuarial investigation was performed as at 30 June 2015. The next actuarial investigation is $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
due as at 30 June 2018. Net Defined Benefit Liability/(Asset) at start of
588 383 7,886 223 288 5,648
year
151 27 215 38 39
iii. Description of other entities' responsibilities for the governance of the fund Current service cost
Net Interest on the net defined benefit
11 7 157 5 8 171
liability/(asset)
The Fund's Trustee is responsible for the governance of the Fund. The Trustee has a legal Past service cost - - - - - -
obligation to act solely in the best interests of fund beneficiaries. The Trustee has the (Gains)/losses arising from settlements - - - - - -
Actual return on Fund assets less Interest
following roles: income
(254) (20) (508) 17 6 (15)

Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from changes in
5 - - 27 - 381
demographic assumptions
 Administration of the fund and payment to the beneficiaries from fund assets when Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from changes in
required in accordance with the fund rules; financial assumptions
(160) (39) (1,309) 283 70 1,805

 Management and investment of the fund assets; and Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from liability
33 (14) (240) (37) - (126)
experience
 Compliance with other applicable regulations. Adjustment for effect of asset ceiling - - - - - -
Employer contributions (96) (19) (145) (28) (17)
iv. Description of risks Net Defined Benefit Liability/(Asset) at end of
279 325 5,987 588 383 7,886
year

There are a number of risks to which the Fund exposes the Employer. The more significant
risks relating to the defined benefits are:
Reconciliation of the Fair Value of Fund Assets
 Investment risk - The risk that investment returns will be lower than assumed and the
Employer will need to increase contributions to offset this shortfall. SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS
 Longevity risk – The risk that pensioners live longer than assumed, increasing future Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial
Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to
pensions. 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 30 June 2016
 Pension indexation risk – The risk that pensions will increase at a rate greater than $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
assumed, increasing future pensions. Fair value of Fund assets at beginning of the
3,707 332 7,094 5,197 662 7,329
year
 Salary growth risk - The risk that wages or salaries (on which future benefit amounts Interest income 74 7 136 155 20 215
for active members will be based) will rise more rapidly than assumed, increasing Actual return on Fund assets less Interest
254 20 508 (17) (6) 15
defined benefit amounts and thereby requiring additional employer contributions. income
Employer contributions 96 19 - 145 28 17
 Legislative risk - The risk is that legislative changes could be made which increase Contributions by participants 58 - - 84 - 20
the cost of providing the defined benefits. Benefits paid (427) (70) (516) (1,829) (364) (523)
Taxes, premiums & expenses paid (20) (1) 88 (29) (7) 21
Transfers in - - - - - -
The defined benefit fund assets are invested with independent fund managers and have a Contributions to accumulation section - - - - - -
diversified asset mix. The Fund has no significant concentration of investment risk or liquidity Settlements - - - - - -
Exchange rate changes - - - - - -
risk. Fair value of Fund assets at end of the year 3,742 307 7,310 3,707 332 7,094

v. Description of significant events

There were no fund amendments, curtailments or settlements during the year.

31 32
98 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 99

Reconciliation of the Defined Benefit Obligation The percentage invested in each asset class at the reporting date is:

SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS As at 30-Jun-17 30-Jun-16
Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial
Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to Cash 7.7% -
30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 Short Term Securities - 5.4%
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
Australian Fixed Interest 6.2% 7.1%
Present value of defined benefit obligations at
4,296 715 14,980 5,421 950 12,977 International Fixed Interest 1.2% 2.2%
beginning of the year
Current service cost 151 27 215 38 39 Australian Equities 23.6% 25.5%
Interest cost 84 14 293 160 28 386
International Equities 30.1% 31.7%
Contributions by participants 58 - - 84 - 20
Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from changes in Property 8.6% 9.6%
5 - - 27 - 381
demographic assumptions Alternatives 22.6% 18.6%
Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from changes in
(160) (39) (1,309) 283 70 1,805 Total 100.0% 100.0%
financial assumptions
Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from liability
33 (14) (240) (37) - (126)
experience *Additional to the assets disclosed above, at 30 June 2017 Pooled Fund has provisions for
Benefits paid (427) (70) (516) (1,829) (364) (523)
receivables/ (payables) estimated to be around $2.83 billion, giving an estimated assets totalling
Taxes, premiums & expenses paid (20) (1) 88 (29) (7) 21
Transfers in - - - - - - around $41.01 billion.
Contributions to accumulation section - - - - - -
Past service cost - - - - - - Level 1 - quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. The assets in these levels
Settlements - - - - - -
Exchange rate changes - - - - - -
are listed shares; listed unit trusts.
Present value of defined benefit obligations at Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices observable for the asset or liability either directly or
4,022 632 13,296 4,296 715 14,980 indirectly. The assets in this level are cash; notes; government, semi-government and corporate
end of the year
bonds; unlisted trusts containing where quoted prices are available in active markets for identical
assets or liabilities.
Reconciliation of the effect of the Asset Ceiling Level 3 - inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data. The assets in
this level are unlisted property; unlisted shares; unlisted infrastructure; distressed debt; hedge funds.
SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS
Derivatives, including futures and options, can be used by investment managers. However, each
Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial Financial manager's investment mandate clearly states that derivatives may only be used to facilitate efficient
Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to Year to cash flow management or to hedge the portfolio against market movements and cannot be used for
30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 30 June 2016 speculative purposes or gearing of the investment portfolio. As such managers make limited use of
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
derivatives.
Adjustment for effect of asset ceiling at
- - - - - -
beginning of the year
Interest on the effect of asset ceiling - - - - - - Fair value of entity's own financial instruments
Change in the effect of asset ceiling - - - - - -
Adjustment for effect of asset ceiling at end of
the year
- - - - - - The fair value of the Pooled Fund assets includes as at 30 June 2017 of $354.0 million in NSW
government bonds.

Of the direct properties owned by the Pooled Fund:
Fair value of Fund assets
SAS Trustee Corporation occupies part of a property 100% owned by the Pooled Fund with a fair
value of $250 million (30 June 2016: $222 million).
All Pooled Fund assets are invested by STC at arm’s length through independent fund managers,
assets are not separately invested for each entity and it is not possible or appropriate to disaggregate Health Administration Corporation occupies part of a property 50% owned by the Pooled Fund with a
and attribute fund assets to individual entities. As such, the disclosures below relate to total fair value (100% interest) of $261 million (30 June 2016: $243 million).
assets of the Pooled Fund.

As at 30 June 2017
Quoted prices in Significant Unobservable
active markets for observable inputs
Total identical assets inputs Level 3
Asset category (A$'000) Level 1 (A$'000) Level 2 (A$'000) (A$'000)
Cash 3,087,307 3,077,362 9,945 -
Australian Fixed Interest 2,500,725 997 2,499,728 -
International Fixed Interest 480,991 - 480,991 -
Australian Equities 9,446,079 8,947,483 498,572 24
International Equities 12,053,503 9,033,497 1,869,112 1,150,894
Property 3,453,107 926,105 533,191 1,993,812
Alternatives 9,066,055 390,899 5,068,137 3,607,020
Total* 40,087,767 22,376,343 10,959,675 6,751,750
34

33
100 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 101

Significant Actuarial Assumptions at the Reporting Date Rate of CPI increase as above as above as above
above rates plus above rates less
As at 30-Jun-17 30-Jun-16 Salary inflation rate as above
2.62% 1.99% pa
0.5% pa 0.5% pa
Discount rate
2.50% 2017/2018 and 2018/2019; 3.50% 2019/2020 and 2.50% 2016/2017 to 2018/2019; 3.50% 2019/2020 and Defined benefit obligation (A$) 17,950,337 18,102,092 17,806,606
Salary increase rate
2020/2021; 3.00% pa 2021/2022 to 2025/2026; 3.50% pa 2020/2021; 3.00% pa 2021/2022 to 2025/2026; 3.50% pa
(excluding promotional increases)
thereafter thereafter
1.5% 2015/2016; 1.75% 2016/2017; 2.25% 2017/2018; *Assumes the short term pensioner mortality improvement factors for years 2017-2021 also apply for
2.00% 2017/2018; 2.25% 2018/2019; 2.50% pa thereafter
Rate of CPI increase 2.50% pa thereafter years after 2021
Pensioner mortality The pensioner mortality assumptions are as per the 2015 The pensioner mortality assumptions are as per the 2015
Actuarial Investigation of the Pooled Fund. These Actuarial Investigation of the Pooled Fund. These
assumptions are disclosed in the actuarial investigation assumptions are disclosed in the actuarial investigation **Assumes the long term pensioner mortality improvement factors for years post 2021 also apply for
report available from the trustee's website. The report shows report available from the trustee's website. The report shows years 2017 to 2021
the pension mortality rates for each age. the pension mortality rates for each age.
Pensioner mortality The pensioner mortality assumptions are as per the 2015 The pensioner mortality assumptions are as per the 2015
Actuarial Investigation of the Pooled Fund. These Actuarial Investigation of the Pooled Fund. These
The defined benefit obligation has been recalculated by changing the assumptions as outlined above,
assumptions are disclosed in the actuarial investigation assumptions are disclosed in the actuarial investigation whilst retaining all other assumptions.
report available from the trustee's website. The report shows report available from the trustee's website. The report shows
the pension mortality rates for each age. the pension mortality rates for each age.
Asset-Liability matching strategies
Sensitivity Analysis The Trustee monitors its asset-liability risk continuously in setting its investment strategy. It also
monitors cash flows to manage liquidity requirements.
The entity's total defined benefit obligation as at 30 June 2017 under several scenarios is presented
below.
Funding arrangements
Scenarios A to F relate to sensitivity of the total defined benefit obligation to economic assumptions,
and scenarios G and H relate to sensitivity to demographic assumptions.
Funding arrangements are reviewed at least every three years following the release of the triennial
Base Case Scenario A Scenario B actuarial review and was last reviewed following completion of the triennial review as at 30 June
-1.0% +1.0% 2015. Contribution rates are set after discussions between the employer, STC and NSW Treasury.
discount rate discount rate
Discount rate as above as above -1.0% pa as above +1.0% pa Funding positions are reviewed annually and funding arrangements may be adjusted as required after
Rate of CPI increase as above as above as above each annual review.
Salary inflation rate as above as above as above
Defined benefit obligation (A$) 17,950,337 20,381,123 15,943,193
Base Case Scenario C Scenario D
Surplus/deficit
+0.5% rate of CPI -0.5% rate of CPI
increase increase The following is a summary of the 30 June 2017 financial position of the Fund calculated in
accordance with AAS 25 “Financial Reporting by Superannuation Plans”:
Discount rate as above as above as above
above rates plus above rates less SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS
Rate of CPI increase as above
0.5% pa 0.5% pa 30-Jun-17 30-Jun-17 30-Jun-17 30-Jun-16 30-Jun-16 30-Jun-16
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
Salary inflation rate as above as above as above
Accrued benefits* 3,374 438 7,176 3,378 456 7,213
Defined benefit obligation (A$) 17,950,337 18,965,623 17,023,971 Net market value of Fund assets (3,742) (307) (7,310) (3,707) (332) (7,094)
Net (surplus)/deficit (368) 131 (134) (329) 123 119
Base Case Scenario E Scenario F
+0.5% salary -0.5% salary
increase rate increase rate
Discount rate as above as above as above
Contribution recommendations
Rate of CPI increase as above as above as above
above rates plus above rates less
Salary inflation rate as above Recommended contribution rates for the entity are:
0.5% pa 0.5% pa
Defined benefit obligation (A$) 17,950,337 18,102,092 17,806,606
Base Case Scenario G Scenario H 2017 2017 2017 2016 2016 2016
Low er Mortality* Higher Mortality** SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS
multiple of % member salary multiple of multiple of % member multiple of
Defined benefit obligation (A$) 17,950,337 18,233,671 17,760,014 member member member salary member
contributions contributions contributions contributions
1.9 2.5 1.6 1.9 2.5 1.6

Base Case Scenario E Scenario F
+0.5% salary -0.5% salary
increase rate increase rate
Discount rate as above as above as above

35 36
102 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 103

Economic assumptions 19. Financial Instruments
The economic assumptions adopted for the 30 June 2015 actuarial investigation of the Pooled Fund Financial Instruments give rise to positions that are a financial asset either of Taronga or its
are:
counterparty and a financial liability (or equity instrument) of the other party. For Taronga
these include cash, receivables, and cash deposited at the bank and in TCorp Hour-Glass
Weighted-Average Assumptions
facility, payables and borrowings.
Expected rate of return on Fund assets backing current pension 7.4% pa
Expected rate of return on Fund assets backing other liabilities 6.4% pa
In accordance with AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures, information is disclosed
Expected salary increase rate 2.7% to 30 June 2019 then 3.2% pa below in respect of the market risk, credit risk and liquidity risk of financial instruments.
(excluding promotional salary increases) thereafter
Expected rate of CPI increase 2.2% pa Financial instruments are carried at amortised cost, with the exception of cash, which is
carried at fair value. However, the fair value of the other classes of financial instruments
approximates their carrying value.
Expected contributions
Taronga does not enter into or trade financial instruments for speculative purposes. Taronga
does not use financial derivatives.
SASS SANCS SSS SASS SANCS SSS
Financial Year to Financial Year to Financial Year to Financial Year to Financial Year to Financial Year to
30 June 2018 30 June 2018 30 June 2018 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 30 June 2017 Financial Instrument Categories
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
Expected employer contributions 111 20 - 159 32 32

Financial Assets Notes Category 2017 2016
$’000 $’000
Class:
Maturity profile of defined benefit obligation Cash and Cash Equivalents 23 N/A 14,099 11,793

The weighted average duration of the defined benefit obligation is 12.5 years. Receivables (1) 9 Loans and receivables at 2,730 2,106
amortised cost
Other Financial Assets 11 Term deposits held in banks 68,502 67,502
Contribution Tax Provision (3-12 months)
Financial Liabilities
The accrued liability includes a contribution tax provision. This is calculated based on grossing up the Class:
deficit/(surplus) less the allowance for past service expenses and insurable death and disability
liabilities at a contribution tax rate of 15%. Payables (2) 15 Financial liabilities 29,626 27,909
measured at amortised cost
Borrowings 17 Financial liabilities 15,894 15,951
measured at amortised cost

(1) Excludes statutory receivables and prepayments (i.e. not within scope of AASB 7).

(2) Excludes statutory payables and unearned revenue in (i.e. not within scope of AASB 7).

37 38
104 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 105

a) Market Risk iii. Other Price Risk – TCorp Hour-Glass Facilities

i. Price Risk Exposure to 'other price risk' also arises through the investment in the TCorp Hour-Glass
Investment Facilities, which are held for strategic rather than trading purposes. Taronga holds units
Taronga sold its bequeathed shares in 2015-16, therefore is no longer exposed to price risk. in the following Hour-Glass investment trusts:

ii. Interest Rate Risk Carrying Amount
2017 2016
Interest rate risk arises through Taronga’s Interest bearing financial liabilities. Facility Investment Sectors Investment Horizon $’000 $’000
Hour-Glass Investment – Cash Cash and money
Financial Instruments Up to 1.5 years
Facility market instruments 9,721 9,110
As at the reporting date the interest rate profile of Taronga's interest bearing financial instruments
was:
The unit price of each facility is equal to the total fair value of the net assets held by the facility
2017 2016
divided by the number of units on issue for that facility. Unit prices are calculated and published
Fixed Rate Instruments
daily.
$’000 $’000
Financial Liabilities - Borrowings 15,894 15,951 NSW TCorp as trustee for each of the above facilities is required to act in the best interest of the
unit holders and to administer the trusts in accordance with the trust deeds. As trustee, TCorp has
Variable Rate Instruments appointed external managers to manage the performance and risks of each facility in accordance
Financial Assets - Cash and Cash Equivalents 14,099 11,793 with a mandate agreed by the parties. TCorp has also leveraged off internal expertise to manage
certain fixed income assets for the Hour-Glass facilities. A significant portion of the administration
Taronga manages its exposure to interest rate risk by financing borrowings through fixed rate of the facilities is outsourced to an external custodian.
borrowings.
Investment in the Hour-Glass facilities limits Taronga’s exposure to risk, as it allows diversification
Summarised Sensitivity Analysis across a pool of funds with different investment horizons and a mix of investments.

The below sensitivity analysis shows Taronga’s exposure to interest rate risk in the event of +/-1% NSW TCorp provides sensitivity analysis information for each of the Investment facilities, using
change in the interest rates. historically based volatility information collected over a ten year period, quoted at two standard
Interest Rate Risk deviations (i.e. 95% probability). The TCorp Hour-Glass Investment facilities are designated at fair
-1% +1% value through profit or loss and therefore any change in unit price impacts directly on profit (rather
Carrying Amount Profit Equity Profit Equity than equity). A reasonably possible change is based on the percentage change in unit price (as
advised by TCorp) multiplied by the redemption value as at 30 June each year for each facility
2017 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
(balance from Hour-Glass statement).
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents 4,378 (44) (44) 44 44
Impact on profit/loss
Receivables 2,730 - - - -
Change in $’000 $’000
Other Financial Assets 68,502 (685) (685) 685 685
unit price 2017 2016
Financial liabilities
Hour-Glass Investment – Cash facility +/-1% 97 91
Payables 29,626 - - - -

Interest Rate Risk
-1% +1% b) Credit Risk
Carrying Amount Profit Equity Profit Equity
2016 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Credit risk arises from the financial assets of Taronga which comprises trade and other
Financial assets receivables. The carrying amount of Taronga's financial assets represents the maximum credit
Cash and cash equivalents 2,683 (27) (27) 27 27 exposure.
Receivables 2,106 - - - -
Other Financial Assets 67,502 (675) (675) 675 675
Taronga's maximum exposure to credit risk at reporting date was $2,730,000 ($2,106,000 in 2016)
Financial liabilities
Payables 27,909 - - - -

There have been no changes in any of the assumptions used in preparing the above sensitivity
analysis from the prior year.

39 40
106 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 107

Taronga's maximum exposure to credit risk for trade receivables at the reporting date by type of The Borrowings are shown as maturing in the future periods above, including interest payable
customer was: there-on. The Board can recommend to either repay the loans on maturity or to extend these loans
for a further period.
2017 2016
$’000 $’000
Trade Receivables Owing from NSW Government Entities 322 18 Fair Value
Trade Receivables Owing from Non-Government Educational Bodies 1 22
Trade Receivables Owing from Tourism Operators 896 775 Fair Value Compared to Carrying Amount
Trade Receivables Owing from Other Entities 1,089 856
Trade Receivables Owing from Sponsors 87 128
Trade Receivables Owing from Catering Franchise Operator 335 307 Financial instruments are generally recognised at amortised cost, with the exception of the TCorp
Less: Allowance for Impairment - - Hour-Glass facilities, which are measured at fair value. The value of the TCorp Hour-Glass
2,730 2,106
investments is based on Taronga’s share of the value of the underlying assets of the facility, based
on market value. All of the TCorp Hour-Glass facilities are valued using ‘redemption’ pricing.
Taronga does not hold any collateral as security over receivables.
The amortised cost of financial instruments recognised in the statement of financial position
approximates the fair value because of the short-term nature of many of the financial instruments.
Impairment as at 30 June 2017
Carrying Value Fair Value
2017 2016 2017 2016
Gross Impairment Gross Impairment
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
2017 2017 2016 2016
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Financial Assets
Not Past Due 2,713 - 2,089 - Cash and Cash Equivalents 14,099 11,793 14,099 11,793
Past due 0-30 Days 17 - 17 - Receivables 2,730 2,106 2,730 2,106
Past due 31-90 days - - - - Other Financial Assets 68,502 67,502 68,502 67,502
Past due > 90 Days - - - - 85,331 81,401 85,331 81,401
2,730 - 2,106 - Financial Liabilities
Payables 29,626 27,909 29,626 27,909
Receivables are not considered to be impaired at 30 June 2017 (nil at 30 June 2016) Borrowings 15,894 15,951 16,821 17,436
45,520 43,861 46,448 45,345
c) Liquidity Risk

The following are the contractual maturities of financial liabilities, including estimated interest
payments:
Fair Value Recognised in the Statement of Financial Position
Maturity Dates
Carrying Contractual Level 1 - Derived from quoted prices in active markets for identical assets/liabilities.
30-Jun-2017 Amount Cash flows < 6 mnths 6-12 mnths >1yr <2 yrs 2-5 yrs >5 yrs Level 2 - Derived from inputs other than quoted prices that are observable directly or indirectly.
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 Level 3 - Derived from valuation techniques that include inputs for the asset/liability not based on
Non-derivative Financial liabilities observable market data.
Trade and Other Payables 12,835 (12,835) (12,835) - - - -
Borrowings - Fixed Interest Rate 15,894 (17,817) (452) (2,275) (6,917) (8,172) -
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000
Financial Assets at Fair Value
Carrying Contractual - -
Tcorp Hour-Glass Cash Facility 9,721 9,721
30-Jun-2016 Amount Cash flows < 6 mnths 6-12 mnths >1yr <2 yrs 2-5 yrs >5 yrs
- 9,721 - 9,721
$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000
Non-derivative Financial liabilities

Trade and Other Payables 8,918 (8,918) (8,918) - - - -
Borrowings - Fixed Interest Rate 15,951 (18,031) (462) (6,398) (2,421) (8,750) -

41 42
108 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 109

20. Restriction on Revenue - Taronga Foundation (b) Members of the Board

Taronga received certain amounts into the Taronga Foundation for specific purposes. As required Mr Steven Crane – Chair
by the Australian Accounting Standards, amounts have been recognised as revenues in the Ms Susan Doyle – Deputy Chair (resigned 28 June 2017)
Income Statement which are yet to be spent in the manner specified. Unexpended amounts Mr Roy Bendall
totalling $12,165,000 ($12,960,000 in 2015/2016) have been included in Accumulated Funds as at Ms Penelope Bingham-Hall
30 June 2017. The unexpended restricted funds are held separately from Taronga’s unrestricted Ms Jennifer Cowley
funds. Ms Nancy Fox
Ms Robyn Parker
Unexpended Mr Ian Roth
2017 2016 Mr Graham Wackett
Taronga Foundation Program $’000 $’000 Mr John Walkom
Capital Redevelopment Fundraising 10,669 11,797
Taronga Foundation Recurrent Projects 1,496 1,163 Board remuneration (including superannuation and payroll tax) of $198,424 ($197,853 in
Total 12,165 12,960 2015/2016) was paid. This amount included Honoraria of $33,228 ($33,228 in 2015/2016) paid to
the Chair of the Board and $138,541 ($137,593 in 2015/2016) paid to the other members of the
Board. The rates of remuneration were fixed and approved by the Premier's Department.

21. Remuneration of Auditors 2017 2016
$10,000 - $19,999 8 8
The Audit Office fees for auditing Taronga’s financial statements were $100,400 ($98,000 in $20,000 - $29,999 1 1
2015/2016). The auditors received no other benefits. $30,000 - $39,999 1 1
Board Members 10 10

22. Related Party Disclosures
During the year, Taronga did not enter into any transactions with key management personnel, their
Taronga’s Key Management Personnel includes the Executive Director and Chief Executive, the close family members and controlled or jointly controlled entities thereof.
divisional Directors and Members of the Board as they are directly or indirectly authorised and
responsible for planning, directing and controlling the activities of Taronga. (c) Government Related Entities

During the year, Taronga entered into transactions with other entities that are controlled/jointly
(a) Chief Executive and Divisional Directors controlled/significantly influenced by NSW Government. This includes grant funding from NSW
Treasury (Note 3), insurance arrangements obtained from NSW Self Insurance Corporation,
Mr Cameron Kerr – Executive Director and Chief Executive personnel services arrangements with OEH (Note 7a), financing arrangements with T-Corp (Note
Mr Timothy Bain – Director 7e) financial audit services from The Audit Office of NSW (Note 21) and providing accredited
Ms Narelle Beattie – Director courses to students funded by NSW Department of Education and Communities.
Mr Simon Duffy – Director
Mr Matthew Fuller – Director (to 14 July 2017) 23. Notes to the Cash Flow Statement
Ms Elizabeth Hodgson – Director
Mr Paul Maguire – Director
Ms Bettina Sammut – Director (a) Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents
2017
Cash at the end of the reporting period as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to the
Key Management Personnel Compensation $’000
related items in the statement of financial position as follows:
Short-term employee benefits 1,668
Other long-term employee benefits 81 2017 2016
Total 1,749 $’000 $’000
Cash at bank and on hand 4,378 2,683
TCorp Hour-Glass cash facility 9,721 9,110
The above compensation forms part of the personnel services provided by OEH – refer note 7(a). Short-term deposits
Total 14,099 11,793
The Key Management Personnel compensation excludes The Minister for the Environment, Local
Government and Heritage. Ministerial compensation is paid by the NSW Legislature and not by Short-term deposits are considered as cash and cash equivalents if they are due to mature in less
Taronga. than 90 days from the date of acquisition.

44
43
110 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 111

(b) Reconciliation of Operating Surplus/(Deficit) to Net Cash from Operating Activities: 25. Commitments for Expenditure

2017 2016 a) Capital Expenditure Commitments
$’000 $’000
Operating Surplus/(Deficit) 18,896 (355) The estimated aggregate amount of contracts for capital expenditure not provided for in the
Depreciation and Amortisation 21,152 20,222 accounts is $25,389,587 ($22,259,623 in 2015/2016) inclusive of GST of $2,308,144 ($2,023,602
(Gain)/Loss on Sale of Assets (21) 1,423 in 2015/2016). These commitments relate to expenditure that will be incurred within the following
Amounts capitalised in prior years transferred to profit 1,896 2,162 twelve months.
and loss

Change in Assets and Liabilities: b) Operating Lease Commitments
(Increase)/Decrease in GST Receivable (265) (590)
(Increase)/Decrease in Accounts Receivable (624) 570
Future non-cancellable operating lease rentals not provided for and payable:
(Increase)/Decrease in Inventories (45) (40)
Increase/(Decrease) in Creditors and Accruals 403 1,182 2017 2016
(Increase)/Decrease in Prepayments 127 (359) $’000 $’000
Increase/(Decrease) in Unearned Income 1,104 474 Not later than one year 157 251
Increase/(Decrease) in Employee Entitlements 65 1,019 Later than one year and not later than five years 45 111
Increase/(Decrease) in Unfunded Superannuation (2,266) 2,698 Later than five years - -
Movement in Unamortised (Premium)/Discount on Loans (57) 4 Total including GST 202 362

Net Cash Provided From Operating Activities 40,365 28,410
The major operating leases relate to computer equipments and motor vehicles.

GST Input Tax Credit Claimable on Commitments Amounts to $2,326,521 ($2,056,537 in
Taronga has not entered into any non cash financing or investing activities. 2015/2016).

(c) Financing Facilities
26. Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Taronga is not aware of any contingent assets or liabilities at 30 June 2017 (nil in 2015/2016).
A Direct Payments facility of $1.4m was available to Taronga and unused at 30 June 2017.

27. Subsequent Events
24. Reserves and Retained Surplus
There were no subsequent events occurring after balance date that have materially affected or
Accumulated Funds Asset Revaluation Available for Sale Total Equity may materially affect the results reported.
Reserve Investments Reserve
2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016
$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Balance at the beginning of the financial year 203,011 203,366 249,143 249,143 - (913) 452,154 451,596

Net Result 18,896 (355) - - - - 18,896 (355)
Net increase in asset revaluation reserve for:
 land and buildings - - 27,687 - - - 27,687 -
 infrastructure - - 4,428 - - - 4,428 -

Available for sale investments revaluation gains/(losses) - - - - - - - -
Transfers on disposal - - - - 913 - 913
Total 18,896 (355) 32,115 - - 913 51,011 558
Balance at the end of the financial year 221,906 203,011 281,258 249,143 - - 503,164 452,154

45 46
112 FINANCIALS ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 113

28. Divisional Information

2017 2017 2017 2017 2016 2016 2016 2016
Taronga & Taronga Taronga & Taronga
Taronga Taronga
Corporate Western Total Corporate Western Total
Foundation Foundation
Services Plains Services Plains
$’000 $'000 $'000 $’000 $’000 $'000 $'000 $’000
Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
Revenue
Admissions 518 37,726 4,762 43,006 533 35,165 4,858 40,555
Trading and Franchise Revenue - 9,687 3,687 13,374 - 9,328 3,638 12,966
Corporate Sponsorship 3,106 - - 3,106 4,043 13 - 4,057
Government Grants - 21,341 8,482 29,823 - 14,416 4,686 19,102
Investment Revenue 60 2,030 - 2,090 130 2,005 - 2,135
Donations and Bequests 12,692 - - 12,692 6,377 - - 6,377
Other Income 4,690 13,058 7,298 25,046 3,296 11,748 7,515 22,558
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Assets - (3) 24 21 (1,423) - - (1,423)
Total Revenue* 21,066 83,838 24,254 129,158 12,956 72,675 20,697 106,328

Expenditure
Personnel Services 2,076 32,372 11,512 45,960 1,765 36,589 11,269 49,624
Trading Cost of Sales - 2,314 1,451 3,765 - 2,140 1,407 3,547
Marketing Expenses 1,108 2,490 426 4,024 863 1,792 447 3,101
Depreciation - 17,976 3,176 21,152 - 17,169 3,052 20,222
Maintenance 284 5,797 1,534 7,615 356 4,868 1,000 6,224
Finance Costs - 783 77 860 - 864 64 929
Other Expenses 4,185 19,565 3,136 26,886 3,203 15,614 4,219 23,036
Total Expenditure 7,654 81,296 21,313 110,262 6,186 79,037 21,459 106,682
Surplus/(Deficit) for the Year 13,413 2,542 2,941 18,896 6,770 (6,361) (762) (355)
Total Assets 12,165 475,549 64,993 552,707 12,960 427,952 58,020 498,932
Total Liabilities - (42,409) (7,134) (49,543) - (40,834) (5,944) (46,778)

*The funds raised by the Foundation for the year ended 30 June 2017 amounted to $21,066,000
($12,956,000 in 2015/2016). Total Foundation expenditure includes expenditure on conservation research
and education projects of $1,024,470 as of 30 June 2017 ($343,500 in 2015/2016).

End of Audited Financial Statements

47
114 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 115

APPENDices Table � Contents
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Functions of the Taronga Conservation Society Australia������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������116
Privacy Management������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������116
Conservation Programs and Population Management Program�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������117
Appendix 4 Animal transactions relating to Conservation Programs and Population Management Programs�����������������������������������������������������118
Appendix 5 Research projects and conservation programs����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������120
Appendix 6 Post Mortem and Clinical samples supplied for research and teaching purposes��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������127
Appendix 7 Scientific Associates���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������128
Appendix 8 Paid consultancies undertaken by the Taronga Conservation Society Australia������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������130
Appendix 9 Lectures and presentations������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������130
Appendix 10 Publications�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������133
Appendix 11 Staff representation on external committees������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������136
Appendix 12 Staff participation in international programs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������138
Appendix 13 Workforce Diversity����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������141
Appendix 14 Senior Executive Service������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������143
Appendix 15 Senior Staff�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������143
Appendix 16 Employees by category��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������144
Appendix 17 Government Information (Public Access) Act – Annual Report for Agency Taronga Conservation Society Australia�����������������144
Appendix 18 Public Interest Disclosures��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������147
Appendix 19 Consultants Fees Incurred in 2016/17��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������147
Appendix 20 VIP visits to Taronga and Taronga Western Plains Zoos in 2016/2017����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������148
Appendix 21 Multicultural Policies and Services Program�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������148
Appendix 22 Internal Audit and Risk Management Attestation for the 2016-2017
financial year for Taronga Conservation Society Australia������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������152
Appendix 23 Credit Card Certification������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Appendix 24 Annual Report external production costs���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Appendix 25 Funds granted to non-government community organisations���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Appendix 26 Land Disposal���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Appendix 27 Digital Information Security Annual Attestation Statement for the 2016-2017 financial year
for Taronga Conservation Society Australia����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
116 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 117

Appendix 1 Appendix 3
Functions of the Taronga Conservation Society Australia Conservation Programs and Population Management Program

The main functions of the Board of the Taronga Conservation and management for other scientific and zoological
Addax X C Magner/L Elliot*
Society Australia are specified in Section 15 of the Zoological Parks purposes; and
Board Act 1973, which provides as follows: African Lion X X L Ginman*
b) may investigate and carry out research into:
15(1) The Board may establish, maintain and control (Taronga) for African Wild Dog X D Noble
1) the design of, and equipment and procedures in
the following purposes:
zoological parks; and Asian Elephant X X A Embury
a) carrying out research and breeding programs for the Australian Little Penguin X N Boyle*
2) t he care and well-being of animals kept in zoological
preservation of endangered species;
parks are maintained and controlled by the Board; and Bellinger River Turtle X A Skidmore*
b) carrying out research programs for the conservation and
c) may provide educational services for the public (whether Black and White Ruffed Lemur X S Barlow
management of other species;
in the nature of lectures, broadcasts, films, publications or
c) c onducting public education and awareness programs otherwise) about species conservation and management, Black-handed Spider Monkey X L Grossfeldt
about species conservation and management; and zoological parks and the biology of animals and;
Black-winged Stilt X V Wilson
d) displaying animals for educational, cultural and d) may provide and charge for such services in connection Bongo X X P Benoit*
recreational purposes. with zoological parks maintained and controlled by the
Board as the Board may determine; and Broad-headed Snake X D Gilbert
15(2) The Board may also maintain and control:
e) may make recommendations or reports to the Minister Brolga X C Srb
a) the zoological park established before the commencement
with respect to matters connected with the Board’s power, Brush-tailed Bettong X V Wilson
of the Act on the land described in Schedules 3 and 4 under
authorities, duties, functions or the administration of this
the name ‘Taronga Zoological Park’; and Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby X A Elphinstone*
Act.
b) Other zoological parks on land or premises vested in or held Cheetah X S Eyre
15(4) The Minister may request the Board to make
by the Board, whether or not those parks were established
recommendations or reports to the Minister with respect to
by the Board, for the purposes referred to in this section. Chimpanzee X M Finnigan
matters connected with the Board’s powers, authorities, duties
15(3) The Board: and functions or the administration of this Act and the Board is to Cook Strait Tuatara X S Eyre
comply with any such request.
a) may cooperate with, and provide funds and other Cotton-Top Tamarin X A Embury
assistance to, such scientific and other institutions, 15(5) The Board may exercise and perform such other powers,
Eastern Whipbird X M Tantini*
governments and other bodies and individuals as the Board authorities, duties and functions as may be conferred or imposed
may determine in connection with species conservation on the Board or under this or any other Act. Eland X L Elliot*
Fijian Crested Iguana X P Harlow*
Ghost Bat X J Hollamby
Giraffe X X L Jolly
Appendix 2 Goodfellow’s Tree-kangaroo X M Richardson

Privacy Management Greater Bilby X J Buchecker
Greater One-horned Rhinoceros X N Boyle*
In accordance with section 33 of the Privacy and Personal For a copy of Taronga’s Privacy Management Plan, please contact: Helmeted Honeyeater X K Cartwright
Information Act 1988, Taronga has produced a Privacy
Manager, Governance Hippopotamus X Y Pauligk
Management Plan, a Security of Personal Information Policy Corporate Services
and an Internet Privacy Policy. Taronga’s Internet Privacy Policy Taronga Conservation Society Australia Meerkat X X S Eyre
can be viewed on our website, www.taronga.org.au/about-us/ PO Box 20
privacy-policy Noisy Pitta X E Schmelitschek*
Mosman NSW 2088
Taronga’s Privacy Management Plan was revised in early 2017 T: 02 9978 4709 Orange-bellied Parrot X A Everaardt
to take account of changes in internal procedures and legislative F: 02 9969 7515
Plains Zebra X X L Jolly
changes. In June 2017 a project was commenced to more fully In the 2016-2017 year, Taronga received one informal complaint
review the Privacy Management Plan and internal procedures Plains-wanderer X M Sheils*
with respect to the collection of personal information. The
supporting Taronga’s adherence to the plan. complaint was resolved to the satisfaction of the complainant. Przewalski’s Horse X F Cameron*
The Policy identifies: Pygmy Hippopotamus X R Moss*
• Collections of personal information held by Taronga; Quokka X X B Turner
• Obligations of employees in respect of personal information; Red Panda X C Hibbard
• Guiding principles for the collection, retention, storage, Regent Bowerbird X M Shiels*
access and disclosure of personal information; and
M Van Sluys/M Sheils/E
• Procedures for lodging complaints or internal reviews. Regent Honeyeater X
Schmelitschek*
Ring-tailed Lemur X X D Noble
Rose-crowned Fruit-dove X N Atchison
Sacred Kingfisher X C Srb
Scimitar Oryx X D Burgoyne
118 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 119

Species Held at TZ Held at TWPZ Coordinator Gender convention Species type Name of place transferred to
Siamang X L Laurenson 1.0.0 Regent Honeyeater Australian Reptile Park NSW
Small-clawed Otter X X L Booth 0.1.0 White-browed Woodswallow Moonlit Sanctuary VIC

Southern Black Rhinoceros X N Boyle* 0.1.0 Goodfellow's Tree-kangaroo Singapore Zoo SINGAPORE
0.0.1 Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby Waterfall Springs NSW
Southern Cassowary X Vacant
1.0.0 Ghost Bat Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW
Squirrel Monkey X L Grossfeldt
1.0.0 Ghost Bat Currumbin Sanctuary QLD
Sumatran Orang-utan X A Embury
1.2.0 African Lion Hunter Valley Zoo NSW
Sumatran Tiger X X C Hibbard
1.2.0 Sumatran Tiger TWPZ
Tasmanian Devil X X C Goldstone-Henry 1.0.0 Bongo Altina Wildlife Park NSW
Waterbuck X L van der Sande
E Walraven*/ L
Western Lowland Gorilla X
Grossfeldt
Animals transferred to Taronga Conservation Society Australia
N Boyle*/Catherine
White Rhinoceros X 1.0.0 Plains Zebra National Zoo and Aquarium ACT
Nichols
White-browed Woodswallow X V Wilson 1.0.0 Eland Monarto Zoo SA

White-cheeked Gibbon X H Thompson 1.0.0 Addax Werribee Open Range Zoo VIC
0.2.0 Black-handed Spider Monkey Auckland Zoo NZ
*Staff member
0.2.0 Chimpanzee Givskud Zoo DENMARK
0.1.0 Chimpanzee Warsaw Zoo POLAND
1.0.0 Ghost Bat Territory Wildlife Park NT

Appendix 4 1.0.0
1.1.0
Ghost Bat
Red Panda
Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW
Auckland Zoo NZ
Animal transactions relating to Conservation Programs and Population Management Programs 1.1.0 Australian Little Penguin Wild (rehab), NSW
Animals transferred from Taronga Conservation Society Australia 1.0.0 Regent Bowerbird Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW
1.1.0 Giraffe Ragunan Zoo, INDONESIA 0.1.0 Regent Bowerbird Hunter Valley Zoo NSW
1.0.0 Przewalski’s Horse Altina Wildlife Park NSW 0.2.0 Regent Honeyeater Adelaide Zoo SA
0.1.0 Addax Monarto Zoo SA 0.1.0 Regent Honeyeater Melbourne Zoo VIC
0.1.0 Plains Zebra Altina Wildlife Park NSW 3.0.0 White-browed Woodswallow Healesville Sanctuary VIC
0.1.0 Tasmanian Devil Lone Pine Sanctuary QLD 1.1.0 Tasmanian Devil Devil ARK NSW
1.0.0 Tasmanian Devil Dreamworld QLD 2.0.0 White-browed Woodswallow Symbio Wildlife Park
3.0.0 Tasmanian Devil Devil ARK NSW 1.0.0 White-browed Woodswallow Australian Reptile Park NSW
0.2.0 Tasmanian Devil St Louis Zoo USA 1.0.0 Regent Bowerbird Australian Reptile Park NSW
0.2.0 Addax Monarto Zoo SA 0.1.0 Regent Bowerbird Dreamworld QLD
0.2.0 Tasmanian Devil DPIWE Tasmania 0.1.0 Red Panda Bronx Zoo USA
0.1.0 Red Panda Symbio Wildlife Park NSW 1.0.0 Black-handed Spider-monkey TWPZ NSW
1.1.0 Black-winged Stilt Adelaide Zoo SA 0.1.0 Goodfellow's Tree-kangaroo Singapore Zoo
2.0.0 Black-winged Stilt Darling Downs Zoo QLD 2.0.0 Meerkat Perth Zoo WA
2.0.0 Rose-crowned Fruit-dove Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW 1.0.0 Black-handed Spider-monkey TWPZ NSW
2.0.0 Rose-crowned Fruit-dove Australia Zoo QLD 1.0.0 Small-clawed Otter Melbourne Zoo VIC
1.0.0 Rose-crowned Fruit-dove Darling Downs Zoo QLD 1.0.0 Small-clawed Otter Perth Zoo WA
0.3.0 Noisy Pitta Gorge Wildlife Park SA 0.1.0 Small-clawed Otter Gorge Wildlife Park SA
0.1.0 Noisy Pitta Adelaide Zoo SA 0.1.0 Eastern Whipbird Melbourne Museum VIC
1.0.0 Noisy Pitta Melbourne Zoo VIC 1.0.0 Western Lowland Gorilla Mogo Zoo NSW
1.0.0 Noisy Pitta Currumbin Sanctuary QLD 1.0.0 Przewalski’s Horse Monarto Zoo SA
1.0.0 Regent Bowerbird Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW 0.3.0 African Wild Dog Perth Zoo WA
0.1.0 Regent Bowerbird Hunter Valley Zoo NSW 1.0.0 Scimitar Oryx Altina Wildlife Park NSW
1.0.0 Regent Bowerbird Healesville Sanctuary VIC 2.0.0 Cheetah Halls Gap Zoo VIC
1.0.0 Regent Honeyeater Featherdale Wildlife Park NSW 1.0.0 Plains Zebra National Zoo and Aquarium ACT
0.1.0 Regent Honeyeater Healesville Sanctuary VIC 0.1.0 Cheetah Monarto Zoo SA
0.1.0 Regent Honeyeater Adelaide Zoo SA 1.0.0 White Rhinoceros Australia Zoo QLD
1.3.0 Regent Honeyeater Moonlit Sanctuary VIC
120 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 121

Appendix 5
Research projects and conservation programs

AEC no. if AEC no. if
Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds
applicable applicable
4d/12/12 & Creating virtual elephent Dr K Smith Macquarie University, Perth Zoo Macquarie University 3b/04/13 Marine predators, Dr D Slip Macquarie University ARC Linkage
3b/12/15 herds Dr J Day marine parks and marine Prof R Harcourt
Mr R Brogran hotspots
Dr R Spindler Wild shark migration, Dr J Day Macquarie University SeaWorld Research & Rescue
Validating welfare indices Dr V Melfi University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage movements and social A/Prof C Brown NSW Fisheries Foundation,
in zoo housed species: Dr A Burns University of Sydney, University networks Dr N Knott Sonotronics ARC Linkage
accentuating the positive of Melbourne Dr T Guttridge Bimini Biological Field Station
Evaluating the impact Dr A Burns University of Western Sydney 3a/06/15 Social preferences, Dr J Day Macquarie University Woolworths, Taronga,
of Chimpanzee Dr J Meade activity patterns and A/Prof C Brown Macquarie University
introductions learning in Port Jackson Ms J Kadar
3a/04/16 Numeracy in amphibians: Dr A Burns University of Western Sydney Sharks
do frogs go for more? Dr J Meade Resolving the warming Dr D Slip Macquarie University ARC Linkage
3d/12/15 Short beaked-echidna Dr A Burns University of Western Sydney East Australian Current's Prof R Harcourt University of New South Wales
cognition Dr J Meade impact on a marine food Dr I Jonsen University of Technology Sydney
Effect of changes to M Shaw web Dr I Suthers Australian Antarctic Division
nutrition balance on Dr A Burns A/Prof M Roughan
glider behaviour Dr C Kemp A/Prof M Doblin
Dr M Cox
Effect of visitor numbers Dr A Burns University of New South Wales ARC Linkage
of animal deaths and Assoc Prof W Shaw 4a/12/14 Bio-inspired camouflage Dr D Slip Macquarie University ARC Linkage, NSW Shark
to prevent shark attacks Dr N Hart University of Western Australia Management Competitive
injuries
on surfers Dr S Collin Flinders University Annual Grants Program
3b/02/17 Human-animal Dr C Kemp University of Melbourne, Zoos ARC Linkage Dr C Huveneers Oceans Research
relationships in zoos: Dr A Burns Victoria, Deakin University, Dr E Gennari Shark Mitigation Systems Pty Ltd
Optimising animal and Dr J Meade University of Sydney, University Dr V Peddemors NSW DPI Fisheries
visitor experiences Dr V Melfi of New South Wales, University
Assoc Prof W Shaw of Western Sydney 3b/08/16 Social foraging olfaction Dr B Pitcher Macquarie University
Prof Grahame Coleman in marine predators Dr D Slip
Prof Paul Hemsworth Environmental predictive Dr D Slip Macquarie University
Dr Mike Magrath models for shark attacks N Hart University of New South Wales
Dr Sally Shewen in Australian waters : an Prof R Harcourt NSW DPI Fisheries
Assessment of potentially Dr C Kemp University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage analysis of the Australian L Ryan
aversive behaviour by Dr A Burns University of Sydney, University Shark Attack File J Everett
visitors towards animals Dr J Meade of Western Sydney Dr V Peddemors
at the zoo Dr V Melfi 4a/04/14 Asian Elephant semen Dr R Hobbs University of Sydney, University of Sydney, Zoos
Assoc Prof W Shaw cryopreservation Mr C Negus Melbourne Zoo Victoria and Perth Zoo
3b/02/17 Elephant sleep behaviour Dr C Kemp University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage Dr R Bathgate Perth Zoo
Dr A Burns University of Sydney Great Barrier Reef Dr R Spindler Australian, Instittute of Marine Great Barrier Reef Foundation,
Dr V Melfi Recovery Initiative Dr M Hagedorn Science Smithsonian Institution,
Assoc Prof W Shaw Dr A Heyward Smithsonian Institution Roddenberry Foundation,
Dr D MacFarlane Monash University Albert George and Nancy
Affecting change: The Dr C Kemp University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage
Dr M van Oppen James Cook University Caroline Youngman Trust,
effect of a human-animal Dr Vicky Melfi University of Sydney
interaction on donation Assoc Prof W Shaw Dr R Hobbs managed by Equity Trustees.
giving Dr J Daly
Developing a scent-based Dr N Jordan University of NSW University of NSW Faculty
Making a splash: the Dr C Kemp University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage
management tool for A/Prof M Letnic NSW Department of Primary Research Grant
effectiveness of a seal Dr A Burns University of Sydney
Dingoes and other wild Dr P Fleming Industries
show to educate zoo Dr V Melfi
dogs in Australia Dr P Meek
visitors Assoc Prof W Shaw
Dr G Ballard
The effect of HAIs at the Dr C Kemp University of New South Wales, ARC Linkage
4a0417 Better the devil you Dr E Reid-Wainscoat University of NSW, Save the
zoo on visitor attitudes Dr A Burns University of Sydney, University
know? Tasmanian Dr N Jordan Tasmanian Devil Program
and behaviour Dr V Melfi of Melbourne
Devil Anal Gland Scent
Assoc Prof W Shaw
Secretion Analysis and
Prof G Coleman
Familiarization study
Doe the personality Dr C Kemp ARC Linkage
3a/02/16 Tails of elephant stress – Dr N Jordan EcoExist Project Botswana
of rabbits affect their Dr A Burns
Using tail hair to measure Dr R Hobbs
reaction to visitor
long-term stress levels
interactions
in wild and captive
Komodo behaviour Dr C Kemp ARC Linkage elephants.
Behaviour and welfare of Dr A Burns University of Sydney ARC Linkage 3a/08/15 Cryopreservation of cells Mr M McFadden
giraffes Dr V Melfi and tissues from critically Dr R Hobbs
Behaviour and welfare of Dr A Burns University of Sydney ARC Linkage endangered frogs
little penguins Dr V Melfi
122 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 123

AEC no. if AEC no. if
Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds
applicable applicable
3a/08/16 Semen cryopreservation Dr R Hobbs Macquarie University Macquarie University Prevalence of koala Dr K Vinette Herrin University of Sydney
techniques in skinks Ms K James retrovirus including koRVB Dr L Vogelnest
Ms L Keogh in Australian-based koalas Mr P Thompson
Dr M Whiting 4c/04/17 Use of pedigree to Dr K Vinette Herrin University of Sydney
Mr J Baxter-Gilbert analyse the mode of
3d/08/16 Opportunistic collection Dr R Hobbs transmission of koala
of electro-ejaculated Mr B Bryant retrovirus variants in
semen Taronga Zoo koalas
3a/08/16 Does mating system drive Dr R Hobbs Macquarie University Royal Zoological Society of Isolates of avian Mr P Thompson University of Sydney
sperm morphology in a Ms K James New South Wales aspergillus
lizard complex? Ms L Keogh Development of improved Dr C Sangster University of Sydney
Dr M Whiting post mortem and ante Dr K Vinette Herrin
Mr J Baxter-Gilbert mortem testing for avian
4c/12/13, Southern Corroboree Frog Mr M McFadden NSW Dept of Environment and The Wilson HTM Foundation mycobacteriosis
3a/10/16 Captive Breeding and re- Dr P. Harlow Heritage Suez 3d/06/13 Aerosol-mediated Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney, Purdue
introduction Transmission of Mr P Thompson University
3b/08/14, Artificial Reproductive Dr P. Byrne University of Wollongong ARC Linkage Pathogenic Bacteria from
3a/08/15, Technology for captive Dr P. Harlow Australian National University Asian Elephants (Elephas
3a/11/16 breeding of frogs Mr M McFadden maximus)
Population Assessments Dr R. Fisher United States Geographical International Iguana Characterisation of milk Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney, University
and Conservation Dr P. Harlow Survey Foundation, Taronga and venom of the long- of Queensland
Genetics of Fijian Conservation Science Initiative beaked echidna
Iguanas. Reproductive parameters Dr L Vogelnest Veterinary Imaging Associates
Effect of dietary Dr P. Byrne University of Wollongong ARC Linkage of the long-beaked Vanessa Stebbings
carotenoids on cutaneous Dr P. Harlow echidna
bacterial in the Trypanosome species in Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
Corroboree Frog Regent Honeyeater Mr P Thompson
Scoop a poop': Antibiotic Dr M. Power Macquarie University Australian Federal Government Borreliacidal activity of Mr P Thompson University of Sydney
resistance in native Dr M. Gillings University of Sydney Fund for Citizen Science (2017) serum from Australian
animals, through citizen Dr C. McArthur native and introduced
science by DNA testing of fauna
possum scats.
Tetanus antibody Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
Monitoring of the Dr L Vogelnest Office of Environment and detection in Asian Mr P Thompson
Jenolan Caves captive Heritage (NSW OEH) Elephants
and remnant population
Lumpy jaw investigation Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
of the Brush-tailed Rock-
in macropods Mr P Thompson
wallaby.
Investigation of Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
Marsupostrongylus in Dr C Sangster University of Sydney
protein binding and Mr P Thompson
Brushtail Possums
pharmacokinetics of
Characterisation of Dr K Vinette Herrin University of Sydney cefovecin in marsupials
renal disease in captive
3d/06/16 Investigation of Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
non-domestic felids in
pharmacokinetics of
Australian zoos.
Amoxicillin in Koalas
Comparative study of Ms V Di Giglio University of Sydney Jenna Donley Fund
Early diagnosis and Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
health and disease in big
clinical management
cats held at Taronga Zoo
of chronic degenerative
and other Australasian
musculoskeletal disorders
zoos.
in zoo felids
Development and Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney
Epidemiology of Mr P Thompson University of Sydney
understanding of the Mr P Thompson
molecular biotypes of
Interferon gamma release
Cryptococcus neoformans
assay for the diagnosis of
sp. complex
Tuberculosis in Elephants
Dining with dasyurids: Ms M Shaw University of Sydney ARC Linkage
4a/02/14 Satellite tracking of sea Dr K Vinette Herrin
Using nutritional
turtles Ms L Hall
geometry to improve
4b/04/17 Satellite tracking of Dr K Vinette Herrin Taronga Foundation diets for captive breeding
marine turtles released Ms L Hall program
from TWH
Developing body Ms M Shaw
Transponder associated Dr C Sangster condition scoring guides
tumours in Australian Dr K Rose for species in captivity
mammals
Feed intake and Ms M Shaw Van Hall Institute
Pathology associated Dr C Sangster diet digestibility in a
with Visible Implantable short-beaked echidna
Elastomers (VIEs) (Tachyglossus aculeatus.
124 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 125

AEC no. if AEC no. if
Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds
applicable applicable
Effect of diet change Ms M Shaw University of Sydney Haematologic and Mr P Thompson
on levels of copper, biochemical parameters Dr L Vogelnest
zinc, and vitamins A, D of the crtically Mr M Shiels
and E in short-beaked endangered Regent Dr P Meagher
(Tachyglossus aculeatus) Honeyeater (Anthochaera
and long-beaked phrygia)
echidnas (Zaglossus Hematology and serum Dr H Stannard
bruijni bartoni). biochemistry reference Dr B McCullum
Effect of diet change Ms M Shaw ranges of healthy Dr D Raubenheimer
on blood and urine captive Tasmanian devils Mr P Thompson
parameters in Black- (Sarcophilus harrisii) and
Footed Tree Rats their association with
(Mesembriomys gouldi) age, gender and seasonal
and Greater Stick-Nest variation
Rats (Leporillus conditor). Proventriculopathy in little Dr K Vinette Herrin
Haematologic and Mr P Thompson University of Western Sydney Penguins at Taronga Zoo Dr L Tong
biochemical parameters Dr G. Tobias
of the Black-footed Developing a floating Ms M Shaw
Tree-rat waterfowl diet.
Effect of various Ms M Shaw University of Western Sydney Developing body Ms M Shaw University of Newcastle
intervententions on condition scoring guides A Howells
behaviour in Black-Footed for species in captivity
Tree Rats (Mesembriomys
Protein for pinnipeds: Ms M Shaw
gouldi), Plains Rats
Determining if pinnipeds Dr D Raubenheimer
(Pseudomys australis),
regulate intake based
Spinifex Hopping Mice
on macronutrient levels
(Notomys alexis) and
in diet
Greater Stick-Nest Rats
(Leporillus conditor). A new coccidian parasite Dr Frances Hulst University of Sydney, Scotia
of the Boodie, Bettongia Sanctuary, Australian Wildlife
Effect of reduced sugar Ms M Shaw University of Western Sydney
lesueur (Mammalia: Conservancy
diets on behaviour
Potoroidae) from Scotia
of chimpanzees (Pan
Sanctuary.
troglodytes)
3b/11/16 Zoo Management of Lord Mr M Shiels Taronga, Lord Howe Island
Investigation of the Dr L Vogelnest Purdue University
Howe Island Woodhen Dr L Vogelnest Board, NSW Office of
mechanism of dispersal Mr P Thompson
and Pied Currawong Environment and Heritage
of aerosolized droplet
associated with the Lord
nuclei from Asian
Howe Island Rodent
elephants (Elephas
Eradication project
maximus) with specific
reference to transmission Diagnostic Placement Dr K Rose Murdoch University Murdoch University
of Mycobacterium in conjunction with the Dr H Bender
tuberculosis Wildlife Health and
Conservation Masters
Ectoparasites of the Mr P Thompson University of Sydney
Unit
Australian Bush Rat
Rissos dolphin mortality Dr K Rose OEH, Department of NSW OEH
Investigation of E. Albertii Mr P Thompson Australian National University
event investigation Ms J Hall Environment, Land, Water and
in collection birds
Planning (Vic), Department of
Impact of feeding Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney Primary Industries, Parks, Water
methods and diet on and Environment (Tasmania),
health in big cats
Georges Turtles Dr K Rose NSW DPI NSW OEH
Elephant births in Dr L Vogelnest University of Sydney epidemiology and disease Ms J Hall
Australia investigation
Isotopic and elemental Dr P Meagher University of New South Wales Australian Geographic Recovery of the Bellinger Dr R Spencer Western Sydney University, NSW Western Sydney University
analysis of echidna quills Dr L Tong River Snapping Turtle Prof A Georges OEH, University of Canberra - Hawkesbury Institute for
to comabt illegal wildlife Ms M Shaw Dr K Rose the Environment, Saving our
trade Ms J Hall Species - NSW OEH
Gasropathology in the Dr L Tong University of New South Wales Australian Geographic Toxoplasma in dolphins Dr S Donahoe University of Sydney
short-beaked echidna Ms M Shaw and bilbies A/Prof J Slapeta
Dr P Meagher Dr K Rose
Gastrophysiology in the Ms M Shae University of New South Wales, Australian Geographic Ms J Hall
short-beaked echidna Dr L Tong Macquarie University and Reintroduction of small Mr N Dexter Booderee National Park (Parks Threatened Species
Dr P Meagher Sydney University mammals into Booderee Dr K Rose Australia); Forestry Corporation Commissioner, Parks Australia
National Park Ms J Hall of NSW; Australian National
University)
126 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 127

AEC no. if AEC no. if
Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds Project title Researchers Partner Institution Source of funds
applicable applicable
Christmas Island Flying Prof J Welbergen Christmas Island National Park Taronga, Christmas Island ADAPT NSW - Dr H Bender NSW OEH, Macquarie University, ADAPT NSW (OEH/Macquarie
Fox Health, Ecology and Prof D Phalen (Parks Australia), University National Park (Parks Australia), Investigating links Dr K Rose Bureau of Meteorology University)
Conservation Dr K Rose of Sydney, CSIRO, Western Western Sydney Univesity, between wildlife disease Ms J Hall
Dr H Bender Sydney University, Royal Botanic Hawksbury Institute for the and climate Ms V Graham
Ms J Hall Gardens Sydney Environment, various small Rainbow Lorikeet Paralysis A/Prof D Phalen University of Sydney, RSPCA National Significant Disease
Mr S Surridge grants Syndrome/Clench Claw Dr K Rose QLD Investigation Scheme
Ms S Flakus Syndrome Investigation Ms J Hall
Dr D Spratt Dr H Bender
Dr D Westcott
Morriset macropod A/Prof D Phalen University of Sydney NSW OEH
Dr J Martin
mortality description Dr K Rose
Dr J West
Ms J Hall
A/Prof E McDonald
Dr H Bender
Madden
Marine Turtle Dr D Hardesty CSIRO CSIRO administered
Contaminant Exposure Dr K Rose
Caused by Plastic
Ingestion
Platypus population
dynamics and a national
Dr R Spindler
Dr N Jordan
University of NSW, University
of Sydney, University of
ARC Linkage Appendix 6
risk assessment Dr K Rose Melbourne, OEH NSW, Qld Dept Post Mortem and Clinical samples supplied for research and teaching purposes
Dr L Vogelnest Environment and Heritage
Prof R Kingsford Protection, Forest Practices
Prof W Sherwin Authority, Dept Environment, Australian Museum (Australian Centre for G Frankham Blood and ear biopsies: Bilby molecular genetics project
Dr G Bino Arthur Rylah Institute for Wildlife Genomics)
Dr T Grant Environmental Research, Cesar Australian Museum (Evolutionary Biology Unit) R Johnson Tissue samples from all species: preparing a genetic library.
Dr J Gongora Pty Ltd.
Adj Prof D Lunney Australian Museum A Summerell Blood from Short-beaked Echidnas: Development of DNA markers for
A/Prof B Wintle pedigree testing and application in wildlife trade
Dr M Fleming Australian Museum S Ingleby Australian and Pacific mammal carcasses: education, tissue banking
Dr M Ronan and display
Dr S Munks Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute (NSW P Kirkland Blood from all species: Evaluation of assays to rapidly identify DNA
Mr S Lang DPI) samples to species of origin
Dr J Koehn Griffith University, Queensland E Stephenson Blood from Australian mammals and birds: test for seroprevelance of
Mr J Griffiths potential animal reservoirs for Ross River Virus
Mr D Papps
Museums Victoria S Balasubramaniam Blood from Plains-wanderers: Genetic diversity and population
Origins and potential Dr K Rose University of Sydney, University Taronga (TCSI), Christmas structure of Plains-wanderers
impacts of a Ms J Hall of Queensland, Christmas Island Island National Park, National
Taronga Zoo L Tong Keratin from all species - Identification of stable isotopes in keratin to
multisystemic bacterial Dr H Bender National Parks, Parks Australia, Environmental Science
prove animal's wild or captive origins
infection emergent in National Environmental Program (Threatened Species
Christmas Island geckos Sciences Program Recovery Program), Perpetual University of Colorado, USA S Jin Song Faecal swabs from Taronga collection animals: Convergent evolution
Philanthropic Grant, Holsworth of the vertebrate microbiome
Wildlife Research Endowment, University of Sydney D Phalen Bird carcasses: Teaching avian anatomy to Biosceince and Veterinary
Australia Pacific Science Fund. sceince students.
Developing non-lethal Dr K Rose University of Sydney, WIRES, Australasian Bat Society University of Sydney S Hemsley Marsupial carcasses: education of university students in how to perform
methods for investigating Ms J Hall ANSTO necropsies
heavy metal analysis in A/Prof D Phalen University of Sydney B Storey-Lewis Blood and ticks from Australian wildlife: identification and
the Grey-headed flying-fox characterisation of pathogens in ticks.
Georges Turtle (Bellinger Dr K Rose University of Western Sydney University of Western Sydney, University of Sydney J Slapeta Blood and tissues from Echidnas: understanding coccidiosis in Short-
River Snapping Turtle) Dr R Spencer Mohamed bin Zayed Species beaked Echidnas
ecology Conservation Fund University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary M Krockenberger Fungal isolates from animals with suspected Cryptococcus
Norfolk Island Green Dr K Rose Parks Australia, Norfolk Island Director of National Parks Science neoformans: Epidemiology of molecular biotypes.
Parrot Translocation Ms J Hall Green Parrot Advisory Panel University of Sydney J Talbot Fungal cultures from animals with localised mycoses: Prevalence of
Project Dr H Bender Aspergillus fumigatus in Australia.
Parasite diversity and Prof M Power Macquarie University, University Sea World Grant University of Sydney/Taronga M Govendir Blood from Australian mammals: Plasma protein binding capacity for
disease risk in the Little A/Prof R Gray of Sydney cefovecin in marsupials
Penguin Dr K Rose University of Sydney K De Silva Blood from Tasmanian Devils: Test for immunoinhibitory molecules
Ms J Hall
Centre for Pathogen Prof E Holmes University of Sydney, The Marie Taronga ( TCSI), University of
Discovery Prof V Sintchenko Bashir Institute for Infectious Sydney
Dr J-S Eden Diseases and Biosecurity, NSW
Dr K Rose Health
Ms J Hall
Dr H Bender
Dr B Hudson
128 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 129

Appendix 7
Scientific Associates

Consultant Institution Consultancy Consultant Institution Consultancy
Dr Graeme Allan Veterinary Imaging Associates Diagnostic Imaging Professor Richard Kingsford School of BEES, University of New South Wales Ecology
Dr Ros Bathgate Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Animal Reproduction Professor Martin Kluckow Royal North Shore Hospital Human Neonatology
Dr Niek Beijerink Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Veterinary Cardiology Dr Chris Lee Office of Environment and Heritage Climate Change Research
Professor Kathy Belov Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Genetics Mr Jason Lohrey IT services
Dr Lee Berger Tropical Infectious Diseases, James Cook University Amphibian Disease Research Associate Professor Guy Marks Woolcock Institute of Medical Research Human Respiratory Physiology
Dr Ian Beveridge Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne Parasitology Dr Debashish Mazumber Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Illegal Wildlife Trade
Dr Kate Brandis Centre for Ecosystem Science, University of New South Wales Illegal Wildlife Trade Dr Vicky Melfi University of Sydney Animal Welfare
Dr Bronwyn McCallan Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney Physiology Mr Larry Melican Gosford City Council Natural Resource Management
Associate Professor Culum Brown Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Behavioural Ecology Livestock Veterinary Teaching & Research Unit, University of
Dr Jennie Mohler Ungulate Medicine
Sydney
Professor Michael Bryden University of Queensland Marine Ecology
Dr G Nicholson University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science Veterinary Cardiology
Dr Philip Byrne Biological Science, University of Woolongong Amphibian Reproductive Biology
Dr Robert Nicoll Veterinary Imaging Associates Diagnostic Imaging
Professor Paul Canfield University of Sydney Amphibian Disease Research
Associate Professor Jacqueline
Ms Gemma Carroll Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Marine Ecology Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Veterinary Microbiology
Norris
Dr Kelly Caruso Eye Clinic for Animals Veterinary Ophthalmology Associate Professor Christopher
School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Pathology
Dr David Clarke K9 Gums Veterinary Dentistry Peacock

Dr Christina Dart Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Veterinary Anaesthesiology Dr David Phalen Avian, Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital, University of Sydney Veterinary Science
Associate Professor Michelle
Dr Sarah Davies Veterinary Imaging Associates Diagnostic Imaging Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Citizen Science
Power
Mr Nick Dexter Booderee National Park National Park Manager Professor David Raubenheimer Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney Nutritional ecology
Associate Professor Martina
Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney Climate Change Research Dr Michael Rodriguez St Vincents Hospital Neuropathologist
Doblin
Dr Bob Doneley Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland Avian Medicine Dr Tracey Rogers School of BEES, University of New South Wales Ecology
Associate Professor Moninya
Dr B Duff Symbion (Laverty Pathology) Veterinary Pathology School of Mathematics and Statistics, UNSW Oceanography
Roughan
Fisheries and Marine Environment Research Lab, University of
Dr Jason Everett Oceanography Dr Cheryl Sangster Consultant Veterinary Pathologist
New South Wales
Dr Nadine Fiani Veterinary Dentist Dr Wendy Shaw School of BEES, University of New South Wales Human Geography

Dr Paul Fowler Obstetrics and Gynaecology Professor William Sherwin School of BEES, University of New South Wales Conservation Genetics

Professor Ian Fraser University of Sydney Obstetrics and Gynaecology Dr Aimee Silla Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong Amphibian Reproductive Biology

Mr Michael Fruin Horseshoe Express Farrier Professor Steve Simpson Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney Nutritional ecology

Dr Frank Goeritz Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Wildlife Reproduction Dr Lee Skerratt Tropical Infectious Diseases, James Cook University Amphibian Disease Research

Dr Mary Hagedorn Smithsonian Institution Marine physiology Associate Professor Jan Slapeta Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney Veterinary Parasitology

Professor Robert Harcourt Macquarie University Marine Ecology Dr Derek Smith Australian Museum Entomology

Associate Professor Nathan Hart Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Comparative Neurobiology Dr Jeffrey Smith Eye Clinic for Animals Veterinary Ophthalmology

Mrs Margaret Hawkins Taronga Conservation Society Australia (Emeritus) Behavioural Biology Dr L-lynn Smith Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Behavioural biology

Professor Mariella Herberstein Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Behavioural Ecology Dr Rebecca Spindler Bush Heritage Wildlife Reproduction

Dr Robert Hermes Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Wildlife Reproduction Dr David Spratt CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems Veterinary Parasitology

Dr Thomas Hildebrandt Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Wildlife Reproduction Professor Iain Suthers School of BEES, University of New South Wales Oceanography

Professor Edward Holmes School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Sydney University Pathogen genetics Dr Madeleine Van Oppen Australian Institute of Marine Sciences Coral biology

Professor Geoff Hosey School of Health and Social Sciences, University of Bolton Animal Behaviour and Welfare Dr Linda Vogelnest Small Animal Specialist Hospital Veterinary Dermatology
Associate Professor Martin
Dr Bernard Hudson Royal North Shore Hospital Human Infectious Diseases Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Behavioural biology
Whiting
Professor Lesley Hughes Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Climate Change Biology Dr Cameron Whittaker Eye Clinic for Animals Veterinary Ophthalmology
Dr Lauren Hughes The Australian Museum Taxonomy Dr Kate Wilson Office of Environment and Heritage OEH Science Division
Dr David Hunter NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Amphibian Conservation Biology Sydney Water Policy Transport
Professor Emma Johnston School of BEES, University of New South Wales Marine Ecology
Dr Ian Jonsen Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University Marine Ecology
130 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 131

Appendix 8 Staff member Subject Receiving body

Paid consultancies undertaken by the Taronga Conservation Society Australia Wildlife presented to TWH affected by North Sydney Council Forum on Plastics at Mosman Council
E Hall
marine debris Chambers
Report/Services Receiving organisation Transport, Intensive Care and Rehabilitation
E Hall Veterinary Nurses' Council of Australia Annual Conference
of Seabirds
NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (via
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies E Hall Rescue Animals (2 x 4 hour classes) TTI Certificate II Animal Care
MOU agreement)
Provide First Aid for Animals (2 x 4 hour
Forensic Pathology Consultancy RSPCA NSW (Consultancy Rate) E Hall TTI Certificate II Animal Care
classes)
Forensic Pathology Consultancy NSW Police (Consultancy Rate) Jane Goodall Institute Chimpounga
E Hall Taronga Zoo staff
Greyhound Racing New South Wales Sanctuary Congo Fellowship presentation
Forensic Pathology Consultancy
(Consultancy Rate) Implementing Taronga's Animal Welfare
Diagnostic Pathology Consultancy Mogo Zoo D Pritchard Charter and how it impacts on individual Veterinary Nurses' Council of Australia Annual Conference
NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (via zoo veterinary nurses/keepers
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Proventricular disease in the Little Penguin
MOU agreement) G Tobias American Association of Zoo Veterinarians Annual Conference
(Eudyptula minor novaehollandiae)
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies University of Canberra
Taronga Wildlife Hospital - A Snapshot: How
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Western Sydney integrated veterinary medicine, pathology North American veterinarians and their partners on VETS
L Tong
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Christmas Island National Park and nutrition helps our collection animals (Veterinary Education and Training Services) program from USA
and their wild relatives
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Australian Walkabout Wildlife Park
Zoo Veterinary Pathology (career
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Darling Downs Zoo L Tong Skype presentation to Years 5, 6, 7 and 8 students in 6 schools
opportunities in science)
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Dreamworld Caterpillar Caution: Visceral Lepidopterism Veterinary Specialist Advisory Group Presentation: ZAA
L Tong
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Somersby Animal Hospital in Captive Otariids Conference.
Inaugural Hugh Wirth Oration: Using
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Berry Veterniary Clinic
L Tong veterinary forensics to improve the lives of RSPCA Australia Animal Welfare Seminar
Clinical Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Consultancies Coffs Harbour Animal Rescue Trust animals and humans
Endocrinology Service Perth Zoo Lecture: Non-accidental injury in veterinary
L Tong Melbourne University Veterinary School
practice
Endocrinology Service Zoos Victoria (Melbourne, Healesville, Werribee)
Can we Quill off the illegal trade of echidna
Endocrinology Service University of Queensland L Tong TRAFFIC South-east Asia Regional Office
using forensic nuclear analysis?
Endocrinology Service University of Sunshine Coast K Vinette Herrin Isoflurane anaesthesia in the field University of Sydney researchers
Hospitalisation, Veterinary and Veterinary Pathology Services WIRES L Vogelnest Careers at Taronga Zoo TTI students
Nutrition Consultancy Zoos Victoria (Melbourne, Healesville, Werribee) L Vogelnest Capture and Restraint ( 2 tutorials) TTI students
Preperation of a Husbandry Manual and Captive Management Plan for the Christmas Quality of life assessment and monitoring Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists
Christmas Island National Park L Vogelnest
Island Flying Fox for geriatric and chronically ill zoo animals Annual Conference
L Vogelnest Conservation Medicine University of Sydney, Wildlife Society
Wildlife Disease Association - Australasian Section and Wildlife
L Vogelnest Radiology of marine turtles
Appendix 9 L Vogelnest
Quality of life assessment and monitoring
Society of NZ Veterinary Association Annual Conference

Veterinary Nurses' Council of Australia Annual Conference
Lectures and presentations for geriatric and chronically ill zoo animals
P Meagher Threats to Urban Birds The Society of Conservation Biology
Staff member Subject Receiving body
P Meagher Project Shark Taronga Education Department - Vincentia Public School
C Kerr Taronga as Leaders in Conservation Kuringagai Rotary Club
P Meagher Project Shark Donors at Taronga's Science fundraising evening
C Kerr Taronga as Leaders in Conservation Australia Canada Economic Forum
P Meagher Science @ Taronga's Wildlife Hospital Macquarie University
Beyond Animal Welfare- Ethical Decision
C Kerr Detroit Zoo Welfare Symposium P Meagher Oceans of Plastic - What Lies Beneath Taronga Education Department - Catholic High Schools
Making in a Modern Zoo
A Social Perspective: Animal Visitor P Meagher Oceans of Plastic - Marine Debris Taronga Education Department - Catholic High Schools
C Kerr Zoo and Aquarium Association
Interactions Down with DNA - The Genetics of Match-
P Meagher Botanic Gardens - National Science Week
C Kerr Tchimpounga Experience Jane Goodall AGM Making
C Kerr Taronga Institute of Science and Learning Ian Potter Foundation P Meagher Habitat Fragmentation in Koala Populations Smithsonian School of Conservation Biology

S Hedt Exloring Career Avenues for EA's and PA's EA/PA Public Sector Summit 2017 Australian Shark Attack File: Past, Present
P Meagher Surf Life Saving Australia
and Future
M Campbell Mast Cell Tumours in Cheetah Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists
P Meagher Project Yellow-Bellied Glider Taronga Education Department - Gosford Public School
M Campbell Cardiac Disease in Tasmanian Devils Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists Taronga Wildlife Hospital: A Collaberative
P Meagher University of New South Wales
M Campbell Life as a Zoo Vet United Hospitals Auxillaries of NSW Inc Approach
E Arthur Zoo Veterinary Nursing at Taronga Refugee students at Years 9 and 10 Westfield Sports High School P Meagher Women in Conservation Science SCEGGS Darlinghurst
Bilateral tusk extraction on a male Asian Georges Turtle Outbreak and Christmas
E Arthur Veterinary Nurses' Council of Australia Annual Conference K Rose Sydney Institute of Marine Science
Elephant at Taronga Zoo Island Emergent Bacterium Investigations
Yellow-bellied Glider handraising and age Update - Christmas Island Reptile Emergent
F Evans Veterinary Nurses' Council of Australia Annual Conference K Rose Christmas Island National Park Science Seminar
determination Bacterium
132 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 133

Staff member Subject Receiving body Staff member Subject Receiving body
R Spindler Prioritisation and Measurement of Impace TAFE NSW P. Maguire Taronga Leadership The Association of Independent School NSW
Painting eyes on livestock to reduce Sydney University, students enrolled in Masters of Wildlife Health
N Jordan Kwando-Okavango Research Institute Research Talks B. Bryant Managing the health of captive populations
predator attacks: fairy tale or future tool? and Population Management
Tularaemia in Australian Willife - Review Sydney University, students enrolled in Masters of Wildlife Health
K Rose National Veterinary Pathology Rounds B. Bryant Restraint of zoo animals
and Pathalogical Lesions and Population Management
Impact of Unsustainable Waste Sydney University, students enrolled in Masters of Wildlife Health
J Day, M Van Sluys, P B. Bryant Sumatran rhino conservation
Management on Sydney Harbour Marine Oceans of Plastic - Geography Focus Day, Taronga Zoo and Population Management
Meagher, L Hamilton
Park Taronga Western Plains Zoo 10 year
Dubbo Regional Council / Dubbo Accommodation Operators
Ocean Currents on the East Coast of M. Fuller Visitor Experience Program and Capital
D Slip Oceans of Plastic - Geography Focus Day, Taronga Zoo Group
Australia Investment Combined
J Day Taronga Conservation Science Macquarie University The business behind the conservation
M. Fuller Sydney University Veterinary Wildlife Residential School
business
J Hall Wildlife Health in Australia Macquarie University
Regional Attraction Investment and
Marine Protected Areas: Design, planning M. Fuller Tourism Australia Investment Advisory Panel
D Slip Macquarie University Taronga Western Plains Zoo Business Model
and marine networks
Taronga Western Plains Zoo Overnight
D Slip Role of Zoos in Conservation Macquarie University M. Fuller Destination NSW International Regional Managers
Experiences
J Day Taronga Conservation Science Office of Environment and Heritage Science Division Taronga Western Plains Zoo Capital
M. Fuller Infrastructure NSW Board
Working in herpetology at a zoological Investment and Business Model
M McFadden Australian Herpetological Society
institution Developing an effective channel and
L. Hodgson Access China Summit
Conservation Management of Australian pricing strategy for China
M McFadden University of Technology, Sydney
Amphibians S.Duffy Leadership for Conservation University of NSW
Recovery Actions to Conserve the Southern Zoo Communications and Stakeholder
M McFadden Frog and Tadpole Study Group S.Duffy Zoo and Aquarium Association Confernence
Corroboree Frog Engagement
Endangered Reptiles of Mauritius and S. Duffy Zoo Leadership and Animal Welfare South East Asian Zoo Association
J Hatton Australian Herpetological Society
Herping in Madagascar
S.Duffy Leaders in Conservation Sydney Youth Forum
Conservation of the Bellinger River Turtle at
A Skidmore Bellingen Turtlefest Festival
Taronga Zoo
Conservation of the Bellinger River Turtle at
A Skidmore Bellingen Public School
Taronga Zoo
Conservation of the Bellinger River Turtle at
Appendix 10
A Skidmore Thora Public School Publications
Taronga Zoo
Conservation of the Bellinger River Turtle at
A Skidmore TAFE NSW
Taronga Zoo Book Chapters Gharibi S, Kimble B, Vogelnest L, Barnes J, Stadler C.K, Govendir M
Conservation of the Bellinger River Turtle at (2017) Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole in koalas (Phascolarctos
A Skidmore Bellinger Rivercare citizen science project launch Tershy, B., Newton, K.M., Spatz, D.R., Swinnerton, K.J., Iverson, J.B., cinereus) after intravenous and oral administration. Journal of
Taronga Zoo
Fisher, R.N. Harlow, P.S., Holmes, N.D., and Croll, D.A. (2016) The Veterinary Pharmacological Therapy, 40:1-7.
Understanding how marine predators biogeography of threatened insular iguanas and opportunities for
B Pitcher forage and respond to environmental Macquarie University invasive vertebrate management. In Iguanas: Biology, Systematics Abrahms, B., Sawyer, S.C., Jordan, N.R., McNutt, J.W., Wilson, A.M.,
change and Conservation. Iverson, J.B., T.D. Grant, C.R. Knapp, and S.A. Brashares, J.S. (2016) “Does wildlife resource selection accurately
C Kemp Human animal interactions in the zoo Macquarie University Pasachnik (Eds.). Herpetological Conservation and Biology 11 inform corridor conservation?”. Journal of Applied Ecology. 54(2):
(Monograph 6). Pp 222-236 412-422.
A Burns Measuring animal behaviour in the zoo Macquarie University
C Kemp Human animal interactions in the zoo University of Melbourne Buesching, C.D. & Jordan, N.R. (In press) Small carnivore latrines Andrew, P., Cogger, H., Driscoll, D., Flakus, S., Harlow, P., Maple, D.,
in space and time (with special emphasis on badgers and Misso, M., Pink, C., Retallick, K., Rose, K. and Tiernan, B., (2016).
C Kemp Human animal interactions in the zoo South-western Sydney Institute of TAFE mongooses). In: Small Carnivores in Space and Time. Ed. E Do Linh “Somewhat saved: a captive breeding programme for two endemic
Willdlife Health and Conservation in San. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK. Part II, Chapter Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild”. Oryx. 1-4.
K Rose University of the Third Age - Gymea 11. DOI:10.1017/S0030605316001071
Australia
Christmas Island Reptile Emergent Jordan, N.R., O’Riain, J., Balmforth, Z., Martins, V., Page-Nicholson, Bashaw, M.J., Sicks, F., Palme, R., Schwarzenberger, F., Tordiffe,
K Rose Christmas Island National Park Staff and Volunteers
Bacterium S., Do Linh San, E. (In press). A conservation assessment of Suricata A.S.W., Ganswind, A. (2016) “Non-invasive assessment of
K Rose Tularaemia in Australian Wildlife Animal Pathology Standards Program – Pathology Road Show suricatta. In Child MF, Roxburgh L, Do Linh San E, Raimondo D, adrenocortical activity as a measure of stress in giraffe (Giraffa
Emergent Multisystemic Enterococcus Davies-Mostert HT, editors. The Red List of Mammals of South camelopardalis)”. BMC Veterinary Research 12: 235
K Rose Infection Threatens Christmas Island Animal Pathology Standards Program – Pathology Road Show Africa, Swaziland and Lesotho. South African National Biodiversity
Bass, N.C., Mourier, J., Knott, N.A. Day, J., Brown, C., Guttridge, T.
Reptiles Institute and Endangered Wildlife Trust, South Africa.
(2016) “Long-term migration patterns and bisexual philopatry in
K. Rose Georges Turtle Mass Mortality Investigation Animal Pathology Standards Program – Pathology Road Show a benthic shark species”. Marine and Freshwater Research. http://
Peer Reviewed Literature dx.doi.org/10.1071/MF16122
K. Rose Woy Woy Pelican, Duck and Ibis mortalities Animal Pathology Standards Program – Pathology Road Show
Stannard, H.J., Thompson, P., McAllan, B.M., Raubenheimer, D. Botero, A., Cooper C.C., Thompson C.K., Clode P.L., Rose K.,
Between the Devil and Ebola - Adventures in (2016) Hematology and serum biochemistry reference ranges of
H. Bender Taronga Journal Club Thompson R.C.A. (2016) “Morphological and Phylogenetic
Wildlife Disease healthy captive Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and their Description of Trypanosoma noyesi sp. nov.: An Australian Wildlife
Georges Turtle Disease Investigation and association with age, gender and seasonal variation Mammalian
J. Hall Taronga Staff Lunch Trypanosome within the T. cruzi Clade”. Protist, 67: 425-439.
Captive Breeding Biology 81:393-398.
Australian Registry of Wildlife Health: Carroll, G., Cox, M., Harcourt, R., Pitcher, B., Slip, D., Jonsen, I.
J. Hall Macquarie University Students Hulst F., Kemp L.F. and Šlapeta J. 2016 A new coccidian parasite (2017). “Hierarchical influences of prey distribution on patterns
Wildlife Health in Australia of the boodie, Bettongia lesueur (Mammalia: Marsupialia: of prey capture by a marine predator”. Functional Ecology. DOI:
Wildlife Health Australia State Coordinators Annual Face-to-Face Potoroidae), from Australia. Folia Parasitologica (Praha) 63:036;
K. Rose Tularaemia in Australian Wildlife 10.1111/1365-2435.12873
Meeting doi:10.14411/fp.2016.036.
134 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 135

Dewhirst, O.P., Roskilly, K., Hubel, T.Y., Jordan, N.R., Golabek, K.A., Meade, J., Formella, I., Melfi, V. (2016). “A note on the effect of American Association of Zoo Veterinarians Annual Conference, McFadden, M. (May 2017). “Creating Taronga’s Herpetological
McNutt, J.W.,Wilson, A.M. (2017) “An exploratory clustering concerts on the behaviour of Domestic dogs Canis lupus familiaris Atlanta, Georgia. ARK – A decade of reptile and amphibian conservation recovery
approach for extracting stride parameters from tracking collars on at Taronga Zoo, Sydney”. International Zoo Yearbook, doi:10.1111/ and research programs”. Australasian Society of Zoo Keeping
Vogelnest, L., Stephenson, T., and Bentley C. (December 2016) Conference, Canberra, Australia.
free ranging wild animals.” Journal of Experimental Biology. 220: izy.12141
“Radiology of Marine Turtles”, Wildlife Disease Association –
341-346.
Phalen D.N., Hall J., Ganesh G., Hartigan A., Smith C., De Jong C., Australasian Section and Wildlife Society of the NZ Veterinary McFadden, M. (February 2017). “Ex-situ conservation program
Eden, J.S., Rose, K., Ng, J., Shi, S., Wang, Q., Sintchenko, V., Holmes, Field H., Rose, K. (2017). Genetic diversity and phylogeny of the Association Annual Conference, Christchurch, New Zealand. to secure the Bellinger River Turtle”. Turtle in Crisis Symposium,
E.C. (2017). “The discovery and isolation of Francisella tularensis Christmas Island flying fox (Pteropus melanotus natalis). Journal Canberra, Australia.
Arthur, E. (March 2017) “Bilateral tusk extraction on a male Asian
spp. holartica in Australian ringtail possums”. Emerging Infectious of Mammology. 98: 428-437.
Elephant at Taronga Zoo”, Veterinary Nurses’ Council of Australia Portas, T., Duarte Barbosa, A., Spratt, D., Fletcher, D., Rose, K.
Diseases, 23(7): available online ahead of print.
Rogers, T.L., Fung, J., Slip, D., Steindler, L., O’Connell, T.C. (2016). Annual Conference, Darling Harbour, Sydney (November 2016). “Clicopathologic findings in a winter mortality
Edwards,C., P. G. Byrne, P.S. Harlow and Silla, A.J. (2017) The “Calibrating the timespan of longitudinal biomarkers in vertebrate event in free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus
Evans, F. (March 2017) “Yellow-bellied Glider handraising and age giganteus) at Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve”. Wildlife Disease
influence of dietary carotenoid supplementation on the cutaneous tissues when fine scale growth records are unavailable”. Ecosphere
determination”, Veterinary Nurses’ Council of Australia Annual Association Conference – Australasian Section Annual Conference,
bacterial communities of the critically endangered Southern 7(12):e01449. 10.1002/ecs2.1449
Conference, Darling Harbour, Sydney Kaikoura, New Zealand.
Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree). Microbial Ecology. 73:
Scheele, B.C., Skerratt, L.F., Grogan, L.F., Hunter, D.A., Clemann, N.,
435-444: doi:10.1007/s00248-016-0853-2 Hall, E. (March 2017) “Transport, Intensive Care and Rehabilitation
McFadden, M., Newell, D., Hoskin C.J., Gillespie G.R., Heard, G.W., Portas, T., Holz, P., Rose K. (August 2016) “Cutaneous neoplasia
of Seabirds”, , Veterinary Nurses’ Council of Australia Annual in a captive colony of northern corroboree frogs (Pseudophryne
Fanson, K.V., Best, E.C., Bunce, A., Fanson, B.G., Hogan, L.A., Keeley, Brannelly, L., Roberts, A.A. & Berger, L. (2017). “After the epidemic:
Conference, Darling Harbour, Sydney pengilleyi)”. Unusual and Exotic Pets & Association of Avian
T., Narayan, E.J., Palme, R., Parrott M.L., Sharp, T.M., Skogvold, K., Ongoing declines, stabilizations and recoveries in amphibians
Tuthill. L., Webster, K.N., & Bashaw, M.J. (2015).  “One size does not afflicted by chytridiomycosis”. Biological Conservation. 206:37-46. Pritchard, D. (March 2017) “Implementing Taronga’s Animal Veterinarians - Australasian Committee Annual Conference,
fit all: Monitoring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in marsupials”. Welfare Charter and how it impacts on individual zoo veterinary Brisbane, Queensland.
Stannard, H.J., Bekkers, J.M., Old, J.M., McAllan, B.M., Shaw,
General and Comparitive Endocrinology, 244: 146-156. nurses/keepers”, Veterinary Nurses’ Council of Australia Annual
M. (2017) “Digestibility of a new diet for captive short-beaked Rose, K. (December 2016). “Wildlife Disease Surveillance”. ADAPT
Conference, Darling Harbour, Sydney NSW Workshop.
Fisher. R.N., Niukula, J., Watling, D, Harlow, P.S. 2017. “A new species echidnas (Tachyglossus aculeatus)”. Zoo Biology. DOI: 10.1002/
of iguana Brachylophus Cuvier 1829 (Sauria: Iguania: Iguanidae) zoo.21347 Jarratt, C., Rose, K. (August, 2016) “Mass Mortality Event in Hall, J., Rose, K. (November 2016). “Tularaemia in Australian
from Gau Island, Fiji Islands”. Zootaxa, 4273: 407-422 Australian Magpies and Australian Ravens in NSW in 2015. Unusual
Stannard, H.J., Tong, L., Shaw, M., Van Sluys, M., McAllan, B., Wildlife”. Wildlife Health Australia AGM
and Exotic Pets & Association of Avian Veterinarians - Australasian
Hocking, D.P., Ladds, M.A., Slip, D.J, Fitzgerald, E.M.G., Evans, A.R. Raubenheimer, D. (2017) “Nutritional status and functional
Committee Annual Conference, Brisbane, Queensland. Rose K. (June 2016). “Christmas Island Flying Fox Health Research”.
(2016). “Shaking, chewing and holding prey in forelimbs during digestive histology of the carnivorous Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus
National Environmental Science Programme Workshop Canberra,
prey processing in Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea)” Marine harrisii)”. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, Part A. 205:1-7 Agius, J., Hall, J., Rose, K., Phalen, D. (November 2016). “Emergent ACT.
Mammal Science 32:541-557 doi/10.1111/mms.12384 Bacterial Infection in Christmas Island’s Endemic and Invasive
Torrents Ticó, M., Rich, L., McNutt, J.W., Nnthomiwa, M., Mothala,
Geckos”. Wildlife Disease Association Conference – Australasian Rose, K. and Hall, J. (November 2016). “Bellinger River Snapping
Jackson, C.R., Groom, R., Jordan, N.R. & McNutt, J.W. (2017). “The M., Motsamai, G. & Jordan, N.R. (In press). “On the right track:
Section Annual Conference, Kaikoura, New Zealand Turtle Outbreak Investigations”. Bellinger River Snapping Turtle
effect of relatedness and pack size on territory overlap in African comparing concurrent spoor and camera-traps surveys in
Conservation Planning Workshop, Sydney, NSW.
wild dogs”. Movement Ecology. 5: 10. DOI: 10.1186/s40462-017- Botswana”. African Journal of Wildlife Research. Fisher, R., Niukula, J., Lovich, K., Davis, H., Harlow, P. (November
0099-8 2016). “Biogeography and Conservation Systematics of the Fijian K Rose. (October 2016). “Bellinger River Snapping Turtle Disease”.
Thesis and Reports Iguanas (Brachylophus sp.)”. IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group Investigation Bellinger River Snapping Turtle Disease Risk
Johnston, S.D., Qualischefski, E., Cooper, J., McLeod, R., Lever,
Meeting, Fiji. Assessment and Conservation Action Plan Workshop, Taronga Zoo,
J., Nixon, B., Anderson, A. L., Hobbs, R., Gosa´lvez, J., Lo´pez- Hall, J. (2016) “Husbandry Manual: Christmas Island Flying-fox Sydney, NSW.
Ferna´ndez, C. & Keeley, T (2017) “Cryopreservation of saltwater (Pteropus melanotus natalis)”. Chirstmas Island National Park, Hall, J., Rose, K. (November 2016). “The Bellinger River Snapping
crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) spermatozoa”. Reproduction, Department of the Environment and Energy, Christmas Island. Turtle (Myuchelys georgesi)”. Wildlife Disease Association K Rose. (November 2016). “Bellinger River Snapping Turtle
Fertility and Development DOI: 10.1071/RD16511 Conference – Australasian Section Annual Conference, Kaikoura, Disease Investigation”. Wildlife Disease Association Conference –
Hall J. & Lees, C. (2016) “Captive Management Plan for the New Zealand. Australasian Section Annual Conference, Kaikoura, New Zealand
Ladds M.A., Thompson A.P., Slip D.J., Hocking D.P., Harcourt RG Christmas Island Flying-fox, Pteropus melanotus natalis”.
(2016) “Seeing It All: Evaluating Supervised Machine Learning Christmas Island National Park, Department of the Environment Harlow, P. (November 2016). “Review of the 2008-2012 Recovery Bryant,B.,Campbell, M. “Periodontal Disease in 2 Zoo-based
Methods for the Classification of Diverse Otariid Behaviours”. and Energy, Christmas Island. Plan for the Fijian Crested Iguana”. IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Southern black rhinoceros”. Poster presentation to the Annual
PLoS ONE 11(12): e0166898. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. Group Meeting, Fiji. Conference of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.
pone.0166898 Rose, K., Hall, J., McGilvray G., Rumings S. (2016). “Bellinger River
Snapping Turtle Conservation Planning Workshop - Disease Risk Harlow, P. (November 2016). “The Pacific Iguanas: Evolution, Bryant,B.,Campbell, M. “Periodontal disease in black rhinoceros”.
Ladds, M.A., Slip, D.J., and Harcourt, R.G. (2017). “Swimming Analysis Briefing Notes”. NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. Discovery and Conservation”. IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group A presentation to the annual Elephant & Rhinoceros Research
metabolic rates vary by sex and development stage, but not by Meeting, Fiji Symposium
species, in three species of Australian otariid seals”. Journal of Hocking, D.P. (2016) “Prey capture and processing in otariid
Comparative Physiology B 187(3):503-516 doi:10.1007/s00360- pinnipeds with implications for understanding the evolution Harlow, P., Davis, H., Fisher, R. (November 2016). “Phylogeography Bryant,B.,Campbell, M., Sangster, C. “Acute hepatic necrosis and
016-1046-5 of aquatic foraging in marine mammals”. PhD thesis, Monash and Population Genetics of Brachylophus”. IUCN SSC Iguana death in a sub adult white rhinoceros”. Australian Vet Journal
University, Vic. Supervisors: A.R. Evans, D.J. Slip, M. Salverson, Specialist Group Meeting, Fiji. 94(11).
Ladds, M.A., Slip, D.J., and Harcourt, R.G. (2017). “Intrinsic and E.M.G. Fitzgerald.
extrinsic influences on the metabolic rates of three species Harlow, P., McFadden, M. and Andrew, P. (August, 2016). “Captive Fairbrother, B. (September 2016). “Lend your eyes to the wild:
of Australian otariid”. Conservation Physiology 5(1): cow074; O’Hara, D.J. (2016) “Increased spatial partitioning among a Breeding of Extinct-in-the-Wild Lizards from Christmas Island, a campaign to disrupt illegal wildlife crime”. Wildlife Trafficking
doi:10.1093/conphys/cow074 multispecies seabird colony in a lower productivity year: tracking Australia”. Captive Breeding and Conservation Strategies for and North America - Association of Zoos & Aquariums Annual
and stable isotope analysis of three sympatrically breeding species Amphibians and Reptiles - 8th World Congress of Herpetology, Conference. San Diego, USA.
Ladds, M.A., Thompson, A.P., Kadar, J. Slip, D.J., Hocking, D.P. over a three year period”. MPhil thesis, Macquarie University, NSW. Hangzhou, China.
and Harcourt, R.G. (2017). “Super machine learning: improving Fairbrother, B. (July 2016). “Empowering citizens to effect change
Supervisors: R.G. Harcourt, I.D. Jonsen, D.J. Slip, N. Carlile, G. Carroll.
accuracy and reducing variance of behaviour classification from Hush, L., McFadden, M. (May 2017). “Booroolong Frog – a case study of zoo based Community Conservation.” Oceania
accelerometry”. Animal Biotelemetry 5:8 DOI: 10.1186/s40317-017- Ladds, M.A. (2016) “Modelling energetics of fur seals and sea lions”. Conservation Program: A Collaborative Approach to Ex-situ Congress for Conservation Biology, Brisbane, Queensland.
0123-1 PhD thesis, Macquarie University, NSW. Supervisors: R.G. Harcourt, Conservation”. Australasian Society of Zoo Keeping Conference,
Walraven,E.,Duffy,S. (November 2016) “Embedding animal
D.J. Slip. Canberra, Australia.
McFadden, M.S., Topham, P., Harlow, P.S. (2017). A Ticking Time welfare in staff culture:the Taronga Conservation Society Australia
Bomb: Is the illegal pet trade a pathway for Corn Snake (Elaphe Carroll, G. (2017) “Foraging dynamics of little penguins in a hotspot Kozlowski, S. (May 2017). “Use of Training and Conditioning in the experience” International Zoo Year Book. Vol 51, Issue 1.
guttata) entry into Australia? Australian Zoologist, DOI: https://doi. of ocean warming”. PhD thesis, Macquarie University, NSW. Management of Komodo Dragons at Taronga Zoo “. Australasian
Whitfield, N. (October 2016). “100 ways to celebrate Taronga”.
org/10.7882/AZ.2017.006. Supervisors: L. Hughes, I.D. Jonsen, D.J. Slip. Society of Zoo Keeping Conference, Canberra, Australia.
Rules of Engagement National Interpretation Conference,
McFadden, M., Kozlowski, S. (2017). Varanus komodoensis (Komodo McFadden, M. and Harlow, P. (August 2016). “Ex situ amphibian Canberra, ACT.
Conference and Workshop Proceedings conservation: an Australian approach to prioritisation,
Dragon). Longevity. Herpetological Review, 48(2): 376.
Tobias, G., Tong, L., Vinette Herrin, K., Vogelnest, L., Hulst, F., collaboration and program outcomes”. Captive Breeding and Workshops convened
Sangster, C., Volait, L. (October 2016) Poster on “Proventricular Conservation Strategies for Amphibians and Reptiles - 8th World
Congress of Herpetology, Hangzhou, China. Emergency Animal Diseases Workshop for Taronga and Taronga
disease in the Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor novaehollandiae“,
Western Plains Zoo staff (September 2016), Taronga Zoo, Sydney.
136 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 137

Appendix 11
Staff representation on external committees

Name Committee Name Committee
C. Kerr Vice President, Zoo and Aquarium Association P. Harlow Member, Christmas Island Reptile Advisory Panel
C. Kerr Chair, Zoo and Aquarium Association Asian Elephant Steering Committee P. Harlow Steering Committee and Member, International Union for Conservation of Nature SSC Iguana Specialist Group.
C Kerr Chair, Finance, Audit and Risk Committee, Zoo and Aquarium Association P. Harlow Member, Corroboree Frog Recovery Team
C.Kerr Board Member, International Rhino Foundation R. Hobbs Steering committee member, FaunaBank
C.Kerr Member, University of New South Wales Scientific Advisory Committee R. Spindler Member, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Science Executive Subcommittee
C.Kerr Member, TAFE NSW Sydney Institute Advisory Council R. Spindler Board Member, Society for Conservation Biology - Oceania
M Campbell Secretary/Treasurer and Head Subject Examiner, Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary R. Spindler Member, UNSW BEES Visiting Committee
Scientists Zoo and Wildlife Medicine Chapter R. Spindler Member, Macquarie University Science and Engineering Faculty Advisory Committee
M Campbell Primary Veterinary Advisor, Zoo and Aquarium Association VetSAG Nutrition Group
R. Spindler Member, International Conservation Science Working Group
V Moushigian Member, Safety Institute of Australia
R. Spindler Member, International Union for the Conservation of Nature Conservation Breeding Specialist Group
V Moushigian Member, Treasury Managed Fund, Mid Sized Agency Collaboration
J. O'Brien Member, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Science Executive Subcommittee
V Di Giglio Member, Animal Record Keeping Specialist Advisory Group
J. O'Brien Co-chairperson, Regulatory Subcommittee of the International Embryo Technology Society’s Parent Committee
E Hall Member, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Wildlife Rehabilitation Standards Advisory Group on Companion Animals, Non-Domestic and Endangered Species (CANDES)
Committee Member, Southern Ocean Seabird Study Association J. O'Brien Taxon Leader (Non-human Primates), Research Subcommittee of the International Embryo Technology Society’s
F Hulst "Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Vet Specialist Advisory Group. Parent Committee on CANDES
Primary Veterinary Advisor, Zoo and Aquarium Association Amphibian Taxon Advisory Group. J. O'Brien Reproduction Co-advisor, Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Rhino Advisory Group
Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Nutrition Group”.
J. O'Brien Reproduction Advisor, AZA Penguin Taxon Advisory Group
P Meagher Committee Member, Society for Conservation Biology, Member, Surf Life Saving Australia Shark Mitigation
Advisory Group H. Bender Australian Society for Veterinary Pathology Conference Organising Committee
G Tobias Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Vet Specialist Advisory Group H. Bender Australian Animal Pathology Standards Program
L Tong "Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Vet Specialist Advisory Group. H. Bender Editorial Panel - Veterinary Pathology
Secretary, Australian Society of Veterinary Pathology”.
K. Rose Norfolk Island Green Parrot Translocation Advisory Panel - Parks Australia
K Vinette Herrin "Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Vet Specialist Advisory Group.
Primary Veterinary Advisor, Zoo and Aquarium Association Carnivore and Small Exotic Mammals Taxon Advisory K. Rose National Environmental Sciences Research Program/Threatened Species Research Hub - Christmas Island
Group “ Committee
L Vogelnest "Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Vet Specialist Advisory Group. K. Rose Christmas Island Reptile Advisory Panel - Parks Australia
Primary Veterinary Advisor, Zoo and Aquarium Association Australian Marine Mammals and Penguins Taxon K. Rose Christmas Island Flying Fox Advisory Panel - Parks Australia
Advisory Group.
Member, Zoo and Aquarium Association Elephant, Primate and Bird Veterinary Advisory Groups. K. Rose Wildlife Disease Association Int’l– Small Grants Committee
Member, Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, National Zoo Animal Health Reference Group”. K. Rose Wildlife Disease Association Int’l – Council Member – Member at Large
D. Slip Member, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Marine Fauna Advisory Gro K. Rose Wildlife Health Australia – Universities Committee
up
K. Rose Wildlife Health Australia - State Coordinators Committee
D. Slip Member, International Union for the Conservation of Nature / Species Survival Commission Boa and Python
Specialist Group K. Rose, NSW Wildlife Biosecurity Committee
M. McFadden Member, NSW Declining Frog Working Group H. Bender, J. Hall
K. Rose Pathogen Discovery Centre - Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney
M. McFadden Member, Corroboree Frog Recovery Team
K. Rose Biodiversity Futures Board - Macquarie University
M. McFadden Co-convenor, Zoo and Aquarium Association (ZAA) Amphibian Taxon Advisory Group
P Maguire Junior Vice President NSW Royal Zoological Society
M. McFadden Member, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Reintroduction Specialist Group
M. Fuller Board Trustee, and Chair Visitor Experience Committee, Member Building and Heritage Committee - Sydney
M. McFadden Member, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Amphibian Specialist Group
Opera House Trust
M. McFadden Member, Bellinger River Turtle Advisory Group M. Fuller Director and Chair Finance Audit and Risk Committee - Inland NSW Tourism (Effective – November 2016)
M. Shaw Member, Association of Zoos and Aquariums Nutrition Advisory Group (AZA-NAG) M. Fuller Winston Churchill Trust Fellowship Selection Panellist - NSW Land, Environment, Commerce and Logistics Panel.
M. Shaw Nutrition advisor for Western Lowland Gorilla Species Survival Plan B. Bryant Primary Veterinary Advisor. Ungulate Taxon Advisory Group. ZAA
M. Shaw Member, Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums Nutrition Advisory and Research Group (CAZA-NARG) S.Duffy ZAA Australasian Species Management Program Committee
M. Shaw Member, European Zoo Nutrition Research Group S. Duffy NSW OEH Science Cluster Committee
M. Shaw Member, Association of Zoos and Aquariums Nutrition Advisory Group (AZA-NAG) S. Duffy Director and Chair Fundraisinga and Advvocacy Committee - Jane Goodall Institute Australia
M. Shaw Member, Comparative Nutrition Society (CNS) S. Duffy UNSW Wild Desert Advisory Committee
M. Shaw Member, European Zoo Nutrition Research Group S.Duffy ZAA Elephant Steering Committee and Taxonomic Advisory Group
M. Shiels Regent honeyeater recovery team.
N. Jordan Publicity Officer, Dubbo Field Naturalists and Conservation Society, Social Meeting, Dubbo.
P. Harlow Member, NSW Declining Frog Working Group
138 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 139

Appendix 12
Staff participation in international programs

Staff Member Destination Date of travel Reason for Travel Staff Member Destination Date of travel Reason for Travel
Libby Hall* Sydney/Perth/ 5/06/2016 - 2/07/2016 Assist at the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Centre, Nicholas Boyle Sydney/Perth/ 21/09/2016 - 5/10/2016Attend the 2016 Convention on International Trade in
Johannesburg/Palmerston in the Republic of Congo Johannesburg/Perth/ Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
North/Johannesburg/ Sydney Conference. Before the conference will support C Kerr to
Perth/Sydney develop relationship in Zimbabwe with Malilangwe Trust.
Andrew Sydney/Jakarta/Bandar 19/06/2016 - 2/07/2016 Development and implementation of an eco-tourism program Brendan Host* Sydney/Perth/ 24/09/2016 - 12/10/2016 Mr Host gained an opportunity through Wildlife ACT to
Nikolaidis* Lampung/Jakarta/Sydney Johannesburg/Richards provide insight into the activities Taronga is supporting in
Steve Williams* Sydney/Jakarta/Bandar 19/06/2016 - 2/07/2016 Development and implementation of an eco-tourism program Bay/Johannesburg/Perth/ Tanzania in relation to White-backed Vultures and allow him
Lampung/Jakarta/ Sydney to develop practical conservation and reSeattlerch skills. Due
Singapore/Sydney to strict Tanzanian laws Mr Host is unable to visit this work.
Paul Fahy* Sydney/Denpasar/Jakarta/ 12/07/2016 - 20/07/2016 Taronga ‘CEO Challenge’ The game reserve in South Africa is the next best place to
Bandar Lampung/Jakarta/ understand these activities. Taking part in the field work will
Denpasar/Sydney allow Mr Host to be a better advocate for these species in the
wild.
Stephanie Sydney/Singapore/Jakarta/ 12/07/2016 - 21/07/2016 Taronga ‘CEO Challenge’
Hedt* Bandar Lampung/Jakarta/ Cameron Kerr Sydney/Dallas/Puebla City/ 8/10/2016 - 14/10/2016 To attend the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums
Sydney Dallas/Sydney (WAZA) Conference and Technical Congress.
Gabrielle Tobias Sydney/Dallas/Atlanta/ 14/07/2016 - 25/07/2016 American Association of Zoo Veterinarians (AAZV) Chris Dryburgh Sydney/Nadi/Sydney 15/10/2016 - 9/11/2016 Dr Harlow and Mr Dryburgh will attend the International
Dallas/Sydney Conference in Atlanta Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Iguana Specialist
Group meeting. They will also conduct reSeattlerch on the
Cameron Kerr* Sydney/Jakarta/Sydney 15/07/2016 - 21/07/2016 Taronga ‘CEO Challenge’ Fijian Crested Iguanas.
Dr Benn Bryant Dubbo/Sydney/Los 16/07/2016 - 26/07/2016 To attend the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians Peter Harlow Sydney/Nadi/Sydney 15/10/2016 - 9/11/2016 Dr Harlow and Mr Dryburgh will attend the International
Angeles/Atlanta/Dallas/ Conference on 15-22 July 2016 and present on ‘Periodental Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Iguana Specialist
McAllen/Dallas/Sydney/ diSeattlese in two zoo based southern black rhinoceros’. Then Group meeting. They will also conduct reSeattlerch on the
Dubbo from 22-25 July 2016, visit a Black Rhinoceros at the El Coyote Fijian Crested Iguanas.
Ranch as Taronga intends to acquire the rhino in the future. Bruce Murdoch* Dubbo/Sydney/ 31/10/2016 - 4/11/2016 Secondment of two Taronga Staff to Orana Park
Cameron Kerr** Sydney/Los Angeles/San 3/08/2016 - 12/08/2016 Receive the San Diego Zoo Global 2016 Conservation Medal Queenstown/Christchurch/
Diego/Los Angeles/Sydney Auckland/Sydney/Dubbo
Jane Hall** Sydney/Perth/Cocos 5/08/2016 - 28/08/2016 In conjunction with Parks Australia, Christmas Island National Nick Hanlon* Sydney/Christchurch/ 14/10/16 - 31/10/16 Secondment of two Taronga Staff to Orana Park
(Keeling) Islands/Christmas Park, University of Western Sydney, University of Sydney, Sydney
Island/Perth/Sydney CSIRO and ANSTO, Taronga has obtained funding from the Louise Ginman Sydney/Jakarta/Singapore/ 2/11/2016 - 5/11/2016 Workshop on SeattleZA conference
Taronga Conservation Science Initiative to investigate the Sydney
decline of the Christmas Island flying fox on Christmas Island.
The flying fox project will occur over three years. Simon Duffy Singapore/Jakarta/ 3/11/2016 - 5/11/2016 Attend SeattleZA conference and meet RaguNadi Zoo
Singapore Director regarding Tiger transaction and keeper training
Karrie Rose** Sydney/Perth/Cocos 5/08/2016 - 28/08/2016 In conjunction with Parks Australia, Christmas Island National
(Keeling) Islands/Christmas Park, University of Western Sydney, University of Sydney, Benn Bryant Dubbo/Sydney/Denpasar/ 8/11/2016 - 20/11/2016 Assist with Anaesthisia of two Sumatran Rhino and attend the
Island/Perth/Sydney CSIRO and ANSTO, Taronga has obtained funding from the Jakarta/Bandar Lampung/ annual Elephant and Rhinoceros ReSeattlerch Symposium
Taronga Conservation Science Initiative to investigate the Jakarta/Singapore/Jakarta/
decline of the Christmas Island flying-fox on Christmas Island. Sydney/Dubbo
The flying fox project will occur over three years. Mike Sydney/Auckland/Buenos 19/11/2016 - 27/11/2016 Attend and present at the International Congress of
Peter Harlow Sydney/Hong Kong/ 14/08/2016 - 22/08/2016 World Congress of Herpetology in Hangzhou Drinkwater* Aires/Auckland/Sydney Zookeepers
Hangzhou, Zhejiang/Hong Karrie Rose Sydney/Christchurch/ 24/11/2016 - 30/11/2016 To attend the Australasian Wildlife DiSeattlese Association
Kong/Sydney Sydney Conference and present the Australian Registry of Wildlife
Michael Sydney/Hong Kong/ 14/08/2016 - 22/08/2016 World Congress of Herpetology in Hangzhou Health's involvement in the Bellinger River snapping turtles
McFAddis Hangzhou, Zhejiang/Hong mortality event and ongoing work on Christmas Island
Ababaen Kong/Sydney Jane Hall Sydney/Christchurch/ 24/11/2016 - 3/12/2016 To attend the Australasian Wildlife DiSeattlese Association
Lisa Welsh Sydney/Singapore/ 14/08/2016 - 24/08/2016 Participating in 2016 Tourism Australia India Travel Mission Sydney Conference and present the Australian Registry of Wildlife
Chennai, Tamil Nadu/ and meeting with senior members of the tourism industry in Health's involvement in the Bellinger River snapping turtles
Mumbai/Singapore/Sydney Singapore and Mumbai. mortality event and ongoing work on Christmas Island
Allan Schmidt* Sydney/San Francisco/ 17/08/2016 - 23/08/2016 Attend ‘Chimpanzees in context’ symposium to be held at the Larry Vogelnest Sydney/Christchurch/ 24/11/2016 - 1/12/2016 NZWA and WDA conference
Chicago/San Francisco/ Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago Sydney
Sydney Jane Hall Sydney/Johannesburg/ 7/05/2017 - 30/08/2017 Churchill Trust Fellowship to “Improve Australia’s Capacity to
Belinda Sydney/Los Angeles/San 6/09/2016 - 11/09/2016 To present at the Association of Zoos and Aquariums London/Toronto/ Manage Wildlife DiSeattlese Incidents”
Fairbrother Diego/Los Angeles/Sydney Conference about Taronga's Wildlife Witness smart phone Saskatoon/Calgary/Dallas/
app. Also conducting meetings and attending workshops with Charlotte/Wilmington/
potential and existing conservation partners. Charlotte/San Diego/
Seattle/Anchorage/
Cameron Kerr Sydney/Johannesburg/ 12/09/2016 - 6/10/2016 Attend the 2016 Convention on International Trade in Portland/Los Angeles/
Addis Ababa/Brazzaville/ Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Sydney
Palmerston North/ Conference. Also travel before the conference to develop and
Brazzaville/Addis Ababa/ maintain relationships in Africa and engage with a number of Warwick Taylor* Sydney/Kuala Lumpur/ 21/01/2017 - 18/03/2017 Undertake a Zoofriends Fellowship to lead training in steel
Johannesburg/Sydney projects that Taronga supports. Kuching/Kuala Lumpur/ fabrication and assist in constructing new animal enclosures
Sydney that rehabilitate more animals.
140 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 141

Appendix 13
Workforce Diversity
Workforce Diversity Achievements in 2016/2017 include:
Staff Member Destination Date of travel Reason for Travel
Phoebe Sydney/Los Angeles/ 26/02/2017 - 10/03/2017 Attend a Statistics in Ecology and Conservation Biology Aboriginal Education Taronga Training Institute Aboriginal Scholarship opportunities identified and provided.
Meagher* Washington, D.C./Los Course at the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Scholarships
Angeles/Sydney Biology Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Following on from the Aboriginal Cultural Awareness training delivered to all full time and part time
Laura Jones Sydney/HND/Sydney 16/03/2017 - 24/03/2017 Escort a Koala to Nagoya Zoo Training employees in 2016, Cultural Immersion & Training was delivered to Taronga’s Executive team by Susan
Moylan-Coombs from Gaimaragal Group to support leadership in this area and for the development
Lisa Welsh** Sydney/Los Angeles/ 19/03/2017 - 8/03/2017 Invited to participate in the 2016 Goway Corroboree, of future strategies.
Toronto/New York City/Los Australian Tourism Summit and Australian Marketplace. Ms
Workforce diversity celebrations NAIDOC, Reconciliation Week, International Women’s Day and Sydney Mardi Gras were amongst
Angeles/Sydney Welsh will showcase and raise awareness of Taronga as a key
the celebrations to promote a greater understanding of EEO groups. These celebrations included
attraction in NSW with a view to further increase visitation
Taronga’s iconic ‘Free Flight Bird Show’ incorporating Aboriginal Dreaming Stories, morning teas and
from the US market to both Taronga Zoo and NSW as a whole,
presentations.
as well as socialise the important conservation, education and
reSeattlerch work being undertaken by Taronga. Aboriginal Employment Strategy Taronga have joined the steering committee of the Office of Environment and Heritage to develop
a whole of portfolio Aboriginal Employment Strategy which will replace Taronga’s Aboriginal
Nick Boyle Sydney/Honolulu/Dallas/ 9/04/2017 - 15/04/2017 To present at, and to attend, the C2S2 Conference in Texas
Employment Strategy. This strategy will continue to develop in line with the Taronga Wildlife Retreat
Sydney
scheduled to open in 2019.
Cameron Kerr Sydney/Dallas/Detroit/ 3/05/2017 - 6/05/2017 To attend the Center for Zoo Animal Welfare’s 4th
Taronga was also a finalist in the Taronga’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is soon be re-launched with ‘stretch’ targets designed that
Dallas/Sydney International Animal Welfare Symposium
2016 AHRI Workplace Diversity will give Taronga the opportunity to focus on the strategies and programs we already have in place
Lisa Welsh Sydney/Auckland/Sydney 4/05/2017 - 6/05/2017 To solidify Taronga’s identity as one of Australia’s pre-eminent Award category for Indigenous and set clear and measurable targets to deepen their impact.
attractions and the world’s great zoos Employment.
Nerida Taylor* Dubbo/Sydney/Jakarta/ 6/05/2017 - 21/05/2017 To further develop outreach and capacity building programs Reconciliation Action Plan Taronga’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is continuously monitored as we aim to work towards
Bandar Lampung/Jakarta/ as part of a Zoofirends Fellowship targets with a completion date of July 2020. Taronga was also nominated for the NSW Government
Sydney/Dubbo Harmony Champion Awards, in recognition of our efforts with our Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan
Kimberly Sydney/Brisbane/ 6/05/2017 - 28/05/2017 To train newly appointed veterinarian and national park staff and commitment to Aboriginal employment and engagement.
Vinette-Herrin Denpasar/Sydney in Bukit Tigapuluh National Park Work placement program As part of our Centenary Celebrations our Burbangana and Walanmarra ‘Shoulder to
Benn Bryant Dubbo/Sydney/Singapore/ 16/05/2017 - 20/05/2017 Invited to attend the international workshop "Capture and Shoulder’participants embarked on a life changing journey from Dubbo to Sydney. They reawakened
Jakarta/Sydney/Dubbo Translocation of Indonesian Rhinos" the cultural practice of walking over a two week period which enabled them to connect and learn on
Bobby-Jo Clow* Sydney/Perth/ 18/05/2017 - 4/06/2017 To observe the wildlife conservation and wildlife law country, self reflect and build their confidence, whilst being supported by Taronga staff, Aboriginal
Johannesburg/Lusaka/ enforcement efforts being implemented in South Luangwa Elders and the communities they met along the way.
Mfuwe/Johannesburg/ National Park Gender diverse leadership group Improving Outcomes for women:
Perth/Sydney
Increased representation of During 2015/16 Taronga has partnered with the Office of Environment and Heritage to develop a
Rodd Stapley Sydney/Los Angeles/San 21/06/2017 - 29/06/2017 To discuss and observe first hand management, culture and woman on Taronga’s Board disability inclusion plan covering, attitudes and behaviours, livable communities, employment and
Diego/Los Angeles/Sydney WHS strategies of protected elephant contact. and in Senior Executive and systems and processes. In addition, accessibility for Taronga staff, students and visitors, is a priority for
Gabriel Virgonia Sydney/Los Angeles/ 18/06/2017 - 4/07/2017 Observe, experience and learn techniques of best practice management positions. Taronga and is actively considered in all capital works projects, and feedback is invited regularly on our
San Diego/Phoenix/ elephant management under protected contact. current facilities and their maintenance.
Albuquerque/Dallas/ Leading for Wild – Taronga’s In partnership with Dubbo Community Corrections – Department of Justice, Taronga facilitates
Sydney newest leadership and community service placements for unpaid work to provide an alternative to custodial sentences for low
Glenn Sullivan Dubbo/Sydney/Los 17/06/2017 - 4/07/2017 Observe, experience and learn techniques of best practice management development risk offenders at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.
Angeles/San Diego/ elephant management under protected contact. program has accepted 70% of
Phoenix/Albuquerque/ women to the first Intake of this
Dallas/Sydney/Dubbo exclusive program.
* Travel costs funded by an external party Return to work parents Taronga continues to communicate and consult with employees returning to work after periods of
** Travel costs partly funded by an external party parental leave and gives due consideration to any flexible work requests outside of the parental leave
period.
Disability Plan Taronga launched an Access @ Taronga day with Autism Australia, providing early entry into the zoo.
Taronga also developed online awareness training for employees to complete to support our guests,
volunteers and staff.
Community Service Program In partnership with Dubbo Community Corrections – Dept. of Justice, Taronga facilitates community
service placements for unpaid work to provide an alternative to custodial sentences for low risk
offenders at Taronga Western Plains Zoo. Taronga also supports volunteers with disabilities to be
placed on various roles throughout the zoo.
142 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 143

Appendix 14
Senior Executive Service

Workforce Diversity Achievements in 2016/2017 include: 2016/2017 – Senior Executive Bands

Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) Taronga’s RAP committee will continue to work towards the 2020 targets.
Level Total Senior Executives Average Remuneration (package) end current year
Aboriginal Employment Strategy In collaboration with Office of Environment and Heritage Taronga will continue to work towards
the Aboriginal Employment Strategy developed for 2016-2019. Development of an online training SE Band 1 11* 205,782
module is being discussed and will form part of the employee induction process for all employees and SE Band 2 1 320,876
volunteers.
Leadership training in mental Taronga has developed a Mental Health Toolkit for all employees to access. All employees attended Total 12 215,373
health awareness Mental Health Awareness training in November 2016 facilitated by the Black Dog Institute. The focus
for 17/18 will include sharing more strategies and tools with management on how to best support * One positions at this level was vacant as at 30 June 2017.
employees with mental health issues for positive outcomes. In 2016/2017 four positions in the Senior Executive Bands were filled by female employees.
Workforce Diversity Celebrations Taronga’s commitment to the promotion of Equal Employment Opportunity is being increased in 4.95% of total employee-related expenditure in 2016/17 related to Senior Executives.
2017/18 with the formal appointment of an HR resource as Taronga’s Diversity Coordinator. Diversity
strategies in Aboriginal Employment, Disability and Women will be put in place as well as appropriate
workplace support to ensure all internal and external stakeholders can engage with the benefits of a
diverse Taronga workforce.
Appendix 15
Additional Human Resources Reporting Requirements: Senior Staff

Movements in salaries and wages Amendments to industrial relations policies and practices Executive Corporate Services and Governance
• 2.5% increase to salaries, wages and salary related allowances Taronga are in the process of consulting regarding changes to the
TCSA Salaried Employee Award effective 11 July 2016 following industrial Awards to ensure their consistency  ameron Kerr BSc(Hons), MCom – Executive Director and Chief
C Narelle Beattie BCom, MA, CA – Director Corporate Services
Executive and Governance
• 2.5% increase to salaries, wages and salary related allowances and compliance with the Government Sector Employment Act
TCSA Wages Employee Award effective 11 July 2016 2013; Stephanie Hedt BAs – Executive Officer Emma Roberts BA FCCA – Manager Finance
• 2.5% increase to salaries, wages and salary related allowances • Taronga Conservation Society Australia Salaried Award Helen Brennan, Bachelor of Laws (Hons) – Manager Governance
Shop Employees (State) Award effective 16 December 2016 • Taronga Conservation Society Australia Wages Award People Culture and Learning
Paul White – Head of Information and Digital Technology
• 2.5% increase to salaries, wages and salary related allowances • Shop Employees (State) Award  ettina Sammut BA, Cert (PR), Grad Cert (HRM) Grad Cert (Change
B
Restaurant & Employees (State) Award effective 16 December • Restaurant & Employees (State) Award Mgt) – Director People Culture and Learning Bruno Da Silva, Bachelor of Agricultural Economics (B of Agr. Ec),
2016 Masters of Business Administration (MBA) Prince 2 Practitioner
Valerie Moushigian Dip WHS, Dip Mgmt – WHS Manager (Project Management) – Manager, Procurement and Contracts
Rebecca Edwards BBA, BA Psych – Human Resources Manager Property Infrastructure and Operations
Amendments to personnel policies and procedures
The following personnel policies were updated during the 16/17  ndrew Nikolaidis, Grad Cert Business Administration, Grad Cert
A Tim Bain BA, Construction Management and Economics – Director
year, to ensure their consistency with applicable legislation; HRM, Dip PM, Dip QA – Manager, Learning and Development Property Infrastructure and Operations
• Performance Development Policy E mma Pollard BAppFin BLLB (Hons) MIEL – Taronga Institute of Stephen Bedford – Manager Facilities
• Working with Children Check Policy Science and Learning Project and Business Manager
• Managing Misconduct Policy Kate McAlpine BE – Infrastructure Manager
Guest Experience, Education and Community Programs
• Managing Unsatisfactory Policy True Swain, Juris Doctor & MBA, Grad Cert Commercial Arbitration,
• ICT Acceptable Use Policy P aul Maguire BEd (PE and Sci) – Director Guest Experience, MProDev, BCPM – Head of Capital Programs
• Travel Policy Education and Community Programs
Marketing Fundraising and Commercial Services
• Public Interest Disclosure Policy S teven Williams BCom and BTrsmMgt – Guest Experience
Operations Manager Libby Hodgson BA (Hons) – Director Marketing Fundraising and
Commercial Services
Hayden Turner – Guest Experience People and Programs Manager
Janelle Blue BSc – Head of Marketing Communications and Tourism
Nicole Whitfield BSc, MAppSc – Manager Interpretations
Helen Wright Dip IDM – Manager Fundraising and Memberships
 od Cheal, Bachelor of Science, Dip Education (Teaching) –
R
Manager Education (Acting) Alex Emson HND Hospitality Business Management, GNVQ
Intermediate & Advanced Hospitality Management – Manager
L ucinda Cveticanin BAppA BEd – Aboriginal and Community Commercial Operations
Programs Manager
Lizzie Borwick BA (hons) Geography – Head of Fundraising &
Belinda Fairbrother BSc – Community Conservation Manager Development (Acting)
Wildlife Conservation and Research Alison Bennett DipBusMgt – Corporate Partnerships Manager
S imon Duffy BEd BTeach – Director Wildlife Conservation and
Research Taronga Western Plains Zoo
Nick Boyle LLB, BSc – Manager, Conservation, Health and Welfare Matthew Fuller GAICD, Fellow Winston Churchill Memorial Trust –
Rodd Stapley BSc – Operations Manager Wildlife Conservation Director, Taronga Western Plains Zoo
J ustine O’Brien,, Doctor of Philosophy in Veterinary Science, Kathleen Oke, Diploma of Management – Facilities and Asset
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (BScAgr; Honors) – Manager Operations Manager
Research and Conservation Zac Jones – Commercial Manager
Erna Walraven BAppSc, DipParkMgmt – Senior Curator (Retired
2015)
144 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 145

Table B: Number of applications by type of application and outcome*

Appendix 16 Access Access Access Information Refuse to
Refuse to
Confirm/Deny
whether
Employees by category Granted Granted Refused Information Already Deal with information Application % of
in Full in Part in Full not Held Available Application is held Withdrawn Total Total

Personal information
Permanent Temp Casual Total applications* 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%

Program Area 2015 2016 2017 2015 2016 2017 2015 2016 2017 2015 2016 2017 Access applications
(other than personal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 100%
Executive 6 12 10 1 1 2 0 0 0 7 13 12 information applications)
Clerical 78 104 113 87 55 48 76 197 94 241 356 255 Access applications
that are partly personal
General 21 23 24 5 2 1 0 0 2 26 25 27 information applications 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
and partly other
Professional 11 15 19 10 5 5 12 7 7 33 27 31
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Services 35 35 53 24 7 12 358 319 395 417 361 460
% of Total 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Technical 6 6 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 8 6 5
*A personal information application is an access application for personal information (as defined in clause 4 of Schedule 4 to the Act) about the
Trades 166 166 163 43 24 22 313 134 121 522 324 306 applicant (the applicant being an individual).
TOTAL 323 361 386 172 93 91 759 657 619 1254 1112 1096

Appendix 17 Table C: Invalid applications
No of applications % of Total
Government Information (Public Access) Act – Annual Report for Agency Taronga Conservation Society Australia
Application does not comply with formal
0 0%
Clause 7A: Details of the review carried out by the agency under section 7 (3) of the Act during the reporting year and the details requirements (section 41 of the Act)
of any information made publicly available by the agency as a result of the review. Application is for excluded information of the
0 0%
Reviews carried out by the agency Information made publicly available by the agency agency (section 43 of the Act)
No No Application contravenes restraint order
0 0%
(section 110 of the Act)
Clause 7A: Details of the review carried out by the agency under section 7 (3) of the Act during the reporting year and the details Total number of invalid applications received 0 0%
of any information made publicly available by the agency as a result of the review.
Invalid applications that subsequently became
0 0%
Total number of applications received valid applications
1 Total 0

Clause 7C: The total number of access applications received by the agency during the reporting year that the agency refused either wholly or
partly, because the application was for the disclosure of information refered to in Schedule 1 to the Act (information for which there is conclusive
presumption of overriding public interest against disclosure)
Table D: Conclusive presumption of overriding public interest against disclosure: matters listed in Schedule 1 of Act
Number of Applications Refused Wholly Partly Total
Number of times
0 0 0
consideration used* % of Total
% of Total 0% 0%
Overriding secrecy laws 0 0%
Schedule 2: Statistical information about access applications to be included in annual report. Cabinet information 0 0%
Table A: Number of applications by type of applicant and outcome* Executive Council information 0 0%
Refuse to Contempt 0 0%
Confirm/Deny
Access Access Access Information Refuse to whether
Legal professional privilege 0 0%
Granted Granted Refused Information Already Deal with information Application % of Excluded information 0 0%
in Full in Part in Full not Held Available Application is held Withdrawn Total Total
Documents affecting law enforcement and public
Media 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 100% 0 0%
safety
Members of Parliament 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% Transport safety 0 0%
Private sector business 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% Adoption 0 0%
Not for profit organisations Care and protection of children 0 0%
or community groups 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%

Members of the public (by
Ministerial code of conduct 0 0%
legal representative) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Aboriginal and environmental heritage 0 0%
Members of the public Total 0
(other) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%

Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 *More than one public interest consideration may apply in relation to a particular access application and if so, each such consideration is to be
recorded (but only once per application). This also applies in relation to Table E.
% of Total 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
* More than one decision can be made in respect of a particular access application. If so, a recording must be made in relation to each such decision.
This also applies to Table B.
146 APPENDICES ANNUAL REPORT 2016–2017 TARONGA 100 147

Table E: Other public interest considerations against disclosure: matters listed in table to section 14 of Act
Number of times
consideration used* % of Total
Appendix 18
Public Interest Disclosures
Responsible and effective government 0 0%
Law enforcement and security 0 0% Taronga Conservation Society Australia had no public interest disclosures in the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017. The following report
Individual rights, judicial processes and natural justice 0 0% has been provided to the NSW Ombudsman in accordance with the Public Interest Disclosures Act 1994 (NSW) and Public Interest
Business interests of agencies and other persons 0 0% Disclosures Regulations 2011 (NSW) for this reporting period.

Environment, culture, economy and general matters 0 0%
Secrecy provisions 0 0% Number of public officials who made public interest disclosures to your public authority 0
Exempt documents under interstate Freedom of Number of public interest disclosures received by your public authority 0
0 0%
Information legislation Of public interest disclosures received, how many were primarily about:
Total 0 • Corrupt conduct 0
• Maladministration 0
Table F: Timelines • Serious and substantial waste 0
Number of applications* % of Total • Government information contravention 0
Decided within the statutory timeframe (20 days plus • Local government pecuniary interest contravention 0
1 100%
any extensions) Number of public interest disclosures that have been finalised in this reporting period 0
Decided after 35 days (by agreement with applicant) 0 0% Have you established an internal reporting policy? Yes
Not decided within time (deemed refusal) 0 0% Has the head of your public authority taken action to meet their staff awareness obligations? Yes
Total 1

Appendix 19
Consultants Fees Incurred in 2016/17
Table G: Number of applications reviewed under Part 5 of the Act (by type of review and outcome)
Decision varied Decision upheld Total % of Total Consultants equal to or more than $50,000
Internal review 0 0 0 0% Nil
Review by Information Commissioner* 0 0 0 0%
Consultants less than $50,000
Internal review following recommendation
0 0 0 0%
under section 93 of Act During the year ten consultancies were engaged in the following area:
Review by NCAT 0 0 0 0% Management Services - $155,321
Total 0 0 0
Total Consultancies less than $50,000 = $155,321
% of Total 0%