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Learning Experience 1

Sequence of Events and Analyzing/Evaluating Story Details


Student Name: Kayla Taylor Grade Level: 1st Grade Date of Lesson: November 13, 2018

Guiding and/or Essential Questions:


Why is it important to know what happens first, next, and last in a story?
Why is the order of events important in a story? How do the parts of a story work together?

Pre-lesson Assignments and/or Student Prior Knowledge


Students have been introduced to strategies for reading, including asking/answering questions
and using key details to identify the main idea. Students have been introduced to story
sequencing in a prior lesson, but were not able to identify what happened first, next, and last in
the story without teacher assistance. This lesson will build upon what students already know and
provide necessary scaffolding to further this skill.

Standards (Common Core State Standards for ELA and Literacy):


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.3
Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.2
Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or
lesson.

Learning Objectives Assessment

Students will understand Teacher will assess student’s participation for the ability
sequence of events and describe to summarize the beginning, middle, and end of the story
the events of A Musical Day in during the whole group read aloud.
the correct order.

Students will use text evidence to Teacher will assess student participation during whole-
analyze and evaluate while group read aloud for text evidence as the reason for their
reading to aid comprehension. analysis or evaluation.
Teacher will assess student understanding during teacher
table center for student’s ability to cite text evidence when
analyzing characters or story events, and making an
evaluation about the story.
Teacher will assess analyzing/evaluating worksheet
during guided reading groups for student’s ability to cite
text evidence when making an analysis or evaluation
about the story.

Materials/Resources:
For Teacher: Journey’s Unit 2 Teacher Edition, chart paper, marker
For Students: Journey’s Unit 2 Student Handbook, pencil
For Guided Reading Groups: Computers, analyzing/evaluating worksheet, short /o/ word sort
folder, book bags
Step by Step plan:
1. Lesson Beginning: “Words to Know” Vocabulary
1. All students will be at their desks. First, we will go over this lesson’s “Words to
Know”. I will point to the word on our “Focus Wall” poster and read the word
aloud. Next, I will ask the class to read it with me. Then, I will ask the students to
define the word or use it in a sentence. If no students volunteer, I will provide a
sentence and ask them to tell me the definition. Finally, I will tell the students that
we will look for these words in our reading this week and study them in our
homework.
2. Body: Mini-Lesson and Focus Story Read Aloud
1. After reviewing our “Words to Know”, I will call the students to the carpet and
ask two students to help handout our Journey’s: Unit 2 textbooks. Once all
students have a textbook, I will ask them to open to page 76.
2. I will ask students to put their finger on the red checkmark and follow along as I
read our “Target Skill” for this lesson. We will read it together 3 times, then I will
ask a student to rephrase what it said. After a student rephrases it, I will explain
that the events in a story happen in a specific order and record the definition for
sequence of events on chart paper. I will ask the students to turn and talk to a
partner about why the order of events in a story is important. Then, I will ask
some students to share what they discussed with their partner. I will record some
of the student’s answers on the chart paper. After the students share, I will point
out the graphic organizer that shows “First®Next®Last” and explain to students
that they can use a chart like that one to help them understand a story.
3. Next, I will ask students to put their finger on the blue check mark and follow
along as I read our “Target Strategy” for this lesson. We will read it together 3
times, then I will ask a student to rephrase what it said. After a student rephrases
the target strategy, I will explain that “thoughtful” readers analyze (think hard
about the story) and find text evidence (clues) to help them understand the story’s
setting, characters, and plot. Next, I will explain that “thoughtful” readers
evaluate (share what they think or feel) the story and use text evidence as reasons
for their evaluations. Finally, I will explain that we are going to practice these
strategies throughout the week.
4. Next, I will tell students that our stories this week are about music. We will read
“Preview the Topic” on pg. 77 together. I will ask students to share some things
they know about music or experiences they have with music. After students share
their knowledge about music, I will ask them to turn to pg. 78.
5. I will explain that this is our focus story for the week. As a class, we will read the
title. I will ask student to share whether they think this is a fiction or nonfiction
book and why they think that. Then, we will read the “Genre” paragraph together.
Before we begin reading, I will remind students that our “Target Skill” is
understanding the sequence of events and that we are focusing on using the
strategies of analyzing and evaluating the story.
6. Before reading, I will ask students to follow along and track as I read. I will start
on pg. 79 by rereading the title. As I read, I will stop and ask questions, such as
“What happened first?”, “How do the characters feel about their aunt visiting?”,
“What text evidence shows us how the characters are feeling?”, and “Why do you
think they like when their aunt comes to visit?”
7. After reading the story, I will ask students to share how they used the
Analyze/Evaluate strategy while we read. If needed, I will provide the following
example: “I noticed that in the illustration at the end the children switched
instruments. I think that this shows that the children are nice and good friends
because they are sharing with each other.” Then, I will tell the class that tomorrow
we will reread the story, think about the sequence of events, and practice using
our Analyze and Evaluate strategy.
3. Centers: Guided Reading Groups
1. Students will break into their guided reading groups. I will explain each center
before dismissing students into groups.
1. Word Work: Groups will sort short /o/ words by ending and practice
reading the words. If done early, groups will right sentences using the
words in their journals.
1. Turtle group, Shark group, Penguin group
2. Reading Strategies: Groups will complete a worksheet to practice
Analyzing and Evaluating stories. They will be asked to cite text evidence
by including a page number.
1. Shark group, Squid group, Turtle group
3. Teacher Table: Groups will go through the story with the teacher and
practice using the Analyzing and Evaluating strategy. Students will work
on the analyzing/evaluating worksheet with the teacher before being sent
to do it independently.
1. Squid group, Turtle group, Dolphin group
4. Independent Reading: Groups will read “just-right” books from their book
bag and practice the strategy of Analyze and Evaluate.
1. Penguin group, Dolphin group, Shark group
5. Lexia: Groups will use the computer to access the online literacy program
and build upon foundational reading skills.
1. Dolphin group, Penguin group, Squid group
4. Closing: End of Guided Reading Meeting
1. As a closing for guided reading, students who worked in the reading strategies
center will share what they analyzed and evaluated in the story. They will also
share the text evidence that led them to their evaluations. After students share, I
will remind the class of the strategy and skill that we are focused on this week by
rereading them aloud.
Key Vocabulary:
• Sequence of Events- Tells the order in which things happen in a story.
• First-What happens in the beginning of the story?
• Next- What happens in the middle of the story?
• Last- What happens at the end of the story?
• Analyze- Think really hard about the story and its details
• Evaluate- Share what the story makes us think or feel (while citing text evidence)

Timing (approximate): 1 hour and 30 minutes


Opening: 10 minutes
Mini-Lesson and Read Aloud: 25 minutes
Centers: 50 minutes (3 rotations of 15 minutes, plus transition time)
Closing: 5 minutes

Key Questions (that you will ask):


What is sequence of events?
Why is it important or helpful to think about the order of events in a story?
How do thoughtful readers analyze a story? How do thoughtful readers evaluate a story?
What happened first? How do the characters feel?
Why do you think that about the story/characters?

Differentiation:
For lower level readers/writers: Lower level reading groups will be pulled to the teacher table
center during guided reading to work in a small group with the teacher. I will provide extra
modeling for the skill of evaluating and analyzing stories using text evidence. The lower-level
reading groups will have a modified worksheet that outlines the key parts of an
analysis/evaluation more clearly, including “I think… because…” and page number. They will
also have extra time to work on the analyzing/evaluating worksheet because after spending time
at the teacher table, they will rotate to the reading strategies center to finish the worksheet
independently.

For advanced students: The advanced level reading group will have a modified version of the
worksheet that requires them to remember the key parts of an analysis/evaluation, including the
text evidence and explanation.
Learning Experience 2
Sequence of Events and Analyzing/Evaluating Story Details
Student Name: Kayla Taylor Grade Level: 1st Grade Date of Lesson: November 14, 2018

Guiding and/or Essential Questions:


Why is it important to know what happens first, next, and last in a story?
Why is the order of events important in a story? How do the parts of a story work together?

Pre-lesson Assignments and/or Student Prior Knowledge


Students have been introduced to strategies for reading, including asking/answering questions,
using key details to identify the main idea, and analyzing and evaluating story details. Students
have been introduced to story sequencing in a prior lesson, but were not able to identify what
happened first, next, and last in the story without teacher assistance. This lesson will build upon
what students already know and provide necessary scaffolding to further this skill.

Standards (Common Core State Standards for ELA and Literacy):


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.3
Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.2
Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or
lesson.

Learning Objectives Assessment

Students will understand Teacher will assess the sequencing worksheet for
sequence of events and describe student’s understanding of sequence of events. Teacher
the events of A Musical Day in will look for correct identification of what happened first,
the correct order. next, and last in the story. Teacher will also assess the
worksheet for understanding that the sequencing is a
summary of the story- this will be shown if students
include only major events/details and put the events into
their own words.

Materials/Resources:
For Teacher: Journey’s Unit 2 Teacher Edition, TV, laptop
For Students: Journey’s Unit 2 Student Handbook, pencil
For Guided Reading Groups: Computers, sequencing worksheet, blends BINGO folder, book
bags, leveled reading books and guided reading group observation binders

Step by Step plan:


1. Lesson Beginning: Story Reread
1. As a whole class, we will reread our focus story, A Musical Day. For our reread, I
will play a video of it being read. As the story is being read, I will pause the video
and ask questions about the plot. Before, dismissing students into their reading
groups, I will ask them to turn and talk to a partner about the sequence of events
in the story.
2. Centers: Guided Reading Groups
1. Students will break into their guided reading groups. I will explain each center
before dismissing students into groups. All groups will go to all centers today, so
that every student works on the reading skill, or sequencing, worksheet.
1. Word Work: Groups will play Blends BINGO, which requires them to
correctly identify the words that have the blend that was called by the
reader.
1. Dolphin group, Squid group, Turtle group, Penguin group, Shark
group
2. Reading Strategies/Skills: Groups will work with teacher to further
develop the skill of determining sequence of events. Groups will practice
describing the sequence of events in A Musical Day. Some groups will use
the sequencing worksheet that asks them to write sentences and some
groups will use a worksheet that allows them to draw pictures of the
events in the story.
1. Squid group, Turtle group, Shark group, Dolphin group, Penguin
group
3. Teacher Table: Groups will be doing guided reading with host teacher.
1. Turtle group, Dolphin group, Penguin group, Shark group, Squid
group
4. Independent Reading: Groups will read “just-right” books from their book
bag and practice the strategy of Analyze and Evaluate.
1. Penguin group, Shark group, Squid group, Turtle group, Dolphin
group
5. Lexia: Groups will use the computer to access the online literacy program
and build upon foundational reading skills.
1. Shark group, Penguin group, Dolphin group, Squid group, Turtle
group
3. Closing: End of Guided Reading Meeting
1. As a closing for reading, students from the reading skills groups will share their
work and we will discuss the sequence of events in A Musical Day as a class.

Key Vocabulary:
• Sequence of Events- Tells the order in which things happen in a story.
• First-What happens in the beginning of the story?
• Next- What happens in the middle of the story?
• Last- What happens at the end of the story?
• Analyze- Think really hard about the story and its details
• Evaluate- Share what the story makes us think or feel (while citing text evidence)

Timing (approximate): 1 hour and 40 minutes


Opening: 10 minutes
Centers: 80 minutes (5 rotations of 15 minutes, plus transition time)
Closing: 10 minutes

Key Questions (that you will ask):


What is sequence of events?
Why is it important or helpful to think about the order of events in a story?
What happened first? What happened next? What happened last?

Differentiation:
For lower level readers/writers: Working with the leveled reading groups will give me the chance
to provide more support to lower level readers and writers. I will scaffold by helping them sound
out words and organize their thoughts into more concise sentences. We will also begin with a
discussion about the events in the story, so they can practice sequencing before they do the
worksheet.
Learning Experience 3
Sequence of Events and Analyzing/Evaluating Story Details
Student Name: Kayla Taylor Grade Level: 1st Grade Date of Lesson: November 15, 2018

Guiding and/or Essential Questions:


Why is it important to know what happens first, next, and last in a story?
Why is the order of events important in a story? How do the parts of a story work together?

Pre-lesson Assignments and/or Student Prior Knowledge


Students have been introduced to strategies for reading, including asking/answering questions
and using key details to identify the main idea. Students have been introduced to story
sequencing in a prior lesson, but were not able to identify what happened first, next, and last in
the story without teacher assistance. This lesson will build upon what students already know and
provide necessary scaffolding to further this skill.

Standards (Common Core State Standards for ELA and Literacy):


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.3
Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.2
Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or
lesson.

Learning Objectives Assessment

Students will understand Teacher will assess the sequencing worksheet for
sequence of events and describe student’s understanding of sequence of events. Teacher
the events of A Musical Day in will look for correct identification of what happened first,
the correct order. next, and last in the story. Teacher will also assess the
worksheet for understanding that the sequencing is a
summary of the story- this will be shown if students
include only major events/details and put the events into
their own words.

Materials/Resources:
For Teacher: Journey’s Unit 2 Teacher Edition, chart paper, marker
For Students: Journey’s Unit 2 Student Handbook, pencil
For Guided Reading Groups: Computers, sequencing worksheet, blends BINGO folder, book
bags, leveled reading books and guided reading group observation binders

Step by Step plan:


1. Lesson Beginning:
1. As a whole group, we will go over our target strategy (analyze and evaluate) and
target skill (sequencing). We will reread their definitions and discuss how they
help us better understand the story. Then, I will reread the focus story, A Musical
Day, to the class. When the story is finished, I will ask the students to turn and
talk to a partner about the sequence of events in the story.
2. Independent Work: Sequencing
1. I will pass out a new copy of the sequencing worksheet from yesterday (the one
that requires they write sentences). As I pass out the worksheets, students will go
back to their desks. They will complete the sequencing worksheet independently.
As they start to finish, I will remind them to check over their work.
3. Centers: Guided Reading Groups
1. As students start to finish, they will be dismissed to their reading centers.
1. Word Work: Groups will play Blends BINGO, which requires them to
correctly identify the words that have the blend that was called by the
reader.
1. Turtle group, Squid group, Penguin group,
2. Reading Strategies/Skills: Groups will complete the analyze and evaluate
worksheet from the first lesson.
1. Dolphin group, Penguin group, Squid group
3. Teacher Table: Groups will be doing guided reading with host teacher.
1. Squid group, Turtle group, Dolphin group
4. Independent Reading: Groups will read “just-right” books from their book
bag and practice the strategy of Analyze and Evaluate.
1. Shark group, Dolphin group,
5. Lexia: Groups will use the computer to access the online literacy program
and build upon foundational reading skills.
1. Penguin group, Shark group, Turtle group
4. Closing: End of Guided Reading Meeting
1. As a closing for guided reading, we will go over the sequencing worksheet as a
class. First, we will define sequencing again. Then, I will write the sequence of
events on a chart paper, as the students share what they wrote. During this time, I
will remind students that we should only be talking about the major events in the
story. Finally, I will tell students that in next week’s lessons we will talk about
sequencing in nonfiction texts.

Key Vocabulary:
• Sequence of Events- Tells the order in which things happen in a story.
• First-What happens in the beginning of the story?
• Next- What happens in the middle of the story?
• Last- What happens at the end of the story?
• Analyze- Think really hard about the story and its details
• Evaluate- Share what the story makes us think or feel (while citing text evidence)

Timing (approximate): 1 hour and 35 minutes


Opening: 10 minutes
Independent work: 20 minutes
Centers: 50 minutes (3 rotations of 15 minutes, plus transition time)
Closing: 15 minutes

Key Questions (that you will ask):


What is sequence of events?
Why is it important or helpful to think about the order of events in a story?
What happened first? What happened next? What happened last?

Differentiation:
For lower level readers/writers: I will walk around as they are doing independent work and help
the lower level readers sound out words they do not know how to spell. I will make notes of what
they are trying to say on their worksheets. When grading, I will not grade them on spelling-only
the sequence of events.