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2. Affirmed
a. The court of appeals affirmed that a county cannot create or
enforce a voluntary deductions provision. This provision
states that it shall be unlawful to deduct from wages,
earnings, etc. of an employee for union dues, fees,
assessments, etc. without the prior written authorization of
the employee
v. Below is a summary of the 71 page brief by Hardin County that won the
partial reversal in the court of appeals
1. Whenever Congress recognizes the power of States to enact laws,
this includes the authority of States to delegate their law­making
powers to their political subdivisions, the powers conferred upon a
State shall be exercised with absolute discretion by the State. The
Supremacy Clause of the US Constitution gives congress the authority
to preempt state law. There is no mention of local laws in the
Supremacy Clause since local governments are simply political
subdivisions of the States that created them. In 1978 the Kentucky
General Assembly passed a law titled the “County Home Rule.” This
rule allows delegates within county fiscal courts to exercise their

K
county’s legislative authority to promote economic development and
regulate commerce. The law also allows fiscal courts to approve
policies not expressly prohibited by the legislature.
b. Other states have tried passing local ordinances as well, including New Mexico,
D Delaware, Maine, Minnesota, and Illinois
c. Lincolnshire, IL recently passed a local ordinance which has been challenged in
federal court. The district judge ruled against the ordinance. Lincolnshire is now
awaiting a decision from the seventh circuit court of appeals.
KS
i. It’s crucial to note that if the seventh district circuit court of appeals
affirms the lower district court’s ruling, this will force the United States
Supreme Court to review this issue since two separate federal district
courts will have issued conflicting rulings in their appeals courts.

4. I have been working to obtain data from the local chambers of commerce regarding the
impacts of right to work at a county level but have been unsuccessful thus far. There is very
little media coverage following up on the status of the communities post­ordinance.
Additionally these local websites are not well maintained or updated with
appropriate/correct information.

From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 9:36 AM
To: Duecker, Jordan <Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov>
Subject: research project

Jordan,
Before Kentucky passed a right to work law statewide they had adopted a process whereby they
allowed counties to pass their own right to work laws that were recognized by the state. Can you
please look into:
1) the process by which counties initiated their effort

about:blank 12/3/2018
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Print Page 9 of 12

2. The fiscal court (county legislature) takes a vote on the proposed ordinance. This is similar to
a board of alderman. There is not a ballot measure before county residents or petition within
the state. This process was the same for a right­to­work ordinance in Lincolnshire, IL

3. A collective of unions sued Hardin County, which was one of the first counties to pass this
ordinance. Below is a summary of the legal dispute in and current legal landscape
a. The validity of the local ordinances stem from one crucial question: are localities
considered political subdivisions of the state? This question had to be answered in
order to accurately interpret section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act. The
Hardin County legal saga is outlined below:
i. The unions initiated the lawsuit in Federal Court
ii. An Obama­pointed US District judge in the sixth district sided with the
unions
1. The judge concluded that Hardin County’s ordinance is not state law
under section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act because this
section does not encompass the law of a local subdivision, and
therefore is not excepted from preemption under that section
iii. Hardin County appealed the district court’s decision to the sixth circuit
court of appeals, which was comprised of three republican appointed judges

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iv. The sixth circuit court of appeals reversed and affirmed various parts of
the district court’s decision
1. Reversed
a. The court of appeals reversed the district ruling that a
D county cannot pass a right to work ordinance
2. Affirmed
a. The court of appeals affirmed that a county cannot create or
enforce a voluntary deductions provision. This provision
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states that it shall be unlawful to deduct from wages,
earnings, etc. of an employee for union dues, fees,
assessments, etc. without the prior written authorization of
the employee
v. Below is a summary of the 71 page brief by Hardin County that won the
partial reversal in the court of appeals
1. Whenever Congress recognizes the power of States to enact laws,
this includes the authority of States to delegate their law­making
powers to their political subdivisions, the powers conferred upon a
State shall be exercised with absolute discretion by the State. The
Supremacy Clause of the US Constitution gives congress the authority
to preempt state law. There is no mention of local laws in the
Supremacy Clause since local governments are simply political
subdivisions of the States that created them. In 1978 the Kentucky
General Assembly passed a law titled the “County Home Rule.” This
rule allows delegates within county fiscal courts to exercise their
county’s legislative authority to promote economic development and
regulate commerce. The law also allows fiscal courts to approve
policies not expressly prohibited by the legislature.
b. Other states have tried passing local ordinances as well, including New Mexico,
Delaware, Maine, Minnesota, and Illinois
c. Lincolnshire, IL recently passed a local ordinance which has been challenged in

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Message: ACCE Local Right to Work Legislation

ACCE Local Right to Work Legislation
From Duecker, Jordan Date Tuesday, July 3, 2018 2:01 PM
To Duecker, Jordan
Cc

http://www.acce.us/model­policy/local­right­to­work­ordinance/

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Message: Re: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf

Re: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf
From Duecker, Jordan Date Tuesday, July 3, 2018 3:02 PM
To Hale, Brenda (WARCO)
Cc

Hi Brenda,

I did receive. Thank you for your assistance!

Enjoy the holiday!

Best,

Jordan Duecker
Office of the Missouri Governor

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Room 216
Missouri State Capitol,
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(C): 573-619-0911
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On Jul 3, 2018, at 2:59 PM, Hale, Brenda (WARCO) <Brenda.Hale@ky.gov> wrote:

Please advise that you received.
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Message: RE: research project

RE: research project
From Duecker, Jordan Date Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:05 AM
To Willard, Aaron
Cc

I am about 55% done. Tracking down legal challenges outside of obvious court proceedings and any
data relating to a county­by­county impact requires a deeper dive.

From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2018 10:53 AM
To: Duecker, Jordan
Subject: FW: research project

How’s progress coming on this?

From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 9:36 AM

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To: Duecker, Jordan <Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov>
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Subject: research project

Jordan,
Before Kentucky passed a right to work law statewide they had adopted a process whereby they
KS
allowed counties to pass their own right to work laws that were recognized by the state. Can you
please look into:
1) the process by which counties initiated their effort
2) the mechanism by which it was then approved (ie did the county commission vote, was it on the
ballot before county residents, a petition with the state).
3) any legal challenges that resulted because of this effort and the outcome of those challenges
4) any data that exists regarding the impact of this county­by­county approach

Aaron M. Willard
Chief of Staff
Missouri Governor Michael L. Parson
aaron.willard@governor.mo.gov
573.508.9120

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Message: RE: research project

RE: research project
From Duecker, Jordan Date Thursday, July 5, 2018 5:13 PM
To Willard, Aaron
Cc

1. A member of a county fiscal court (a county legislature) introduces legislation (an ordinance)
that is researched by court lawyers, vetted by the court, voted on, and implemented if
passed. At least two counties initiated their right to work ordinance via a commissioner that
sits on their fiscal court.

2. The fiscal court (county legislature) takes a vote on the proposed ordinance. This is similar to
a board of alderman. There is not a ballot measure before county residents or petition within
the state. This process was the same for a right­to­work ordinance in Lincolnshire, IL

K
3. A collective of unions sued Hardin County, which was one of the first counties to pass this
ordinance. Below is a summary of the legal dispute in and current legal landscape
a. The validity of the local ordinances stem from one crucial question: are localities
considered political subdivisions of the state? This question had to be answered in
D order to accurately interpret section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act. The
Hardin County legal saga is outlined below:
i. The unions initiated the lawsuit in Federal Court
ii. An Obama­pointed US District judge in the sixth district sided with the
unions
KS
1. The judge concluded that Hardin County’s ordinance is not state law
under section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act because this
section does not encompass the law of a local subdivision, and
therefore is not excepted from preemption under that section
iii. Hardin County appealed the district court’s decision to the sixth circuit
court of appeals, which was comprised of three republican appointed judges
iv. The sixth circuit court of appeals reversed and affirmed various parts of
the district court’s decision
1. Reversed
a. The court of appeals reversed the district ruling that a
county cannot pass a right to work ordinance
2. Affirmed
a. The court of appeals affirmed that a county cannot create or
enforce a voluntary deductions provision. This provision
states that it shall be unlawful to deduct from wages,
earnings, etc. of an employee for union dues, fees,
assessments, etc. without the prior written authorization of
the employee
v. Below is a summary of the 71 page brief by Hardin County that won the
partial reversal in the court of appeals
1. Whenever Congress recognizes the power of States to enact laws,

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Print Page 5 of 22

this includes the authority of States to delegate their law­making powers
to their political subdivisions, the powers conferred upon a State shall
be exercised with absolute discretion by the State. The Supremacy
Clause of the US Constitution gives congress the authority to preempt
state law. There is no mention of local laws in the Supremacy Clause
since local governments are simply political subdivisions of the States
that created them. In 1978 the Kentucky General Assembly passed a
law titled the “County Home Rule.” This rule allows delegates within
county fiscal courts to exercise their county’s legislative authority to
promote economic development and regulate commerce. The law
also allows fiscal courts to approve policies not expressly prohibited
by the legislature.
b. Other states have tried passing local ordinances as well, including New Mexico,
Delaware, Maine, Minnesota, and Illinois
c. Lincolnshire, IL recently passed a local ordinance which has been challenged in
federal court. The district judge ruled against the ordinance. Lincolnshire is now
awaiting a decision from the seventh circuit court of appeals.
i. It’s crucial to note that if the seventh district circuit court of appeals
affirms the lower district court’s ruling, this will force the United States

4.
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Supreme Court to review this issue since two separate federal district
courts will have issued conflicting rulings in their appeals courts.

I have been working to obtain data from the local chambers of commerce regarding the
D
impacts of right to work at a county level but have been unsuccessful thus far. There is very
little media coverage following up on the status of the communities post­ordinance.
Additionally these local websites are not well maintained or updated with
appropriate/correct information.
KS

From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 9:36 AM
To: Duecker, Jordan <Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov>
Subject: research project

Jordan,
Before Kentucky passed a right to work law statewide they had adopted a process whereby they
allowed counties to pass their own right to work laws that were recognized by the state. Can you
please look into:
1) the process by which counties initiated their effort
2) the mechanism by which it was then approved (ie did the county commission vote, was it on the
ballot before county residents, a petition with the state).
3) any legal challenges that resulted because of this effort and the outcome of those challenges
4) any data that exists regarding the impact of this county­by­county approach

Aaron M. Willard
Chief of Staff
Missouri Governor Michael L. Parson
aaron.willard@governor.mo.gov

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573.508.9120

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Message: RE: research project

RE: research project
From Duecker, Jordan Date Thursday, July 5, 2018 5:17 PM
To Willard, Aaron
Cc

RTW Model Language.pdf (131 Kb HTML) Hardin County Ordinance.pdf (145 Kb HTML)
County Home Rule.pdf (116 Kb HTML)

I also meant to attach the following in the previous email:
The right to work model language used for at least two of the county ordinances in Kentucky
The Hardin County ordinance
Kentucky’s County Home Rule statutes

From: Willard, Aaron

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Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 9:36 AM
To: Duecker, Jordan <Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov>
Subject: research project

Jordan,
D
Before Kentucky passed a right to work law statewide they had adopted a process whereby they
allowed counties to pass their own right to work laws that were recognized by the state. Can you
please look into:
KS
1) the process by which counties initiated their effort
2) the mechanism by which it was then approved (ie did the county commission vote, was it on the
ballot before county residents, a petition with the state).
3) any legal challenges that resulted because of this effort and the outcome of those challenges
4) any data that exists regarding the impact of this county­by­county approach

Aaron M. Willard
Chief of Staff
Missouri Governor Michael L. Parson
aaron.willard@governor.mo.gov
573.508.9120

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Message: RE: research project

RE: research project
From Duecker, Jordan Date Friday, July 6, 2018 9:10 AM
To Willard, Aaron
Cc

I’ll put set some Google alerts on this and keep track of any significant changes for you.

The seventh district court of appeals heard this case in either late March or early April so I think a
decision is due any time now. The sixth district court of appeals handed down a ruling in a matter of
three months so a decision should be due soon. Although the Mark Janus case is expecting a ruling
from SCOTUS soon which may dictate the seventh districts ruling.

The Mark Janus started in IL and pertains to government workers being forced to pay union fees.

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From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2018 5:26 PM
To: Duecker, Jordan
Subject: RE: research project
D
Great, thank you Jordan this is very helpful. It will be interesting to see what timeline on this shakes
out, especially if it ends up going to the SCOTUS because of the current vacancy there…if however the
7th District maintains consistency with the 6th I would think there is fairly strong footing for states to
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move forward.

From: Duecker, Jordan
Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2018 5:13 PM
To: Willard, Aaron <Aaron.Willard@governor.mo.gov>
Subject: RE: research project

1. A member of a county fiscal court (a county legislature) introduces legislation (an ordinance)
that is researched by court lawyers, vetted by the court, voted on, and implemented if
passed. At least two counties initiated their right to work ordinance via a commissioner that
sits on their fiscal court.

2. The fiscal court (county legislature) takes a vote on the proposed ordinance. This is similar to
a board of alderman. There is not a ballot measure before county residents or petition within
the state. This process was the same for a right­to­work ordinance in Lincolnshire, IL

3. A collective of unions sued Hardin County, which was one of the first counties to pass this
ordinance. Below is a summary of the legal dispute in and current legal landscape
a. The validity of the local ordinances stem from one crucial question: are localities
considered political subdivisions of the state? This question had to be answered in
order to accurately interpret section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act. The

about:blank 12/3/2018
Print Page 12 of 22

Hardin County legal saga is outlined below:
i. The unions initiated the lawsuit in Federal Court
ii. An Obama­pointed US District judge in the sixth district sided with the
unions
1. The judge concluded that Hardin County’s ordinance is not state law
under section 14(b) of the National Labor Relations Act because this
section does not encompass the law of a local subdivision, and
therefore is not excepted from preemption under that section
iii. Hardin County appealed the district court’s decision to the sixth circuit
court of appeals, which was comprised of three republican appointed judges
iv. The sixth circuit court of appeals reversed and affirmed various parts of
the district court’s decision
1. Reversed
a. The court of appeals reversed the district ruling that a
county cannot pass a right to work ordinance
2. Affirmed
a. The court of appeals affirmed that a county cannot create or
enforce a voluntary deductions provision. This provision
states that it shall be unlawful to deduct from wages,

K
earnings, etc. of an employee for union dues, fees,
assessments, etc. without the prior written authorization of
the employee
v. Below is a summary of the 71 page brief by Hardin County that won the
D partial reversal in the court of appeals
1. Whenever Congress recognizes the power of States to enact laws,
this includes the authority of States to delegate their law­making
powers to their political subdivisions, the powers conferred upon a
KS
State shall be exercised with absolute discretion by the State. The
Supremacy Clause of the US Constitution gives congress the authority
to preempt state law. There is no mention of local laws in the
Supremacy Clause since local governments are simply political
subdivisions of the States that created them. In 1978 the Kentucky
General Assembly passed a law titled the “County Home Rule.” This
rule allows delegates within county fiscal courts to exercise their
county’s legislative authority to promote economic development and
regulate commerce. The law also allows fiscal courts to approve
policies not expressly prohibited by the legislature.
b. Other states have tried passing local ordinances as well, including New Mexico,
Delaware, Maine, Minnesota, and Illinois
c. Lincolnshire, IL recently passed a local ordinance which has been challenged in
federal court. The district judge ruled against the ordinance. Lincolnshire is now
awaiting a decision from the seventh circuit court of appeals.
i. It’s crucial to note that if the seventh district circuit court of appeals
affirms the lower district court’s ruling, this will force the United States
Supreme Court to review this issue since two separate federal district
courts will have issued conflicting rulings in their appeals courts.

4. I have been working to obtain data from the local chambers of commerce regarding the
impacts of right to work at a county level but have been unsuccessful thus far. There is very

about:blank 12/3/2018
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little media coverage following up on the status of the communities post­ordinance. Additionally
these local websites are not well maintained or updated with appropriate/correct
information.

From: Willard, Aaron
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 9:36 AM
To: Duecker, Jordan <Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov>
Subject: research project

Jordan,
Before Kentucky passed a right to work law statewide they had adopted a process whereby they
allowed counties to pass their own right to work laws that were recognized by the state. Can you
please look into:
1) the process by which counties initiated their effort
2) the mechanism by which it was then approved (ie did the county commission vote, was it on the
ballot before county residents, a petition with the state).
3) any legal challenges that resulted because of this effort and the outcome of those challenges

K
4) any data that exists regarding the impact of this county­by­county approach

Aaron M. Willard
Chief of Staff
D
Missouri Governor Michael L. Parson
aaron.willard@governor.mo.gov
573.508.9120
KS

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Message: RE: Governor Parson - UPDATED Springfield State of the State

RE: Governor Parson - UPDATED Springfield State of the State
From Duecker, Jordan Date Friday, July 27, 2018 4:39 PM
To Moreland, Chris
Cc

Right to work
o 25 states have right to work
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa,
Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North
Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah,
Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming
Hundreds of millions of dollars of capital investment from private companies in
these states as a result of right­to­work legislation

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From: Moreland, Chris
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2018 2:15 PM
To: Duecker, Jordan
Subject: Governor Parson ­ UPDATED Springfield State of the State
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Message: RTW County Ordinance Follow Up

RTW County Ordinance Follow Up
From Duecker, Jordan Date Tuesday, July 31, 2018 4:42 PM
To Willard, Aaron
Cc Knodell, Robert

Hi Aaron,

Just talked with the lawyer from the IL Policy Institute who is representing Lincolnshire, IL in the 7th
Circuit Court of Appeals regarding right­to­work county ordinance. He said the 7th Circuit has not
handed down a decision yet. He alluded the court may not hand down a decision until after the IL
gubernatorial election since a Democrat­controlled legislature and a potential Democratic Governor
would pass legislation preventing municipalities from passing right­to­work ordinances, which would
render any court decision moot.

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We may consider drumming up a municipality in Missouri to pass a right­to­work ordinance. With an
impending favorable Supreme Court it would be helpful to create a split between the sixth and eighth
circuits. The attorney from the IL Policy Institute offered to potentially take on a pro­bono case for a
municipality in the State should a municipality choose this path.
D
Jordan Duecker
Office of Governor Michael L. Parson
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Missouri State Capitol, Rm 218
Jefferson City, MO 65101
(573)-619-0911

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Message: Trump Victory/Right to Work

Trump Victory/Right to Work
From Duecker, Jordan Date Thursday, August 9, 2018 12:44 PM
To Hahn, Kayla
Cc

Trump Victory by County.xlsx (26 Kb HTML)

I have attached the formatted version of the document I just gave you.

Jordan Duecker
Office of Governor Michael L. Parson
Missouri State Capitol, Rm 218
Jefferson City, MO 65101
(573)-619-0911

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Sheet1
A B C D E F G H I J
County
1 Commission
State
Percentage Percentage Representative
Classification State Senator
County of Trump of Prop A Population (s) (only GOP GOP DEM IN
Class (s)
Vote Vote Reps were listed
2 in red cities)
Nate Walker, Brian
3 Adair 58.97% 42.108% Third Class 25,607 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 3 0 0
4 Andrew 72.92% 32.818% Third Class 17,291 Delus Johnson Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
5 Atchison 75.46% 57.613% Third Class 5,685 Allen Andrews Dan Hegeman 2 1 0
6 Audrain 69.39% 36.618% Third Class 25,529 Jay Houghton Jeanie Riddle 3 0 0
7 Barry 78.25% 53.785% Third Class 35,597 Scott Fitzpatrick David Sater 2 1 0

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8 Barton 83.50% 57.824% Third Class 12,402 Mike Kelley Ed Emery 3 0 0
Jack Bondon,
Wanda Brown,
9 Bates 74.72% 24.583% Third Class 17,049 Patricia Pike Ed Emery 1 2 0
D Wanda Brown, Sandy
10 Benton 75.21% 35.240% Third Class 19,056 Warren Love Crawford 3 0 0
Wayne
11 Bollinger 85.04% 39.843% Third Class 12,363 Rick Francis Wallingford 3 0 0
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Cheri Toalson
Boone 43.16% 35.003% First Class 162,642 Reisch, Chuck Caleb Rowden N/A N/A N/A
12 Basye, Sara Walsh
Delus Johnson,
Pat Conway,
13 Buchanan 59.79% 29.022% First Class 89,100 Galen Higdon Rob Schaaf 2 1 0
Todd Richardson,
14 Butler 79.09% 45.538% Third Class 42,794 Steve Cookson Doug Libla 3 0 0
15 Caldwell 74.95% 30.326% Third Class 9,424 Jim Neely Denny Hoskins 3 0 0
Jay Houghton,
16 Callaway 68.03% 37.384% Second Class 44,332 Travis Fitzwater Jeanie Riddle 3 0 0
Diane Franklin,
17 Camden 75.26% 51.585% First Class 44,002 Rocky Miller Dan Brown 3 0 0
Donna
Cape Lichtenegger, Wayne
18 Giradeau 72.94% 50.400% First Class 75,674 Kathryn Swan Wallingford 3 0 0
Third Class
Carroll 79.80% 36.374% 9,295 Peggy McGaugh Denny Hoskins 3 0 0
19 Township
20 Carter 81.54% 34.203% Third Class 6,265 Steve Cookson Doug Libla 3 0 0

Donna Pfautsch,
Cass 64.91% 33.676% First Class 99,478 Joe Runions, Rick Ed Emery 3 0 0
Brattin, Jack
Bondon, Wanda

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21 Brown
Warren Love,
Mike Kelley, Mike Sandy
22 Cedar 79.85% 48.388% Third Class 13,982 Stephens Crawford 3 0 0
Peggy McGaugh, Brian
23 Chariton 74.33% 35.764% Third Class 7,831 Dave Muntzel Muzlinger 0 3 0
Don Phillips, Jered
Taylor, Lynn
24 Christian 74.51% 51.460% First Class 77,422 Morris Jay Wasson 3 0 0
Brian
25 Clark 74.13% 41.994% Third Class 7,139 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 3 0 0
Jim Neely,
Kenneth Wilson,
Dan Hegeman,
Clay 52.17% 29.216% First Class 221,939 Kevin N/A N/A N/A
Vacant
Corlew, Noel J
26 Shull, T.J. Berry
27 Clinton 69.23% 28.374% Third Class 20,743 Jim Neely Dan Hegeman 2 1 0
Travis Ftizwater, Vacant (Mike
Sara Walsh, Mike Bernskoetter is
Cole 65.86% 44.898% First Class 76,699 3 0 0
Bernskoetter, Jay the favored

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28 Barnes, Tom Hurst canidate)
Chuck Basye, Dave
Muntzel, Sara
29 Cooper 70.42% 42.276% Third Class 17,601 Walsh Caleb Rowden 3 0 0
D Tom Hurst, Jason
30 Crawford 77.86% 30.066% Third Class 24,696 Chipman Dan Brown 3 0 0
31 Dade 80.59% 47.420% Third Class 7,883 Mike Kelley Ron Richard 3 0 0
Sandy
32 Dallas 79.10% 40.395% Third Class 16,777 Jeff Knight Crawford 3 0 0
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33 Daviess 74.02% 37.073% Third Class 8,433 J. Eggleston Dan Hegeman 2 0 0
34 DeKalb 77.06% 34.253% Third Class 12,892 J. Eggleston Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
35 Dent 82.46% 41.938% Third Class 15,681 Jeff Pogue Dan Brown 3 0 0
Mike
36 Douglas 82.30% 48.275% Third Class 13,684 Lyle Rowland Cunningham 3 0 0
Andrew McDaniel,
37 Dunklin 75.87% 56.387% Third Class 31,953 Todd Richardson Doug Libla 2 1 0
Vacant, Paul
Curtman, Kirk
Franklin 70.70% 26.810% First Class 101,492 Dave Schatz 3 0 0
Matthews, Nate
38 Tate
Vacant (Mike
Bernskoetter is
the favored
39 Gasconade 76.10% 32.117% Third Class 15,222 Vacant, Tom Hurst canidate) 3 0 0
40 Gentry 75.72% 38.178% Third Class 6,738 J. Eggleston Dan Hegeman 2 1 0

Jeffrey
Messenger, Sonya
Rob Dixon, Jay
Greene 60.38% 42.546% First Class 283,870 Anderson, Crystal 3 0 0
Wasson
Quade, Curtis
Trent, Elijah
Haahr, Steve

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Helms, Kevin
Austin, Lyndall
41 Fraker
42 Grundy 78.18% 36.468% Third Class 10,261 Rusty Black Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
43 Harrison 80.37% 40.922% Third Class 8,957 J. Eggleston Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
44 Henry 71.71% 29.028% Third Class 22,059 Wanda Brown Ed Emery, 3 0 0
Sandy
45 Hickory 74.98% 42.230% Third Class 9,627 Warren Love Crawford 2 1 0
46 Holt 81.78% 48.997% Third Class 4,912 Allen Andrews Dan Hegeman 2 1 0
Chuck Basye, Dave
Denny Hoskins
47 Howard 67.32% 39.165% Third Class 10,144 Muntzel 1 2 0
Vacant, Robert Mike
48 Howell 79.59% 50.282% Third Class 40,400 Ross Cunningham 3 0 0
49 Iron 74.33% 22.010% Third Class 10,630 Chris Dinkins Gary Romine 1 2 0
Vacant, Dan Stacy,
Jeenie Lauer, Mike Cierpiot,
Donna Pfautsch, S. Kiki Curls,
Jackson 52.84% 29.422% First Class 687,623 Rebecca, Gary L. Jason N/A N/A N/A
Cross, Joe Holsman, John

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Runions, Glen Rizzo
50 Kolkmeyer
Mike Kelley, Bill
Jasper 72.57% 51.944% First Class 117,404 White, Charlie Ron Richard 3 0 0
51 Davis, Cody Smith
D Mike Revis, Shane
Roden, Rob
Vescovo, Dan
Jefferson 64.98% 21.549% First Class 218,733 2 1 0
Shaul, Becky Ruth,
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Elaine Gannon, Gary Romine,
52 Ben Harris Paul Wieland
Dean Dohrman,
Nathan Beard,
Johnson 64.92% 34.841% Second Class 52,595 Denny Hoskins 3 0 0
Glen Kolkmeyer,
53 Dan Doux
Gary L. Cross, Jack S. Kiki Curls,
Kansas City 19.17% 17.134% Home rule 467,990 N/A N/A N/A
54 Bondon Jason Holsman
Brian
55 Knox 75.72% 45.749% Third Class 4,131 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 1 2 0
Diane Franklin, Sandy
56 Laclede 80.25% 48.649% Third Class 35,571 Jeff Knight Crawford 3 0 0
Donna Pfautsch,
Denny Hoskins
57 Lafayette 69.21% 30.077% Fourth Class 33,381 Glen Kolkmeyer 3 0 0
Mike Moon, Scott
58 Lawrence 78.31% 47.109% Third Class 38,634 Fitzpatrick David Sater 3 0 0
Brian
59 Lewis 75.05% 47.560% Third Class 10,211 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 3 0 0
Jim Hansen,
Randy Pietzman,
60 Lincoln 72.75% 24.768% Second Class 52,566 Robert Cornejo Jeanie Riddle 3 0 0
Tim Remole, Rusty Brian
61 Linn 73.17% 32.528% Third Class 12,761 Black Muzlinger 3 0 0
Denny Hoskins

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62 Livingston 75.99% 32.249% Third Class 15,195 Rusty Black 3 0 0
Brian
63 Macon 75.98% 40.400% Third Class 15,566 Tim Remole Muzlinger 2 1 0
Wayne
64 Madison 77.09% 30.208% Third Class 12,408 Rick Francis Wallingford 3 0 0
Vacant (Mike
Bernskoetter is
the favored
65 Maries 79.13% 36.852% Third Class 9,176 Tom Hurst canidate) 2 1 0
Brian
66 Marion 72.80% 45.145% Third Class 28,781 Lindell Shumake Muzlinger 2 1 0
67 McDonald 80.07% 60.932% Third Class 23,083 Bill Lant David Sater 3 0 0
68 Mercer 85.16% 48.297% Third Class 3,785 Nate Walker Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
David Wood, Mike Vacant (Mike
Bernskoetter, Bernskoetter is
Miller 81.33% 42.501% Third Class 24,748 3 0 0
Tom Hurst, Rocky the favored
69 Miller canidate)
Holly Rehder, Don
70 Mississippi 69.65% 43.435% Third Class 14,358 Rone Doug Libla 1 2 0
Vacant (Mike

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Bernskoetter is
Sara Walsh, David the favored
71 Moniteau 78.29% 42.297% Third Class 15,607 Wood canidate) 3 0 0
Lindell Shumake,
72 Monroe
D 76.01% 38.326% Third Class 8,840 Jim Hansen Jeanie Riddle 1 2 0
73 Montgomery 76.02% 33.237% Third Class 12,236 Bart Korman Jeanie Riddle 3 0 0
Vacant (Mike
Bernskoetter is
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the favored
74 Morgan 76.64% 43.973% Third Class 20,565 David Wood canidate) 3 0 0
75 New Madrid 71.63% 47.718% Third Class 18,956 Don Rone Doug Libla 0 3 0
Bill Lant, Bill
reiboldt, Bill
White, Charlie
76 Newton 77.25% 55.419% Second Class 58,845 Davis Ron Richard 3 0 0
77 Nodaway 67.46% 44.395% Third Class 23,370 Allen Andrews Dan Hegeman 2 1 0
Mike
78 Oregon 78.64% 43.956% Third Class 10,881 Jeff Pogue Cunningham 2 1 0
Vacant (Mike
Bernskoetter is
the favored
79 Osage 82.60% 41.794% Third Class 13,878 Vacant, Tom Hurst canidate) 2 1 0
Mike
80 Ozark 80.78% 45.443% Third Class 9,723 Lyle Rowland Cunningham 2 0 1
Don Rone,
81 Pemiscot 65.77% 64.051% Third Class 18,296 Andrew McDaniel Doug Libla 0 3 0
Kevin Engler, Rick Wayne
82 Perry 79.04% 32.275% Third Class 18,971 Francis Wallingford 3 0 0

Dave Muntzel, Sandy
Pettis 70.73% 37.289% Second Class 42,201 3 0 0
Dean Dohrman, Crawford
Nathan Beard,

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83 Dan Houx
Tom Hurst, Jason
Chipamn, Keith
Phelps 68.50% 44.958% Third Class 45,156 Dan Brown 2 1 0
Frederick, Robert
84 Ross
Brian
85 Pike 71.44% 26.632% Third Class 18,516 Jim Hansen Muzlinger 3 0 0
Galen Higdon,
Kenneth Wilson,
Platte 52.82% 36.447% First Class 93,310 Rob Schaaf N/A N/A N/A
Nick Marshall,
86 Kevin Corlew
Sandy
87 Polk 75.84% 43.048% Third Class 31,137 Mike Stephens Crawford 3 0 0
Keith Frederick,
Steve Lynch,
88 Pulaski 73.22% 49.851% Third Class 52,274 Robert Ross Dan Brown 3 0 0
89 Putnam 82.52% 54.363% Third Class 4,979 Nate Walker Dan Hegeman 3 0 0
Brian
90 Ralls 75.37% 35.430% Third Class 10,192 Jim Hansen Muzlinger 1 2 0
Tim Remole, Cheri

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Toalson Reisch,
Randolph 73.03% 37.743% Third Class 25,414 3 0 0
Chuck Basye, Dave Brian
91 Muntzel Muzlinger
Jim Neely, Peggy
Denny Hoskins
92 Ray
D 65.36% 21.031% Third Class 23,494 McGaugh 2 1 0
Jeff Pogue, Chris
93 Reynolds 79.20% 24.091% Third Class 6,696 Dinkins Gary Romine 0 3 0
Mike
94 Ripley 15.03% 44.605% Third Class 14,100 Steve Cookson Cunningham 3 0 0
KS
Dave Muntzel,
Denny Hoskins
95 Saline 64.45% 33.721% Fourth Class 23,370 Dean Dorhman 1 2 0
Brian
96 Schuyler 77.74% 41.566% Third Class 4,431 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 2 1 0
Brian
97 Scotland 77.49% 42.604% Third Class 4,843 Craig Redmon Muzlinger 3 0 0
Holly Rehder, Don
Rone, Herman Wayne
98 Scott 76.31% 41.187% Third Class 39,191 Morse Wallingford 0 3 0
99 Shannon 75.97% 31.701% Third Class 8,441 Jeff Pogue Doug Libla 1 2 0
Brian
100 Shelby 77.54% 39.103% Third Class 6,373 Lindell Shumake Muzlinger 3 0 0

Bart Korman,
Bryan Spencer,
Robert Cornejo,
Tom Hannegan,
First Class Mark Matthiesen, Bill Eigel, Bob
St. Charles 60.52% 31.908% 385,590 3 0 0
Charter Kurt Bahr, John Onder
Wiemann, Kathie
Conway, Phil
Christofanelli,
Chrissy Sommer,
Nick Schroer,

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101 Justin Hill
Sandy
102 St. Clair 75.62% 33.020% Third Class 9,805 Warren Love Crawford 3 0 0
Elaine Gannon,
Kevin Engler, Mike
103 St. Francois 70.64% 22.297% First Class 65,359 Henderson Gary Romine 2 1 0
Kirk Matthews,
Scott Sifton,
Bruce DeGroot,
Maria
Derek Grier, Jean
Chappelle­
Evans, Shamed
St. Louis Nadal, Andrew
39.32% 27.217% First Class 998,954 Dogan, David N/A N/A N/A
County Koenig, Dave
Gregory, Marsha
Schatz, Jill
Haefner, Dean
Schupp, Gina
Plocher, Mark
Walsh
104 Matthiesen
Jacob
Hummel,
Jamilah
105 St. Louis City 15.88% 11.945% First Class City 319,294 No Republicans Nasheed N/A N/A N/A
Ste. Elaine Gannon,
106 Genevieve 64.90% 15.178% Third Class 18,145 Kevin Engler Gary Romine 0 3 0
107 Stoddard

108 Stone
83.36%

79.42%
48.665%

54.003%

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Third Class

Third Class
29,968

32,202
Herman Morse
Don Phillips, Scott
Fitzpatrick
Doug Libla

David Sater
2

3
1

0
0

0
109
D
Sullivan 75.78% 47.782% Third Class 6,714 Nate Walker Dan Hegeman 2 1 0
Don Phillips, Lyle
Rowland, Jeffery
110 Taney 77.72% 53.624% First Class 51,675 Justus David Sater 3 0 0
Mike
KS
111 Texas 81.01% 42.994% Third Class 26,008 Robert Ross Cunningham 3 0 0
112 Vernon 75.97% 40.440% Third Class 21,159 Patricia Pike Ed Emery 3 0 0
Bart Korman,
113 Warren 70.39% 27.892% Third Class 33,043 Bryan Spencer Jeanie Riddle 3 0 0
Ben Harris, Nate
114 Washington 75.93% 17.905% Third Class 25,195 Tate, Chris Dinkins Gary Romine 3 0 0
Chris Dinkins, Wayne
115 Wayne 80.84% 34.148% Third Class 13,521 Steve Cookson Wallingford 2 1 0
Lyndall Fraker, Mike
116 Webster 76.69% 41.469% Third Class 36,202 Hannah Kelly Cunningham 3 0 0
117 Worth 77.25% 49.474% Third Class 2,171 Allen Andrews 2 1 0
Mike
118 Wright 82.61% 46.493% Third Class 18,815 Hannah Kelly Cunningham 3 0 0
119 Totals 72.21% 39.198% 6,510,058 266 59 1
Poor Candidate­Voted below state
120 Potential Candidate­Voted above 50% on Prop A, and above state average for Trump average of 56% for Trump

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Message: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf

Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf
From Hale, Brenda (WARCO) Date Tuesday, July 3, 2018 2:59
PM
To Duecker, Jordan
Cc
Journal jordan.duecker@governor.mo.gov
Recipients

Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf (269 Kb HTML)

Please advise that you received.

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KS

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Message: RE: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf

RE: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf
From Hale, Brenda (WARCO) Date Tuesday, July 3, 2018 3:05
PM
To Duecker, Jordan
Cc
Journal Jordan.Duecker@governor.mo.gov
Recipients

Same to you.  

From: Duecker, Jordan 
Sent: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 3:02 PM
To: Hale, Brenda (WARCO) 
Subject: Re: Right To Work Signed Ordinance.pdf

Hi Brenda,  

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I did receive.  Thank you for your assistance! 
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Enjoy the holiday! 

Best, 
KS
Jordan Duecker  
Office of the Missouri Governor 
Missouri State Capitol, Room 216 
Jefferson City, MO 65102 
(C): 573­619­0911

On Jul 3, 2018, at 2:59 PM, Hale, Brenda (WARCO) <Brenda.Hale@ky.gov> wrote:

Please advise that you received.

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