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Elementary Education - Literacy

Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

TASK 3: LITERACY ASSESSMENT COMMENTARY


Respond to the prompts below (​no more than 10 single-spaced pages, including prompts​​) by typing your responses within the
brackets following each prompt. Do not delete or alter the prompts. Commentary pages exceeding the maximum will not be
scored. Attach the assessment you used to evaluate student performance (​no more than 5 additional pages​​) to the end of this
file. If you submit a student work sample or feedback as a video or audio clip and you or your focus students cannot be clearly
heard, attach a transcription of the inaudible comments (​no more than 2 additional pages​​) to the end of this file. These pages
do not count toward your page total.

1. Analyzing Student Learning


a. Identify the specific learning objectives measured by the assessment you chose for analysis.
[Students will describe the structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of
a text.]
b. Provide a graphic (table or chart) or narrative that summarizes student learning for your
whole class. Be sure to summarize student learning for all evaluation criteria submitted in
Literacy Assessment Task 3, Part D.
[

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

The four charts above focuses on the class and individual incorrect results on the multiple
choice and written portion of their pre and post-assessment. There is a great improvement
shown between the individual pre-assessment multiple choice results to the individual
post-assessment results. I had only five students out of twenty-one that did missed more on the
post-assessment than on the pre-assessment. Overall, it is evident that the students learned
how to identify story elements and search for details within narratives. The majority of the
multiple choice questions were text-feature, story element, and reading comprehension of text.
The individual pre-assessment writing error results showed me that I have students who need
more practice writing. The post-Assessment version of the test showed the same thing.
Grammar, punctuation, and convention are always overlooked by young writers. As a whole
class, the post-assessment writing portion shows only four areas (Capitalization, Correct
Spelling (l), Grammar, and Verb Tense) improved from the pre-assessment. Discovering the
high amount of errors and overlooked mistakes, caused me to find another strategic approach
to practice writing and formatting coherent narratives. As I stated in Task #1b the morning work I
assign to students includes correcting errors found in paragraphs and identifying text details. I
made sure to plan my lessons according to the commonly missed questions, and decided to
extend what they knew. The students used their prior knowledge as a precursor to help connect
details together with elements to produce clear narratives. For, example, one group used places
such as the playground, school, backyard, and more to define what a setting is in Lesson#1.
Those are everyday settings that all students know about. When I made the lesson or activity a

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

personal this caused the students to become engaged and willing to elaborate in writing and
literary exercises.]
c. Use evidence found in the ​3 student work samples and the whole class summary​​ to
analyze the patterns of learning ​for the whole class​​ and differences for groups or individual
learners relative to
◼ the essential literacy strategy
◼ related skills

Consider what students understand and do well, and where they continue to struggle (e.g.,
common errors, confusions, need for greater challenge).
[Most of the students were able to define their story elements and understood their function in
narratives. Visually the students did excellent with giving their elements visual representation;
and it helped them explain what the element meant and how it is used in a story. I had a few
groups who were unsure on how to present their element and depict them in drawings.]
d. If a video or audio work sample occurs in a group context (e.g., discussion), provide the
name of the clip and clearly describe how the scorer can identify the focus student(s)
(e.g., position, physical description) whose work is portrayed.
[N/A ]
2. Feedback to Guide Further Learning
Refer to specific evidence of submitted feedback to support your explanations.
a. Identify the format in which you submitted your evidence of feedback for the 3 focus
students. ​(Delete choices that do not apply.)
◼ Written directly on work samples or in separate documents that were provided to the
focus students
◼ If a video or audio clip of feedback occurs in a group context (e.g., discussion), clearly
describe how the scorer can identify the focus student (e.g., position, physical
description) who is being given feedback.
[​Student #1 ELA Work Samples
Student #2 ELA Work Samples
Student #3 ELA Work Samples​]
b. Explain how feedback provided to the 3​ ​focus students addresses their individual strengths
and needs relative to the learning objectives measured.
[The feedback provided to the focus students helps extend their prior knowledge and become
skilled in performing the learning objective. Student #1 has a strong concept of what narratives
are and how they are developed through story elements in her first work sample. The second
work sample from Student #1 is incomplete, but she knows how to end run-on sentences with
punctuation. In the third work sample she correctly sequences a passage, but struggles with
answering questions about narratives in her fourth work sample.The only thing Student #1
needs help with is remembering details support the topic of a narrative. Student #2 struggled
with stating all of the story elements when questioned in the first work sample, but did a good
job using them to form a narrative. She also needs help developing their story’s elements, such

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

as the problem and solution in their narrative. In the second work sample, she knew that she
needed to use punctuation to make complete sentences, but began using them out of context
and later formed many fragmented sentences. Sentence structure also needs improvement,
which results from her being a second-language English speaker. The third work sample
required assistance in her putting the passage in order, she gave me one transition word to use
in between the paragraphs demonstrating progress. Her last work sample showed me that I
need to work with her on knowing the purpose of narratives and how to support the topic with
details. Student #3 strength is adding supportive detail to their story’s topic in his first work
sample, but he does not put the story in order or develop his story elements. Their use of
dialogue is clever, but needs polishing in identifying speakers and proper punctuation. The
second work sample is incomplete, but he used correct punctuation and capitalization at the
beginning of each new sentence. In Student #3’s third work sample he put the story in order and
wrote many transition words, but got confused along the way with sequencing which is
displayed in his first work sample. His fourth sample work he understands that a narrative’s topic
is supported by detail, but does not correlate story elements with forming a narrative nor
understands the purpose of a narrative.]
c. Describe how you will support each focus student to understand and use this feedback to
further their learning related to learning objectives, either within the learning segment or at a
later time.
[To support Student#1 I will give the student challenging passages to read and describe the
elements used to create the text and how the text is structured. This will help with keeping the
student engaged in learning and continue to display their understanding of the lesson’s learning
objective. Student #2 needs guided support and practice with using story elements to form a
cohesive narrative. I can give the student prompts to write about and get them to highlight or
identify the elements found in their passage. This will help them with distinguishing what the
story elements are and how to properly use them when writing. Student #3 will receive help with
sequencing narratives, formatting dialogue, and properly using story elements. The student is
already skilled with creating speakers in their narrative and adding supportive detail. I will use
their strengths to demonstrate how story elements are key components within text to help make
narratives run fluently and for their plot to build and be explicit for their audience to understand.
These strategies mentioned above align with the lesson’s learning objective and supports each
of my focus students in their quest to make literary improvements in writing.]
3. Evidence of Language Understanding and Use
When responding to the prompt below, use concrete examples from the video clip(s) and/or
student work samples as evidence. Evidence from the clip(s) may focus on one or more
students.

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

You may provide evidence of students’ language use ​from ONE, TWO, OR ALL THREE of the
following sources:

1. Use video clips from Literacy Instruction Task 2 and provide time-stamp references for
evidence of language use.
2. Submit an additional video file named “Language Use” of no more than 5 minutes in
length and cite language use (this can be footage of one or more students’ language
use). Submit the clip in Literacy Assessment Task 3,
Part B.
3. Use the student work samples analyzed in Literacy Assessment Task 3 and cite
language use.

a. Explain and provide concrete examples for the extent to which your students were able to
use or struggled to use
◼ selected language function,
◼ vocabulary or key phrases, ​AND
◼ discourse or syntax
to develop content understandings.
[When I asked my focus students to name the story elements they stated them all or most of
them and told me how they used them in context to form their stories. The students also used
the vocabulary (the story elements) to identify the ideas for their narratives. The dialogue that
was found in some of my focus student’s narratives provided evidence of language use. In
example, Student #1 told me that the story story elements helped formed her narrative, in which
she confirmed it when she read her story and identified the elements used in her plan. ​ELA
edTPA Language Use w/Student #1​]
4. Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
a. Based on your analysis of student learning presented in prompts 1b–c, describe next steps
for instruction to impact student learning:
◼ For the whole class
◼ For the 3 focus students and other individuals/groups with specific needs

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support
(e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling readers,
underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted
students needing greater support or challenge).
[The analysis I gathered from the whole class by the ​Plan A Story With Story Elements​ activity
proved to be a catalyst to get students better at their writing literary skill. Additional instruction
used to help impact student learning are expanding the student’s original writing or use the
activity as a template to write more narratives as well as serve as a reference tool to encourage
forming narratives.My three focus students needed specific instructions to strengthen or

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Elementary Education - Literacy
Task 3: Literacy Assessment Commentary

challenge their concepts of story elements and its connection with writing stories Student #2
needs practice using dialogue in narratives and proper use of punctuation (i.e quotation marks
and identifying who’s the speaker). Student #1 can review her plan and see how she can help
her narrative become clearer. Student #3 will benefit by taking her narrative to the next level by
developing her character's persona and include background details.]
b. Explain how these next steps follow from your analysis of student learning. Support your
explanation with principles from research and/or theory.
[The instructional strategies mentioned above to enhance the quality of learning for my students
has been proven to help students’ application of writing and skills. Struggling writers need to
learn that components (such as story elements) structure writing and helps with giving their
stories a clear purpose. An article found in ​Teach HUB​ explains the importance of reiterating
this concept by saying “In order for students to effectively write a narrative, they should learn
and memorize every key component of a narrative writing piece (Cox, Janelle).” Reminding
students that they must keep their audience in mind, helps them make sure their paper flows
and that their use of story elements are evident. A statement found in a ​ReadingRockets a ​ rticle,
states, “In explicit instruction, teachers tell readers why and when they should use strategies,
what strategies to use, and how to apply them.(Alder, C.R.).” Reinforcing the strategies can be
through templates, writing activities, and guided practice to serve as a blueprint for students to
use when forming narratives.

Cited Sources:
Cox, Janelle. “Teaching Strategies: Narrative Writing for Elementary Kids.” TeachHUB,
www.teachhub.com/teaching-strategies-narrative-writing-elementary-kids​.

“Seven Strategies to Teach Students Text Comprehension.” Reading Rockets, 23 Aug. 2017,
www.readingrockets.org/article/seven-strategies-teach-students-text-comprehension​. ]

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