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THE LEGEND OF TIZONA

Teacher Resource Guide

Ms. Huck
INTERMEDIATE BAND Unit Two
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................... 2
1
Focus Piece .................................................................................................................... 2
Learning Goals and Objectives: ..................................................................................... 2
National Standards: ........................................................................................................ 3
UNIT STUDY .......................................................................................................................... 4
Unit One: Composer....................................................................................................... 4
Unit Two: Composition ................................................................................................... 4
Unit Three: Historical/Cultural Perspective .................................................................... 4
Unit Four: Technical Considerations ............................................................................... 4
Unit Five: Stylistic Considerations .................................................................................. 5
Unit Six: Musical Elements.............................................................................................. 7
Unit Seven: Form and Structure ...................................................................................... 8
Unit Eight: Recommended Listening............................................................................... 9
Unit Nine: Additional References and Resources ............................................................ 9
ACTIVITY GUIDES .............................................................................................................. 10
Warm Up One.................................................................................................................. 11
Warm Up Two .................................................................................................................. 12
Warm Up Three ............................................................................................................... 12
Warm Up Four ................................................................................................................. 14
Warm Up Five.................................................................................................................. 17
Activity One..................................................................................................................... 18
Activity Two..................................................................................................................... 19
Activity Three .................................................................................................................. 20
Activity Four .................................................................................................................... 22
Activity Five .................................................................................................................... 23
Activity Six ...................................................................................................................... 25
INTRODUCTION
2
Focus Piece: Unit Two

Title: “The Legend of Tizona; The Sword of El Cid”

Composer: Rick Kirby

Grade Level: Grade 2

Learning Goals and Objectives:

 Encourage Student Composition

 Chordal Tuning

 Identifying Rhythms Aurally

 Identifying the Melody Line

 Choosing a Piece

 Sight Reading

 Enhancing Student Error Detection

 Building Student Problem-Solving Skills

 Understanding Historical Significance

 Using Movement to Identify Recurring Musical Patterns

 Develop Literacy Skills, Creativity & Cross-curricular Opportunities


National Standards:

 MU.Pr.1.N
Select varied repertoire to study based on interest, music reading skills (where
3
appropriate), an understanding of the structure of the music, context, and the technical
skill of the individual or ensemble.

 MU. Pr.2.N
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how knowledge of formal
aspects in musical works inform prepared or improvised performances

 MU.Pr.2.I
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how the setting and formal
characteristics of musical works contribute to understanding the context of the music in
prepared or improvised performances.

 MU. Pr.2.5.b
When analyzing selected music, read and perform using standard notation.

 MU. Pr.3.N
Identify expressive qualities in a varied repertoire of music that can be demonstrated
through prepared and improvised performances

 MU. Pr.3.I
Demonstrate understanding and application of expressive qualities in a varied repertoire
of music through prepared and improvised performances.

 MU.Pr.4.I
Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a varied repertoire of music and
evaluate their success using feedback from ensemble peers and other sources to refine
performances.

 MU. Cr.2.I
Select and develop draft melodies and rhythmic passages that demonstrate
understanding of characteristic(s) of music or text(s) studied in rehearsal preserving draft
compositions and improvisations through standard notation and audio recording
4
UNIT STUDY
“The Legend of Tizona” by Rick Kirby
Unit One: Composer
Rick Kirby was born in 1945 in Boston, Massachusetts. He was educated in the New
England area as a Music Educator and worked in the Wisconsin area. In 2001, he left his job
at Waukesha West High School to pursue a career in composition. Throughout his career, he
has been the recipient of Wisconsin Music Educators Association Distinguished Service Award
in 2002, the Wisconsin chapter Phi Beta Mu Outstanding Band Director award in 2007, and an
article over his piece, Different Voices, was featured in the Teaching Through Performance in
Band series, Volume 7. Currently, he is the staff arranger for the Waukesha High School
Marching Band and the Sound of the Sun Prairie Marching Band. In addition to those jobs, he
directs the Waukesha Area Symphonic Band and the Carroll College Jazz Ensemble and is the
associate conductor of the Youth Wind Orchestra of Wisconsin.

Unit Two: Composition


The Legend of Tizona was first published in 2014. It is a Grade 2 Band piece. It is 3
minutes and 30 seconds in length.

Unit Three: Historical/Cultural Perspective


This is based off the story of El Cid and Tizona. El Cid was a Spanish war hero who is
known for his use of the sword Tizona. The sword originally belonged to a Moorish King Bucar
but was taken by El Cid when the former was defeated in battle. The sword became a symbol of
power. El Cid, being the owner of the sword, became known as a great warrior. The most
memorable story of El Cid and Tizona is takes place over 900 years ago. In 1099, the enemies
of the city of Valencia had fallen upon it. El Cid and his wife tragically died, unbeknownst to
many in the town. After his death, El Cid was dressed in his armor, put atop his horse and
given the faithful sword Tizona. The horse, Babieca was then startled and took off running
towards the battle. El Cid seemingly sped into the fight fearlessly and the troops of Valencia
followed in a charge that would lead them to victory.

Unit Four: Technical Considerations


This piece is in 4/4 time throughout with one tempo change from 100 bpm to 132 bpm in m.
10. There are some unique instruments that may not be familiar to the everyday middle or high
school band. The trumpets are asked to use a straight mute, which many of them may not
have used before this. The percussion is also required to use a shakere. The technique for this
instrument may have to be explained to the percussion students beforehand.

Some of the parts have range considerations. More attention should be paid to the flutes and
French horns.

-The flutes are slightly higher than a standard Middle School range at a concert Eb at times,

-Clarinet One crosses the break in two places, and the

-Horn rips in the “fight” sections (m. 34-39, 102-107) extend up to their written D, which is a
concert A, which may be too high for them.
*make sure they aren’t forcing the note out and making a pinched tone.*

There are a few solos/solis in the piece. There are many timpani solos throughout, in m. 40-41,
92-96, and 108-109. There’s a misc. percussion soli in m 72-84, and a tam-tam solo in 115.
Winds-wise, there is an optional trumpet solo in 53-58. There is also a trumpet 1&2 soli 10-13,
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and a clarinet soli in 96-97.

The percussion needed for the piece is Bass Drum, Snare Drum, Tambourine, Bongos, Crash
Cymbals, Tam-Tam, Shakere, Sus. Cymbal, Hi-Hat, Chimes, Woodblock, Xylophone, Marimba
and Timpani.

As for the beaming and phrasing, it is standard 4/4 until m. 9, which then has a NC fermata
going into 10. It is standard 4/4 until m. 22, when hypermeter conducting in 2 is introduced
each measure until 30. From there, it is again standard 4/4 until m. 50, when hypermeter
conducting in 2 lasts m.50-52. Measure 53 is conducted in standard four, m. 54-56 is
hypermeter in 2, then back to the standard 4/4 in m. 57. Measure 58 is a hypermeter in 2
until 66, when standard 4/4 remains until the end of the piece (m. 115).

The phrase structure for the piece is as follows;

Phrase # Measures Tonal Center


1 1-10 Bb Major
2 10-18 Bb Major
3 18-21 beat 4 Bb Major
4 21 beat 4-30 G minor, Bb Major
5 30-34 Bb Major
6 34-42 Bb Major
7 42-50 Eb Major
8 50-58 Eb Major
9 58-66 Eb Major
10 66-72 Transition material, Eb Major
11 72-84 G Minor
12 84-92 G Minor
13 92-96 Bb Major
14 96-102 Bb Major
15 102-108 Bb Major
16 108-115 Bb Major

Unit Five: Stylistic Considerations (Articulation Chart)

1-10 slurred 10-18 staccato w/one slur

18-21 legato & staccato 22-26 accented/staccato

26-30 slurs and ties 30-34 staccato

34-42 accents in the lower voices 42-50 unmarked noteheads

50-56 juxtaposition of legato and staccato 58-63 slurred

64-65 staccato 66-72 heavily accented

72-84 unmarked noteheads 84-92 same as 22-26

92-102 staccato 103-108 same as 34-42


108-115 accented to the end
(View A Comprehensive Dynamics Chart Here)
)https://d.docs.live.net/3c42668382b7ed05/Documents/Legend%20of%20Tizona%20Comprehensive%20Dynamics%2
0Grid.docx
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Unit Six: Musical Elements
Measure #
1-10
10-13
13-18
Who has the melody?
Timpani
Trumpet
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe,
Harmony?
Fl, Ob, Cl, A Sax
Timp
Perc 1
Texture
Thin
Thin
Moderately
Mood
Foreboding
Jolly
Jolly
7
Clarinet 1 & 2, Thin
Xylophone
18-21 Low Brass, Bari and Bongos Moderate Pointed
Tenor Sax, Bass
Clarinet, Bassoon
21-26 Clarinet 1 & 2, Alto Tuba, Euph, Thick Heroic
Sax, Horn Trombone, Bari
and Tenor Sax,
Bass Clarinet,
Bassoon
26-30 Flute, Oboe, Trumpet B Clar, A Sax, T Moderately Hopeful
1&2 Sax, B Sax, Horn, thick
Tbn, Euph, Tuba
30-34 Clarinet 1 & 2, Fl, Ob., Fl, Ob, Bsn, B Thin Building
T Sax, Xylo Clar, A Sax, T
Sax, B Sax, Tpt,
Horn, Tbn, Euph,
Tuba (just 30)
34-42 F Horn, ASax Everyone Else Thick Fight
42-50 Xylo Shakere, Bongo, Thin Somber
Sus Cym
50-58 Clarinet 1 & 2, ASax, Bsn, Horn, Tbn. Moderately Mournful
(Fl Tpt 53 & 57) Euph, Tuba Thin (Hopeful)
58-64 T Sax, Horn,Trombone, Fl, Ob, Cl, A Sax, Thick Building
Xylo B Sax, Tpt, Euph, Courage
Tuba
64-66 Trumpet 1 & 2 Everyone but Perc Moderately Pushing
1 Thick
66-72 Horn, A Sax, Cl 2 Everyone Else Thick but Pointed
Exposed
72-84 Shakere, Claps Woodblock, Thin Steady
Bongos, Hi-Hat,
Marimba
84-88 Fl, Cl, A Sax Percussion and Thin Lyrical
Clap
88-92 Ob, Bsn, B Clar, T Fl, Cl, A Sax Moderately Pointed
Sax, B Sax, Euph Thick
92-96 Timpani Snare Thin Steady
96-102 Clarinet 1 & 2, Fl, Ob, Thin Building
T Sax, Xylo
102-108 Horn, A Sax Everyone Else Thick Fight
108 Timpani Thin Suspense
109 Fl, Ob, Cl, A Sax, T Thin Hope
Sax
110 Bsn, BClar, B Sax, Fl, Ob, Cl, A Sax, Moderately Foreboding
Tpt, Horn, Trn, Euph, T Sax Thick
Tuba
111-114

115
Tuba, Euph, Tbn, Bsn,
BClar, B Sax
Tam-Tam
Fl, Cl, Ob, A Sax,
T Sax, Tpt, Horn
Thick

Thin
Foreboding

Triumphant
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Unit Seven: Form and Structure
Measure Number: Section: Musical Tonal Center(s):
Considerations:
1-10 Introduction Tuning upper Bb Major
woodwinds
10-18 Main Theme Assertive Bb Major
statement of the
first theme
18-21 beat 4 Foundation of Theme Tone, Articulation Bb Major
2
21 beat 4-30 Theme 2 Articulation, G minor, Bb Major
Moving Line
30-34 Theme 1 Articulation Bb Major
34-42 Climax 1 Moving line Bb Major
coming out
Volume
Accuracy of Horn
42-50 Transition Vertical Alignment Eb Major
50-58 Chorale w/Theme 1 Stylistic Shift in 1 Eb Major
bar incriments
58-66 Chorale Lyrical Style Eb Major
Moving line
66-72 Transition, Building Composite Quarter Transition material, Eb
Chords Note Rhythm Major
72-84 Transition Vertical Alignment G Minor
84-92 Return of Chorale Listening for the G Minor
Theme and Theme 2 moving line
92-96 Introduction of Theme Should be leading Bb Major
1 to 96
96-102 Theme 1 Same Articulation Bb Major
style as before
102-108 Climax Moving line Bb Major
coming out
Volume
Accuracy of Horn
108-115 Outro Tuning of chords Bb Major
111-115
Articulation
Unit Eight: Recommended Listening
Rick Kirby has composed many great pieces for the concert band, but some of them are similar
to the piece “The Legend of Tizona”, and have been added here for the conductor’s (and perhaps
students’) use for enhancement of listening and understanding the composer’s personal style
and thematic ideas.
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The Dragon Prince, Rick Kirby

Three Colonial Movements, Rick Kirby

Sea Glass, Rick Kirby (Harmonic Movement is similar, although style is different)

For the composer, listening to pieces with a similar style is also helpful to the enhancement of
a particular piece. Here is a list of pieces that I have compiled that are, in my opinion, similar
in style to The Legend of Tizona and may be able to help with the stylistic interpretation and
context of the piece.

Blacksmith Variations, Mahaffey

Ghost Fleet, Sheldon

Unit Nine: Additional References and Resources


http://www.rbcmusic.com/uilcbgrade3.htm

http://www.stantons.com/sheet-music/products/concert-band-sheet-music/performance-
literature/grade-25-3/#p15

https://www.halleonard.com/search/search.action?_c&keywords=Rick%20Kirby%20Band&su
bsiteid=1

https://www.halleonard.com/biographyDisplay.do?id=396&subsiteid=1

https://anotherbagmoretravel.wordpress.com/2011/10/30/el-cid-and-la-tizona/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tizona

For A More Comprehensive Form, Rhythm and Phrase Analysis; Please View Here

https://d.docs.live.net/3c42668382b7ed05/Documents/Legend%20of%20Tizona%20Grid.pdf
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THE LEGEND OF TIZONA


ACTIVITY GUIDES

Ms. Huck
INTERMEDIATE BAND Unit Two
Related Objective(s):
Warm Up One
11
 MU.Pr.4.I
Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a varied repertoire of music
and evaluate their success using feedback from ensemble peers and other sources
to refine performances.

Purpose:
 Help students learn to tune and listen to specific notes in chords
 Warms up students’ chops and brains
Activity:
Chorale
We will begin the class by playing a function chorale based on measures 111 and 115.
Playing the chords all together before playing them broken as written will help tuning
individually. With the function chorale, director will guide students in playing the
rhythm the way it is notated in m 111-115. Students should perform this aurally
without the music in front of them. (This allows for an “aha” moment later, when the
students realize they were playing a part of the piece without realizing it!)
Assessment:
Can the students recognize the harmonic motion from the piece out of context? This is
more of an observation type of assessment, as many warm-ups are. If the goal is not
successful, another warm-up or classroom activity can be adjusted to cover back over
the concept missed from the warm-up.
Related Objective(s):
Warm Up Two
12
 MU. Pr.2.N
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how knowledge of formal
aspects in musical works inform prepared or improvised performances

Purpose:
 Familiarize the students with the clapping rhythm in the middle
 Warms up students’ chops and brains
Activity:
Rhythm
Students will think of words that are one or two syllables each and the director
will place them in the correct locations on the board to mimic the clapping
pattern in the middle of the piece. These word rhythms will then be spoken by
the entire class. After they are spoken, they will be played on a concert Bb (or
the above-mentioned chord sequence to tie the two learning objectives
together). Then, the notes will be clapped. The students will then write their
own words to the rhythm and turn them in.
Assessment:
Warm-Up Two 15 10 5
Rhythm Accuracy Words chosen Words chosen Words chosen do
match rhythm almost match not match
given rhythm given rhythm given
Total

Given Rhythm:

Sample Answer:

Al- a- bam-a, Al-a-bam-a, Is A State


Related Objective(s):
Warm Up Three
13
 MU.Pr.2.I
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how the setting and formal
characteristics of musical works contribute to understanding the context of the music in
prepared or improvised performances.

Purpose:
 Identifying rhythms aurally
 Listening in the ensemble
 Warms up students’ chops and brains
Activity:
The Teacher will lead the students in a game of “poison rhythm.” In this game,
the teacher picks a rhythm and claps it for the students. The students
accurately clap back the rhythm and then this rhythm becomes the “poison
rhythm.” The game then begins with the teacher clapping various rhythms and
the students echoing the rhythm UNLESS it is the poison rhythm. If they
repeat the poison rhythm, they are “out.” This activity will be used to help
students internalize the rhythm of tricky sections in the piece. The most
important rhythmic element where this can be helpful is when the band is
clapping syncopated rhythms in the piece. The Teacher can use these rhythms
in the game to solidify the rhythms for when the band plays.
Assessment:
This warm-up will be assessed using Teacher Observation.

Poison Rhythm One Poison Rhythm Two


Related Objective(s):
Warm Up Four
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 MU.Pr.1.N
Select varied repertoire to study based on interest, music reading skills (where
appropriate), an understanding of the structure of the music, context, and the technical
skill of the individual or ensemble.

Purpose:
 Grow student discretion of musical works
 Set up the piece using a warm-up technique
 Warms up students’ chops and brains
Activity:
Using the Lip Benders handout*, the students will choose an appropriate
warm-up to match the given section of the piece being rehearsed that day. The
teacher will have the students look at the given rehearsal excerpt of the piece
and then choose two lip benders that they believe best prepare the band for the
upcoming repertoire. They will discuss the reason for their choices with their
stand partner and then volunteers will share with the class.
Assessment:

This will be assessed through teacher observation. The teacher will assess
whether the students are understanding the concept by the depth of their
chosen warm-ups and the reasoning behind those choices.
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16
Related Objective(s):
Warm Up Five
17
 MU. Pr.2.5.b
When analyzing selected music, read and perform using standard notation.

Purpose:
 Students will grow in their musical understanding in the areas of sight
reading, technical performance, and reading standard notation.
Activity:
The Teacher will use sight reading composition cards in conjunction with the
students to create sight-readable melodies and rhythms. Each section will
select one card, and the teacher will put the cards together on the board in a
sight-readable melody. The students will sight read the rhythm, then the notes,
then the whole segment. More cards can be chosen and the process will be
repeated in the same manner.
Assessment:
This warm-up will be assessed using Teacher Observation.

The composition cards can be accessed here:


https://d.docs.live.net/3c42668382b7ed05/Documents/Composition%20Cards.docx
Related Objective(s):
Activity One
18
 MU. Pr.4.I
Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a varied repertoire of music and
evaluate their success using feedback from ensemble peers and other sources to refine
performances.

Purpose:
 To enhance student error detection
 Building student problem-solving skills
Activity:
Students will be played a series of recordings and they will an accompanying
question using the app ‘Kahoot!’. The recordings will be in pairs, with a correct
version and an incorrect version. Between the rounds of the game, the t and ss
will discuss WHY the recording was right/wrong, and then they will brainstorm
ideas on how to fix those issues.
Assessment:

The teacher will view the Kahoot! Scores and fill out the following chart
according to the data.

“Excellent” Recording

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQCtVn-aRXE

“Good” Recording

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=55&v=QIS0fe6h9CE

Kahoot
https://create.kahoot.it/details/musical-terms/46e434ad-9de8-4df8-aaf6-f98d678276b6
Related Objective(s):
Activity Two
19
 MU. Pr.2.N
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how knowledge of formal
aspects in musical works inform prepared or improvised performances.

Purpose:
This activity has two purposes;

 To help students listen for the melodic line and see how their part fits
into it
 Introducing the concept of composite rhythm
Activity:
Students will play the rhythm written on the board as a warm-up. (Rhythm
included below) After this, the teacher will move directly into the piece at measure 66.
The students will play it once through, then they will play it as a “dut chorale.” This
means that they will play each note as if it is only a quarter note and no longer even if
it is written as a half note or longer. This will allow them to hear other entrances that
happen while they are holding. The teacher will then ask what the rhythm the band is
playing is. The teacher will ask the students to write down the rhythm of the first two
measures and then they will check as a class. The term composite rhythm will be
introduced, and then the students will be charged to figure out the composite rhythm
of the next two measures silently after the next repetition. After this, they will be
handed the following worksheet as an assessment strategy.
Assessment:

Write the Composite Rhythm of Each Group of Two Measures

Write the Composite Rhythm of Each Group of Two Measures


Activity Three
20
Related Objective(s):
 MU.Pr.2.I
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how the setting and formal
characteristics of musical works contribute to understanding the context of the music in
prepared or improvised performances.

Purpose:
This activity has two purposes;

 To help students better understand the background of this piece


 Introducing the topic of text-painting or otherwise shaping music to fit
the text or story behind it.
Activity:
Students will be asked to research the story of a famous sword from a list given
to them by the instructor. They will use an electronic device to find the story and may
write themselves notes on the story if necessary. They will need to know the
swordsman associated with the sword, one memorable moment, and if the story is real
or mythological. After each student has researched a sword, they will share the story
with the class. The students will then be asked to guess which story corresponds with
each famous sword bearer. We will discuss what difference it can make in our
performance, taking into account the story of its origin.
*If a cross-curricular lesson is desired, this can easily be modified to include concepts used in
the English or communications classrooms*

Assessment:

Research 15 10 5

Contents Mention of the Some combination of Most of the elements


swordsman, one the elements present are not mentioned
memorable moment, but not all (2/3 (1/3 elements
and identify if it is elements present) present)
history or myth (3/3
elements present)
Accuracy Included information Included information
was correct was incorrect

Participation in Class Comments that are Comments that are Comments that are
Discussion made are meaningful made have made have little to no
and well-placed significance to the significance, or no
topic comments are made
at all
Scores
Total
Powerpoint used to introduce different swords/concepts:
https://d.docs.live.net/3c42668382b7ed05/Documents/Swordz.pptx

Student Worksheet
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C:\Users\abbam\OneDrive\Pictures\Saved Pictures\Sword Worksheet.pdf
Student Worksheet Answer Key
C:\Users\abbam\OneDrive\Pictures\Saved Pictures\Sword Worksheet
KEY.pdf
Related Objective(s):
Activity Four
22
 MU. Pr.3.N
Identify expressive qualities in a varied repertoire of music that can be demonstrated
through prepared and improvised performances

Purpose:
 Giving students a kinesthetic link to the three themes of the piece
 Identifying recurring themes in music
Activity:
Students will be invited to create three motions at the beginning of the class
period. (Students must make up the motions, or else this is “too weird” and will not be
as effective) Motions may be sitting, standing, doing jumping jacks, etc. Teacher will
then assign a chosen movement to each of the three themes of the piece. The class as
a whole will listen to a recording of “The Legend of Tizona” and perform the
appropriate actions along with it. Teacher will observe and ensure students are using
the right actions. Then, the band will play the piece, (along with the motions, if they
are possible to do safely while playing) noting the themes throughout. They will then
be asked to fill out a notecard with their analysis of the piece.
Assessment:

This is simply a “Yes” or “No” Objective, where the student is either right or wrong. In this case,
there will be a sheet for the class as a whole where markings are made throughout the year to
show the achievement of the student individually.

The student sheet is simply a blank notecard. By the end of class, it will be turned in as an exit
ticket. The exit ticket should read; ABCBAABAC

Students Melody Harmony Historical Identifying Storyboard Composition


Perspective Themes
Student 1 P P P P P P
Student 2 A D P A A P
Student 3 D D D A P A
Student 4 A D A P A A
P-Proficient A- Approaching D-Developing
Related Objective(s):
Activity Five:
23
 MU. Pr.2.I
Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how the setting and formal
characteristics of musical works contribute to understanding the context of the music in
prepared or improvised performances.

 MU. Pr.3.I
Demonstrate understanding and application of expressive qualities in a varied repertoire
of music through prepared and improvised performances.

Purpose:
This activity has two purposes;

 Help students identify musical themes and strengthen musicality (Pr.3.1)


 Develop literacy skills, creativity, and to create cross-curricular
opportunities for the ELA classroom
Activity:
Students will be asked to complete the storyboard template that they are given
in their student packet using either formal writing or visual representation that can be
explained aloud. They will be creating their own version of the story of The Sword of El
Cid based on the rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic motives present in ‘The Legend of
Tizona.’ The stories will be shared among the student’s sections, then the combined
section’s story will be presented to the class. The class will then vote to keep certain
elements of the story and then discuss how to relate that story line to musical
expressive elements.
Assessment:

Storyboard Elements 15 10 5
Verbal Explanation Verbal explanation is Verbal explanation Verbal explanation
clear, succinct, and fits the storyline, but doesn’t correspond
each written or all elements are not with written frames
drawn element is identified
identified
Individual Frames 8 frames are 5 frames are Less than 3 frames
complete complete are complete
Thematic All three musical All three musical Musical themes are
Understanding themes are identified themes are identified not all correctly
and highlighted by and incorporated into identified, and the
the creative the story, with some thematic framework
framework written by connection doesn’t support the
the student thematically musical queues
Scores
24

Total /45
Related Objective(s):
Activity Six
25
 MU. Cr.2.I
Select and develop draft melodies and rhythmic passages that demonstrate
understanding of characteristic(s) of music or text(s) studied in rehearsal preserving draft
compositions and improvisations through standard notation and audio recording

Purpose:

 Give students an opportunity to grow in compositional skills using


familiar concepts as a scaffolding technique

Activity:

Students will be asked to create a new composition to end the piece


including one to three of the thematic motives discussed in class. They will be
using Garage Band and the written themes from the piece itself to create an 18
measure ending starting from measure 97. The composition must have two
parts and begin in Bb Major. The compositions can be presented in the midi
version or a recorded instrumental version.

Assessment:

Compositional Elements 15 10 5

Thematic Development The theme(s) The theme(s) used The theme(s) are
used is/are set seem rushed or present
up in an disjunct.
appropriate
harmonic
manner
Length At least 18 At least 12 measures At least 8 measures
measures
Key Starts in Bb Does not start in Bb
Major Major
Dynamic Change Students Students manipulate Students do not
manipulate two one instrument/loop achieve dynamic
or more loops to to create dynamic contrast
create dynamic contrast
contrast
Scores
Total /60
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