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Energy and Power Management System

CSI Spec 26 09 13

PART 1 GENERAL

PART 2 SUMMARY

PART 3 Scope: Furnish and install an Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) as detailed on the
Drawings and as herein specified. The system is defined to include data and analytics functionality in the
broad categories of (a) energy performance optimization, (b) power reliability and availability, and (c)
sustainability metrics. Features like real-time monitoring, alarming and event management, energy,
power, and sustainability data analytics and visualization will facilitate the following functions at a high
level:
PART 4 Analyze energy usage and uncover savings opportunities.
PART 5 Meet and exceed energy efficiency and sustainability standards and certifications.
PART 6 Measure return on investment of energy capital projects.
PART 7 Allocate and bill energy costs accurately to processes, tenants, cost centers, and departments.
PART 8 Decrease the frequency and duration of unplanned outages.
PART 9 Improve workplace safety by minimizing exposure to electrical hazards.
PART 10 Provide accurate and automated documentation for regulatory compliance.
PART 11 Improve the effectiveness of equipment maintenance activities.
PART 12 Manage multiple power generation sources effectively.
PART 13 Increase the return on electrical distribution assets.
PART 14 Measure and achieve sustainability targets.

PART 15 The work specified in this Section includes but shall not be limited to the following:
PART 16 Hardware—such as metering devices for monitoring, protection, and control; device communication
interface hardware; servers; mobile or workstation devices; and ancillary equipment.
PART 17 Software—such as on premise installed software and cloud based software-as-a-service (SaaS)
applications.
PART 18 Services, support, and training.

PART 19 The EPMS shall use Ethernet as the high-speed backbone network for device communications.

PART 20 The high-speed network shall allow direct access to data provided by the power monitoring
devices for implementing automatic control.

PART 21 Data and analytics provided by the EPMS system for centralized display, analysis, logging,
alarming, event recording, and other EPMS operations shall be accessible from a computer workstation
with supported operating system and interface software.

PART 22 The EPMS shall be manufactured by Schneider Electric, or approved equal using Schneider
Electric’s EPMS system components as the basis-of-design products.

PART 23 Single Source Responsibility: Obtain LV Switchgear, Breakers, Metering Devices, Gateways,
Energy Servers and required accessories from a single source with resources to produce products of
consistent quality in appearance and physical properties without delaying the work. Materials not
produced by the manufacturer shall be acceptable to and approved by the manufacturer.

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PART 24 REFERENCES

PART 25 General: The publications listed below form a part of this Specification to the extent referenced.
The publications are referred to in the text by the basic designation only. The edition or revision of the
referenced publications shall be the latest date as of the date of the Contract Documents, unless
otherwise specified.

PART 26 All metering devices shall be UL 508 listed, CSA approved, and have CE marking.

PART 27 The system shall comply with the applicable portions of NEMA standards. In addition, the control
unit shall comply with FCC emission standards specified in Part 15, Sub-Part J for Class A application.

PART 28 The Energy and Power Management System and components shall comply with codes and
standards as applicable.

PART 29 SUBMITTALS

PART 30 Product Data: EPMS product catalog sheets and technical data sheets specifying physical data
and electrical performance, electrical characteristics, and connection requirements of each device shall
be supplied under the EPMS scope of work.

PART 31 Drawings, Documentation, Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Manuals:


PART 32 EPMS drawings shall show elementary and interconnection diagrams for all
relevant field-monitoring devices and networking components including power, signal,
control, communications wiring and network addresses. Drawings shall identify network
connections and protocols. Drawings shall identify device room locations and
recommended installation notations. Specific locations and mounting details are subject
to the discretion and responsibilities of the installation contractor. Where LV Switchgear
interconnection is specified, drawings shall not be typical, but shall be provided for each
Switchgear and Breaker furnished.
PART 33 Sequence of operation (for control applications such as automatic transfer schemes, load control,
etc.), layout drawings, as-built wiring diagrams, bill of material, spare parts list, and component catalog
information shall be included in a final documentation package that will be delivered to the owner prior to
training.

PART 34 QUALITY ASSURANCE

PART 35 Manufacturer Qualifications: Manufacturer shall be a firm engaged in providing EPMS systems,
and shall be able to prove an installed base of such systems successfully operating in at least one
hundred customer sites for a minimum of five years.

PART 36 The EPMS vendor shall bear full responsibility to ensure that the EPMS system performs as
specified.

PART 37 The EPMS solution shall be fully tested in a test-bed environment with hardware devices
representative of a large scale functional power distribution system (including both physical and simulated
devices) such as advanced power quality meters, low voltage main meters, low voltage feeder meters,
circuit breaker trip units, transformer monitoring units, protective relays, branch circuit power meters, etc.
Documented test results including system response times, network performance, and recommended
network architectures shall be published and provided upon request.

PART 38 No products shall violate patents filed in any country.

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PART 39 PRODUCTS

PART 40 METERING—MV MAINS—STANDARD

PART 41 The metering device used to monitor medium voltage mains for network management, energy
cost allocation, power quality analysis, asset management, operational efficiency, and compliance
reporting, shall have at minimum the following features:
PART 42 Voltage and current inputs—three (3) phase inputs; direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC,
eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers; five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs.
PART 43 Supported measured and calculated metering parameters—four-quadrant metering, full range of
three (3) phase voltage, current, power and energy measurements, percentage unbalance, power factor
(true and displacement per phase and three (3) phase) demand (minimum/maximum, present demand
interval, running average demand, and predicted demand), total harmonic distortion (THD), individual
current and voltage harmonics readings.
PART 44 High accuracy standards—meets stringent IEC and ANSI measurement accuracy standards such
as IEC 62053-22 Class 0.2S, ANSI C12.20 0.2 Class 10 and 20.
PART 45 High-visibility display with the following characteristics:
PART 46 User programmable to display up to four (4) quantities per screen.
PART 47 Capable of displaying graphical metering data such as phasor diagrams, watt-hour disk simulator,
spectral components etc.
PART 48 Capable of displaying harmonics content (THD, K-factor, crest-factor) in histogram format.
PART 49 I/O: integrated or expandable with the following characteristics:
PART 50 Minimum four (4) digital inputs and four (4) digital outputs for equipment status/position monitoring
and equipment control/interface.
PART 51 Minimum four (4) analog inputs (4-20 mA).
PART 52 Pulse output relay operation for kWh/kVARh total/imported/exported.
PART 53 Communications Capability—multi-port serial and Ethernet communications with at least two
Modbus serial ports and one Ethernet port with Ethernet-to-serial RS-485 gateway.
PART 54 On-board logging:
PART 55 Non-volatile time stamps with on-board logging of I/O conditions, minimum/maximum values, energy
and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured parameters; trending and short-term
forecasting of energy and demand.
PART 56 Ability to record any parameter in the meter and trigger multiple such recordings in continuous
succession (triggered manually or through internal event conditions, including periodic timers or set-point
activity).
PART 57 Continuous recording of intervals from 100 years down to one-half (½) cycle.
PART 58 Number of records (depth) and overflow conditions (stop-when-full or circular) shall be
programmable
PART 59 On-board web server can be used for:
PART 60 Access to real-time values and basic power quality information using standard web browser.
PART 61 Basic meter configuration.
PART 62 Alarming capabilities:
PART 63 Set-point driven alarming capability.
PART 64 Generate an email notification upon an alarm condition.
PART 65 Millisecond resolution timestamp on alarm entries.
PART 66 Support consecutive high-speed triggers for alarms and waveform recording, triggering on a cycle-
by-cycle basis with no “dead” time between events (i.e. no need for a re-arming delay time between
events).
PART 67 Operate relays or initiate data logging captures on alarm conditions
PART 68 Control any number of digital output relays in an AND or an OR configuration, using pulse mode or
latch mode operation, for control and alarm purposes.
PART 69 Combine any logical combination of available set-point conditions to control an internal or external
function/event.
PART 70 Time-stamped event log (1 millisecond (ms.) resolution) with the following characteristics:
PART 71 Support at least 500 events, programmable up to a maximum of 20000 events.

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PART 72 For each event, record date and time, cause and effect, and priority.
PART 73 Record all events relating to set-point activity, relay operation and self-diagnostics.
PART 74 Capable of synchronizing time stamps between devices on the same serial communications
network to within 100 ms.
PART 75 Minimum event recording response time is one-half (½) cycle (8.3ms 60Hz, 10ms 50Hz) for high-
speed events and one (1) second for other events.
PART 76 Programmable set-point events.
PART 77 Power quality analysis and compliance monitoring:
PART 78 Without separate software, have the following capabilities:
PART 79 Display statistical indicators of power quality on the front display.
PART 80 Compare power quality parameters (present, predicted, average, or calculated values) with an
absolute or relative set point, and alert (via e-mail or pager), or enable control (via a local interface to
power quality (PQ) mitigation equipment/control systems through relays and analog or digital outputs)
when set-point is exceeded.
PART 81 Support EN50160 reporting for compliance monitoring.
PART 82 Third party laboratory tested to the power quality standards—IEC 61000-4-30 Class 'A' 2nd edition,
IEC 61000-4-15 – Flicker.
PART 83 Low pass anti-aliasing signal filters to meet the requirements of IEC 61000-4-7:2002.
PART 84 Fault recording and waveform capture:
PART 85 Simultaneously capture voltage and current channels for sub-cycle disturbance, transients, as well
as multi-cycle sags, swells and outages in quick succession, without dead time between recordings.
PART 86 512 samples per cycle waveform recording, minimum 33/40 μs transient capture (60/50 Hz).
PART 87 Configurable to provide COMTRADE waveforms for all captures.
PART 88 Disturbance detection:
PART 89 High-speed sag/swell detection of voltage disturbances on a cycle-by-cycle basis, providing duration
of the disturbance, the minimum, maximum, and average value of the voltage for each phase during the
disturbance.
PART 90 Detect disturbances less than one cycle in duration.
PART 91 Determine the location of a disturbance more quickly and accurately by determining the direction of
the disturbance relative to the meter. Capture analysis results in the event log, along with a timestamp
and confidence level indicating level of certainty.
PART 92 Programmability:
PART 93 Capable of deriving values for combinations of measured or calculated parameters, using
arithmetic, trigonometric, logic, thermocouple linearization, and temperature conversion functions.
PART 94 Capable (through a graphical flexible programming language) of creating programmable modules
with metered and input data, through arithmetic and logic operations (such as minimum, maximum, set
point, digital input, digital output, etc.) that can be arbitrarily linked together to create application
functionality.

PART 95 METERING—LV MAINS—STANDARD

PART 96 The metering device used to monitor the low voltage mains for network management, energy
cost allocation, power quality analysis, asset management, operational efficiency, and compliance
reporting, shall have at minimum the following features:
PART 97 High-visibility color graphical display.
PART 98 Direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC, eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers;
five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs.
PART 99 Supported monitoring parameters—full range of three (3) phase voltage, current, power and energy
measurements, total harmonic distortion (THD), individual current and voltage harmonics readings,
waveform capture, voltage and current disturbances (dip/swell) detection, ability to determine the location
of a disturbance (upstream/downstream).
PART 100 COMTRADE—up to 255 COMTRADE disturbance capture files available via FTP and providing
client notification of new captures through IEC 61850 (RDRE logical node).
PART 101 Power Quality compliance—without using separate software, determine statistical indicators of
power quality that include but are not limited to voltage dips and swells, harmonics, and frequency in

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accordance with EN 50160 power quality standard and provide an indication of pass/fail in a web
interface.
PART 102 User customization—capable of deriving values for any combination of measured or calculated
parameters using arithmetic, trigonometric, and logic functions through graphical, flexible object oriented,
programmable modules. Modules can be linked together in an arbitrary manner to create functionality
such as totalization, efficiency measurements, control functions, load shedding, demand response, power
factor correction, and compliance monitoring.
PART 103 Communications capability—multi-port Ethernet and serial communications with at least two
Ethernet ports and one RS485 serial port. Functionality through Ethernet connectivity includes e-mail on
alarm, e-mail interval energy data, on-board web server, SNMP network management, NTP time
synchronization, Ethernet-to-serial RS-485 gateway, Modbus, DNP3, and IEC 61850.
PART 104 On-board logging—non-volatile time stamped on-board logging of input/output (I/O) conditions,
min/max values, energy and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured parameters; trending
and short-term forecasting of energy and demand; custom alarming with time stamping; trigger alarms on
at least 50 definable power or I/O conditions; use of Boolean logic to combine alarms.
PART 105 I/O—at least three (3) digital inputs and one (1) digital output for equipment status/position
monitoring and equipment control or interfacing with millisecond timestamp.
PART 106 Expandable I/O—the ability to add optional I/O of at least 24 digital inputs and 16 relay outputs, 16
analog inputs and eight (8) analog outputs, or combinations of digital and analog I/O in the field.

PART 107 METERING—LV FEEDERS—STANDARD

PART 108 The metering device used to monitor the medium voltage mains for network management,
energy cost allocation, power quality analysis, asset management, operational efficiency, and compliance
reporting, shall have at minimum the following features:
PART 109 High-visibility color graphical display.
PART 110 Direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC, eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers; 5
A nominal current inputs.
PART 111 Supported monitoring parameters—full range of 3-phase voltage, current, power and energy
measurements, total harmonic distortion (THD), individual current and voltage harmonics readings,
waveform capture, voltage and current disturbances (dip/swell) detection, ability to determine the location
of a disturbance (upstream/downstream).
PART 112 COMTRADE—up to 255 COMTRADE disturbance capture files available via FTP and providing
client notification of new captures through IEC 61850 (RDRE logical node).
PART 113 Power Quality compliance—without using separate software, determine statistical indicators of
power quality that include, but are not limited to, voltage dips and swells, harmonics, and frequency in
accordance with EN 50160 power quality standard and provide an indication of pass/fail in a web
interface.
PART 114 User customization—capable of deriving values for any combination of measured or calculated
parameters using arithmetic, trigonometric, and logic functions through graphical, flexible object oriented,
programmable modules. Modules can be linked together in an arbitrary manner to create functionality
such as totalization, efficiency measurements, control functions, load shedding, demand response, power
factor correction, and compliance monitoring.
PART 115 Communications capability—multi-port Ethernet and serial communications with at least two
Ethernet ports and one RS485 serial port. Functionality through Ethernet connectivity includes e-mail on
alarm, e-mail interval energy data, on-board web server, SNMP network management, NTP time
synchronization, Ethernet-to-serial RS-485 gateway, Modbus, DNP3, and IEC 61850.
PART 116 On-board logging—non-volatile time stamped on-board logging of I/O conditions, min/max values,
energy and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured parameters; trending and short-term
forecasting of energy and demand; custom alarming with time stamping; trigger alarms on at least 50
definable power or I/O conditions; use of Boolean logic to combine alarms.
PART 117 I/O—at least three (3) digital inputs and one (1) digital output for equipment status/position
monitoring and equipment control or interfacing with millisecond timestamp.
PART 118 Expandable I/O—the ability to add optional I/O of at least 24 digital inputs and 16 relay outputs, 16
analog inputs and eight (8) analog outputs, or combinations of digital and analog I/O in the field.

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PART 119 SUB METERING—INDIVIDUAL CIRCUITS—STANDARD

A. The metering device used to monitor circuits for purposes of network management, energy
cost management, energy allocation, and operational efficiency shall have the following
minimum features:

1. Connections and form factor - direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC, eliminating the
need for voltage (potential) transformers; five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs.
Removable connectors for voltage inputs, control power, communications, inputs and
outputs; easily mountable in the pre-made cutout without tools; form factor shall be ¼
DIN with 92 X 92 cut-out and 96 x 96 panel mount integrated display.
2. Supported monitoring parameters—full range of 3-phase voltage, current, power and
energy measurements, power factor, frequency, total harmonic distortion (THD),
individual power harmonics (up to 63rd order).
3. Accuracy standards - use four-quadrant metering and sample current/voltage
simultaneously without gaps with 64 samples per cycle (zero bling); comply with ANSI
C12.20 class 0.2 and IEC 61557-12 class 0.2 for revenue meters.
4. Display - Backlit dot-matrix LCD display, anti-glare and scratch resistant with a minimum
of 128 x128 pixels, capable of displaying four values in one screen simultaneously; a
summary screen to allow the user to view a snapshot of the system; support either
integrated or remote display.
5. Support four (4) digital inputs for Demand Synch Pulse, Time Synch Input, and
Conditional Energy Control; have two (2) digital outputs that operate either by user
command sent over communication link, or in response to a user defined alarm or event.
6. Communications - serial RS-485 Modbus and Ethernet Modbus TCP; provide two
Ethernet ports to allow wiring from meter to meter as a daisy-chain; be capable of serve
data over the Ethernet network accessible through a standard web browser; the monitor
shall contain default pages from the factory.
7. Onboard data logging capabilities - to log data, alarms and events; logged information will
include data logs, minimum/maximum log files of selected parameter values, and alarm
logs for each user defined alarm or event log; support the following on-board nonvolatile
memory—14 parameters every 15 minutes for 90 days.
8. Alarming capabilities - support 29 set-point driven alarms, four (4) digital alarms, (4) unary
alarms, 10 Boolean alarms and five (5) custom alarms; user definable alarm events; set-
point driven alarms shall be available for voltage/current parameters, input status, and
end of interval status.
9. Firmware-upgradeable to enhance functionality through the Ethernet or serial
communication connection and shall allow upgrades of individual meters or groups.
10. Integrated gateway functionality, enabling the capability to connect via Ethernet to
downstream, serially connected devices.
11. Designed accordingly to eco-design complying with ISO 14062, especially MCCB
materials shall be halogen free type; designed for easy disassembly and recycling at end
of life, and comply with environmental directives ROHS and WEEE.

PART 120 METERING—UTILITY REVENUE

PART 121 The revenue grade metering device used to monitor incoming utility medium voltage mains for
grid revenue, substation automation, network management, energy cost allocation, power quality
analysis, asset management, operational efficiency, and compliance reporting, shall have at minimum the
following features:
PART 122 Form factor—ANSI socket 9S, 29S, 35S and 36S; user-selectable 9S, 29S, and 36S; FT-21
switchboard/draw-out style

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PART 123 Voltage and current inputs—three (3) phase inputs; Direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC,
eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers; five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs;
equipped with two spring-loaded socket grounding tabs to ensure reliable electrical contact; optional
mechanical bonding ground.
PART 124 Supported measured and calculated metering parameters—four-quadrant metering, full range of
three-phase voltage, current, power and energy measurements, percentage unbalance, power factor (true
and displacement per phase and three-phase) demand (minimum/maximum, present demand interval,
running average demand, and predicted demand), total harmonic distortion (THD), individual current, and
voltage harmonics readings.
PART 125 High accuracy standards—meet in a single device over the Class 2/10/20 current classes in a
single device (over all environmental conditions and influence factors outlined in the standard and its
referenced standards).
PART 126 Less than half the measurement error of ANSI C12.20 class 0.2 accuracy over the Class 2/10/20
current classes.
PART 127 Less than half the measurement error of IEC62053-22 class 0,2S accuracy from 0.010A-20A in a
single device.
PART 128 Less than twenty times the measurement error of IEC62053-23 class 2 accuracy from 0.010A-20A
in a single device.
PART 129 Support up to eight (8) points of magnitude and phase correction for each voltage and current
measurement input.
PART 130 Overvoltage/overcurrent protection—capable of meeting all accuracy specifications after
withstanding 500A for one (1) second or 2500 VAC RMS for one (1) minute (with internal protection
disabled).
PART 131 High-visibility display with the following characteristics:
PART 132 User programmable to display up to four (4) quantities per screen.
PART 133 Capable of displaying graphical metering data such as phasor diagrams, watt-hour disk simulator,
spectral components etc.
PART 134 Capable of displaying harmonics content (THD, K-factor, crest-factor) in histogram format.
PART 135 I/O—integrated or expandable with the following characteristics:
PART 136 Minimum four (4) digital inputs and four (4) digital outputs for equipment status/position monitoring
and equipment control or interfacing.
PART 137 Minimum four (4) analog inputs (4-20 mA).
PART 138 Pulse output relay operation for kWh/kVARh total/imported/exported.
PART 139 Communications Capability.
PART 140 Ethernet, RS485/232 serial, ANSI 12.18 compliant optical port.
PART 141 Protocol support: DNP3.0(Ethernet/serial); Modbus slave/mastering (Ethernet/serial);
SMTP/SNTP(Ethernet); MV90(Ethernet/serial); XML(TCP); IEC61850(TCP).
PART 142 IRIG-B port to allow GPS time synchronization to +/-1ms accuracy from GPS source.
PART 143 Automatically e-mail alarm notifications, scheduled system status updates and data logs on an
event-driven or scheduled basis.
PART 144 On-board logging.
PART 145 Non-volatile time stamps with on-board logging of I/O conditions, minimum/maximum values,
energy and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured parameters; trending and short-term
forecasting of energy and demand.
PART 146 Ability to record any parameter in the meter and trigger multiple such recordings in continuous
succession (triggered manually or through internal event conditions, including periodic timers or set-point
activity).
PART 147 Continuous recording of intervals from 100 years down to ½ cycle.
PART 148 Number of records (depth) and overflow conditions (stop-when-full or circular) shall be
programmable.
PART 149 On-board web server that can be used for:
PART 150 Access to real-time values and basic power quality data through a web browser.
PART 151 Basic meter configuration.
PART 152 Alarming capabilities:
PART 153 Set-point driven alarming capability.
PART 154 Generate an email notification upon an alarm condition.

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PART 155 Millisecond resolution timestamp on alarm entries
PART 156 Support consecutive high-speed alarm conditions for alarms and waveform recording, triggering on
a cycle-by-cycle basis with no “dead” time between events (i.e., no need for a re-arming delay time
between events).
PART 157 Operate relays or initiate data logging captures on alarm conditions.
PART 158 Control any number of digital output relays in an AND or an OR configuration using pulse mode or
latch mode operation for control and alarm purposes.
PART 159 Combine any logical combination of any number of available set-point conditions to control an
internal or external function or event.
PART 160 Time-stamped event log (one (1) millisecond resolution) with the following characteristics:
PART 161 Support at least 500 events, programmable up to a maximum of 20000 events.
PART 162 For each event, record date and time, cause and effect, and priority.
PART 163 Record all events relating to set-point activity, relay operation, and self-diagnostics.
PART 164 Capable of synchronizing time stamps between devices on the same serial communications
network, to within 100 milliseconds.
PART 165 Minimum event recording response time is ½ cycle (8.3ms 60Hz, 10ms 50Hz) for high-speed
events and one (1) second for other events.
PART 166 Programmable set-point events.
PART 167 Power quality analysis and compliance monitoring.
PART 168 Without separate software, have the following capabilities:
PART 169 Display statistical indicators of power quality on the front display.
PART 170 Compare power quality parameters (present, predicted, average, or calculated values) with an
absolute or relative set point. When set-point is exceeded, alert via e-mail or pager, or enable control via a
local interface to PQ mitigation equipment or control systems through relays and analog or digital outputs.
PART 171 Support EN50160 reporting for compliance monitoring.
PART 172 Third party Laboratory tested to the power quality standards IEC 61000-4-30 Class 'A' 2nd edition,
IEC 61000-4-15, and Flicker.
PART 173 Low pass anti-aliasing signal filters to meet the requirements of IEC 61000-4-7:2002.
PART 174 Fault recording and waveform capture.
PART 175 Simultaneously capture voltage and current channels for sub-cycle disturbance, transients, as well
as multi-cycle sags, swells and outages in quick succession, without dead time between recordings.
PART 176 1024 samples per cycle waveform recording, minimum 17/20 μs transient capture (60/50 Hz).
PART 177 Configurable to provide COMTRADE waveforms for all captures.
PART 178 Disturbance detection.
PART 179 High-speed sag/swell detection of voltage disturbances on a cycle-by-cycle basis, providing
duration of the disturbance, the minimum, maximum, and average value of the voltage for each phase
during the disturbance.
PART 180 Detect disturbances less than one cycle in duration.
PART 181 Determine the location of a disturbance more quickly and accurately by determining the direction
of the disturbance relative to the meter. Capture analysis results in the event log, along with a timestamp
and confidence level indicating level of certainty.
PART 182 Programmability.
PART 183 Capable of deriving values for any combination of measured or calculated parameter using
arithmetic, trigonometric, logic, thermocouple linearization, and temperature conversion functions,
PART 184 Capable (through a graphical flexible programming language) of creating programmable modules
with metered and input data through arithmetic and logic operations (such as minimum, maximum, set
point, digital input, digital output, etc.) that can be arbitrarily linked together to create application
functionality.
PART 185 System Integration—capable of integrating with custom reporting, spreadsheet, database and
other applications with XML compatible data.

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PART 186 METERING—TRANSFER SWITCHES—STANDARD

PART 187 The metering device used to monitor transfer switches for purposes of automated generator
test documentation such as Emergency Power Supply System (EPSS) Test Automation, shall have at
minimum the following features:
PART 188 High-visibility display.
PART 189 Direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC, eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers;
five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs.
PART 190 Supported monitoring parameters—full range of 3-phase voltage, current, power and energy
measurements, total harmonic distortion (THD), individual current and voltage harmonics readings,
waveform capture, and voltage and current disturbance (sag/swell) detection.
PART 191 Communications capability—multi-port serial and Ethernet communications with at least two
Modbus serial ports and one (1) Ethernet port. The Ethernet port offers e-mail on alarm, web server, and
an Ethernet-to-serial RS-485 gateway.
PART 192 On-board logging—non-volatile time stamped on-board logging of I/O conditions,
minimum/maximum values, energy and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured
parameters; trending and short-term forecasting of energy and demand; custom alarming with time
stamping; trigger alarms on at least 50 definable power or I/O conditions; use of Boolean logic to combine
alarms.
PART 193 I/O—at least four (4) digital inputs and four (4) digital outputs for equipment status/position
monitoring, and equipment control or interfacing.

PART 194 METERING—GENERATORS—STANDARD

PART 195 The metering device used to monitor generators for purposes of automated generator test
documentation, Emergency Power Supply System (EPSS) Test Automation, shall have at minimum the
following features:
PART 196 High-visibility display.
PART 197 Direct connect to circuits up to 600 VAC, eliminating the need for voltage (potential) transformers;
five (5) amperes (A) nominal current inputs.
PART 198 Supported monitoring parameters—full range of 3-phase voltage, current, power and energy
measurements, total harmonic distortion (THD), individual current and voltage harmonics readings,
waveform capture, and voltage and current disturbance (sag/swell) detection.
PART 199 Communications Capability—multi-port serial and Ethernet communications with at least two
Modbus serial ports and one (1) Ethernet port. The Ethernet port offers e-mail on alarm, web server and
an Ethernet-to-serial RS-485 gateway.
PART 200 On-board logging—non-volatile time stamped on-board logging of I/O conditions,
minimum/maximum values, energy and demand, maintenance data, alarms, and any measured
parameters; trending and short-term forecasting of energy and demand; custom alarming with time
stamping; trigger alarms on at least 50 definable power or I/O conditions; use of Boolean logic to combine
alarms.
PART 201 I/O—at least four (4) digital inputs and four (4) digital outputs for equipment status/position
monitoring and equipment control or interfacing, four (4) analog inputs (4-20 mA) to monitor engine
parameters such as oil pressure, coolant temperature, etc.
PART 202 High accuracy standards—meet stringent IEC and ANSI measurement accuracy standards such
as IEC 62053-22 Class 0.2S, ANSI C12.20 0.2 Class 10 and 20.
PART 203 Digital fault recording—simultaneously capture voltage and current channels for sub-cycle
disturbance, transients, as well as multi-cycle sags, swells and outages; 512 samples per cycle waveform
recording, 40/33 μs transient capture (50/60 Hz).
PART 204 Power quality analysis and compliance monitoring—a choice of THD metering, individual current
and voltage harmonics readings, waveform capture, and voltage and current disturbance (sag/swell)
detection.
PART 205 Disturbance direction detection—determines the location of a disturbance more quickly and
accurately by determining the direction of the disturbance relative to the meter. Analysis results are
captured in the event log, along with a timestamp and confidence level indicating level of certainty.

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PART 206 Integration of fuel parameters—communications with the fuel monitoring system shall provide
integration of parameters such as fuel level, water content, run time remaining with fuel on hand, etc.
Communications shall be direct or through a protocol converter.
PART 207 Battery Health Monitoring—the system shall be capable of capturing the voltage of the engine start
battery during engine starting with a minimum sampling rate of one sample per millisecond for purposes
of signature analysis.

PART 208 METERING—ENCLOSURES

PART 209 Any metering enclosed cabinets supplied shall meet the following specifications:
PART 210 Minimum UL type 1 listed steel enclosure with factory-supplied knockouts.
PART 211 Lockable and provide for the application of a security seal.
PART 212 Available options for NEMA Type 1 and Type 3R applications.
PART 213 Single set of incoming terminals for connecting the voltage metering leads.
PART 214 Control power and voltage sensing power separated for distribution to each meter from main set of
incoming terminals.
PART 215 External control power transformers not required for any power systems up to, and including, 480
volts.
PART 216 Standard wiring harnesses for control power and voltage sensing to connect each meter internally.
The harness may daisy chain the voltage connections from meter to meter on each row of meters. Finger
safe terminals to terminate the meter end of the wiring harness.
PART 217 Common daisy chain wiring for communications wiring, with a single loop for all meters connected
to the circuit and each end terminated in a common location. Communication wiring installed such that
interference from the power wiring is minimized.
PART 218 Shorting terminal blocks for connecting the current transformer leads from the field to all ordered
meters. Factory installed wiring harness shall be provided to connect the CT circuit from the shorting
block to the meter.
PART 219 Capability to field-install meters without cutting or splicing the voltage or communication wiring
harnesses to be provided.
PART 220 Terminal blocks for incoming and outgoing communications circuit connections.

PART 221 GATEWAYS AND ENERGY SERVERS—ENERGY SERVER LOCAL

PART 222 The energy server appliance shall collect and log WAGES (water, air, gas, electricity, steam)
data by connecting to meters, as well as environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and
CO2 levels connected to its input/output modules. The appliance shall be capable of the following:
PART 223 Logging the historical data for up to two years to its own local storage.
PART 224 Communicating directly to compatible on premise software for gateway access to real-time or
historical data used in dashboards, real-time screens, and reports.
PART 225 Basic energy awareness functionality through display of real time and historical energy data.
PART 226 Entry level energy management software in a box.
PART 227 No software to install. Web pages and data visualization embedded in Energy Server.

PART 228 Gateway Features.


PART 229 The energy server shall have the ability to serve as a Modbus serial to Modbus TCP/IP gateway
for connected software.
PART 230 The energy server shall have the ability to serve as a gateway for connected input devices.

PART 231 Appliance Operating Features—the appliance shall support the following minimum features:
PART 232 Environmental—operating temperature range: -25°C to + 60°C; Humidity 5% to 95%.
PART 233 Power Supply—24 VDC (+/- 10%); Power over Ethernet (POE Class 3, IEEE 802.3 af) at 50 W.
PART 234 Internal Memory—internal memory for web pages with the ability to utilize SD memory cards for
data logging storage.

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PART 235 Connectivity—support for a maximum of 64 connected devices (serial port, Ethernet network via
another Ethernet gateway or devices with embedded Modbus TCP) for real-time readings and data
logging.
PART 236 Digital Inputs—minimum of six IEC62053-31 Class A with LED indication for status and pulse
reception. The digital input shall be supplied directly from the data logger (see power supply output
section below) or from a 10 to 30 VDC external power supply. The maximum pulse frequency is 25 Hz.
PART 237 Analog Inputs—minimum two inputs supporting RTD probes (1% accuracy), 0-10 V sensors (0.5%
accuracy), or 4-20 MA sensors (0.5% accuracy).
PART 238 Ethernet ports—two Ethernet ports, which can be used either as a switch or separated ports (one
(1) IP address for each). Ethernet port shall be configurable as DHCP client or DHCP server.
PART 239 Serial port—configurable for RS232/485 with 2-wire and 4-wire support.
PART 240 Protocol: Ethernet–Modbus TCP/IP, HTTP, FTP, SNMP (MIB2), TCP, UDP, IP, ICMP, ARP; Serial–
MODBUS.
PART 241 Troubleshooting—indicators to show failure mode and firmware updating; detection and reporting
for device communication loss, CPU and memory overuse, weak GPRS signals.

PART 242 Communications Interface—the appliance shall support one of the following three modes of
communication depending on the specified ordering option:
PART 243 Wi-Fi—two modes–connection to LAN infrastructure as an access point without additional Wi-Fi
infrastructure shall be supported. The appliance shall support uploading logged data through the Wi-Fi
connection to a centralized server.
PART 244 GPRS/3G—when equipped with the appropriate cellular contract and SIM card, the appliance shall
support uploading logged data through a GPRS or 3G network to a centralized server. Management of
the GPRS/3G telecom contract is the responsibility of the customer and is out of scope for this
specification.
PART 245 Direct Connect (Gateway—connect directly to compatible on premise software as specified in the
other sections of the specification.

PART 246 Configuration and Setup—appliance configuration shall include the following capabilities:
PART 247 On-board web pages for setup and configuration.
PART 248 Equipped with Device Profile for Web Services (DPWS) technology (available on Windows
operating systems starting with Vista) with two specific web services, discovery and identification.
PART 249 Login secured with https: SSL protocol.
PART 250 Support for multiple user accounts with encrypted passwords.
PART 251 Configure data logging intervals at 5, 15, 30, or 60 minutes.
PART 252 Configure a different logging interval for each of six (6) device types–water, air, gas, electricity,
steam, or environmental values.
PART 253 Count for digital inputs.
PART 254 Export logged data in CSV format.
PART 255 Manage data export through proxy servers.
PART 256 Ability to schedule data file export through email or FTP.
PART 257 Ability to connect to a remote or digital service provider for M2M services.

PART 258 Basic Energy Analytics Capabilities—the appliance shall support some basic energy analytics
capabilities without the need for additional software. Features shall include the display of the following:
PART 259 Real-time data through trends.
PART 260 Historical energy data through dashboards and trends.

PART 261 ENERGY AND POWER MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE—GENERAL

PART 262 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software platform shall facilitate
applications in the broad categories of (a) energy performance, (b) power availability, quality and
reliability, and (c) sustainability performance. At a high level, the feature-set shall provide functions in:
PART 263 Real-time monitoring.
PART 264 Alarming and event management.

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PART 265 Energy cost analysis.
PART 266 Energy, power, and sustainability data analytics and visualization.

PART 267 The software platform shall be certified for use as a part of an ISO50001 program and
verifiably support compliance. In addition, the functionality shall support ongoing ISO50001 programs per
the following areas of Section 4 of the ISO standard:
PART 268 Energy review.
PART 269 Energy baseline.
PART 270 Energy performance indicators.
PART 271 Monitoring, measurement, and analysis.
PART 272 Input to management review.

PART 273 The EPMS shall verifiably support compliance with EN 16247-1 for energy audits.

PART 274 ENERGY AND POWER MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE—REAL TIME MONITORING

PART 275 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall include the capability to
provide screens including real-time data about the electrical infrastructure showing incoming utility feeds,
medium voltage, and low voltage distribution. Relevant data from other energy and facility metadata, such
as water, air, gas, electric, and steam meters (WAGES), industrial process data, weather, occupancy, etc.,
can be integrated, provided the communications and data infrastructure are in place. The capability to
provide real-time monitoring data within other analytics functions, such as dashboard views, shall also be
provided.

PART 276 Electrical single line diagrams: The EPMS shall include a set of screens that show the
electrical single line diagram for the facility with the following:
PART 277 Links to navigate between various levels of the single line diagram.
PART 278 Animated power component of the single line (for example, MV switchgear, MV transformers,
generators, unit substations, LV switchboards, UPS, isolated panel system) shall link to a power
equipment details screen, assuming that the necessary protection and metering hardware is in place as
defined in the Appendix.

PART 279 Equipment details: The EPMS shall include a set of screens that show equipment details
including:
PART 280 Details pertaining to each piece of equipment. This includes a picture of the equipment (if
available), local single line (if applicable), information for each electrical section (for example, breaker and
disconnect switch), and all alarm points.
PART 281 A link to each of the default diagrams of each meter/protection device that apply to the piece of
equipment shall be provided.
PART 282 The EPMS shall have a graphic library with electrical one-line symbols to simplify the creation of
single line diagrams.

PART 283 Floor plans: The EPMS shall include the capability to overlay the display of real time data on
facility floor plans when available. Links to summary screens, equipment details screens, etc., can be
integrated.

PART 284 Status panel: The EPMS shall include a summary status screen for alarm status indication for
major power equipment components of the electrical distribution system.

PART 285 Web-enabled real-time tables: The system shall have the following capabilities for interactive
side-by-side visualization of real-time measurements:
PART 286 Display a tabular view to compare device readings from multiple meters in the power monitoring
network quickly.

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PART 287 Permit users to create, modify, view and share table views through a browser without the need for
a separate software application.
PART 288 Have built-in functions that allow users to easily and instantly filter out measurements when
viewing a table.
PART 289 Support both physical and virtual devices defined in the system.
PART 290 Support exporting real time tabular data into Excel formats.

PART 291 Power monitoring trending: The EPMS shall include graphical charts for real-time trending of
power usage (kW, Volt, Amp, and kWh) or any measurement supported by metered equipment such as
generators and MV/LV switchgear. These trends shall include the capability to:
PART 292 Trend up to 14 measurements on the same chart (limit may be increased if desired).
PART 293 Customize attributes such as color, line thickness, overlays, display name, and display units for
each data series.
PART 294 View the trend using an auto-scaling or manual chart axis.
PART 295 Adjust the desired time viewing window for the trend.
PART 296 Inspect the trend by zooming and panning to focus in on key areas of the trend.
PART 297 Provide drill-down detail for the highlighted trend data point to help identify root causes of
concern.
PART 298 Trend measurements with different units on the same chart using two different axes.
PART 299 Provide calculated values of minimum, maximum, and average values for a trend.
PART 300 Configure a target threshold line for comparison against actual measurements.
PART 301 Configure up to two target bands with visual indicators to identify when a measurement is outside
specified limits.
PART 302 Display real-time data and/or historical data per data series, with optional back-filling of the real-
time data using historical data.
PART 303 Export trend data to .CSV/Excel format.
PART 304 Access trend data from a web browser or mobile environment.
PART 305 Save specified trends in a library for later use.
PART 306 Share trends with other users or restrict use.
PART 307 Simultaneously view multiple trend charts, or alternatively maximize a selected trend to display it
in full screen mode.

PART 308 ENERGY AND POWER MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE—ALARM AND EVENT ANALYSIS AND
NOTIFICATION

PART 309 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall provide alarm and event
annunciation features that include the following:
PART 310 An alarm viewer that provides a summary of the active alarms shall be provided. The viewer shall:
PART 311 Be visible in any screen when logged into the web interface of the system.
PART 312 Display the total number of unacknowledged alarms, and the breakdown of how many of those
alarms are high priority, medium priority and low priority.
PART 313 Provide an audible alarm and a simple means for muting the alarm.
PART 314 Allow a simple mechanism to acknowledge alarms for users with appropriate user privileges.
PART 315 Allow a mechanism to sort and group alarms.
PART 316 Allow a mechanism to set configurable alarm thresholds, for example, high, medium, and low.
PART 317 Allow a mechanism to create user defined alarm views that fit user defined criteria.
PART 318 Provide an active alarms view to show alarms currently in the active state.

PART 319 The EPMS shall provide an alarm notification system.


PART 320 The alarm evaluation and notification system shall ensure that appropriate staff members are
notified of power system events. The system shall collect data, evaluate alarm conditions, and annunciate
the alarms to specified users through email or SMS text messages.
PART 321 The alarm evaluation and notification system shall include:
PART 322 An alarm evaluation engine.

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PART 323 An alarm notification/annunciation engine that supports annunciation through email and SMS text
message.
PART 324 Flexible alarm scheduling capabilities.
PART 325 Web-based configuration tools for notification configuration, log viewing, and filtering.
PART 326 The ability to control alarm flooding by intelligent aggregation through alarm filtering and
consolidation.
PART 327 Message delivery mechanisms such as:
PART 328 Electronic mail (Email).
PART 329 Text messaging for cell phones (GSM Modem).
PART 330 Short messaging peer-to-peer protocol (SMPP).
PART 331 Simple Network Paging Protocol (SNPP).
PART 332 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
PART 333 Traditional dial-up Pager (TAP).

PART 334 ENERGY AND POWER MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE—DATA ANALYTICS AND


VISUALIZATION

PART 335 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall provide web-enabled
dashboards.
PART 336 The system shall have a web client interface that presents interactive auto-updating dashboard
views that may contain water, air, gas, electric, and steam (WAGES) energy summary data, historical data
trends, images, and content from any accessible URL address.
PART 337 Users shall be able to create, modify, view, and share their dashboards (including graphics, labels,
scaling, measurements, date ranges, etc.) using only a browser and without a separate software
application.
PART 338 Users shall be able to create with configurable drag and drop gadgets to show the following data:
PART 339 Images from any web-based content
PART 340 Energy consumption
PART 341 Energy cost
PART 342 Energy comparison
PART 343 Energy savings
PART 344 Emissions
PART 345 Trends
PART 346 The system shall facilitate kiosk displays by assigning individual dashboards to slideshows to run
in unattended mode, scrolling through designated dashboards at a configurable time interval.
PART 347 The system shall permit users to create, save, and share an unlimited number of dashboards and
slideshows.

PART 348 The system shall provide a web-enabled reporting platform.


PART 349 The system shall provide a web-enabled reporting tool to view historical data in pre-formatted or
user-defined report templates.
PART 350 The system shall support reporting on all supported physical devices and virtual (or calculated)
meters as defined in the device hierarchy.
PART 351 Users shall be able to create, modify, view and share their reports in the web reports interface.
PART 352 The reporting tool shall provide standard pre-formatted report templates for:
PART 353 Billing.
PART 354 Energy cost.
PART 355 Load profile.
PART 356 System-wide interactive power quality with CBEMA/ITIC evaluation.
PART 357 EN50160 compliance.
PART 358 EN50160 Edition 4 compliance.
PART 359 IEE519-1992 Harmonics compliance.
PART 360 IEC61000-4-30.
PART 361 100 ms. power quality.
PART 362 Energy Usage: period-over-period, by shift, single and multi-device comparison.

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 14 of 27


PART 363 Tabular and trend report.
PART 364 Alarm and event history.
PART 365 System configuration.
PART 366 Hourly usage report.
PART 367 Single and multi-device usage reports.
PART 368 The reporting tool shall support exporting to the following output formats: .HTML, .PDF, .TIFF,
.Excel, and .XML.
PART 369 The reporting tool shall be capable of subscriptions to facilitate automatic distribution of reports
according to a configurable schedule by saving to network locations, email, or print.
PART 370 The system shall support the ability to trigger the generation and delivery of a pre-configured report
based on pre-specified event criteria.The system shall be capable of configuring event monitoring
detection filters criteria.
PART 371 The reporting tool shall have a framework to support:
PART 372 Simple customizations to reports such as colors, image inclusions, turning report sections on/off,
and logo changes without programming.
PART 373 Additional more complex report customization through a programming kit.
PART 374 The reporting tool shall be capable of subscriptions to facilitate automatic distribution of reports
according to a configurable schedule by saving to network locations, email, or print.

PART 375 ENERGY AND POWER MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE—TECHNICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

PART 376 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall provide the following
operating system and browser support:
PART 377 All associated core components of the EPMS software operate as Windows operating system
services.
PART 378 The web client interface shall support multiple browsers.

PART 379 The EPMS shall provide the following data management support:
PART 380 Microsoft SQL Server database engine per supported configurations.
PART 381 All network configuration settings relating to device routing and addressing, communication
gateways, distributed I/O servers, and load-distributing application servers shall be stored in the EPMS
databases.
PART 382 Archiving, trimming, and on-demand or scheduled capabilities shall be supported.
PART 383 The capability to view historical data from archived databases shall be included.
PART 384 The EPMS shall be capable of retrieving data from devices in the monitoring network and provide
the following abilities:
PART 385 Interrogate and download logs of interval, waveform, and alarm data stored onboard metering
devices and related circuit breaker trip units.
PART 386 Interrogate and download logs of interval data generated by the software system (software-based
logging).
PART 387 Interrogate and download logs of alarm and event data generated by the software system
(software-based alarming).
PART 388 Automatically re-arm the waveform recorders upon upload of information.
PART 389 Detect unknown measurement quantities provided by devices in the network, and automatically
generate appropriate database references for those quantities without user intervention.

PART 390 The EPMS system shall include an Administrative interface with the following management
functions:
PART 391 Security: administer groups and user accounts with role based privileges.
PART 392 Database: initiate backup, archiving, and trimming tasks.
PART 393 Devices: Add or rename devices, map measurements, and communication settings.
PART 394 Connections: Configure connection schedules and manage modem connections.
PART 395 Events: View and manage software system events.

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PART 396 The EPMS system shall function without disruptions (including communications, logging, and
alarming) and shall remain online during all system administration functions such as adding, modifying, or
removing devices in the system; creating, modifying, or removing graphical diagrams, dashboards, tables,
and reports; creating, modifying, or removing application logic programs in the application logic engine

PART 397 The EPMS shall support the following device support and management features:
PART 398 The system shall include factory-tested native support for at least 50 electrical distribution devices
(energy and power meters, protection relays, circuit breakers, PLCs, etc.).
PART 399 Native comprehensive device support shall include:
PART 400 Pre-engineered, interactive graphical display screens for viewing and analyzing real-time and
historical device data.
PART 401 All registers pre-mapped to standard measurement names without additional mapping of internal
device registers.
PART 402 Automatic upload of time-stamped onboard data logs, event strings, and waveform captures
without additional configuration.
PART 403 Automatic time synchronization.
PART 404 The system shall support integration with other third party intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) not
directly supported natively.
PART 405 The system shall support logical device definitions for user-friendly device and measurement
names for inputs/outputs or channels on devices that represent a downstream device (in the case of
PLCs and auxiliary inputs) or an individual circuit (in the case of multi-circuit devices). Bulk-import
capability to create large numbers of logical devices without manual single-device configuration shall be
supported.
PART 406 The system shall support the concept of hierarchies to organize devices structurally into various
levels. Examples include Tenants/Racks/Circuits, PDUs/RPPs/Panels, or Buildings/Floors/Rooms. The
system shall include the ability to:
PART 407 Aggregate data at any location in the hierarchy.
PART 408 Track hierarchy configuration changes over time.
PART 409 Allow administrators to update names in a given hierarchy at any time (even in the past) to ensure
accurate reporting of associated data points (for example, report on energy consumption for a Tenant who
has re-located, expanded, added, or removed circuits during the billing period).
PART 410 Export the hierarchy structure to Excel format.
PART 411 Bulk-import capability to create and edit large hierarchies without manual per-device setup.

PART 412 The system shall support extensibility in the following ways:
PART 413 Provide a graphical, object-oriented application logic engine to create system-wide logic modules
with arithmetic, XML data import, PC-based alarming, and logging capabilities.
PART 414 The application logic engine shall have a comprehensive set of functions to create customized
applications programs for functions such as weather or real-time price import, KPI calculations, energy
units conversion, data aggregation, data normalization, data comparison, power loss calculations, power
factor control, load shedding, etc.

PART 415 The EPMS system shall support system integration in the following ways:
PART 416 Device-level Modbus interoperability.
PART 417 The system shall be capable of supporting Modbus communicating devices and be capable of
functioning as a Modbus master to read/write registers in Modbus devices for monitoring and control
applications.
PART 418 The system shall be capable of Modbus device definition (device drivers) creation to enable
integration of third-party Modbus protocol devices.
PART 419 System-level OPC interoperability.
PART 420 The system shall be OPC DA 2.0.1 compliant (as per the OPC Foundation Compliance Testing
process) for OPC Server and OPC Client data sharing applications amongst OPC compliant systems.
PART 421 The system shall provide default OPC Server tag mappings for all natively supported device types
without the need to select, configure, or program the mapping of device registers to OPC tags.

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 16 of 27


PART 422 The system shall provide a flexible means to add or change OPC mappings and shall support the
ability to add custom measurements.
PART 423 Data-level interoperability.
PART 424 The system shall support the Extract, Transform, and Load (ETL) data log file transfer mechanism
to import and export data log files to integrate functions such as manual data entry, offline device data
import, push data to the cloud, or to other systems.
PART 425 The system shall include a mapping application for specifying log data file import-export mappings
and import schedules to facilitate import/export in formats such as .CSV, .XML, etc.

PART 426 Web application level integration.


PART 427 The system shall include:
PART 428 The capability to integrate other web applications into its web interface through the use of
pluggable web content widgets.
PART 429 The capability to supply content such as dashboards, reports, trends and diagrams to other
external web applications through addressable URLs.
PART 430 Web services integration.
PART 431 The system shall include web services integration capabilities for machine-to-machine interactions
with other application software systems with the following characteristics:
PART 432 Based on SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) protocol specification.
PART 433 Provide a Web Services Description Language (WSDL), machine-readable description.
PART 434 Allow access to real-time, historical (i.e., time stamped), and alarm/event type data.
PART 435 Provide the ability to acknowledge alarms by authenticated and authorized clients.
PART 436 Provide digest authentication functionality.
PART 437 Provide the ability to be enabled or disabled.

PART 438 The system shall support internationalization and regional settings for localization. The
languages supported by default are: Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), English, French,
German, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Polish, Czech, and Japanese.

PART 439 The EPMS shall support system configuration and advanced analysis tools in the following
ways:
PART 440 The system shall include a monitoring and analysis application with a rich set of power tools for
water, air, gas, electric, and steam (WAGES) energy analysis, power quality analysis, power system
monitoring and control, and include the following capabilities:
PART 441 Auto-diagram creation capability to create a comprehensive set of linked hierarchical graphical
diagrams showing devices and their associated device specific diagrams in the network.
PART 442 Ability to import custom graphics or images to create electrical one-line diagrams, facility maps,
plan views, floor layouts, equipment representations, and mimic displays.
PART 443 Support for power quality analysis.
PART 444 Plot PQ events on an ITIC/CBMEA curve or SEMI F47 curve.
PART 445 Manual waveform capture.
PART 446 Visualization or analysis tools for sinusoidal electrical waveforms including waveform overlay,
zooming, and calculations for RMS, peak, delta, harmonics spectrum bar charts, and phasor diagrams.
PART 447 Ability to write to device registers for applications such as resetting, triggering, toggling, switching,
manual waveform capture, controlling remote devices and equipment, including breakers.
PART 448 Ability to develop custom graphics screens and application logic programs with the devices being
offline or disabled to allow for project development in disconnected mode.

PART 449 The system communications infrastructure shall support the following:
PART 450 Multiple communications network topologies including Ethernet/TCP, serial RS-485/RS-232, and
Modem dial-up connections.
PART 451 The capability to provide time-synchronization signals over an Ethernet network with 16ms
accuracy or better.
PART 452 The capability to communicate simultaneously with multiple devices, including devices on different
physical communications channels.

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PART 453 Scalability to greater than a thousand devices.
PART 454 The ability to automatically retrieve logged data (interval data, event data, and waveform data)
from natively supported devices without additional configuration.
PART 455 The ability to accept or reject duplicate data entries into the database.
PART 456 The ability to schedule connection times for specific time-periods to conserve bandwidth.
PART 457 The ability to automatically disconnect modem connections when all device data is database-
synchronized (used to minimize long distance phone charges).
PART 458 Support for modem pooling and assignment of communication sites to specific modems for
communications optimization.

PART 459 APPLICATIONS—POWER QUALITY MONITORING, COMPLIANCE AND ANALYSIS

PART 460 Power Quality Monitoring: The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall
provide power quality specific screens and reports as follows.
PART 461 Device Level Power quality summary screen—the data collected by any compliant PQ-capable
metering device shall be summarized to show:
PART 462 Voltage disturbances, including the date and time of the last disturbance, the count of the number
of transient events, and the count of the number of sag/swell events.
PART 463 Harmonic measurements, including a link to the harmonics log for the particular device.
Additionally, there shall be a link to another screen that shall show the real-time Total Harmonic Distortion
(THD) content and the maximum THD.
PART 464 Flicker measurements.
PART 465 Logged events, including a link to the event log for the particular device.
PART 466 Waveform logs, including a link for waveforms captured during transients and sag/swell events.
PART 467 Further detailed waveform analysis using a tool shall be provided.

PART 468 System Level Power Quality summary screen—the power quality report shall display all power
quality events collected in the EPMS for one or more measuring points for a given period of time.
PART 469 The report shall show a summary table of all the events in a given time period and provide the
means to see further details (power quality details report) for any given event.
PART 470 The summary report shall contain a plot of the Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) (also
known as ITIC or CBEMA) curve that displays the worst disturbance from each event listed in the
summary table. The summary table shall contain the following components for each event:
PART 471 Event identifier.
PART 472 Source.
PART 473 Event timestamp.
PART 474 Phase identifier for the worst disturbance during this event (ex., "V1").
PART 475 Voltage magnitude for the worst disturbance during this event in % of nominal (for example,
"68.80%")
PART 476 Voltage magnitude maximum and minimum on phases V1, V2 and V3 for the worst disturbance
during this event in % of nominal.
PART 477 Duration for the worst disturbance during this event in seconds (for example, "0.084s").
PART 478 Disturbance type for the worst disturbance during this event (for example, "sag").
PART 479 ITI (ITIC, CBEMA) tolerance curve violations (for example, "outside tolerance").
PART 480 Link to the details report for this event.
PART 481 Link to waveform report for the worst disturbance during this event.
PART 482 Each entry in the summary table shall include a link that provides further details for the given
event. The details to be shown are:
PART 483 Disturbance event timestamp.
PART 484 Phase identifier.
PART 485 Voltage magnitude in % of nominal (for example, "68.80%")
PART 486 Voltage magnitude maximum and minimum on phase V1, V2 and V3 in percentage of nominal.
PART 487 Duration in seconds.
PART 488 Disturbance type.
PART 489 ITI (CBEMA) tolerance curve violations (for example, "outside tolerance").

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 18 of 27


PART 490 Link to waveform report.
PART 491 Each entry in the summary table shall include a link that shows the waveforms of the given event
(if any exist). The waveforms shown shall be for both the voltage and current readings of the measuring
point.

PART 492 One hundred (100)-millisecond Power Quality Report


PART 493 This report shall display data recorded at 100 millisecond intervals, with a data table for the
measured point and selected measurement containing columns labeled: Timestamp, Source Label,
Measurement Label, Measurement Unit, and Data Value.

PART 494 IEEE1159.3 Power Quality Data Interchange Format (PQDIF) Support
PART 495 The system shall provide a mechanism to export power quality data to the non-proprietary
standard PQDIF format with support for the following default templates:
PART 496 Flicker: Short-term and long-term flicker disturbance data on the voltage inputs.
PART 497 Sag/Swell: Sag/swell disturbance data for voltage inputs, including minimum, maximum and
average values.
PART 498 Sag/Swell Waveforms: Waveform data for voltage sag/swell.
PART 499 Steady-state: Steady-state (RMS) data for trending.
PART 500 Steady-state Waveforms: Waveform data for steady-state data.

PART 501 Disturbance Direction Detection


PART 502 For power quality compliant devices, the system will indicate the direction of the disturbance within
the electrical distribution system in event logs, with associated confidence or certainty rating (for example,
“Upstream: Confidence Rating - High”, or “Downstream: Confidence Rating – Medium” etc.).

PART 503 Power Quality Compliance Reporting


PART 504 EN50160 Edition 4 compliance report
PART 505 The EN50160 voltage characteristics of public distribution systems compliance report shall display
a summary of EN50160 compliance for a set of measuring points in the system for a given time period for
the following components:
PART 506 Power frequency.
PART 507 Supply voltage variations.
PART 508 Flicker severity.
PART 509 Supply voltage unbalance.
PART 510 Harmonic voltage.
PART 511 Inter-harmonic voltages.
PART 512 Mains signaling voltages.
PART 513 Interruptions of supply voltage.
PART 514 Supply voltage dips and swells.
PART 515 Additionally, the report shall allow for detailed drill-down for a given measuring point and
measurement period.

PART 516 IEC61000-4-30 report


The IEC61000-4-30 compliance report shall display a summary of the IEC61000-4-30
compliance for a set of measuring points in the system for a given period. The report
shall:
PART 517 Include the following IEC61000-4-30 components: frequency, supply voltage magnitude, flicker,
supply voltage unbalance and supply voltage THD.
PART 518 Provide a means to manually enter a baseline value for each component.
PART 519 Display a series of trends for each component listed with each component’s manually entered
baseline.
PART 520 Include a data table that displays all the power quality-related events for the given report period
including voltage dips, voltage swells, and voltage interruptions.

PART 521 IEEE 519 Harmonics Compliance report


The IEEE519 harmonics compliance report shall have the following capabilities:

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 19 of 27


PART 522 Provide a mechanism to report on IEEE519 limits.
PART 523 Provide a mechanism to report on user defined limits.
PART 524 Ability to determine voltage and Isc/I-l ratio directly from the device, where Isc is the maximum
short circuit current at the point of common coupling (PCC), and the I-l is the maximum fundamental
frequency demand current.

PART 525 For both individual and total harmonic voltage distortion, display the following:
PART 526 The allowable IEEE519 limits.
PART 527 The % time out of compliance.
PART 528 The number of non-compliant three-second intervals.
PART 529 The number of total measured intervals.
PART 530 Number of missing or invalid intervals.
PART 531 Compliance levels of Warning, Out of compliance, or Compliant.
PART 532 A maximum value with a time-stamp of when that distortion was measured.

PART 533 For both individual and total harmonic distortion for current, display all the values specified in the
previous section for every range of harmonic orders.

PART 534 For each phase, voltage, and current provide a graphical plot of THD versus time stamp. On the
same plot, plot the allowable limit to allow for visual comparison of compliance.

PART 535 Provide a graphical plot of “average value of voltage per harmonic” and “average value of current
per harmonic” as a percentage of fundamental frequency, versus harmonic order to allow for visual
identification of the worst harmonic problems.

PART 536 For each phase voltage and current, provide a graphical plot of harmonic content versus time
stamp with simultaneous plot lines for a set of harmonic orders (for example, h <= 11). This allows the
user to identify the harmonic orders associated with the worst problems to enable mitigation measures
such as active filtering.

PART 537 Integration with Power Quality Mitigation Equipment


PART 538 The system shall natively support interfaces with power quality mitigation equipment for power
factor correction, harmonic filtering, voltage sag mitigation (UPS), and transient protection to provide end-
to-end solutions for monitoring, correction and optimization of power quality.

PART 539 APPLICATIONS—ASSET AND CAPACITY MANAGEMENT

PART 540 Equipment Capacity Planning (NEC 220.87 compliant) reporting shall meet the following
criteria:
PART 541 For each device, monitor maximum load and compare to equipment capacity to indicate the
degree of equipment loading.
PART 542 Highlight when a user configurable threshold (for example, 80%) is exceeded.
PART 543 Provide the ability to report on all power distribution equipment such as automatic transfer
switches, medium and low voltage switch gear, transformers, power distribution panels, uninterruptible
power supply, etc.
PART 544 Show the peak load provided by the transfer switch or other equipment during a time period and
compare the peak load to equipment capacity.
PART 545 Provide a summary of all transfer switches or equipment in a group or daily information for each
piece of equipment in the group.

PART 546 APPLICATIONS—ENERGY COST ALLOCATION

PART 547 The Energy and Power Management System (EPMS) software shall include energy cost
allocation and bill generation features designed for the following applications.
PART 548 Internal Cost Allocation

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PART 549 Tenant Bill Generation
PART 550 Utility Bill Verification (Shadow Bill Generation)

PART 551 The EPMS cost allocation and bill generation features shall include
PART 552 Reporting on energy costs for all energy sources - WAGES (Water, Air, Gas, Electrical and Steam)
PART 553 Aggregating energy costs up to any point in the organizational hierarchy, such as areas,
departments, cost centers, tenants etc.
PART 554 Configurable start and end dates for energy cost reporting.
PART 555 Calculated apportionment by creating virtual measurements allocating percentages of physical
meters, for example, 20% (Meter 2) + 80% (Meter 3).
PART 556 Calculated net metering by creating summed or subtracted physical meters, for example, Meter 1
+ Meter 2 – Meter 3.
PART 557 Common area allocation to allocate calculated values to various entities in the organization
hierarchy
PART 558 Allocation of cost by standard time intervals, such as daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, or by specified
time intervals like production shift
PART 559 Data integrity checks including warnings for data gaps or duplicates.
PART 560 Customization of energy cost reports to allow for custom logos and headers.

PART 561 The EPMS shall include a rate engine with the following capabilities.
PART 562 Pre-engineered rate files for common utility rate structures.
PART 563 Support for rate schedule configuration and business logic through configuration files (no
programming)
PART 564 Support for common rate determinants including:
PART 565 Energy usage (kWh, kVARh, kVAh)
PART 566 Demand (kW, kVAR)
PART 567 Power factor penalties
PART 568 Co-incident demand
PART 569 Time of use rates (off-peak, on-peak, etc.)
PART 570 Seasonal rates (summer, winter, etc.)
PART 571 Daily charges
PART 572 Tiered or block energy rates (kWh)
PART 573 Taxes
PART 574 Dynamic rate formulas
PART 575 Web based interface for rate schedule editing.

PART 576 The EPMS shall include the following user-configurable report templates to facilitate energy
analysis.
PART 577 Billing Report: Billing report for any entity in the hierarchy with
PART 578 configurable time-periods and rate structures
PART 579 Itemized entries with each item in the rate structure and associated costs clearly specified
PART 580 Billing Summary Report: Billing Report for multiple entities in the hierarchy with
PART 581 Energy costs per entity represented as a subtotal section
PART 582 Grand Total for all entities
PART 583 Multiple Billing Report: Billing Report for multiple entities in the hierarchy with
PART 584 Each individual entity represented as a distinct section
PART 585 Itemized entries with each item in the rate structure and associated costs clearly specified

PART 586 The EPMS will support customizing the cost allocation reporting to different environments such
as:
PART 587 Industrial Environment:
PART 588 Energy cost while in operation versus shut down, by shift etc.
PART 589 Energy cost per unit of production.
PART 590 Building Environment:
PART 591 Energy cost while building occupied versus empty.

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PART 592 Energy cost per occupant.
PART 593 Data Centers:
PART 594 Energy cost by colocation tenant.
PART 595 Energy cost by PDU, rack etc.
PART 596 Provide above comparisons in graphical format such as bar and pie charts.

PART 597 The EPMS shall have the capability of exporting energy cost data, along with pertinent
metadata, to integrate with external billing systems. The export mechanisms must be flexible with
PART 598 Support for common data file formats such as xml, csv and multiple files
PART 599 Support for XSLT transformations to customize format to match systems for billing, accounting,
SAP, ERP etc.

PART 600 APPLICATIONS—ENERGY AWARENESS)

A. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) software shall include features to
enhance energy awareness and drive energy conservation and sustainability programs. The
features must facilitate the following functions.
A. Profiling and trending energy use for all electrical and piped utilities (WAGES)
B. Establishing energy baselines
C. Comparing and ranking energy use with different entities (buildings, departments etc.)
D. Energy monitoring against user-configurable targets

E. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) will facilitate energy awareness through
the following capabilities.
F. Display energy usage using trend, graph, bar, dial dashboard visualizations.
G. Rank selected energy consumption entities or loads in descending order.
H. Convert various energy measurements to a common unit.
I. Normalize energy usage by typical measurements like area, and compare normalized data
visually.
J. Display energy profiles according to time of use (time of day, week day, holidays, season,
etc.) with overlaid energy target lines from other dynamic sources or fixed limits.

K. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) shall include the following user-
configurable report templates to facilitate energy awareness.
L. Energy Usage
M. Organize and overlay energy usage data from multiple entities (such as load type, departments
etc.) in the same graph through common visual cues such as column, bar, pie chart etc.
N. Organize and overlay energy usage data from multiple entities vs. common time intervals such as
daily, weekly, monthly etc.
O. Consumption Ranking: Visually rank different entities (such as buildings, floor,
departments etc.) by energy usage
P. Energy Comparison: Visually
Q. categorize energy usage by load type to find opportunities for savings
R. compare energy performance across entities such as buildings, departments for benchmarking
purposes
S. Energy Usage by Time-of-use: Aggregate energy usage by time-of-use periods and
highlight any exceeded thresholds (targets)

T. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) energy awareness report templates
report templates will include the following general capabilities.
U. Normalize consumption data by a static scalar
V. Set different aggregation intervals
W. Configure different time periods
X. Set upper and lower target lines

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Y. Display data through common visual cues such as column, line, pie chart, gauges etc.
Z. Display warnings for missing data points

PART 601 APPLICATIONS—ENERGY ANALYSIS

B. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) software shall include features for
detailed energy analysis to determine the factors contributing most to energy usage, find
energy usage patterns, and implement energy conservation measures. The features must
support common activities such as
A. Energy Usage Analysis
B. Capacity Analysis
C. Regression Analysis
D. Energy Modeling

E. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) will facilitate energy analysis through the
following capabilities.
F. Display energy data in interactive calendar views for more intuitive human analysis.
G. Plot data by order of magnitude (rather than chronological).
H. Model data using linear predictor functions for assessing the relationship of two variables to
find anomalies and track performance.
I. Plot single or broken “best-fit” line and trend actual values against expected values based on
linear regression calculations.

J. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) shall include the following user-
configurable report templates to facilitate energy analysis.
K. Calendar Trend Monthly & Calendar Trend Weekly Reports
L. Display any measurement dataset as a line trend in a calendar formatted output with
M. daily trends for a given month or the last complete 31 days (monthly)
N. daily trends for a given week or the last complete 7 days (weekly)
O. Support user-defined hours for a day (e.g. 09:00 – 17:00).
P. Display the line trend in a different color for the user-defined period.
Q. Overlay user-defined target lines
R. Duration Curve:
S. Display any measurement dataset as a
T. Duration curve trend, organizing data from highest to lowest magnitude
U. Scatter plot by occurrences in the time range
V. A table of chronological interval data
W. Overlay user-defined target lines
X. Display a user-specified percentage occurrence indicator on the duration trend line

Y. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) shall include a report template to support
energy modeling through regression analysis with the following capabilities.
Z. Represent the relationship between any measurement datasets in the following manner:
AA. X-Y scatter plot with overlay best-fit or broken-line regression lines
BB. Model summary table with model output variables - slope, Y-Intercept, R2, RMSE etc.
CC.Display measured values vs. expected (model output) values
DD.Support the following X Axis Calculation methods - Cooling degree Days (CDD), Heating
Degree Days (HDD), Average, Sum, Delta
EE. Support the following Y Axis Calculation Methods – Average, Sum, Delta
FF. Support data quality checks and optionally exclude missing data

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 23 of 27


PART 602 [EQUIPMENT - LOW VOLTAGE DRAWOUT (LVDO) SWITCHGEAR INTEGRATED INTO
EPMS

When specified, Low Voltage Drawout Switchgear (identified as LV switchgear) constructed to


ANSI C37.20.1 standards shall be provided as indicated on the drawings. Main and Feeder Circuit
Breakers used in the LV Switchgear shall be Stored Energy Power Circuit Breakers designed,
tested and manufactured to ANSI C37.13 and UL1066.

PART 603 The switchgear manufacturer shall be a firm engaged in the manufacture of switchgear of
types and sizes required, and whose products have been in satisfactory use in similar service
for a minimum of fifteen (15) years.

PART 604 The scope of work specified herein shall be coordinated with LV Switchgear
manufacturer to ensure compatibility between software and hardware as follows:
1. The LV Switchgear lineup shall include an internal inter-wired communications network
for connection to the user’s network for power monitoring, equipment status and alarms.
2. The following communications capabilities to the switchgear communications network will
be provided.
a. A connection to connect to on premise EPMS software
b. Communications to each breaker’s embedded web pages for maintenance review,
troubleshooting and monitoring through a standard web browser.
3. The switchgear communication system shall have the following characteristics.
a. Ethernet Modbus TCPIP connection via daisy-chain architecture to each Stored
Energy Power Circuit Breaker and meters
b. Pre-configured and tested at the factory (including breakers and metering devices),
with relevant network drawings provided. Final device addressing will be
configurable by the end user.
c. Network inter-wiring consisting of shielded cables with pluggable connectors to
facilitate ease of connection across shipping splits.
d. Documented communications test results including network connections provided
upon request.
4. Each Stored Energy Power Circuit Breaker shall contain an embedded web server to
provide breaker/cradle status, energy monitoring, historical trending, maintenance
indicators/logging, email alerts and communications diagnostics without necessarily
connecting to the system EPMS software i.e. via a direct connection to the web server.
Downloadable software shall be available to adjust trip/alarm points, display tripping
curves and update firmware.
5. EPMS software integration will include native communications drivers as specified in the
“EPMS Software – Technical Infrastructure” section.
6. Each Stored Energy Power Circuit Breaker shall be compatible with the Breaker Aging
Monitoring functionality as specified in the “Applications - Breaker (LV) Infrastructure
Management” section, to provide an estimate of electrical and environmental aging data
for preventive maintenance planning.]

PART 605 [APPLICATIONS— BREAKER (LV) INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT

C. The Energy & Power Management System (EPMS) software shall include Low Voltage (LV)
Breaker Aging Monitoring to provide an estimate of electrical and environmental aging data
(for all supported breakers) that can then be used for preventive maintenance planning for LV
switchgear.

D. The aging algorithm will use the following electrical and environmental parameters to estimate
aging percentages for supported devices.
A. Overload tripping

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 24 of 27


B. Short circuit tripping
C. Operation
D. Commissioning date
E. Ambient temperature
F. Vibration
G. Humidity

H. The system will include a breaker aging report providing maintenance information (for
supported devices) related to:
I. Electrical aging in percent
J. Environmental aging in percent
K. Classification of breakers by group and aging status]

PART 606 EXECUTION

PART 607 SERVICES—INSTALLATION AND COMMISSIONING

PART 608 Installation.


PART 609 System components, including meters, electronic trip units, sensors, motor protection devices,
relays, etc. included within power equipment line ups, shall be factory installed, wired, and tested prior to
shipment to the job site.
PART 610 All control power, CT, PT, and data communications wiring shall be factory wired and harnessed
within the equipment enclosure.
PART 611 Where external circuit connections are required, terminal blocks shall be provided with
manufacturer drawings clearly identifying any interconnection requirements and wire types.
PART 612 All external wiring required to connect equipment lineups shall be installed by the electrical
contractor.
PART 613 Contractor interconnection wiring requirements shall be clearly identified on the system drawings.
PART 614 Vendor field technicians shall verify accuracy of installation prior to commissioning.

PART 615 System Commissioning and Acceptance.


PART 616 Factory-trained personnel shall perform on-site commissioning using automated
commissioning tools to improve consistency and quality of commissioning.
PART 617 Central engineering resources in conjunction with onsite factory trained personnel
shall be involved in preparing a client’s system for startup.
PART 618 If needed, a trained and certified project manager shall be provided during project
installation and commissioning.
PART 619 If LV Switchgear is specified, a representative of the LV Switchgear manufacturer
trained in the installation, operation, and maintenance of the LV Switchgear and
Breakers, will perform commissioning and acceptance of the equipment.
PART 620 Engineering drawings shall be made available to the client for all EPMS projects.
PART 621 On-site commissioning and initial user training of the EPMS shall be included in
the project bid.
PART 622 Commissioning shall include a detailed scope of work checklist document with
delivered functionality listed and checked.
PART 623 Commissioning shall include a full working demonstration of the system under
normal operating conditions and simulated scenarios.
PART 624 For control applications such as automatic transfer, commissioning shall include a
thorough verification of the approved sequence of operation in both manual and
automatic modes. Testing of source outage and breaker exercising shall be included in
test procedures.
PART 625 For control applications, such as automatic transfer, source interruptions are
necessary. The owner must schedule appropriate times for such commissioning, and

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 25 of 27


must plan for time (typically a day) for system pre-testing and a day for acceptance
testing. Weekends are preferred due to minimized impact on operations.

PART 626 SERVICES—TECHNICAL SUPPORT

PART 627 The vendor shall have capabilities to deliver a full suite of ongoing technical support services to
optimize and tune performance of the Energy and Power Management System (EPMS). Services shall
include but not be limited to the following:
PART 628 Basic product support via telephone and email during regular business hours to provide technical
guidance, incident diagnosis, basic troubleshooting, and “how-to” instructions to operate installed
software and hardware.
PART 629 Fully staffed technical support teams for advanced problem escalation.
PART 630 Troubleshooting using remote connectivity to the customer system.
PART 631 Self-help web portal access to service packs and knowledge base detailing technical best
practices and product details.
PART 632 On-demand self-paced training with energy management, metering infrastructure, and power
quality content modules.
PART 633 Reserved support engineer as a “single point of contact” for customer support (when specified).
PART 634 Emergency after-hours support with guaranteed response within two hours (when specified).
PART 635 Software Assurance including service packs and upgrade licenses for installed EPMS software
(upgrade-commissioning-services when specified).
PART 636 Power Analysis Diagnostic Report including results of remote diagnostics to assess EPMS system
health including configuration, data accuracy, and communications infrastructure.
PART 637 Periodic monitoring of EPMS server and software to proactively alert for system problems.
PART 638 Onsite maintenance including system repairs, database maintenance, firmware upgrades, and
software installations.

PART 639 SERVICES—TRAINING

PART 640 The vendor shall have capabilities to deliver a full suite of training solutions focused on the
operation, maintenance, and optimization of the customer's EPMS system. These training solutions shall
address both initial and ongoing training needs for the customer and shall include the following:
PART 641 Training delivered by experienced instructors with direct experience with the installed equipment
and teaching proficiency.
PART 642 Majority of the training is hands-on (up to 80%) with the equipment. Each student has access to
their own mini power monitoring system through an electrical metering demo case, Ethernet
communications, and laptop running applicable metering software, or through a virtual server if attending
remotely (not applicable for self-paced on-demand training).
PART 643 Training manuals including agenda, defined objectives for each lesson, detailed content organized
by lesson, and descriptive labs to complete hands-on exercises shall be provided.
PART 644 Training content (depending on class) will cover functionality and operation of electric meters,
definition and use of various metering data (such as energy, demand, power factor, load profile, time of
use, KYZ, etc.), communication methods applied in various design topologies, and capabilities and
operation of applicable software.

PART 645 Training options may include but are not limited to:
PART 646 Self-paced on- demand training on energy management, metering infrastructure, and power
quality.
PART 647 Hands-on training at client’s site using metering and communications hardware, equipment and
relevant software to implement, operate and maintain the power monitoring system.
PART 648 Instructor led remote web based training with real time interaction with trainer and hands on
training using virtual servers to perform labs and exercises.
PART 649 At Schneider facility, hands-on training on how to design, implement, and operate the EPMS
system.

V1.1 Modified June 17, 2015 Page 26 of 27


PART 650 Video recording services to complement custom client onsite training with professional post-
production services to provide the customer with a professional customized training DVD.

END OF SECTION

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