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Through The Eyes of the Poet Stage 3 1
Through The Eyes of
the Poet
Stage 3
1
What is poetry? a) Who is the audience and what is the purpose of poetry? What
What is
poetry?
a)
Who is the audience
and what is the
purpose of poetry?
What do I
know about
poetry and
the devices?
How can I
organise my
ideas?
b)
How can I analyse
poetry?
Planning
Immersion
Through The
Eyes of the Poet
How can I convey
my ideas and
feelings through
literary devices?
-
Key Concepts
How can I
share my
interpretation
s of poetry?
Drafting
Publishing
Revising and
Editing
What literary
devices can I
use to enhance
my writing?
How can I
creatively
publish my
work?
What do I
need to do
to edit my
work?
What do I
need to do to
revise my
work?
2

Unit Overview:

Outcomes:

Links to the Literacy Learning Progressions

This unit explores poetry, why we create it and the different

EN3-2A composes, edits and presents well-structured and

Understanding texts

literary devices used to express ideas and feelings.

coherent texts

(UnT8UnT9)

Students will look ‘through the poet’s eyes” to critically

EN3-1A communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and

analyse and discuss their interpretations of poetry. Students

purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues

Creating texts (CrT8

will compose and publish a variety of poems to demonstrate

and language forms and features

CrT10)

their understanding of poetry and present this to their audience considering voice.

EN3-3A uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and

Grammar (GrA5)

knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies

Spelling (SpG14)

EN3-5B discusses how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes for a widening range of audiences and contexts

Handwriting and keyboarding (HWK7

HwK8)

EN3-6B uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts

EN3-9E recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner

Writing

Lesson Scope and Sequence Learning Intentions

Links to other KLAs

Process

Immersion

What is poetry? Who is the audience and what is the purpose of poetry? How can I analyse poetry?

CAPA artworks, music, song analyses, rhythm, metre, beat, poetic language.

  • 1. I understand that there are different forms of poetry

Science Earth and Space

  • 2. I can identify the different structural features of different forms of poetry

Grammar Punctuation, vocabulary

  • 3. I understand the intended audience and purpose for different forms of poetry

embedded and linked to unit.

  • 4. I can respond to poetry and describe how it makes me think/feel.

R2R and WOW

  • 5. I can respond to mentor poems

Guided reading

Planning

How can I organise my ideas? What do I know about poetry and the devices?

Note: *Guided reading activities based on

 
  • 6. I can generate ideas with sensory images for ordinary objects

poetry response to reading will be

  • 7. I can look through the ‘Poet's Eyes’ to gather seeds and ideas for my writing.

poetry card questions. ** Grammar and

  • 8. I can brainstorm and grow my seeds when planning for poetry writing.

punctuation lessons linked with explicit

Drafting /

How can I convey my ideas and feelings through literary devices?

teaching of literary devices such as

Writing

What literary devices can I use to enhance my writing?

adjectives, similes, imagery and metaphor

9. I can use adjectives to add detail, meaning and depth to my writing.

10.

I can use line breaks and phrases to influence the sound and look of a poem.

11.

I can add line breaks and stanzas to make my poems sound like music.

12.

I can use personification as a literary device in my writing.

13.

I can creatively publish my work in handwritten form.

14.

I can creatively publish my work.

15.

I can examine mentor texts to find intended purpose and poet’s voice.

Revising

What do I need to do to revise my work?

and Editing

What do I need to do to edit my work?

16.

I can create a success criteria to scaffold my poetry

17.

I can edit my own and others writing with an emphasis on stanzas, lines, pace, rhythm and

punctuation.

19.

I can annotate the use of poetic techniques such as rhyme, repetition and structure (verse,

chorus, bridge).

Publishing

How can I creatively publish my work? How can I share my interpretations of poetry?

18.

I can creatively publish my work digitally and share my interpretations of poetry.

19.

I can annotate the use of poetic techniques such as rhyme, repetition, form and structure.

20.

I can identify the language devices used to enhance meaning of songs.

21.

I can reflect on the techniques and language devices use in the song I have chosen to

analyse. 22&23. I can discuss my annotations and provide feedback to peers on their work.

Pre-Assessment Task:

 

On demand pre assessment (30 min) student choice of style e.g. Acrostic, Haiku, Ballad, Ode, Limerick, Shape Poem, Riddle. No restrictions

Post Assessment Task:

 

On demand assessment task 30 minutes write a poem (choice of form) to express an idea / emotion.

 

Through the eyes of the poet

Stage 3

Copy and paste the relevant 8 Way symbol next to relevant activities. Key Concept 1: What
Copy and paste the relevant 8 Way symbol next to relevant activities.
Key Concept 1:
What is poetry?- Immersion
Learning
Intention /
Teaching Point
I can study the
forms of poetry
to guide my own
writing.
Learning Activities
Assessment /
Resources
WOW/R2R
Success Criteria
Links
Modelled: Teaching and Engagement – Immersion Phase –
Introduction: Poetry is a very different text type. The purpose is to capture the
emotion of an event or some objector a person. Words are connected, but not
always in grammatically correct sentences. They are linked by meaning and
emotion. Poetic language often rhymes, or has a natural rhythm that is best
captured when read aloud.
Students can
recall some of
the forms of
poetry and the
rules they follow.
TeachStarter-
Students
Forms-of-Poetry-
begin
Posters-with-
Annotations.pdf
Guided: Recap poetry writing process. Revisit forms of poetry with whole
class – look at Forms of Poetry Posters and ask students to ‘Think, Pair,
Share’ any poems that they know – can they share which form they are in?
Independent: Watch the What is Poetry? Video.
gathering
seeds in
writers
notebook for
ideas and
inspiration for
poetry –
could be in
brainstorm or
list form etc.
http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/media/2116673/what-is-poetry
http://splash.abc.
net.au/home#!/m
edia/2116673/wh
Share time: Ask students:
at-is-poetry
-
What are some of the reasons why people might avoid reading and writing
poetry?
Word wall.
-
What comes to mind when you think about the ‘rules’ of poetry?
-
How does the presenter in the video describe what constitutes poetry?
Roald Dahl
Revolting
Begin development of word walls with students and add to this as unit
progresses
Rhymes Jack
and the
Beanstalk
Introduce students to a variety of poetry – Roald Dahl Revolting Rhymes
Jack and the Beanstalk
Writers notebook
BEFORE READING:
Lesson Sequence 1
Prediction Bingo (what will happen in the poem) DURING READING: Making Connections Does the poem remind
Prediction Bingo (what will happen in the poem)
DURING READING: Making Connections
Does the poem remind you of anything you have experiences or another
poem or story, and in what way?
AFTER READING:
Complete prediction bingo.
 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

 

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Strategic pairing where necessary

 

Poet, poetry,

emotion,

language.

 

Key Concept :

What is poetry?- Immersion

 

Learning

 

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

 

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can identify the

Modelled:

Students are

Printed poetry

Add any

different

Display different forms of mentor poems from the PowerPoint using another

able to correctly

forms from Forms

newly

structural

mentor poem, model and think aloud process for determining its form. Repeat

identify and sort

of Poetry

discovered

features of

this process with a second mentor poem.

different forms of

PowerPoint

forms of

different forms

poetry.

poetry to

of poetry

Guided:

Bed in Summer

previous

Lesson Sequence 2

Ask a student to come up and show and talk aloud as to how they would sort

by Robert Louis

brainstorm

a poem according to its characteristics. Stevenson page in

a poem according to its characteristics.

Stevenson

page in

writer’s

 

Independent:

Puppy And I

notebook.

In small groups students analyse copies of rich poetry and sort according to form and place

In small groups students analyse copies of rich poetry and sort according to form and place sorted poems in piles on top of master poem

by A.A. Milne

Selection of

Share time:

mentor poems

 

Groups present their justifications/ reasons for sorting the poetry into the forms they have chosen. Revisit PowerPoint

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

 

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

 

Mentor poems,

Strategic grouping

 

justification,

Differentiated levels of poetry

characteristics,

 

analyse.

 

Learning

 

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

 

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I understand the

 

Modelled:

Students provide

Poetry Analysis

R2R cards

intended audience and

Read / think aloud mentor poem speculate on author and purpose – remember there’s no right or wrong!

 

thoughtful and meaningful

BLM

purpose for

 

Guided:

answers to

Poetry PP

different forms of poetry

o

o

Mentor Poem Alphabet Stew Jack P

o

Independent:

questions from BLM (at least

What is this poem about?

two sentences

Who do you think this poem was written for? ( Kids, adults, per question).

Who do you think this poem was written for? ( Kids, adults,

per question).

other poets, experts) Why do you think the poet decided to write this poem?

(entertain, inform, evoke feelings, point of view, tell a story, share knowledge, represent/reflect)

(entertain, inform, evoke feelings, point of view, tell a story, share knowledge, represent/reflect)

Explain to the students that poems are usually written for a particular

Lesson Sequence 3

reason (purpose), for a particular group of people (audience) about a particular topic (context).

Provide students with a selection of mentor poems in different forms

(from
(from
PP)
PP)
 

Students work in pairs to answer:

 

o

o

What is this poem about?

o

Who do you think this poem was written for? ( Kids, adults,

other poets, experts) Why do you think the poet decided to write this poem?

Share time: Class discussion on poem displayed on board students justify and explain their answers promote student feedback and differing points of view.

PP of poems

           

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Strategic pairing where necessary

Purpose,

 

Differentiated levels of poetry

 

audience,

 

evoke, devices.

 
 
 

Key Concept : What is poetry?- Immersion

 

Learning

 

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

 

WOW/R2R

Intention /

 

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 
 

I can respond to

I can respond to

Modelled:

 

Students

 

Students

poetry and describe how it

Model mentor text poems students pick one to talk about including what they like about the poem, what elements the author has used etc.

participate in global café and

Digital copies and

write a response

Lesson Sequence 4

makes me think/feel.

Guided: Teacher guides poetry discussion as student share their feelings and ideas on their chosen poem in a global café (double circles moving around)

Independent: Watch Why Do We Create Poetry?

justify/ share ideas for choosing their poem.

poetry books to share amongst class

to one of the questions discussed in share

My Country Dorethea

time e.g.

Share time: Ask students:

Mackellar Waltzing Matilda

what are some of

   What are some of the reasons for writing a poem? – Banjo Paterson

What are some of the reasons for writing a poem?

Banjo Paterson

the

What should you do when you read a poem for the first time?

The Melbourne

reasons

   

What might you need to think about if you wanted to write a poem of your own? Immersion Phase TUNING IN: (Refer to PowerPoint Elements of Poetry)

for writing a poem?

-

Display and discuss slide 4 (Tuning In What is a Poem?). Encourage

 

students to share any thoughts of prior knowledge about poetry.

   
  • - Read slides 5-9. Discuss whether students consider these to be poems

   

and why.

  • - Once the poems have been discussed ask students:

  • - What did the texts we considered to poems have in common?

Goldilocks and

  • - What was different about the texts we did not consider to be poems?

the three bears

  • - Is it possible to define poetry?

Revolting

Place students into pairs. Using the ideas from the tuning in activity, encourage each pair to write a one sentence definition of what constitutes poetry. (5 minutes) Partner Talk / interaction

Rhymes

Use mentor poems and have students pick one poem to report back to the

class on Global Café double circle moving around.

 

Adjustments / Differentiation Differentiated levels of poetry

Registration and Evaluation

 
 

Lesson

Vocabulary

Rhythm, rhyme,

onomatopoeia.

 

Key Concept :

What is poetry?- Immersion

 

Learning

 

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

 

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can respond to

Modelled:

Using R2R

R2R cards

Using R2R

Lesson

mentor poems.

Teacher uses mentor text and models responding to reading cards Teacher

cards students

cards

Se uence 5

Se uence 5 student hot seat – choose a student to ask one of the question

student hot seat choose a student to ask one of the question cards to the

write a quality

Sick by Shel

students

teacher teacher models writing a quality response on the board.

response to

Silverstein

write a

 

mentor poem.

(document at

quality

bottom of unit) response to

bottom of unit)

response to

 

Guided:

In pairs students are given a response to reading card to perform student to student hot
In pairs students are given a response to reading card to perform student to
student hot seat.
https://www.famil
mentor
yfriendpoems.co
poem.
m/poem/sick-by-
shel-silverstein
Independent:
Distribute a range of cards (e.g. 4 of each throughout the class) – one card
per child. All students will be responding to the same poem
Share time:
Students with the same card share their differing response by all standing in
front of class to present answers.
Lesson
Adjustments / Differentiation
Registration and Evaluation
Vocabulary
Interpretation,
alliteration.
Differentiated levels of poetry
Carefully selected question cards for students according to ability
Assessment – length of written response dependent on ability
Talk to text app for students who require additional support
Copy and paste the relevant 8 Way symbol next to relevant activities.

Key Concept: Planning How can I organise my ideas? /What do I know about poetry and the devices?

 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can look through the

Modelled: Gathering seeds – teacher models both the ‘heart map’ and the’ 5

Students gather a minimum of 5

Heart map

Complete Heart map

‘Poet's Eyes’ to

doors of poetry’ idea development methods for the whole class.

ideas/seeds for

5 doors of poetry

and

gather seeds and ideas for my writing.

Guided: Teacher provides topic prompts for reluctant writers teacher moves around room to identify that students are on the right track and provide

possible poetry topics N.B. The majority of

Pobble 365

5 doors of poetry written pieces.

Lesson Sequence 6

Lesson Sequence 6 guidance where necessary. students are expected to fill Writers

guidance where necessary.

students are expected to fill

Writers

Independent: Gathering seeds Using heart map -what is important to the student and why?

their heart maps.

notebooks

Additional objects

Share time: Students pick their favourite/strongest topic and discuss with a shoulder partner why they think

Share time: Students pick their favourite/strongest topic and discuss with a shoulder partner why they think this topic will work well in poetry form adjust choice if necessary.

for class to observe.

 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Talk to text app to get down ideas

Scaffolded ideas for reluctant writers

 
 

Scaled requirement of written ideas depending on ability

Personification.

   

Key Concept:

Planning How can I organise my ideas? /What do I know about poetry and the devices?

 
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point
Teaching Point
 

I can brainstorm

 

Modelled:

Students

Word Web

Students use

and grow my

Growing seeds teacher chooses a poetry topic to brainstorm and models for

develop poetic

brainstorming

poem

seeds when

class effective brainstorming techniques for poetry writing (e.g. word web).

interpretations of

sheet.

drafting sheet

planning for

Teach that poets generate ideas for poems from feelings, everyday

everyday

to refine

poetry writing.

experiences and from observing the world around them.

objects.

Everyday objects

ideas

Students begin e.g. apple, clock, developed in

Students begin

e.g. apple, clock,

developed in

Guided:

developing

and cup.

brainstorm.

Students sit in a circle to play a game to practice looking at everyday objects through

Students sit in a circle to play a game to practice looking at everyday objects through a poet’s eyes. Teacher shows an everyday object - students observe silently at first with their poet’s eyes. Teacher then passes the object to the

over!

topics for their poetry writing.

Lesson Sequence 7

Lesson Sequence 7 first student to share their interpretation through a poet's eyes - share an

first student to share their interpretation through a poet's eyes - share an apple for example - it’s a worm’s mansion, it’s a poison apple to put a

beautiful princess to sleep, it’s the last apple in Australia and is being fought

beautiful princess to sleep, it’s the last apple in Australia and is being fought

 

Independent:

 

Students choose and object and develop a word web on the object.

 

Share time:

Students think pair share and discuss the words and ideas they came up with for their object.

 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Generate Add

More scaffolding for students requiring support e.g. small group with

 

any interesting words students

teacher to complete word web brainstorm. Speech to text app.

come up with to word wall.

Extension students to include literary devices they will use in brainstorm

 

Key Concept:

Planning How can I organise my ideas? /What do I know about poetry and the devices?

 
I can brainstorm Modelled: Students Word Web Students use and grow my Growing seeds – teacher
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

8

I can generate

Take students on a nature walk for inspiration and to collect one object to

 

Students

 

Students will

ideas with

bring back to class to observe.

demonstrate the

Object e.g. a

brainstorm in

sensory images

 

ability to analyses

feather

their writer’s

for ordinary

Modelled: Show students how to get ideas for poems by using the 5 senses

 

an object using

notebooks

objects

to really observe something e.g. a feather

Seeing
Seeing

: it is brown and white with

their senses by

Senses

about a

some flecks of tan – this makes me wonder what type of bird it came from…

 

recording ideas on

recording

second object

why did it fall off? Is the bird okay? Record ideas on recording sheet. senses observation

why did it fall off? Is the bird okay? Record ideas on recording sheet.

senses observation

sheet

using their

Touching
Touching

it feels soft and like it could tickle, it makes me feel calm. When I

sheet.

senses.

smell it I close my eyes and can smell the gum tree the bird once sate

smell it I close my eyes and can

smell
smell

the gum tree the bird once sate in and

the fresh air blowing through the birds wings.

Hearing
Hearing

I can hear the birds

 

call and its wings flapping as it flies through the sky I

cannot use my taste

Writers

sense on this object as it could have some germs that would make me sick. Did

sense on this object as it could have some germs that would make me sick. Did you see how I used my senses to observe this feather? It gives me ideas

notebook

to write my poem.

Guided:

Guided:

Students use senses to observe an object collected from nature walk on senses recording sheet. Share some student examples with class and make them aware that these can be used to create some fantastic poetry.

 

Independent:

Display a number of objects for students to observe. Students will brainstorm

in their writer’s notebooks about a second object using their senses.

 

Share time:

Select some students to share their favourite observations with the class.

 
 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

 

Sensory

More scaffolding for students requiring support e.g. SLSO to move

   

Senses

around with identified students on nature walk.

Speech to text app.

Key Concept: Drafting/Writing: How can I convey my ideas and feelings through literary devices? / What

Key Concept: Drafting/Writing: How can I convey my ideas and feelings through literary devices? / What literary devices can I use to enhance my writing?

 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can use

Modelled:

Students

Observing

Students

adjectives to add detail,

Teacher displays picture of object on smart board and models adding adjectives

develop a minimum of 6

Everyday Objects using our 5

choose an object that

meaning and depth to my writing.

Guided:

adjectives to describe their object. Students

senses and our poets eyes sheet.

they will write about in their poem. They

Lesson Sequence 9

Lesson Sequence 9 Teacher displays second image on IWB and selects students to add adjectives that

Teacher displays second image on IWB and selects students to add adjectives that they have come up with through a “think, pair sharepartner.

justify why the chosen adjectives are

develop a list of adjectives that will

Independent:

effective in

poetically

Students take picture on iPad using pic collage and add adjectives. Seeing through the poets eyes

Students take picture on iPad using pic collage and add adjectives. Seeing through the poets eyes to add detail.

adding poetic meaning to the

describe this object.

Share time: object.

Share time:

object.

Choose some students work to upload and display for class to see students reflect and share with the class about how the adjectives used add meaning and depth to the image.

 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

 

Adjectives

More scaffolding for students requiring support e.g. small group with

 

teacher to complete word web brainstorm. Speech to text app.

Key Concept: Drafting/Writing: How can I convey my ideas and feelings through literary devices? / What literary devices can I use to enhance my writing?

   

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

10.

I can use

Using line breaks and phrases to influence the sound and look of a poem.

Students

Little Brown

Students

line breaks and

manipulate their

Seeds written

manipulate

phrases to

Modelled: We’ve been observing objects using our 5 senses and our poet’s

own poem to

in two ways.

their own

influence the

eyes. Now you are ready to think about really writing poems today I want to

include line

poem to

Lesson Sequence 10 & 11

sound and look

teach about another ingredient to make a poem that is music! Poets give

breaks and

Plain Old Rock

include line

of a poem.

poems their own special music by using line breaks or phrases when they

stanzas.

cut up for class to

breaks and

write. One way to give our poems music is to divide our words into lines that

manipulate.

stanzas.

11.

I can add

go down the paper demonstrate column like structure.

When I read the poem out this way the layout on the page tells me to read it

line breaks and

line breaks and

Watch me use the poem little brown seeds without any line breaks read

Blank paper.

stanzas to make my poems

poem in blah kind of way to show this doesn’t work.

sound like music.

just like I’m talking to you. Because all of the words go across the page I read this like I’m telling you about a plant growing – it’s like blah, blah, blah not much music here! Now watch me read with line breaks and notice the difference. Discuss why the line breaks support the meaning and influence your reading.

 
When the author divided the words into lines they are telling me how to read the

When the author divided the words into lines they are telling me how to read the poem. Writers use line breaks to turn the poems into music

   

Guided: Students will think about the poem Plain Old Rock and how it could be written to help the readers turn the poem into music. Students think pair share as to how they would re write the poem teacher guides student thinking. Teacher asks for examples from students and rearranges poem accordingly when class is satisfied with new arrangement, read poem with line breaks.

     

Independent:

Students manipulate their own poem to include line breaks and stanzas. Read poems over to themselves to see if it sounds right.

Lesson

Share time: Have some exemplar students share their work. Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Line breaks

   

Stanzas

Key Concept: Drafting/Writing: How can I convey my ideas and feelings through literary devices? / What literary devices can I use to enhance my writing?

 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can use

Modelled:

Students apply

Art paper

In writers

Lesson Sequence

 

personification as a literary device in my

Personification writing from perspective - Teacher demonstrates creative art/poetry lesson Teacher folds a piece of art paper in quarters and informs students that they will represent each of the seasons in each quarter - revise

personal nature or human characteristics to

Art supplies e.g. crayons, pastels, coloured pencils.

notebook students personify the

12

writing.

focus on senses for inspiration. Teacher demonstrates personification by reading ‘City Jungle’ poem to students as an example.

something non- human, or they

Brennex circles.

season they have chosen

Guided: Students play verbal tennis with a shoulder partner, they say a word represent an abstract

Guided: Students play verbal tennis with a shoulder partner, they say a word

represent an abstract quality

Writers

and turn it into a Haiku.

 

associated with a certain season and their partner must respond with an

in human form.

notebooks

 
associated word, thus generating ideas for both the drawing and writing component of the independent session.

associated word, thus generating ideas for both the drawing and writing component of the independent session.

     
Independent:
 

Independent:

Students are given a selection of mediums e.g. crayon. Pastel, pencils and a piece of art paper. Students fold art paper in quarters and begin representing each of the seasons in each quarter. Students then choose their favourite quarter of their artwork as inspiration for their writing. In writers notebook students personify the season they have chosen e.g. I am summer, I am the sun gazing down on the people below, I am the ocean slapping children on the back and throwing them onto the shore, I am ice cream cheekily running away from the children trying to munch me up! I am summer. Students then create a Haiku from the personification exercise, publish onto brennex circles and attach to the corner of the seasons artwork for display.

Share time: During writing of personification and haiku choose some exemplar students to share and model to class.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Personification

Small group setting with teacher /SLSO for students who require

 

Haiku

additional support

Perspective

Reduced amount of writing – e.g. Just personify (don’t turn into Haiku)

Extend by requiring two season to be personified and turned into Haiku.

Key Concept: Publishing How can I creatively publish my work? / How can I share my interpretations of poetry?

 
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I

can creatively

Modelled:

Students

Art and craft

Students

publish my

Publishing teacher shows examples of some pieces of creatively published

represent their

supplies.

read each

work.

poetry.

poetry in a

other’s

creative way

Examples of

poems and

Guided: this must be creative give a written

Guided:

this must be

creative

give a written

Teacher guides students in choice of their best/favourite piece to publish and

hand written in a

publishing

response to

Lesson Sequence 13 & 14

 
Lesson Sequence 13 & 14 works with class to brainstorm imagery for their artworks. legible style.https://www.pinte their peers in the form of 2 " id="pdf-obj-18-91" src="pdf-obj-18-91.jpg">

works with class to brainstorm imagery for their artworks.

legible style.

their peers in the form of 2

Independent: Students are provided with a selection of mediums to publish

stars and a

their pieces – in handwritten form e.g. Bee, Daisy etc. with poem written <a href=43950461225747 wish. " id="pdf-obj-18-115" src="pdf-obj-18-115.jpg">

their pieces in handwritten form e.g. Bee, Daisy etc. with poem written

wish.

inside.

 

Share time: Share and discuss example display in classroom.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 
 

Vocabulary

Imagery

Extra scaffolding and support where required

 
 

Key Concept:

Revising and Editing What do I need to do to revise my work? /What do I need to do to edit my work?

 
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I

can examine

Modelled:

Students

Mentor texts

Students are

Lesson

Se uence

mentor texts to

Examining mentor texts for the composer’s intended purpose by exploring the

present their

used throughout

to highlight

find intended

poet’s passive and active voice e.g. angry, calm, happy, and other attitudes

word wall/phrase

unit so far.

key words

purpose and

expressed within the poem.

wall to class.

and

 

poet’s voice.

Teacher will model how to reflect on the effectiveness of voice through a mentor poem, focussing on the strength of language to express emotion.

examples of

 
Guided: the poet’s

Guided:

   

the poet’s

In small groups of 2-3, students will be provided with mentor poem to

voice

examine and reflect upon the poet’s voice. Students are to highlight key words and examples of

examine and reflect upon the poet’s voice. Students are to highlight key words and examples of the poet’s voice. Students will then annotate

effectiveness of the poet’s voice. Groups share with the rest of the class their findings. Independent:

 

Students creatively produce a word wall/phrase wall of strong emotive language. Share Time:

Students present their word wall/phrase wall to class.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

intended

   

purpose

Strategic grouping to allow for peer learning

examine

 

Key Concept:

Revising and Editing What do I need to do to revise my work? /What do I need to do to edit my work?

 
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can

create a

Modelled: Class brainstorms the purpose and effectiveness of poetry voice

Students edit

Word document

Students

Lesson

Se uence

success criteria

and techniques to create a success criteria to scaffold their poetry. Using a

their poetry

to create success

revise their

to scaffold my

previously constructed poem, the teacher will model how to revise the ideas

according to

criteria

poems based

poetry

expressed within the poem based on the newly created success criteria.

success criteria

on success

Guided:

criteria.

 
In pairs, students share and revise each other’s poems using the created Success criteria Students

In pairs, students share and revise each other’s poems using the created

 

Success criteria

Students

success criteria with a focus on two strengths and an area of improvement (2

template as

provide

 

stars and a wish concept).

example

feedback and

Independent: respond to

Independent:

respond to

Individually, students revise their poem based on the success criteria and

reading of

 

feedback from partner.

partner’s

Share time: Students go back to partner to show the improvements made based on success criteria and feedback. This partnership will then combine with another pair to share their revised poems.

poetry.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

Criteria

   

feedback

Strategic pairing Teacher/slso supports identified students in small group

 

Key Concept:

Revising and Editing What do I need to do to revise my work? /What do I need to do to edit my work?

 
 

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can edit my

Modelled:

Students edit

poetry editing

Students

Lesson

Se uence

own and others

Using a quality mentor text and poetry editing checklist students identify key

their writing to

checklist

provide

writing with an

structural and grammatical features of the effectiveness of a poem with an

create an

verbal

emphasis on

emphasis on stanzas, lines, pace, rhythm and punctuation.

effective piece of

a student’s poem

responses

stanzas, lines,

Teacher, uses professional judgement to select a student’s poem to edit as a

poetry.

and

 

pace, rhythm

class focusing on above key concepts.

justifications

 

and

   

My Country

of student

punctuation.

Guided: In pairs, students share and edit each other’s poem using poetry

Dorethea

poems that

editing checklist.

Mackellar

are read to

Independent: Individually, students edit their poem using poetry editing checklist. Waltzing Matilda – Banjo Paterson The

Independent: Individually, students edit their poem using poetry editing checklist.

Waltzing Matilda Banjo Paterson The Melbourne

the class.

Share: Cup – Slim Dusty <a href=https://australiant " id="pdf-obj-21-51" src="pdf-obj-21-51.jpg">

Share:

Cup Slim Dusty https://australiant

Teacher asks for student volunteers to share their edited poems to class.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

stanzas, lines,

   

pace, rhythm

Strategic pairing Focus on two key editing feature for students requiring support

Key Concept:

Publishing How can I creatively publish my work? / How can I share my interpretations of poetry?

 
   

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

Less

on

I can creatively publish my work and share my

Modelled: Teacher displays quality and creatively published poems to inspire students and as an example of task expectations for published pieces.

Using a digital format, students creatively

Computer lab

 
 

interpretations

Independent: Using a digital format, students will creatively publish their

publish their

Examples of

 

of poetry.

poem making sure to incorporate features such as clip art, background, voice

poem making

creative

recorded, etc. Share Time: sure to incorporate publishing

recorded, etc. Share Time:

sure to incorporate

publishing

Celebration of published poetry with a poetry walk (can be held at an features such ashttps://www.pinte " id="pdf-obj-22-41" src="pdf-obj-22-41.jpg">

Celebration of published poetry with a poetry walk (can be held at an

features such as

appropriate time).

clip art,

background,

 

voice recorded, etc.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

     
 

Learning

Intention /

Teaching Point

Key Concept :

 
   

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Success Criteria

Links

 

I can annotate

Modelled:

Students

Song Lyrics

Students

the use of poetic techniques such as rhyme,

Using mentor song, students annotate the use of poetic techniques such as rhyme, repetition and structure (verse, chorus, bridge). Guided:

correctly identify the poetic techniques used

High Hopes

create and write an additional

Lesson Sequence 19

repetition, form

In small groups, students use another mentor song to identify the techniques

in the songs.

Don’t you worry

verse for one

and structure (verse, chorus,

used. Independent:

about a thing Stevie

of the songs studied.

bridge).

Students are provided with a song to identify the techniques used. (Year 6

As a class, students state structural techniques and examples they found in

Wonder/Sing

end of year theme song)

movie

Share: their song. And the band played waltzing matilda – Eric Bogle
Share: their song. And the band played waltzing matilda – Eric Bogle

Share:

their song.

And the band played waltzing matilda Eric Bogle

 
Key Concept : Learning Activities Assessment / Resources WOW/R2R Success Criteria Links I can annotate Modelled:
 

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

Vocabulary

annotate

Focus on one to two verses for students of lower ability

 

Provide additional song for analyse to extend students

Key Concept :

 
 
 

Learning

 

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

 

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I can identify the language devices used to

Modelled: Analyse the song from the previous lesson with a focus on language devices (e.g. similes). Guided:

Students correctly identify similes,

Use the same 3 songs from previous lesson

Students write/create some

enhance meaning of songs.

In small groups, students use another mentor song to identify the language devices used. Independent:

metaphors, personification, imagery, diction

examples of language devices they

Lesson Sequence 20

Lesson Sequence 20 Students are provided with a song to identify the language devices used. (Year

Students are provided with a song to identify the language devices used. (Year 6 end of year theme song) Share:

(word choice).

could use to enhance their writing.

As a class, students state structural techniques and examples they found in their song.

As a class, students state structural techniques and examples they found in their song.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

   

Posters displaying definitions of language devices to assist students in identifying devices

 
Key Concept :
Key Concept :
   

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

 

I

can reflect on

Guide students to choose an effective song that has significance to them.

Students

Student song

Students

the techniques

the techniques

Reflect on the techniques and language devices explored in the previous

correctly identify

choice

select their

and language devices use in the song I have

lesson. Independent: Students choose their song on iPad. They need to take a screenshot and paste song lyrics into pic collage to analyse and annotate the

techniques and language devices explored

Ipads with pic collage app

favourite device from the song and

Lesson Sequence 21

 

chosen to analyse.

poetic devices used within song.

in the previous lesson.

create their own examples based on this.

Learning Learning Activities Assessment / Resources WOW/R2R Intention / Success Criteria Links Teaching Point I can

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

       
 

Key Concept :

 
   

Learning

Learning Activities

Assessment /

Resources

WOW/R2R

Intention /

Success Criteria

Links

Teaching Point

Lesson Sequence 22 &

 

I

can discuss

Continuation of lesson 20

Students

Feedback sheet

Students

23

my annotations and provide feedback to peers on their work.

Modelled: Teacher scaffolds with mentor poem how to effectively discuss their song choice and explain their annotations in a sharing circle. Model how to use feedback sheet. Guided: Selected students demonstrate how sharing circle will work as well

effectively discuss their song choice and explain their annotations in a

develop a two starts and a wish template that they can use

as how to effectively share their song and annotations using feedback sheet. Independent: In a whole

as how to effectively share their song and annotations using feedback sheet. Independent: In a whole class sharing circle, students effectively share their song and annotations giving feedback as they move around the circle. Using

sharing circle. Students provide feedback to others.

to give feedback to peers.

 
a feedback sheet, students record presenter’s name, song and one piece of

a feedback sheet, students record presenter’s name, song and one piece of

     
feedback. Share time: students share one piece of feedback from their feedback sheet with the class.

feedback. Share time: students share one piece of feedback from their feedback sheet with the class.

Lesson

Adjustments / Differentiation

Registration and Evaluation

 

Vocabulary

annotations

Peer mentoring through strategic seating in sharing circle

 

SLSO support where needed

Small group mentoring with teacher

Sick

By Shel Silverstein

“I cannot go to school today,"

Said little Peggy Ann McKay.

“I have the measles and the mumps,

A gash, a rash and purple bumps. My mouth is wet, my throat is dry,

I’m going blind in my right eye.

My tonsils are as big as rocks,

I’ve counted sixteen chicken pox And there’s one more--that’s seventeen, And don’t you think my face looks green?

My leg is cut--my eyes are blue-- It might be instamatic flu.

  • I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke,

I’m sure that my left leg is broke--

My hip hurts when I move my chin,

My belly button’s caving in, My back is wrenched, my ankle’s sprained,

My ‘pendix pains each time it rains. My nose is cold, my toes are numb.

  • I have a sliver in my thumb.

My neck is stiff, my voice is weak,

  • I hardly whisper when I speak.

My tongue is filling up my mouth,

  • I think my hair is falling out.

My elbow’s bent, my spine ain’t straight,

My temperature is one-o-eight. My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear,

There is a hole inside my ear.

  • I have a hangnail, and my heart is--what?

What’s that? What’s that you say?

You say today

is. .

.Saturday?

G’bye, I’m going out to play!”