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Mekong

 Sen)nel  Landscape:    
Monitoring  Social-­‐ecological  Processes  at  Landscape  Scales  
2  
Manichanh  Satdichanh ,  RheL  D.  Harrison ,  Jianchu  Xu ,Leigh  Winowiecki ,  Tor-­‐Gunnar  Vagan
1 1,2 3 2  
1Kunming  Ins'tute  of  Botany,  2World  Agroforestry  Centre,  3Interna'onal  Center  for  Tropical  Agriculture  

ABSTRACT   The  Sen'nel  Landscapes  programme  is  a  CGIAR  collabora've  project  to  establish  a  network  
of  landscapes  for  monitoring  socio-­‐ecological  processes.  Currently  there  are  six  main  regional  
The  Sen'nel  Landscapes  programme  is  a   Sen'nel  Landscape  Projects  including  the  Mekong  Sen'nel  Landscape.  In  the  recent  decades,  
CGIAR   collabora've   project   to   establish   rubber   planta'ons   have   expanded   in   South   China   and   SE-­‐Asia   countries,   which   has   led   to  
a   network   of   landscapes   for   monitoring   deforesta'on,   land   degrada'on   and   put   many   ecosystem   services   at   the   cri'cal   condi'on   [1].  
socio-­‐ecological  processes.  In  the  recent   The   Mekong   Sen'nel   Landscapes   was   established   to   provide   a   baseline   on   biophysical   and  
decades,  rubber  planta'ons  have  expan-­‐ socio-­‐economic   condi'ons   in   this   region   and   understand   the   impacts   of   land   use   change   on  
ded  in  South  China  and  SE-­‐Asia  countries   socio-­‐ecological  processes.  This  poster  presents  the  preliminary  analyses  and  characterisa'on  
which  has  led  to  deforesta'on,  land  deg-­‐ of   the   landscape   from   the   datasets   collected   in   Manlaxiang,   Xishuangbanna   and   Mengbeng,  
rada'on  and  put  many  ecosystem  servic-­‐ Oudomxay.  
es   at   the   cri'cal   condi'on.   The   Mekong  
Sen'nel   Landscapes   was   established   to  
provide  a  baseline  on  biophysical  and  so-­‐
cio-­‐economic   condi'ons   in   this   region  
and   understand   the   impacts   of   land   use  
change   on   socio-­‐ecological   processes.  
The   land   degrada'on   survey   and   socio-­‐
economics   survey   were   implemented   at   Mekong  Sen'nel  Landscape  project  was  implemented  in  four  loca'ons.  The  land  degrada'on  
two   SL   sites   using   LDSF   and   SLHM   pro-­‐ survey   and   socio-­‐economics   survey   were   implemented   at   two   SL   sites:   Manlaxiang,   Xishuang-­‐
tocol.   banna,   China   and   Mengbeng,   Oudomxay   Province,   Laos   in   2014-­‐2015   using   the   Land   Degrada'on  
Surveillance  Framework  (LDSF)  and  Sen'nel  Landscape  Household  Module  (SLHM).  Each  LDSF  site  
is   a   10   x   10   km   block.   Each   sampling   site   is   divided   into   16   clusters;   each   cluster   consists   of   10  
randomly  assigned  plots  (each  plot  is  1,000  m2  in  size).  The  sampling  design  for  vegeta'on  survey  
and  soil  sampling  follows  the  LDSF  protocol.  At  each  SL  site,  the  socio-­‐economics  survey  has  been  
conducted   following   the   LDSF   survey.   The   socio-­‐economics   survey   included   both   village   and  
household  level.  

4.5"
Tree"species"diversity"indices"according"to"land"use"
4" types"
Tree  diversity  in  both  Manlaxiang  and  Mbeng  were  higher  in  natural  forest  and  and  lower  
3.5" in   rubber   planta'on.   Interes'ngly,   croplands   in   Manlaxiang   have   quite   high   tree   diversity,  
which   mean   the   agroforestry   system   in   Manlaxiang   is   well   managed   and   appears   to   be   a  
Shannon"Diversity"Index"

3"
more  sustainable  land  use  system.  
2.5"
CONTACT   2"
Manla"
Mbeng"
1.5"
Manichanh  Satdichanh  
Kunming  Ins'tute  of  Botany   1"
Email:  chanh199@gmail.com  
0.5"

0"
Cropland" Rubber" Fallow"land" Forest" Secondary"
planta6on" forest"

Erosion  and  infiltra'on  capacity  are  important  indicators  of  land  degrada'on  
and  land  health.  Visible  soil  erosion  in  SL  sites  tend  to  have  high  prevalence  in  
bamboo  forest,  rubber  planta'on,  fallow  land  and  forest.  Forest  plots  in  Mbeng   Visible"soil"erosion"in"different"land"use"types""
have  higher  soil  erosion  because  many  of  these  plots  were  located  at  the  steep  
slopes.  The  infiltra'on  capacity  in  each  SL  site  is  low  on  average  in  most  of  the   Rubber"plantaAon"

land  use  types.   Secondary"forest"

Intergrated"cropGforest"
Manla"

Forest"

Fallow"land"
Gully"
Cropland"
Rill"
Further   analyses   and   studies   will   be   Secondary"forest"
Sheet"
carried   out   by   combining   the   main  
REFERENCE  
Rubber"plantaAon"

indicators   of   biodiversity,   land,   soil   Forest"


Mbeng"

health  and  socio-­‐economic.   Fallow"land"


1.  Warren-­‐Thomas,  E.,  Dolman,  P.  M.,  &  Edwards,  D.  P.   Cropland"
(2015).  Increasing  Demand  for  Natural  Rubber  
Bamboo"mixed"forest"
Necessitates  a  Robust  Sustainability  Ini'a've  to  
Mi'gate  Impacts  on  Tropical  Biodiversity.   0" 10" 20" 30" 40" 50" 60" 70" 80" 90"
Conserva)on  Le,ers,  8(4),  230–241.  hLp://doi.org/ %"of"subplot"
10.1111/conl.12170   Some  soil  chemical  analyses  results  of  SL  sites