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Vectorworks Educational Version

Studio Design - Voice of God Recording Studio


Corren Olson & Rob Milton
ARSP 1541
12/11/2018

Vectorworks Educational Version


Mission Statement​​……………………………………………………………………………………....1

Axial Modes​​……………………………………………………………………………………………....3

Room Shell​​………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Windows and Doors​​…………………………………………………………………………………….6

Electrical​​…………………………………………………………………………………………………..​​7

Network Design………………………………………………………………………………………...​​10

Absorbers ……………………………………………………………………………………………….​​11

Diffusers​​………………………………………………………………………………………………....​​12

HVAC ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..​​13

Appendix………………………………………………………………………………………………...​​14

Studio Design
Rob Milton & Corren Olson
Mission Statement
Welcome to the Voice of God Recording Studio! Our purpose is to provide a space for
recording of live instrumentation for production release, background tracks and limited
recording of post production projects. With access to a 1700 seat auditorium,Voice of
God Recording Studio can also record live shows as well as being able to host CD
release concerts using our Dante Network from FOH. Voice of God Recording Studio
has spaces available for recording video with quality audio for presentations, live acts
and other videos that may be necessary for the normal operation of the church. While
the focus of Voice of God Recording Studio is on the ministry of the church, we
welcome and record other musical artists.

Voice of God Recording Studio: “Hear the sound of the Lord”

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Voice of God Recording Studios is housed in Salt City Church in Minneapolis,
Minnesota. It’s anticipated use will be for recording various media for the church. It can
record the worship band in studio for recording releases of original and covers of music.
It can also record live worship music of varying genres in the auditorium section of the
church that will also be equipped to record. Its recording studio can also provide a
space for video announcements and presentations with quality premium sound
recording using industry standard Pro Tools recording software. It will be paired with
the church and will share many of the same amenities that the church’s worship
services utilize such as a green room, storage and practice areas. Priority scheduling
for recording sessions will be for the church but others wishing to book studio and
engineer time can as well. Approaching an “all things to all men” attitude, it can do
studio work, video, live sound, limited voice over and post production. It has the option
to house a musical act’s live release show in its auditorium and simultaneously record
the live show of said release show. It will be able to film video with high caliber sound
for church functions, announcements and programming as well as corporate and
secular presentations. Using analog and digital VGAs and effects processing, it will still
have room to expand any new gear as the technology continues to improve. As the
church continues to expand, the role of the music and worship recording will expand as
well. Distribution of worship and praise music is a worthy and lofty goal to be attained
and is certainly that can be achieved over time.
The main auditorium will be equipped with a DiGiCo console and D-2 Stage
Rack. It will also house a full lighting rig consisting of intelligent lighting fixtures and
basic washes. The video system also provides the ability for IMAG during concerts,
which can also be recorded. It is composed of 4 stationary manned cameras around the
back ring of the auditorium main floor. There is also the ability to have multiple
stationary cameras on the stage, along with a couple handheld cameras on stage.
All video switching and editing is done in a suite backstage, which shares a wall
with the green room space. Lighting control is housed in a booth in the upper balcony
which is shared with the technical director. Audio has a booth on the floor, where they
are immersed in the audio that the majority of the seats receive, thus allowing for the
best live mix possible.

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Axial Modes
Studio - 13’4” x 11’4” x 12’ Control Room 10’3’’ x 8’ x 12’
42.39 47.08
47.08 55.12
49.87 70.63
84.78 94.16
94.16 110.24
99.74 141.24
127.17 141.26
141.24 165.36
149.61 188.32
169.56 211.89
188.32 220.48
199.48 235.40
211.95 275.60
235.40 282.48
249.35 282.52
254.34 329.56
282.48 330.72
296.73 353.15
299.22 376.64
329.56 385.84
339.12 423.72
349.09 423.78
376.64 440.96
381.51 470.80
398.96 494.41
423.72 496.08
423.90 517.88
448.83 551.20
466.29 564.96
470.80 565.04
498.70 606.32
508.68
517.88
548.57
551.07
564.96
593.46
598.44
612.04

BOLD ​= Standing Wave Frequencies UNDERLINED​ = Suspect Problems

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Room Shell
Quick Reference:
Studio:
-Walls - STC 65-70
-Floor - STC 45-50
-Ceiling - 4” concrete slab w/ gypsum board build out below; there is only minimal use
storage above the concrete slab
Sound Lock:
-Walls - STC 65-70
-Floor - STC 45-50
-Ceiling - 4” concrete slab; there is only minimal use storage above the concrete slab
Control Room:
-Walls - STC 40-45
-Floor - STC 45-50
-Ceiling - 4” concrete slab w/ gypsum board build out below; there is only minimal use
storage above the concrete slab

Studio Shell (drawing #2):


The studio shell is a concrete block wall, filled with concrete. On each side of these
blocks, there is a spacer to create a ½ inch air gap, covered in 2 layers of ⅜ inch sheetrock,
alternating the seams to prevent any leakage between. This buildout will provide a 65 to 70 dB
loss. The floor is a concrete slab, which provides between 45 and 50 dB loss. Finally, the ceiling
is a 4 inch concrete slab, with a sheetrock buildout below, again made of 2 layers of sheetrock
alternating seams. There is a door in the southeast corner of the studio which opens into the
sound lock. There is also a window into the control room on the east wall. Both of these items
are explained in more detail in the section on doors and windows.
The ceiling buildout is angled at 6 degrees so as to prevent standing waves between the
floor and the ceiling. The high side starts at 12 feet, and angles down to just under 11 feet. Two
of the walls are also angled at 6 degrees. The widest dimensions of the room are 13 feet by 11
feet roughly. The east wall is angled, with the narrow end at the south, which narrows the room
to roughly 12 feet. The south wall is also angled with the narrow end at the west. This narrows
the room to roughly 10 feet. Because of this, we have essentially eliminated the axial mode
issues.
In the electrical section on page 7, we discuss the placement of outlets, switches, and
other electrical system components. All of these would be cut into the sheetrock, and then
sealed back up using caulking. We would also seal all the corners of the room with caulking to
further prevent any sound leakage. One issue we have is with the lighting in the room. The
standard fixtures are mounted above the angled buildout, so we would cut 4 8”x8” holes, one
under each. These would then be covered with a frosted glass type of cover, and again sealed
with caulking.
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Sound Lock Shell:
The sound walls have an identical design to the studio walls, composed of concrete filled
cinder blocks, covered in 2 layers of sheetrock. The sound lock however does not have any
buildout on the ceiling under the 4” concrete slab. It is just over 3 feet wide and almost 4 feet
deep. The wall it shares with the studio is one of the angled walls which means it widens out to
just over 4 feet deep at the opposite side. Once again, the light is completely sealed with
caulking, as are all the corners of the sheetrock to prevent sound transmission.

Control Room Shell (drawing #3):


The control room is a standard 2x4 wall frame, 12 feet tall, all built on top of a concrete
slab. It has 2 layers of sheetrock on each side with alternating seams, which when filled with
insulation, provides a 40-45 dB loss in transmission. The outer dimensions of the room are
roughly 8 feet by 10.5 feet. Within this is a buildout, which angles the side walls, creating a
coffin like shape. There is a point 3.5 feet from the front wall where the walls angle away from at
6 degrees. This helps, as it did in the studio, with preventing standing waves. Much like the
studio, the control room has outlets and switches cut into the sheetrock, and then sealed with
caulking.
The ceiling of the control room is an expansion ceiling, where it is lower in the front and
back of the room, and higher just in front of the optimal mix position. The peak is just over 3 feet
off the front wall. The front section starts at 11 feet, and angles up to 12 feet, which is about a
15 degree angle. The rear angles downward from the peak at a 15 degree angle as well, which
make the back end at just under 10 feet off the floor. This ceiling is framed from 2x4s, and
covered in 2 layers of sheetrock with alternating seams. It is attached above to the 4 inch
concrete slab that covers the entire backstage area.
The ceiling has 4 light fixtures mounted in it, which are sealed with caulking. There is
also an HVAC diffuser that cuts through, which is also sealed with caulking. There is a door in
the southeast corner of the room, which opens into the green room entry, right by the sound
lock. On the west wall is a window into the isolation room. Both of these items are described
more specifically in the section on windows and doors.

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Windows and Doors
Studio/CR Shared Window:
The control room and studio observation windows are each seated in an independant
wall. Consisting of a 5’ x 4’ pane of glass with a depth of ¼“, the window in the studio is on the
wall that is skewed 6° so we can install the window pane at a 90 degree angle with the existing
wall construction. This angle will also reduce flutter and standing waves upon reflection. The
control room window is a 5’ x 4’ pane of glass with a depth of ⅜“,on a wall that runs
perpendicular to the exterior wall but in contrast to the skewed studio window this will not cause
standing waves. By changing the thickness of the glass, this avoids sympathetic resonance.
Rubber gaskets on the seals help seat and sound insulate the windows. Caulking around them
will also cut and sound transmission.

Doors (Appendix A):


The doors are flush solid core with a door width of 36” meeting ADA standards. The
transmission loss of this will be brought up 30dB. There are 4 total creating a sound proofing
corridor from the main public areas. The first door is a left inswing leading to a green room and
prep area. From the green room there is a right inswinging door to the control room. On the
west side of the green room, there is a left inswing door swinging into the green room that leads
to a 3’x3’ sound lock. While too small to be a proper vocal booth or isolation room, it it not too
large to be unstable. The last door is a left inswing door leading into the studio proper.
The automatic door bottom is spring operated, dropping a neoprene seal on the
threshold which will seal off the bottom of the door. The door jams are also neoprene for the
sides and top of the door.
The threshold is a rabbeted threshold with a neoprene gasket. This will reduce gaps
beneath the door and paired with the door bottom will reinforce any sound transmission loss. Of
course, liberal amounts of caulk will be used as sound insulation.

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Electrical
Outlets:
-Control Room:​ In the control room, we have 2 circuits of power for all the gear. Both come from
the main panel, through a junction box which is placed in the northwest corner of the green
room, above the counters. From that junction box, each circuit is in its own ½ inch flexible
conduit. One runs along the north wall of the control room while the other runs along the south
wall. The south wall has 2 outlets on it, along with one on the west. The north has 4 outlets on it
along with one on the west wall. This gives us plenty of locations to plug in gear to dedicated
circuits for the control room. All the gear is primarily run off the south circuit, through the Furman
power sequencer.
-Studio:​ The studio also has 2 circuits of outlets. One is the east wall, and the other is the south
wall. Just like the control room, they come from the main panel in the amp room, via the junction
box above the green room counters. From there again ½ flex conduit runs to each wall. The
east wall has 2 outlets, one under the window and the other in the gap between the window and
the door. The south wall has its own run from the junction box, with the two outlets spaced out
on the wall.
-Green Room:​ The green room has 3 circuits of outlets in it. Each comes from the main box in
the amp room, and runs through a junction box in the ceiling in the northeast corner of the green
room. The first circuit runs over to behind the fridge. It is the only outlet on the circuit. The
second circuit runs over in the same direction, towards the counter. There are 4 outlets on the
circuit: one on the north wall right beside the fridge, one on the north wall between the west wall
and the sink, another on the west wall between the north wall and the edge of the counter, and
one near the end of the counter on the west wall. The final circuit has 2 outlets between the
bathroom doors on the east wall and 2 outlets spaced out on the south wall.
There is also a circuit for power running to each bathroom. It comes off the junction box
in the northeast corner of the green room and runs over to the wall just above the counter in the
bathroom. Each bathroom has its own dedicated run and individual circuit with one outlet on it.

Lights:
-Control Room:​ The lights in the control room pull power from their own circuit on the main panel
in the amp room via the junction box above the green room counter. A ½ inch conduit runs to
the dimmer wall switch by the door, and then from there up to each fixture. This dimmer wall
switch also controls the light fixture in the sound lock leading into the studio. There are 4 fixtures
in the control room which are mounted into the angled ceiling.
-Studio:​ The studio lighting system is unique. It is described more in the DMX section below,
however it is all controlled externally via a DMX system. The only requirement from a power side
was to get power to each fixture. To do this, we ran ½ inch flex conduit from the main junction
box above the green room counter to the first fixture. The junction box is connected back to the
main panel in the amp room, providing a dedicated circuit specifically for the studio lights. These
are constant power, with no switch in between. There are 3 panels for lighting power as the
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main fixtures can be daisy-chained via the powercon outputs. The front-lights however must be
run to their own outlets at each fixture.
-Green Room:​ The green room lighting fixtures are also on their own dedicated circuit run back
to the main panel in the amp room. However, their power comes from a second junction box in
the northeast corner of the green room. ½ inch conduit is run from the box to the switch first
which is on the wall by the door. From there the ½ inch conduit runs up and to each of the light
fixtures. There are 5 fixtures in the green room, all mounted in the ceiling tile grid.
Each bathroom also has its own circuit for lights. It runs from the junction box in the
northeast corner of the green room to the switch, then up to the 2 light fixtures in each bathroom
through ½ inch conduit.

Mic/Line (Appendix C):


-Control Room:​ The control room is a fairly simple setup. All of the tie-lines from the studio run
into the patchbay, as does all the outboard gear and the desk inputs. The desk’s main LR output
run directly to the studio monitors, and 8 aux outputs are routed directly to the 4 in-ear systems
in the control room and studio via the omni outputs. The only other audio connections we had in
the control room were for comm between the main auditorium system and the studio. This would
mostly be used on Sunday morning if someone was mixing the broadcast mix, but would also
allow for communication if we were tracking live concert in the auditorium.
One thing we had to be careful with was placement of conduit to prevent any signal
issues with power. The conduits all stick straight out of the floor behind the desk about a foot.
Once under the floor it makes a 90 degree bend and runs directly towards the patch panel in the
studio. Once under it, it makes a 90 degree bend upward and runs straight out of the floor into
the patch panel. There is no audio run in the walls or ceiling, which is the only place that power
is run in the control room.
-Studio:​ The studio is designed to have a patch panel on the wall under the window where
everything would connect. It has 10 XLR-Female jacks that run through a 1 ½ inch conduit to
the patchbay in the studio. It would also have 4 XLR-Male jacks for the in-ear returns which
would also be in the 1 ½ inch conduit. Finally, there would be one more XLR-Female jack that
ties to the iso-cab in the amp room so we can put amps in an isolation space where they won’t
have outside sound, or be heard outside of the space. This line would run through the 2 inch
conduit with the SDI cables mentioned below. The patch panel would also have 4 SDI jacks and
2 ethernet jacks as explained in the section below on networking and video.
To maintain the integrity of the signal, power and audio is kept separate in the control
room. The closest that they come is where the patch panel is. There is a power run in ½ inch
flex conduit running behind the sheetrock between two outlets on that wall. However, because
the patch panel and box is set off the wall, and each in their own enclosure, there shouldn’t be
any issues.

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Network/Video/DMX:
-Network:​ Due to our studio being a Dante system primarily, the networking is one of the most
important aspects. The auditorium will have a DiGiCo SD12 system with a DiGiCo stage rack.
The DiGiCo system runs on MADI, either over Cat6 or BNC. The stage box MADI outputs run to
the SD12 as well as a DiGiCo Orange Box, which converts the MADI to Dante. The Dante
outputs then run into a switch in the amp room. This allows the studio to access anything on the
stage through the network.
We then have a network line running from the switch in the amp room to the switch in the
control room through a 2 inch conduit along with a DMX hard-line, 4 SDI cables, and a comm
line . This is a main line that carries the Dante network, internet, and artnet. The switch in the
control room then has multiple lines coming off of it. One runs to the computer for Dante, and
another for internet. We also have 2 coming from the switch to the DM2000 for Dante primary
and secondary. Finally, we have 2 that are running through a ½ inch conduit to the studio patch
panel, one for Dante and one for internet.
-Video:​ One of the purposes of our studio is to provide a space to record quality videos in as
well. To provide for this, we needed to run SDI cables to the studio to be able to patch cameras
in so we could record them in the video suite used for live switching on Sunday mornings. To do
this, we placed a 2 inch conduit running from the patch panel in the studio directly to the amp
room. This way the SDI lines could be run directly to the main switcher patch in the amp room.
We put in 4 cables so that we could have 2 cameras and each have the capability to do genlock
in case we wanted to do live video feed to the screens in the auditorium. This 2 inch conduit
also housed the mic line running to the iso-cab in the amp room as explained above in the
section on mic/line for the studio.
-DMX:​ Due to the studio also being used for video, we wanted a way to be able to directly
control the lighting. This would be best accomplished by putting in a DMX lighting system. This
also allowed us to use color changing lights, which allows talent that are recording to change
between preset colors and intensities simply.
The typical setup will include a wall panel in the studio with 10 push buttons, each
labeled for a different setting. This would include one button for turning the green screen
front-light on and off, another for the same but on the wall of 2x4s and 4x4s. The other 8 would
have intensities and colors saved on them for the main ceiling lights. There would be a DMX
cable running from the wall panel through a ½ inch conduit up into the ceiling space where the
lights are hung. Once there it daisy chains between each light through the empty space
between the angled ceiling we added and the slab that forms the main ceiling for the whole
backstage area.
As a way to provide more specific control for video shoots, we also have a patch panel in
the control room where we can hook up a lighting console and have control over everything
instead of using the wall panel with presets. The wall panel we selected deactivates itself and
simply passes the DMX signal as soon as a console is plugged into the line, which means there
is minimal setup needed to move from normal operation to video shoots and back. There is also

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a DMX hard-line running between the control room and amp room which means we can patch
the studio into the main auditorium system if we need for any special events.

Network Design
The network design for the studio space would be fairly simple. As explained in the
electrical section on networking, there would be a switch in the control room. From there, all
other Dante devices would be connected. Nothing would be daisy-chained as Dante does not
support it. The Dante ports on the switch would all be assigned to their own VLAN, which
provides separation from the other ports on the switch as well as the data being transferred
through them. This would allow us to run internet through the same switch without causing
issues with the Dante network, which gives us hard-line internet accessibility on the computer.
One of the ports on the switch would be open to all VLANs. This port would be
connected to the home run cable that runs back to the video room. The switch in the video room
would be configured much the same. One port would be open to all VLANs, which would be
connected to the home run from the control room. The other ports would all be set to the VLANs
specific to whatever purpose they would be serving. We would also have a DHCP server there
which would assign IP addresses to different equipment as needed.

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Absorbers
We have one absorber in the studio. It is a bass-trap material in the northeast corner of
the room. It also helps in removing the sharp corner which would cause large amounts of bass
buildup. It is 2 feet wide and 8 feet tall. This means it doesn’t quite reach the ceiling, but it does
cover a majority of the corner.

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Diffusers
Studio Diffusion (Drawing #7):
Our studio design initially had issues with standing waves. As described in the section on
the room shell, we angled the walls, which helped to solve this problem. To help even out the
sound a bit more, we added diffusion. The main element to help with this was a unique wall
design, which would be able to double as a backdrop for video shoots.
This design included 2x4 and 4x4 lumber cut in lengths between 2” and 6”. We then
placed these on end against the west wall, creating a random pattern sticking out of the wall.
This would create multiple layers and widths for waves to reflect off of, which would help to
diffuse the sound as it can no longer have clean direct reflections. This wall stretched to about
the 10’8” mark, where it returned to just a standard sheetrock wall. The reason we stopped the
diffusers at this height was because of the ceilings angle, which ended just shortly above that on
one side.
To supplement the wall of diffusion we had built, we also added 4 boxes on the south
wall. These boxes were 1’ deep and 3’ wide. They had sheets of wood 1” thick inside at varying
angles to help with the diffusion as well, as it would create different reflections, not just square
ones.

Control Room DIffusion (Drawing #7):


In the control Room, we added a couple types of diffusion as well. The first was on the
ceiling. As described in the section on HVAC, we have the air coming into the room through the
ceiling, which creates a block cutting through. We continued this method, building blocks out of
wood and then attaching them to the ceiling. This created a few blocks to help break up sound
wave propagation and create more random reflections. It also served an aesthetic purpose as it
made the vent in the ceiling for HVAC not seem so out of place.
We also added diffusion along the back wall. We followed the model shown in the picture
in the appendix (appendix D), by making a frame from 2x4s in a curved shape along the wall.
We then filled the frame with insulation and covered it with a mesh so as to act as an absorber.
Finally, we placed lumber strips upright over it, which helped to create some reflections, but at
different angles than the direct back and forth which would lead to standing waves.
As with any control room, we also had some diffusion “built in” with standard gear. We
had a few racks along with the console desk and monitors. These also helped to break up
waves and prevent some of the buildup of waves.

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HVAC
Air Sends:
Based on the dimensions of the studio, I was able to find the dimensions of the needed
vents. With the studio being roughly 13 feet by 11 feet by 12 feet, the first calculator
(​http://www.phreshfilter.com/tools/cfm-calculator​) gave me the CFM, or Cubic Feet per Minute,
of 1172 which I was able to plug into the second calculator (​https://ductcalc.ca/​). I plugged in the
CFM and the velocity, for which I used 400 fpm, as that was the number mentioned in the book.
From there I simply had to take the dimensions of the ducts I needed. The studio required ducts
with a dimension of 12” by 35.16”. I did the same for the control room with dimensions of 10 feet
by 8 feet by 12 feet. Plugging in the CFM of 984 gave me duct dimensions of 12” by 29.52”.
For positioning, I placed the air input for the studio running along the green-screen wall
in the ceiling. In the control room, we placed the input roughly in the center of the room,
perpendicular to the side walls. This allowed it to punch through the angled ceiling in a more
clean manner than it would have if we ran it parallel to the side walls. It also would help to
create a bit of a diffuser in the ceiling for sound waves.
Each of these had their own separate runs all the way back to the handling system.
Each also had 4 90 degree turns in them. With both of these factors, it would greatly help to
decrease if not eliminate all sound from leaking between rooms.
Air Returns:
For the returns I simply used 12” square ductwork. Each room had air returns in the floor
opposite the air inputs in the ceiling. This provides a smooth flow of air across the room. Each
room is on it’s own duct system all the way back to the air handler, which provides isolation from
audio in other rooms leaking into the studio or control room.

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Appendix
The appendix includes all drawings and pictures which are referenced in the writeup section.

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Appendix A -- Door Features:
Appendix B -- Conduit Breakdown:
Recording Electrical Conduit Runs (From Junction Box above Green Room):
-Studio Lights(½ inch flex): 33 ft.
-Studio Outlets East (½ inch flex): 32 ft.
-Studio Outlets South (½ inch flex): 62 ft.
-CR Outlets South (½ inch flex): 45 ft.
-CR Outlets North (½ inch flex): 24 ft.
-CR Lights (½ inch flex): 86 ft.

Green Room Electrical Conduit Runs (From Junction Box above Green Room):
-Fridge (½ inch flex): 21 ft.
-Green Room Outlets Counter (½ inch flex): 38 ft.
-North Bathroom Outlets (½ inch flex): 15 ft.
-North Bathroom Lights (½ inch flex): 24 ft.
-South Bathroom Outlets (½ inch flex): 30 ft.
-South Bathroom Lights (½ inch flex): 30 ft.
-Green Room Outlets South/East (½ inch flex): 62 ft.
-Green Room Lights (½ inch flex): 100 ft.

Junction Box to Panel Conduit Runs:


-Recording Junction Box Run (2 inch rigid): 94 ft.
-Green Room Junction Box Run (2 inch rigid): 75 ft.

DMX Cable Conduit Runs:


-CR to Studio (½ inch rigid): 26 ft.
-CR to Amp Room w/network, 4 SDI, & comm (2 inch rigid): 106 ft.

Studio Panel to CR Rack:


-Mic Lines (1 ½ inch rigid): 27 ft.
-Network Lines (½ inch rigid): 27 ft.

Studio Video Lines to Amp Room:


-4 SDI Line+Iso Cab Line (2 inch rigid): 110 ft.

Totals:
Electrical ½ inch flex: 602 ft.
Electrical 2 inch rigid: 169 ft.
DMX ½ inch rigid: 26 ft.
DMX 2 inch rigid: 106 ft.
Mic 1 ½ Inch rigid: 27 ft.
Network ½ inch rigid: 27 ft.
SDI/ISO Line 2 inch rigid: 110 ft.
Appendix C -- Patch Panels:
Studio Patch Panel:

Control Room Patch Panel:


Appendix D -- Control Room Model Inspiration:
Grand
Construction/Install Materials Cost Number Total Comments Total: $13,052.97
1/2" Flex Metal conduit - 100' $46.41 7 $324.87
2" x 10' Rigid Conduit $57.75 40 $2,310.00
1-1/2" x 10' Rigid Conduit $45.68 4 $182.72
1/2" x 10' Rigid Conduit $17.64 8 $141.12
8"x8"x16" Concrete Blocks $1.19 828 $985.32
12-2 NM-B w/ gr Electrical wire -
1000' $273.88 1 $273.88
2"x4"-12' Construction Lumber $4.89 84 $410.76
2"x4"-10' Construction Lumber $3.89 26 $101.14
3/8"-4'x8' Gypsum $7.42 269 $1,995.98
4'x5'x1/4" Studio window $550.58 1 $550.58
4'x5'x3/8" Control Room window $929.33 1 $929.33
2"x4"-10' Cedar Rough Sawn $14.49 22 $318.78
4"x4"-10' Cedar Rough Sawn $33.78 22 $743.16
DMX Wire 300' $210.00 1 $210.00 Bulk
SDI cable 500' $343.60 1 $343.60 Bulk
Network wire 500' $89.99 1 $89.99 Bulk
Bulk Audio Wire 1500' $0.25 1500 $375.00 price per foot
includes 36"x84" door, jamb seal,
Acoustic Door Seal kit 506.63 4 $2,026.52 threshold, door bottom
10' extention cord 4.99 5 $24.95
25' extention cord 9.97 5 $49.85
Tri-taps 1.97 5 $9.85
Light swtich - Rocker 1.89 3 $5.67
Rotary on/off dimmer switch 5.27 1 $5.27
15 amp outlet 1.99 18 $35.82
Quad box outlet 2.99 2 $5.98
15 amp GFCI outlet 11.99 2 $23.98
4" Recessed light 10.99 15 $164.85
Outlet box 1.99 20 $39.80
Silicone caulk 7.99 tons!!!!
Studio Patch Panel 196.39 1 $196.39
Control Room Patch Panel 177.81 1 $177.81
Grand
Gear Cost Number Total Comments Total: $49,854.81
Ovation F-55FC $569.99 4 $2,279.96 Video Front Light
SixPar 100 $380.00 4 $1,520.00 Studio Ceiling Lights
DFD Pre10-A-POPO $511.92 1 $511.92 Studio Light Control
8" Square Recessed Frame $14.98 4 $59.92 Frame for ceiling lights
Vintech 473 $2,850.00 1 $2,850.00 Pre-Amp
Distressor $1,450.00 2 $2,900.00 Compressor
Furman Merit M-8S Rackmount
Power sequencer $380.00 1 $380.00 Power Sequencer
Rolling Chair $94.99 2 $189.98 Control Room Chairs
Ubiquiti Edgeswitch Lite $240.00 1 $240.00 Dante Network/Internet Switch
Studio
Neumann KH 80 $500.00 2 $1,000.00 Monitors
UA 4110 $2,500.00 1 $2,500.00 Pre-Amp
Breakdown Rack $363.00 1 $363.00
iMac Pro Trashcan $3,000.00 1 $3,000.00
$20,024.1 $20,024.1
Yamaha DM-2000 0 1 0 New (used $3k - $1k)
$0.00
$0.00
Guitar Strings - 3 pack $14.00 3 $42.00
Bass Strings $20.00 3 $60.00
Drum Sticks $9.00 10 $90.00
Drum Heads (full set + 2 xtr snare) $135.00 1 $135.00
Mic cords - 25' $32.00 20 $640.00
Guitar cords - 10' $20.00 5 $100.00
Mic stands (5 tall, 4 short, 2
straight) $410.00 1 $410.00
Pop filters $20.00 3 $60.00
DIs (2 J48, 2 Radial JDI, 1 Radial
SGI DI reamp pair) $1,060.00 1 $1,060.00
Music Stands $35.00 2 $70.00
Ethernet cables - 10' $20.00 10 $200.00
Mounts for monitors $40.00 3 $120.00
$0.00
AKG C414 (pair) $2,250.00 1 $2,250.00
Audix 7 pc drum mic $999.00 1 $999.00
Shure SM57 $99.00 4 $396.00
Neumann KM 184 $849.00 2 $1,698.00
AT 4047 $699.00 2 $1,398.00
Sennheiser e906 $190.00 1 $190.00
AT 4050 $699.00 1 $699.00
Shure SM7B $399.00 1 $399.00
$0.00
Video monitors $69.99 3 $209.97
Studio monitor isolation pads $89.99 2 $179.98
$0.00
Pro Tools Perpetual License $599.99 1 $599.99
Dante Virtual Soundcard $29.99 1 $29.99

The total estimated cost for buildout and equipping of the studio and
control room, along with the green room would be roughly $63,000.
Vectorworks Educational Version

Rest Rest
Room Room

Green
Room

Control Birds Eye Overview


Room Scale: 1/8" = 1'-0"
Sound
Lock
1

Studio

Title

Birds Eye Overview


Drawing Number Drawn By Date

1 CSO 11/27/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Top
1
Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Left Front
3 2
Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0" Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Title

Studio
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

2 CSO 11/28/2018
12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Top
2
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

Front
1
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

Title

Control Room
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

3 CSO 11/28/2018
12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Top
1
Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Front
2
Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Title

Green Room
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

4 CSO 11/28/2018
12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Control Room Ceiling


2
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

CR Back Wall
1
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

Studio Wall Blocks Studio Wall


3 4
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0" Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

Title

Diffusers
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

5 CSO 12/06/2018
12/07/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Scale: 1:175
Front

Scale: 1:175
1

Top
2

Title

HVAC Sends
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

6 CSO 11/27/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Scale: 1:175

Scale: 1:175
Bottom
Front
1

Title

HVAC Returns
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

7 CSO 11/27/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Studio
1
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"

CR/Sound Lock
2
Scale: 1/4" = 1'-0"
Title

AC Wiring-1
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

8 CSO 12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Green Room
1
Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Title

AC Wiring-2
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

9 CSO 12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Top
1
Scale: 1/32" = 1'-0"

Title

Auditorium-1
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

10 CSO 12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version


Vectorworks Educational Version

Right Rear Iso


1
Scale: 1/32" = 1'-0"

Title

Auditorium-2
Drawing Number Drawn By Date

11 CSO 12/10/2018
CAD File Name Project Title

SCC Auditorium.vwx Voice of God Recording Studio

Vectorworks Educational Version