EXPEDITIONARY WARFARE TRAINING GROUP, PACIFIC N571 DEPARTMENT 3423 GUADALCANAL ROAD SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 92155-5099

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

LESSON PLAN

TRANSFORMATION MPF 19 MARITIME PREPOSITIONING FORCE (MPF) STAFF PLANNING N20L8QM REVISED 07/01/2008

APPROVED BY _______________________

DATE ______________________

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INTRODUCTION 1. GAIN ATTENTION. (Slide 1) Now we are going to discuss transformation The material in this class will be able to help you not only in MPF deployments but also help you understand the basic planning considerations for reconstitution planning that you may be a part of as a staff planner. This information will also assist the student in the practical exercise portion of this course. (Slide 2) OVERVIEW. This lesson will provide the student with information Seabasing, the 2015 MEB, Maritime Expeditionary Capabilities, Planning considerations and the five phases of MPF(F). (Slide 3) 3. LEARNING OBJECTIVES (LESSON PURPOSE) To familiarize the student with the concept of seabasing and the pillars of MPF (Future). TERMINAL LEARNING OBJECTIVES. 1. With the aid of references, discuss the planning considerations for seabasing and MPF(F). ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S): 1. 2. 3. With the aid of references, explain a sea base. With the aid of references, explain the terms sea shield and sea strike. With the aid of references, explain the role MPF(F) plays within seabasing. (3 MIN)

INSTRUCTOR NOTE. Take a minute to read over your TLOs and ELOs. looks up I will know when to begin.

Once everyone

(Slide 4) These are the references associated with the lecture. 1. MCWP 3-32/NWP 3-02.3, Maritime Prepositioning Force Operations

2. Naval Transformation Roadmap 3. Joint Publication 1-02 4. Sea basing Integration Division Brief, Program Review, March 2008

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4. METHOD/MEDIA. This period of instruction will be given using the informal lecture method aided by a powerpoint presentation. 5. EVALUATION. You will be evaluated during the practical application on training day 4 and 5. 6. SAFETY/CEASE TRAINING (CT) BRIEF. N/A

TRANSITION. Are there any questions about what we will be covering, how we will cover it, or how you will be evaluated? Good, now let’s discuss seabasing. ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ___

(Slide 5) BODY a.Paragraph Heading. Seabasing Case Study Film (45 MIN)

(10:45 MIN)

We are now going to view a short video (Slide 6) Play video imbedded in PPT. (Slide 7) Are there any questions about the video? seabasing. (Slide 8) Seabasing is the next generation of our Naval Expeditionary Force Power projection Concept. The use of the sea as maneuver space is nothing new to our naval warfighting concept. It creates uncertainty for our adversaries and opportunities for us. In addition, seabasing also makes it easy for us to protect our forces and provide operational security in anti-access environments. Finally, It gives us the flexibility of responding to a broad range of missions from cooperative security engagements to major combat operations. (Slide 9) All of the capabilities above exist in our inventory today. The RRDF provides an assembly platform for staging equipment for in-stream offload. Our current and future amphibious platforms are well suited for arrival and assembly of forces at sea. The Improved Navy Lighterage System provides a relatively high speed interface for in-stream operations to the shore. Our existing LCACs perform a high speed connector role between the amphibs, the RRDF and the beach. If not, let’s continue on with

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While not part of today’s inventory the future Joint High Speed Vessel will provide a longer range connector role for force closure and sustainment of the seabase. This capability is available from commercial vendors and lease to DoD – WestPac Express and HSV Swift are two examples. (Slide 10) This graphic depicts how Seabasing works. (Animated Slide)

Forces close from CONUS or a prepositioned site and assemble at sea. This allows our forces to employ immediately upon arriving in theater without a friendly airfield or port. Seabased forces maneuver directly to the objective rather than first establishing a presence on shore. The Sea Base also provides Sea Shield and Sea Strike for force protection.

(First Click) Forces close via FIE to an Advanced base (Second Click) MPF(F) Squadron proceeds toward the seabase (Third Click) Elements of the ESG also arrive at the Seabase (Fourth Click) Intra-theater high speed connectors such as JHSV and other theater air and surface assets may be employed to support movement of personnel and equipment from the advanced base to the sea base (Fifth Click) The seabase permits the rapid build up of combat power which can deter the escalation of global crisis or allow the JFC to seize the initiative with synchronized combat power. (Sixth Click) The Seabase also provides a protected area (50-100NM off the coast) for the forces. The Sea Base also provides Sea Shield and Sea Strike for force protection. Sea Shield: exploits control of the seas and forward-deployed defensive capabilities to defeat area-denial strategies, enabling joint forces to project and sustain power. Sea Shield transformational capabilities are :Theater Air and Missile Defense (TAMD); Littoral Sea Control; and Homeland Defense. MPF(F) will typically operate in close proximity with other Naval forces (ESG and/or CSG) which are responsible for providing adequate active Sea Shield defenses. MPF(F) will be capable of independent operations only in secured or benign scenarios. Sea Strike: Sea Strike is a broadened naval concept for projecting dominant and decisive offensive power from the sea in support of joint objectives. Sea Strike incorporates and integrates multi-dimensional capabilities for power projection with new combinations of forces and platforms, such as the Expeditionary Strike Force. Transformational capabilities within Sea Strike are being pursued in four areas: Persistent Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR); Time Sensitive Strike; Information Operations; and Shipto-Objective Maneuver.

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What are some of the Key Attributes to using the seabasing concept vice the currently legacy MPF? (Answer next slide) (Slide 11) A) Key Attributes Reduced Infrastructure=less security, less unnecessary exposure of equipment and supplies. No secure beach or host nation required Assembles troops & equipment at sea Selective offload for different missions Sustainment and reconstitution of fighting forces from the sea (Slide 12) Today’s dynamic global environment demands that the sea base be flexible and scalable, allowing Operational Commanders the ability to configure the sea base in order to optimize the employment of the appropriate size and capable forces to accomplish the mission, whatever that mission may be--from Humanitarian Assistance to Major Combat Operations. (Slide 13) The Sea Base should be viewed as a capability. It can be formed by one ship, a small group of ships, or a larger, more diverse force. No two seabases will ever be the same. The platforms shown on this graphic are all components that will play a role in the system of systems. At the center of the Sea Base will be the Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future). The Carrier Strike Group is built around an aircraft carrier, while an Expeditionary Strike Group provides the synergy of surface combatants with a Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked on Amphibious Warfare Ships. Various connectors will provide both intra-theater and inter-theater lift of aircraft, personnel, and equipment. The Combat Logistics Force ships provide sustainment, and Coalition Forces provide unique capabilities to the Sea Base that will be critical to our success. (Slide 14) A Seabase is a suite of Expeditionary Capabilities provided to the Joint Force Commander to project power from the sea. In the next couple of slides we will talk about the following Maritime Expeditionary Capabilities: AE, MPF(F), and Connectors as well as the 2015 MEB. (Slide 15) 2015 Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB). The 2015 Baseline MEB was designed to be deployed and employed by both amphibious ships and MPF(F) ships. The MAGTF has the same capability, regardless of deployment/employment means. The MPF(F) is designed to introduce the 2015 MEB via 1 Air and 2 Surface Battalions using a concept called “selective offload”.

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We will discuss some of the planning considerations and how the ACE has changed in a few slides. (Slide 16) Animated Slide (First Click) In amphibious operations, the element of a force comprised of tailored units and aircraft assigned to conduct the initial assault is the AE. The AE will introduce 2 MEBs (15 ships per MEB) into the Obj area via Amphibious shipping comprised of 1 LHA, 4 LHD-1 (Wasp Class), (5) LPD-17 (San Antonio Class), and 5 LSD-41 (Whidbey Island Class). (Slide 17) The Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future) will be the true enabler of seabased operations. The MPF(F) is not part of the assault follow-on echelon but will aid rapid force closure by reinforcing the landing force with 1.0 MEB into the objective area. (Slide 18) In amphibious operations, that echelon of the assault troops, vehicles, aircraft, equipment, and supplies that is required to support and sustain the assault is known as the Assault Follow-on Echelon (AFOE). The Assault Follow-on Echelon (AFOE) deploys on 10 to 14 Strategic Sea Lift ships, depending on what ships are available. MPF(F) is not assault echelon shipping; therefore it does not have a forcible entry capability and requires the sea shield in non-permissive environments. (Slide 19) The AE is the muscle of our naval forces. It allows us forcible entry capability as well as provides the bulk of the forward presence and deterrence capability As I mentioned before the AE is composed of 15 ships for one MEB’s worth of lift. The AE will introduce 2 MEBs (15 ships per MEB) into the Obj area via Amphibious shipping comprised of 1 LHA, 4 LHD-1 (Wasp Class), (5) LPD-17 (San Antonio Class), and 5 LSD-41 (Whidbey Island Class). (Slide 20) The MPF(F) program will be still be composed of 3 total squadrons. One squadron will be MPF(F) consisting of 14 various vessels and two legacy squadrons. MPF(F) provides all the same capabilities as the Legacy MPF but in addition also provides the JFC with at sea AA, Selective offload, and the full capacity to operate is a SS of 3 with its INLS, and advanced connectors (JHSV and JMAC). We will discuss each of the ships within the MPF(F) squadron in the next couple of slides. (Slide 21) First, let’s watch a quick video on Joint Seabasing. MPF(F) is only one Expeditionary Capability of Seabasing. Video is 15 minutes long.

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(Slide 22) Play Video (Slide 23) Are there any questions about the video? The biggest thing about MPF(F) is that even though it retains all the prepositioning capabilities associated with current Maritime Prepositioning Ships (MPS), it can also exploit the sea as maneuver space from over-thehorizon, and conduct dispersed operations while supported by force protection commensurate with the threat. An MPF(F) squadron shall provide capabilities beyond that of the existing Maritime Prepositioning Squadron (MPSRON), including surface connector interfaces; organic aviation interfaces and support for tiltrotor/rotary-wing aircraft, vehicle/equipment and surface connector maintenance; selective offload; MEB level command and control; underway and vertical replenishment; and skin-to-skin cargo transfer. (Slide 24) As we discussed on training day 1 in the overview class, the MPF has evolved dramatically since it was born in the early 1980s. In the beginning the MPF Program only consisted of 13 contracted and constructed Merchant vessels owned and operated by MSC. Today, we have those original ships plus the addition of the 3 MPF Enhancement ships (added to the program in the early 2000s), that provided additional square foot space for the NMCB equipment, the FH and the EAF. In the future the MPF(F) will consist of 3 squadrons encompassing a 14 ship MPF(F) squadron and 2 legacy squadrons. Between now and 2015 we are bridging the gap with adding the LMSRs to the MPF program over the next 3 years. The transition from MPF to MPF(E) was evolutionary. The transition from MPF(E) to MPF(F) is revolutionary, representing a break from how we do business today. (Slide 25) Although capable and still relevant, today’s prepositioning equipment come on densely packed ships that must be offloaded at a port, and require significant investments in Host Nation Support and force protection ashore. (Slide 26) As the slide indicates, the MPF(F) will provide several significant capabilities compared to today’s prepositioning force, MPF. MPF(F) offers a rapid response option with enhanced access in restricted access environments, arrival and assembly of combat forces at sea, employment of “combat ready” forces from OTH, and persistent sustainment of forces operating ashore. All important capabilities not inherent in today’s MPF squadron (Slide 27) Acting SecNav, CNO, and CMC agreed on 24 May 2005 that the MPF(F) squadron would be comprised of these hull forms. The planned Squadron would consist of 14 vessels to support the future MEB capabilities on previous slide. This mix of vessels is based on existing hull form designs in order to minimize cost and production schedule risk when compared to clean-sheet designs and construction.

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The Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) is the only clean sheet design; however, it is based on current Float on Float Off technology that is used in the commercial sector. This technology was recently demonstrated when a commercial vessel modified to resemble a MLP performed skin to skin transfer of cargo with an existing Watson class LMSR. Recent discussions with Navy counterparts reveal that the LMSR’s may be sourced from Army’s planned divestiture of some of their afloat prepositioned stocks, and that DASN ships is proposing to convert an existing LHD to a prepositioning ship ~2015 once a new-construction LHA(R) is built. These vessels will closely resemble their current sister ships with some modifications to support the Concept Of Employment and Maritime Sealift Command (MSC) crewing and operations. (Slide 28) The LHA(R) would replace the LHA 1 class of amphibious assault ships, and would have the flexibility to operate in the traditional role as the flagship for an Expeditionary Strike Group, as well as potentially playing a key role in the maritime pre-positioning force future (MPF(F)). As the Navy's Seabasing plan matures, the flexibility to operate with the Expeditionary Strike Group and as part of the MPF(F) will make the LHA(R) a vital cog in the Sea Base. LHA(R) would be a variant of the gas turbine-powered LHD 8. The one key difference of LHA(R) from LHD 8 was that it would be an aviation-enhanced assault ship tailored for the US Marine Corps future Aviation Combat Element centered on the STOVL F-35B Joint Strike Fighter and the tilt-rotor V-22 Osprey. The LHA replacement modifies the LHD design to maximize support for the V-22, the CH-53, and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, with adequate service margins for growth. The biggest change brought about in the Global War on Terror is LHA(R). The aviation specific variant of the LHA(R) has no well deck, but an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. LHA 6 would be multi-functional and versatile, modifying existing Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) spaces to allow for flexible mission dependent reconfiguration (Slide 29) LHDs conduct prompt, sustained combat operations at sea as the centerpiece of the Navy's amphibious strategy of "Forward Presence From the Sea." They provide the means to deliver command and support all elements of a Marine Landing Force in an assault by air and amphibious craft. In carrying out their mission, the ships have the option of utilizing various combinations of helicopters, Harrier II (AV-8B) Jump Jets and air cushion landing craft (LCAC), as well as conventional landing craft and assault vehicles, illustrating the LHD's flexibility. The LHD l has an enhanced well deck, enabling it to carry three LCACs (vice one LCAC in the LHAs). The flight deck and elevator scheme is also improved, which allows the ship to carry two more helicopters than its predecessor, the LHA. (Slide 30) Pedestal cranes and both side and stern ramps mean that the LMSR is ideally suited for undeveloped ports or logistics over the shore. LMSR's huge, six-deck

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interior has a cargo carrying capacity of approximately 393,000 square feet, equivalent to greater than eight football fields. The ship's decks have ample open space for lashing down helicopters, tanks, trucks and other large vehicles. A slewing-stern ramp and a moveable side-port ramp make it easy to drive vehicles on and off the ship -- speeding loading and off-loading operations to just 96 hours total per ship. Two 110-ton single pedestal-twin cranes make it possible to load and unload cargo where shoreside infrastructure is limited or nonexistent (Slide 31) Mobile Landing Platforms, or MLPs, are being developed to facilitate at-sea cargo transfers. A platform that partially submerges in water and allows cargo to float on and off of it, the MLP is essentially a "beach" that links a rollon/roll-off cargo ship to small, barge-like watercraft that can deliver the equipment from the sea base ashore. The Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) is a 34,544 MT displacement carrier for LCACs [Landing Craft Air Cushion]. It would also function as a staging position for doing some of the assembly of forces. The MLP would be a troop carrier, carrying 1,112 Marines, and a place where forces could be matched with their equipment before being transported ashore on LCACs or via aviation assets. The ships would be about 800 feet (250 meters) long and built to commercial standards, with a maximum speed of about 20 knots. (Slide 32) This slide shows the only clean sheet, newly designed ship in the MPFF squadron. The Mobile Landing Platform is based on Float On/Float Off or FLO/FLO commercial ships design concepts. This ship’s current concept includes the primary characteristics you see on this slide. The ship is being designed to interface with MPF(F), LMSRs, and Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCACs) through sea state 3/4, but other platforms like Army LMSRs, Army and Naval Landing Craft Utility (LCUs), could easily leverage the ship as an interface for loading as well. (Slide 33) The Vehicle Transfer System (VTS) is the primary system to transfer vehicles and personnel from the LMSRs to the MLPs underway. There will be 1 VTS per MLP (no redundancy) and analysis suggests that the it should be able to conduct 24 hour operations in a SS of 3. (Slide 34) Mobile Landing Platforms, or MLPs, are being developed to facilitate at-sea cargo transfers. A platform that partially submerges in water and allows cargo to float on and off of it, the MLP is essentially a "beach" that links a rollon/roll-off cargo ship to small, barge-like watercraft that can deliver the equipment from the sea base ashore. Since both MPF(F) ships and MLPs are in the early development stages, the demonstration used MSC-chartered heavy lift ship MV Mighty Servant I as the at-

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sea platform. MV Mighty Servant I, a float-on/float-off ship designed to submerge in the water, is used to transport large, unwieldy cargo like drydocks, vessels and oil rigs. The ship's open deck made it an ideal landing platform for this demonstration. The 950-foot large, medium-speed, roll-on/roll-off ship USNS Watkins stood-in as the MPF(F) seabasing cargo ship. (Slide 35) A Landing Craft Air Cushion, or LCAC, flies onto the flat deck of heavy lift ship MV Mighty Servant I to load equipment and supplies for transport to shore during a Mobile Landing Platform demonstration near San Diego. (Slide 36) The dry cargo/ammunition ships are operated by the Navy’s Military Sealift Command and provide multi-product combat logistics support to the Navy fleet. USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE 1), the class lead ship, is a new Combat Logistics Force (CLF) underway replenishment vessel intended to replace the current capability of the Kilauea-class (T-AE 26) ammunition ships and Mars-class (T-AFS 1) combat stores ships The T-AKE program calls for up to 14 ships, three of which are expected to be part of the Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future), and has a budget of more than $6 billion. As an auxiliary support ship, T-AKEs directly contribute to the ability of the Navy to maintain a forward presence. In its primary mission role, the T-AKE provides logistic lift to deliver cargo (ammunition, food, limited quantities of fuel, repair parts, ship store items, and expendable supplies and material) to U.S. and allied Navy ships at sea. In its secondary mission, the T-AKE may operate in concert with a Henry J. Kaiser-class (T-AO 187) oiler as a substitute station ship to provide direct logistics support to the ships within a Carrier Battle Group. (Slide 37) And finally, there will be 2 Legacy MPF ships (most likely Bobo class ships- as they were build specifically for the MPF Program) (Slide 38) Connectors. A connector provides the capability to rapidly deploy selected portions of the force that can immediately transition to execution, even in the absence of developed infrastructure, and conduct deployment and sustainment activities in support of multiple simultaneous, distributed, decentralized battles and campaigns. Examples are the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) and the Joint Maritime Amphibious Connector (JMAC). The JHSV provides a high speed intra-theater surface connector capability to rapidly deploy selected portions of the Joint Force. JHSV are capable of transporting personnel, equipment and supplies over operational distances in support of maneuver and sustainment operations. The JHSV has a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship. The ramp is suitable for the types of austere piers and quay walls common in developing countries. The JHSV would also be shallow draft (under 15 feet) that would further enhance access by enabling the JHSV to operate in shallow waters. These requirements would make the JHSV an extremely flexible asset able to support of a wide range of operations including maneuver and

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sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport. JHSV Capabilities: a. 600-700 ST payload, 1200 NM range b. 35 kts, Sea State 3 c. Seating for 312 Marines d. Slewing ramp (40 degrees forward) f. Flight deck for H-60s (Slide 39)

The JMAC will serve as a tactical assault connector from the Sea Base to the beach and between sea base platforms. The JMAC program will be introduced FY 2015 and will replace the LCAC Service Life Extension Program (SLEP), to be retired by FY 2018, and will take advantage of advanced technology, materials, and design and so enhance the nation’s ability to project expeditionary forces from the sea-based platforms of the future. JMAC Capabilities: a. 25 NM or lesss b. Sea State 3 c. Operates independent of tides, water depth, underwater obstacles
(Slide 40) Are there any questions on MPF(F), Seabasing, or anything that we have discussed up to this point? If not, then let’s move on to MPF(F) planning considerations. (Slide 41) MPF(F) Planning Considerations: Preposition the MEB (1 Air and 2 Surface Battalions [selective offload]) Close a MEB in 10-14 days At Sea Arrival and Assembly in 24-72 Hours Employ one Surface Battalion and one Vertical Battalion in 8-10 hours Sustain the forces ashore from the Sea Base Provide Level II (resuscitative surgery) medical support Conduct external operations in Sea State 3 threshold/Sea State 4 objective

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MEB C2 Notional 2015 MEB changes MEB Equipment List MEB ACE revised to include JSF and MV-22. We will discuss the Notional MEB changes in the next 2 slides. (Slide 42) Here is the current and future Notional MPF personnel and Major PEI breakdown. What are the major differences between the two? A) More equipment B) New equipment (Slide 43) Here is the breakdown of the RW/FW aircraft as part of the Notional MPF MEB. The MPF MAGTF Aviation Combat Element (ACE) is composed of a fixed wing and a rotary wing component. The Marine Corps aviation plan would substitute 5 squadrons (60 aircraft) of VSTOL Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) for the two F/A18A/B (12 plane), one F/A-18D (12 plane), and one AV-8B (20 plane) squadrons. The KC-130 and EA-6B aircraft remain as in today's ACE. Similarly three squadrons (36 total aircraft) of MV-22 aircraft are substituted for the two CH46 (12 plane) and one CH-53D (8 plane) helicopter squadrons. The CH-53E heavy lift helicopter squadron and the attack and utility helicopters remain. The AH1W and UH-1N helicopters are upgraded to 4 bladed rotors, increasing range and payload. (Slide 44) Similar to Legacy MPF Operations, MPF(F) operations also consists of five phases. They are Close, Arrival and Assembly, Employment, Sustainment and Reconstitution. I will briefly discuss each of these. (Slide 45) What do you think Closing the Force Entails? A) During this phase, the task organized force deploys from multiple locations. B) Elements of the main body will close with the MPF(F) squadron via strategic airlift through the advanced base and/or arrive directly to the sea base via strategic lift while the MPF(F) squadron is underway and conduct an at-sea transfer

C) Advance elements of the force, to include naval supporting elements, form an Employment Preparation Party (EPP) that immediately deploys to the sea base to prepare for Arrival and Assembly of the Fly in Echelon (FIE) and main body.

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D) Intra-theater high speed connectors such as JHSV and other theater air and surface assets may be employed to support movement of personnel and equipment from the advanced base to the sea base (Slide 46) Next we have Arrival and Assembly at Sea (this is where you marshal, operationally configure the gear, and stage it) (Slide 47) The arrival and assembly phase begins with the receipt of warning order at the preposition site through completion of cross decking personnel, equipment, and supplies aboard the MLPs. During this phase the Employment Preparation Party (EPP) conducts marshalling operations in preparation for employment. Once the equipment is operationally configured, it will be cross-decked from the LMSRs to the MLPs, and staged on the MLPs for employment. (Slide 48) And who does all of these things? The EPP embarks and conducts marshalling operations in preparation for employment. What kinds of things need to be prepared? EPP Responsibilities: A) Locating, identifying, and preparing equipment and supplies for employment B) Conducting mobile loading and vehicle marriages C) Validating weights D Placarding What are some of the main differences between and EPP and an OPP? A) Movement to debarkation points, and get things ready to be staged in landing serials and On-Call waves B) C) D) Assist in receiving the FIE Not just unchalking chains and start-ups any more. Combat ready. They only have ~72-96 hours just like OPP. Making equipment

Intra-theater high speed connectors such as JHSV and other theater air and surface assets may be employed to support movement of personnel and equipment from the advanced base to the sea base.

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(Slide 49) Next we have the Employment Phase. (Slide 50) During this phase the MLPs will need to come in from the Outer Sea Echelon Area (110-75 NM) to the LOD (25 NM) to deploy LCACs and EFVs (Slide 51) Once scheduled LCAC serials have landed in the initial surface assault, the MLPs will return to the LMSRs to cross–deck and load other surface-delivered units (including elements of the 2nd BLT if required) per the landing plan. Two definitons that need to be explained are the Sea Base Maneuver Element (SBME) and Sea Base Support Element (SBSE). 1. The SBME will be employed ashore from the sea base. The SBME units may stay ashore, or may be recovered for reinsertion into the same fight, or redeployment to another fight, for as many iterations as mission requirements dictate. 1. The SBSE personnel will normally be employed on the sea base. Portions of the SBSE will attach to the SBME for varying periods ashore, as required (i.e. a mobile contact team). This is how we “put the teeth ashore, while the tail remains out at sea” Fighting force (or only the necessary force ashore) with required support personnel back at the sea base protected by the Sea Shield capability. (click once) alligator appears (Slide 52) The LHD/LHA(R) ships will maneuver to positions that will support the employment of the vertical assault BLT. The vertical assault may occur simultaneously with the surface assault, or separated by time, per the operation order.The LHD can also close to the LOD and by virtue of its well deck provide an immediately employable mechanized infantry rifle company (reinforced) which includes an EFV platoon, a Light Armored Reconnaissance (LAR) platoon and/or a tank platoon. The LMSRs and MLPs may be used as aircraft staging and refueling platforms (lily pads) as needed. (Slide 53) The fourth phase of MPF(F) is Sustainment. (Slide 54) Not only will the MPF(F) send the 2015 MEB ashore with a combat load but it will also be able to supply that MEB with 20-45 DOS. Beyond that it will be able to tap into Joint and Navy logistics pipelines. MPF(F) will have Connected Replenishment (CONREP) where the ships can maneuver alongside and receive fuel,

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stores, ammunition, food and personnel. They can also receive the same products (except fuel) through helicopter delivery (Vertical Replishment (VERTREP)). And finally the MPF (F) can do skin-to-skin cargo transfer. Sea Basing will support persistent joint operations afloat and ashore by continuously sustaining forces via flexible and responsive Integrated Naval Logistics chain. The idea is to minimize the establishment of a relatively immobile “Iron Mountain” MPF(F) will link to the strategic/theater, Naval/Joint logistics pipeline for persistent sustainment. MPF(F) will interface with the JHSV intra-theater connector, combat logistics force (CLF), and other Sealift assets. Picture on the lower left is the T-AKE, a new Combat Logistics Force (CLF) Underway Replenishment Naval vessel (Slide 55) MPF(F) will have the ability to reconstitute a brigade at sea following operations ashore. The level of reconstitution will be driven by available resources and operational requirements. (Slide 56) When possible, reconstitution will be conducted ashore due to space and time requirements. Afloat reconstitution for major end items is achievable, but more time consuming. Given the complexity of reconstituting a force and its capabilities, this effort is broken down into four “levels of effort”, in order to provide commanders with the flexibility necessary to conduct concurrent operations: Immediate, Rapid, Deliberate and Regeneration. (Slide 57) All 4 levels of reconstitution can be differentiated by the level of combat capability they attain and the amount of time it takes to complete this phase. See the suggested criteria and timeline above. (Slide 58) SUMMARY (1 MIN)

This handout has highlighted the overall concept and planning considerations of seabasing and MPF(F). During this lesson we discussed: Seabasing, the definition of a sea base, as well as the characteristics and five phases of MPF(F). If there are no questions, then let’s take a 10 minute break. REFERENCES: 1. MCWP 3-32/NWP 3-02.3, Maritime 2. Naval Transformation Roadmap

Prepositioning Force Operations

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3. 4.

Joint Publication 1-02 Sea basing Integration Division Brief, Program Review, March 2008

5. ATTACHMENTS: None.

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