DH-1018 | Annual Percentage Rate | Democratic Party (United States)

1

Monday, october 18, 2010
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
‘The Beaver’s’ mom dies,
p8A

Ottoville beats Jays in VB
marathon, p6A
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-7A
Announcements 8A
World news 10A
Classifieds 2B
TV 3B
Index
Mostly sunny
Tuesday;
high near 60.
See page 2.
St. John’s Fall Festival
Nancy Spencer photos
Hundreds of volunteers make the St. John’s Fall Festival a success. Above: Sue Trentman,
left, “Dino” Schwinnen, Sarah Jostpille and Chris Koverman fill take-out containers.
Above right: Festival-goers enjoy a family-style meal. Right: Hundreds of cakes are cut
and served during the two-day festival. Sue Vonderwell, left, Winnie Siefker and Mary
Lou Schulte make sure the desserts keep moving into the Little Theatre for diners.
Latta tours Kennedy,
Universal Lettering
Kirk Dougal photo
Latta watches as an FFA patch is sewn on to a jacket at Universal Lettering Co. Latta
toured the production facility during a visit on Friday.
BY KIRK DOUGAL
kdougal@timesbulletin.
com
VAN WERT — U.S.
Congressman Bob Latta
(R-Bowling Green) had one
message when he addressed
the Van Wert County
Republican Luncheon Friday.
He said the upcoming elec-
tion is important to this area
of the country and vital to
the state.
“We have got to get this
state turned around and we
have got to get it turned
around starting at the top,” he
said. “Because I don’t know
how Ohio is going to survive
four more years of (Governor
Ted) Strickland. Ohio and
this country are right on the
edge of the abyss. We are
one step away from falling in
a giant hole that we are not
going to get out of.”
Latta said he is constantly
amazed at how out-of-touch
with the middle of the country
many people in Washington
remain. He said most of them
rarely go to the Midwest and
other areas to get voter input.
He shared the story that while
serving on the Energy and
Commerce Committee, he
listened to Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke say
the economy was back on
the right track. Latta said he
argued with Bernanke that
the economy was not improv-
ing, then invited the chairman
to come to Ohio with him.
Bernanke has yet to take him
up on his offer.
He also gave a dire warn-
ing about the federal debt on
the day it was announced the
fiscal year deficit was $1.29
trillion. He recounted meet-
ing with the Congressional
Budget Office director. Latta
said he spread financial doc-
uments across a conference
table and asked the director
what the deficit would be
by 2065. The CBO director
replied the deficit would be
$318 trillion.
Library to host
‘Fancy Nancy’
program
The Delphos Public
Library will hold a fabulously
fancy program for girls ages
4-8 at 4 p.m. Oct. 26.
“Fancy Nancy and
Fabulous Fun” invites little
girls to get fancy and join us
for stories, crafts, games and
ice cream parfaits (that’s a
fancy word for sundaes)!
Nancy, who loves to
get dressed up and is very
posh, is a new and popu-
lar book character created
by author Jane O’Conner.
She will inspire all the
activities that day.
Sign-up is required and
the group will be limited to
25. Call the library at 419-
695-4015 to register.
St. John’s Hall of
Fame to induct
class of 2101
The Delphos St. John’s
Hall of Fame induc-
tion ceremony is set for
12:30 p.m. Nov. 28 in the
All Saints Building.
This years inductees are:
— Professional
Achievement: Mary Scherger
Bonhomme, class of 1970
— Arts/Athletic
Achievement: Jim Carder and
Jerry Carder, class of 1964
— Service to St. John’s:
Ollie Sever, class of 1932
— Service to Mankind:
Ronnie Grothous,
class of 1961
The brunch and induction
ceremony are free and open
to the public but reserva-
tions are required. To make
reservations, contact Bob
Ebbeskotte at rebbeskotte@
woh.rr.com or 419-692-0752
or send your reservations to
Hall of Fame, PO Box 112,
Delphos. Include your name
and number attending.
Deadline for reser-
vations is Nov. 14.
Weigh-ins today for
midget football
Weigh-ins for the four
teams left in the Tri-County
Midget Football Association:
the Delphos Reds and
Vikings, the Columbus
Grove Bulldogs and the
St. Marys Broncos; are
at 7 p.m. tonight at Peak
24-Hour Fitness in Delphos.
TODAY’s SECTIONALS
Boys Soccer
Division III
At Lima Stadium:
Fort Jennings vs.
Spencerville, 5 p.m.
At Kalida: Ottawa-
Glandorf vs. Miller
City, 6 p.m.; Archbold
vs. Kalida, 8 p.m.
Division II
At Shawnee: Celina
vs. Elida, 7 p.m.
Girls Soccer
At Ottoville: Crestview
vs. Coldwater, 5:15
p.m.; Ottoville vs.
Jefferson, 7:15 p.m.
Iran releases American
held for 2 years in Tehran
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Iran on Saturday set free an
American businessman jailed in
Tehran for more than two years
on suspicion of ties to an alleg-
edly violent opposition group.
Reza Taghavi, 71, hadn’t
been charged with a crime and
denied knowingly support-
ing the organization, known as
Tondar.
“He admitted to nothing and
he continues to maintain his
innocence,” his lawyer, Pierre
Prosper, told The Associated
Press in a telephone interview
from Tehran after his client’s
release from Tehran’s Evin pris-
on. He’s not expected to return
to Southern California before
the middle of next week.
Iranian officials are “com-
fortable that he was in fact used
by this organization, and com-
fortable that he does not pose
a threat to them and that he can
leave and go back to the United
States,” Prosper said.
Iran had accused Taghavi
of passing $200 in cash to an
Iranian man tied to Tondar.
Taghavi, who regularly visits
Iran to conduct business and see
family, had received the money
from a friend in California with
instructions to pass the cash to an
Iranian, according to Prosper.
“I didn’t do anything wrong.
Someone just asked me take
this money to help someone,”
Taghavi told ABC News.
“Sometimes I feel relief,
sometimes, I feel angry. What
happened? Two-and-a-half
years for what?” he said.
His family had said he has
diabetes and was in poor health,
and his lawyer has asked Iran
to free him on humanitarian
grounds.
Prosper said Taghavi won’t
be able to leave until this com-
ing week because of conditions
attached to his release. While
Taghavi never was charged
formally or presented with
paperwork indicating a charge,
Prosper said there is a case with-
in the Iranian justice system. He
plans to meet with a judge in the
next week in hopes of getting
that case dismissed.
The best way to describe the
situation, he said, is that the case
is suspended and Taghavi is free
to leave.
“We welcome the release
of Reza Taghavi from deten-
tion in Evin Prison in Iran, and
are pleased that he will soon
be reunited with his family.
We urge Iranian authorities to
extend the same consideration
to Josh Fattal and Shane Bauer,
and other detained Americans
by resolving their cases without
delay,” said State Department
spokesman Noel Clay.
Fattal and Bauer are two
American hikers jailed in Iran
since they were arrested near the
Iran-Iraq border in July 2009.
The Iranians released Bauer’s
fiancee, Sarah Shourd, a month
ago.
Prosper said he and Taghavi
will visit the southern Iranian
city of Shiraz, site of an April
2008 bombing at a mosque
that killed 14 people. Iranian
authorities blame the group that
Taghavi is suspected of being
involved with, and told Taghavi
to meet with victims of the
attack.
“He feels aggrieved. He feels
used” by his friend back home
who provided the cash, Prosper
said.
Prosper had five direct meet-
ings with Iranian officials since
Taghavi was jailed. Three were
in Iran, one in New York and
one in Europe.
A family representative, Ric
Grenell, said Taghavi planned
to hold a news conference upon
his return to the United States.
Stacy Taff photos
Van Wert hosts annual Apple Festival
The Van Wert County Apple Festival was held this weekend at the Van
Wert County Fairgrounds. Above: Doris Tenwalde, left, and Janet and
Ciara Becker choose from an array of small pumpkins a the festival. At
right: Hubert Keuneke of “The Loom Room” does a weaving demonstra-
tion.
See LATTA, page 3A
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Josh
Fish.
Congratulations
Josh!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Dulton
Moore.
Congratulations
Dulton!
Scholars of the Day
2A – The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 107
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl, general manager/
Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
2
419-225-4911
LIMA PODIATRY
Dr. Lewis M. Vichinsky
2745 Ft. Amanda Rd., Lima, OH
$
50 OFF
Any New Patient Visit
• Good towards OUT OF POCKET EXPENSE ONLY
• Must be presented at time of initial service
Jerry Lewis’
McDonald’s
Restaurants
Accepting applications for MANAGEMENT Delphos McDonald’s. Apply online at www.mcohio.com
Delphos police were called
to the 400 block of South
Main Street at 5 p.m. Sunday
in reference to a criminal dam-
aging complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that she was at
a friend’s residence at which
time, a subject arrived at that
location and began causing
damage to the victim’s motor
vehicle.
Delphos police were con-
tacted at 3:22 p.m. Saturday
by a subject who stated that
she was just threatened by
someone in the 400 block of
Grant Street.
The victim stated that the
subject had issued verbal
threats and the victim was in
fear for her safety.
While on routine patrol at
3:09 a.m. Saturday, Delphos
Police observed a vehi-
cle being driven by Jeffrey
Carder, 51, of Delphos fail to
stop for a posted stop sign at
West Third Street and North
Canal streets.
As a result of the violation,
Carder was stopped, at which
time it was found that Carder
was operating a motor vehicle
while impaired.
Carder was taken into cus-
tody and was issued a cita-
tion into Van Wert Municipal
Court on the charges and was
later released.
Delphos police arrest-
ed Andrew Stocklin, 25, of
Delphos at 8:30 p.m. Friday in
the 100 block of North Main
Street on an outstanding arrest
warrant issued out of Van
Wert County Ohio for failing
to appear on a prior domestic
violence charge.
Stocklin was transported
to the Van Wert County Jail
and will appear in Van Wert
Municipal Court.
Delphos police were con-
tacted by a resident at 2:22
p.m. Saturday in reference to
a domestic dispute that had
occurred in the 1000 block of
North Main Street.
The victim stated that a
family or household member
had became upset and verbal-
ly abusive towards the victim.
The victim advised that no
physical abuse had occurred
and did not wish to pursue
charges.
Victim witnesses
damage to vehicle
Female reports
verbal threats
Stop sign
violation leads
to OVI arrest
Man arrested on
outstanding
warrant
Victim reports
verbal abuse
While on routine patrol at
4:37 a.m. Sunday in the area
of Monroe Street and Elida
Avenue, Delphos Police came
into contact with a vehicle
being driven by Bliss Paquette,
24, of Delphos. Upon check-
ing, it was found that Paquette
was operating a motor vehicle
while having a suspended
drivers license.
Paquette was cited into
Lima Municipal Court on the
charges and was released.
DALLAS (AP) — A
20-year-old Jordanian man
caught in an FBI sting trying
to blow up a Dallas sky-
scraper faces a sentencing
hearing today just blocks
away from the building he
tried to take down.
Hosam Smadi faces up to
life in prison after pleading
guilty in May to attempted
use of a weapon of mass
destruction. Under his plea
agreement, however, it
is likely he will receive a
30-year sentence and then
face deportation.
According to the pleading
documents, Smadi acknowl-
edged leaving what he
thought was a truck bomb in
a garage beneath the 60-story
Fountain Place building in
September 2009. Smadi said
he parked the truck, started a
timer connected to the decoy
provided by undercover FBI
agents, then rode away to
watch the explosion.
Smadi dialed a cell phone
number from the roof of
a nearby parking garage,
where he had planned to
watch the explosion. The
number was supposed to set
off his truck bomb. It instead
alerted tactical agents hiding
in a stairwell, who swarmed
the rooftop and arrested the
teenager.
Posing as members of an
al-Qaida sleeper cell, three
undercover FBI employees
had monitored Smadi since
January 2009. After he
shared his plans to blow up
the office tower, they helped
him secure a truck and fake
bomb used to carry out the
mission, according to court
documents.
Since the arrest, Smadi’s
public defenders have por-
trayed their client as a trou-
bled and depressed young
man, who exhibited signs of
depression and mental ill-
ness when his parents sepa-
rated and then suffered a
breakdown after his moth-
er’s death from brain cancer.
At the plea hearing in May,
attorney Peter Fleury said
Smadi had been diagnosed
with schizophrenia by a pris-
on doctor and a physician
working for the defense.
FBI officials, however,
tell a different story. After
monitoring Smadi for nine
months, they say the defen-
dant was a committed would-
be terrorist determined to
connect with al-Qaida or
Hamas. It was fortunate,
they say, that they found
him first, spewing hatred
for America on an extremist
web site.
“Smadi was asked what
he would do if he had never
met the al-Qaida ‘sleeper’
cell,” said Tom Petrowski,
a supervisory special agent
with the FBI in Dallas, in
an affidavit. “Smadi replied
that he would keep looking
for such an entity to be a
part of, even if it meant him
having to leave the United
States and go to Palestine
and join Hamas or go back
to Pakistan and join the
Taliban.”
At 12:12 p.m. on Saturday,
a collision occurred when the
drivers of two vehicles backed
out of parking spots in the
Arby’s parking lot.
Randall Shinn, 60, of
Gibsonburg backed out of his
parking space and started to
move forward when Alfred
Breeden, 74, of Vermilion
started backing out of his park-
ing space and struck Shinn’s
vehicle.
No injuries were sustained
and there was light damage to
Breeden’s vehicle and none to
Shinn’s.
At 5:37 p.m. on Saturday,
a collision occurred when the
driver of one vehicle attempt-
ed to enter a roadway without
yielding to oncoming traffic.
Helen Mericle, 83, of
Delphos, was traveling south-
bound on North Pierce Street
when Eileen Lause, 86, of
Delphos, who was parked fac-
ing south on North Pierce,
attempted to enter the road-
way and struck Mericle.
There were no injuries and
minor damage to the vehicles.
Lause was cited for failure
to yield right of way when
entering a roadway.
At 2:49 p.m. on Friday,
a collision occurred between
two vehicles traveling south-
bound on North Franklin
Street.
Linda Miller, 61, of
Delphos, claimed she attempt-
ed to turn left into a parking
spot when Tricia Martz, 31,
of Delphos, attempted to pass
her and struck her vehicle on
the right side.
Martz claimed Miller
pulled out from the right side
of the road and attempted to
turn in front of her, causing
Martz to strike Miller’s right
side.
There were no injuries and
minor damage to the vehicles.
Due to the lack of witnesses
and the vehicles being moved,
no citations were issued.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly
cloudy. A chance of showers
in the evening. Lows in the
upper 30s. Northwest winds
around 5 mph. Chance of rain
40 percent.
TUESDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs around 60. Northwest
winds around 5 mph.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows around 40.
West winds around 5 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph
becoming west around 15 mph
with gusts up to 25 mph in the
afternoon.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT,
THURSDAY: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs in
the upper 50s.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were drawn
Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $86 million
Midday 3
6-6-7
Midday 4
9-8-5-4
Pick 3
1-0-7
Pick 4
1-2-4-5
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $46 million
Rolling Cash 5
01-03-09-10-35
Estimated jackpot: $192,000
Ten OH
04-05-07-17-19-21-24-25-26-
29-31-35-44-47-51-56-58-60-73-
77
Ten OH Midday
01-04-08-11-16-17-19-20-22-
28-31-41-43-47-58-59-65-69-71-
74
Woman cited for
driving under
suspension
Jordanian man
faces sentencing in
Dallas bomb plot
Police probe
backing accident
Driver cited in
backing accident
No citation in
afternoon crash
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 67 degrees,
low was 43. High a year ago
today was 57, low was 24.
Record high for today is 86,
set in 1950. Record low is 21,
set in 1976.
Delphos weather
Corn: $5.11
Wheat: $5.80
Beans: $11.33
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October Special:
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All color services include cut & Style. Lo is a graduate
of Paul Mitchell Academy with 3 years experience.
Lo also offers: pedicures, manicures, facial waxing,
block coloring techniques, highlighting and lowlighting.
Lo’s hours are: Mon. 12-8; every other Tues. morning;
Wed. 1-8; Thurs. 11-7; Fri. 10-4; Sat. 9-2
Shear Brilliance Salon
Elida Ave., Delphos 419-692-9517
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Oct. 19
10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Knights of Columbus,
Delphos
Oct. 21
5 – 7 p.m.
Interfaith Thrift Store
Oct. 22
10 a.m. - Noon
US Bank, Delphos
Oct. 25
5 – 7 p.m.
Immanuel U. Methodist,
Elida
Oct. 27
1:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Fort Haven Senior
Apartments,
Ft. Jennings
Oct. 29
10 a.m. - Noon
Alco Store, Delphos
Oct. 30
8:30 – 10:30 a.m.
Gomer United Church
of Christ
Community Health Professionals
of Delphos - 602 E. Fifth St., 419-695-1999
www.ComHealthPro.org
No Charge with Medicare Part B
All others age 18+: Flu Shots: $30
Flu Shots
Elite Naturescapes
10740 Elida Rd., Delphos 419-692-2525
Open M-F 9-5; Sat. 9-1 *Some exclusions apply
50% OFF
20% OFF
OF IN-STOCK TREES -
SHRUBS - PERENNIALS
FALL PLANT SALE
GARDEN DECOR
Garden Center • Cash ‘n Carry Only
Delphos Eagles
HALLOWEEN PARTY
OCTOBER 30
Live Band:
DAVE LILES BAND
Beginning at 8:00 till 12:00
Drink Specials:
$1-16 oz. Coors
Light Draft
APPLE CIDER
BLOODY MARY
DINNER SPECIAL:
T-Bone Steak and Rib Dinners
Costume ContesT at 10:00
Cash awards for best dressed
PUBLIC
WELCOME
SENIOR’S DAY
Monday and Tuesday
All Day!
Elida Road, Lima•Next to WENDY’S
6 Senior Specials
Complete w/2 extras
and choice of bread
Starting at
$6.49
Includes FREE
coffee or soft drink.
Golden Buckeye Card Accepted.
No other discounts apply.
of the Blessed Virgin Mary
(Medjugorje, Bosnia-Herzegovina)
“Dear children!
Today I am with you and bless
you all with my motherly
blessing of peace, and I urge
you to live your life of faith even
more, because you are still weak
and are not humble. I urge you,
little children, to speak less and
to work more on your personal
conversion so that your witness
may be fruitful. And may your life
be unceasing prayer. Thank you
for having responded to my call.”
September 25, 2010
MESSAGE TO
THE WORLD
Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald –3A
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
Police charge
collector with
sex crimes
CINCINNATI (AP) — A
Cincinnati area man who has
claimed to have the world’s
largest handcuff collection is
being held on charges involv-
ing sexually oriented material
with children.
Hamilton County authori-
ties say 67-year-old Stanley
Willis was jailed Sunday after
his extradition from Dade
County in Florida. He had
been indicted in May on two
counts of pandering sexually
oriented material involving a
minor and one count of tam-
pering with evidence.
He was being held today
pending court action. Attorney
information wasn’t immedi-
ately available.
The Cincinnati Enquirer
says Willis ran a website from
his Amberley Village home
featuring more than 1,500 dif-
ferent kinds of handcuffs and
restraints. The site was listed
as “down for maintenance”
Monday.
MADISON (AP) — A
school district near Cleveland
has canceled classes today
because vandals deflated tires
on most of the school buses.
Madison Local Schools
Superintendent Roger Goudy
tells Cleveland television sta-
tions WJW and WKYC that
about three-quarters of the
district’s 41 buses were found
in a bus garage with air let out
of their tires.
Officials say by the time
the discovery was made it was
too late to get the buses ready
this morning.
Police are investigating.
State Rep. Lynn Wachtmann toured Stoneco Quarry in Van Wert Friday afternoon,
getting a look at operations at the facility and seeing some of the progress of the Blue
Creek Wind Farm. (Times Bulletin/Ed Gebert)
By Times Bulletin Staff
VAN WERT – It was a
busy day on the Republican
side of the ticket on Friday
in Van Wert County as two
incumbent representatives
paid extended visits to the
area.
The afternoon started
with the Van Wert County
Republican Luncheon at Willow
Bend and U.S. Congressman
Bob Latta (OH-5) (*see other
story on this page) and State
District 75 Representative
Lynn Wachtmann spoke to the
crowd.
In just a few words to
the gathering, Wachtmann
thanked the group for their
support over the years and
also asked that they contin-
ue to work hard, knocking
on doors and putting signs
in their yards. After the
meeting, he toured Stoneco
Quarry and saw firsthand
some of the work being
performed on the Iberdrola
Renewables Blue Creek
Wind Farm project.
At the luncheon, County
Republican Chairman
Martin Burchfield also
urged the crowd to not only
vote but to utilize the early
voting option and to get
their friends to vote early
as well.
“Suggest that (friends)
go visit Linda Stutz at the
Board of Elections next
week and cast their ballot,”
he said. “Of course the best
way to get them out is to
vote early and then we know
they voted.”
Burchfield warned the
Republican crowd to not
become complacent even
though it appeared most
local races were trending
toward the GOP. He urged
the crowd not to think that
anything was over before
the final ballot was cast.
Wachtmann tours quarry
U.S. Congressman Bob Latta (OH-5) visits with employ-
ees at Kennedy Manufacturing on Friday. Latta was in
town to visit multiple manufacturing facilities. (Times
Bulletin/Kirk Dougal)
Latta
(Continued from page 1)
“That’s $305 trillion more
than we are today,” Latta told the
crowd. “In 55 years!”
A recent CBO report said
U.S. employment would not be
back to normal levels until the
end of 2014 or the beginning of
2015 at its current rate. He asked
rhetorically how America could
continue to survive with that kind
of answer. Latta said as he has
gone around his district and told
others what he had just shared,
he asked if anyone could sum up
in one sentence what the people
outside the Beltway would tell the
administration. Latta reported one
man’s response:
“Tell Washington to quit
killing the entrepreneur,” Latta
quoted. He said the man went on
to say that he had not hired more
workers, though he had enough
orders for his business to do so.
Latta said he was told this was
because the anticipated rise in
health care costs and income and
the end of the Bush tax cuts gave
him no incentive to work harder
to expand his business.
After the luncheon, Latta
toured Universal Lettering Co.
and Kennedy Manufacturing to
see how tool boxes were made. In
the Kennedy plant, he heard from
employees and management.
They informed him the union
agreed to work under reduced
hours just so more workers could
remain employed at the beginning
of the economic downturn. Many
of the workers expressed concern
about the affects of NAFTA and
jobs going to plants in Mexico
and other foreign countries.
At Universal, Latta saw FFA
jackets being produced and was
treated to seeing one of the sewers
put his name on some of the cloth.
He was also able to take a few
minutes and speak to the group,
asking if they had any questions
for him.
Afterward, he sat down with
The Times Bulletin and talked
about how important it is for him
to see what and how manufactur-
ing plants in his district make their
goods. Latta said the normal way
to go into a committee meeting
in Washington is to have a pre-
pared list of questions to ask those
invited. Latta said that by seeing
manufacturing facilities, he can
ask his own pertinent questions
and relate them to what he has
witnessed.
In a continuation of a previous
interview, Latta also talked about
a possible lame-duck session of
Congress after the elections. He
previously said he did not want to
see anything done in such a ses-
sion. He said Congress was being
forced to pass legislation because
no vote was taken on extending
the Bush tax cuts or continu-
ing the repeal of the inheritance
taxes. Without some action on
those items, the effect would be
the same as a huge tax increase
for much of the country. He also
bemoaned that a budget had not
been introduced, let alone passed.
School closes
over bus tires
CONNEAUT (AP) —
Authorities say an Ohio prison
was under lockdown for part
of the weekend because of a
kitchen fire.
John Chapin with the
Conneaut Fire Department
says the fire at the Lake Erie
Correctional Institution broke
out around 11:30 a.m. Sunday
in the insulation of a 90-gal-
lon cooking unit. He tells The
Star-Beacon of Ashtabula that
guards used a couple of fire
extinguishers to put out the
flames.
Inmates at the facility 65
miles northeast of Cleveland
were confined to their living
areas for about two hours dur-
ing the cleanup.
Chapin estimates the dam-
age at around $11,000, includ-
ing the value of food that had
to be thrown out.
Prison locked
down over fre
Study shows antibiotics found in river
COLUMBUS (AP) —
A recently released study
shows trace amounts
of antibiotics in Ohio’s
Scioto River system and in
treated drinking water in
Columbus.
The report issued by the
U.S. Geological Survey last
week found a dozen antibiot-
ics — including a drug used
to treat bacterial infections
and anthrax — in the Scioto
River. The study also shows
three drugs in treated drink-
ing water in Columbus.
The Columbus Dispatch
reports that the amount
of the drugs was 1,000 to
10,000 times lower than
more commonly detected
pollutants.
But the fact that the drugs
were found in small quan-
tities doesn’t rule out the
potential for harmful side
effects in people or the envi-
ronment, says Columbus-
based hydrologist Greg
Koltun, who helped review
the report.
“If you think of a fish
or another aquatic organism
that’s living in water and
has chronic exposure to this,
you don’t know what would
happen,” Koltun said.
The Dispatch reports
these antibiotics are part of
a new class of water pollut-
ants that also includes anti-
depressants, birth control
and household cleaners.
There aren’t government
limits on these pollutants in
streams or drinking water
and scientists studying them
say they don’t know wheth-
er there should be.
“That’s the million-dollar
question. Does it have any
negative consequences or
not?” says Dana Kolpin, a
research hydrologist who’s
coordinating the Geological
Survey’s national Emerging
Contaminants in the
Environment project.
Past tests have indicated
that at least 17 such contami-
nants — including caffeine
and mosquito repellant — are
in Columbus drinking water.
Columbus paid $125,000
in 2005 to help fund the
study. City officials say
they want to know how
many pollutants are in the
water so they can stay ahead
of any drinking-water stan-
dards that federal officials
might impose.
“We’re not public-health
experts or doctors. We can’t
make that decision on what’s
acceptable (in drinking
water),” says Matt Steele,
the water-quality-assurance
manager in Columbus. “We
wanted to see just how much
is out there.”
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4A — The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
POLITICS
“The strongest are those who renounce their own times and become a living
part of those yet to come. The strongest, and the rarest.”
— Milovan Djilas (1911-1995), Yugoslav author and politician
www.delphosherald.com
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
IT WAS NEWS THEN
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
DEAR EDITOR,
I am writing to urge all voters to vote “yes” for the proposed
income tax levy for the Delphos City Schools on Nov. 2.
I say Delphos City Schools because this levy will benefit ALL
students in our community. If this levy is passed, it will reduce
real estate taxes for Agricultural and Residential property in 2012
by rolling back the 5.5-mil 2004 levy and then by not renewing
the 5.5-mil 1992 levy in 2013. This will give all property own-
ers, including farmers, a reprieve from property taxes.
I have attended many school board meetings, I have sat
through a few finance meetings and I have learned a few things
about the way school funding works. By no means do I under-
stand everything there is to know, but what I do know is the state
mandates force our district into financing programs for which
there is no funding. This in turn forces school board members to
make cuts that are harmful to our students’ education.
Unfortunately, if this levy is not passed, another round of cuts
will come from the school board. These cuts will affect both the
public and the private schools in our town.
One of the hits our schools will take in this round of cuts is
the Agricultural Education Program and FFA Chapter. This pro-
gram has been ranked in the top ten in the state in the National
chapter program for 9 out of the last 10 years. There are 317
FFA chapters in the state of Ohio and twice, Delphos has fin-
ished on top, bringing the top ranking in the state to our district
in 2006 and 2007. The chapter has also been ranked in the top
10 in the nation in the area of community development through
this same program. There are approximately 100 kids enrolled
in agricultural education courses and participate as members of
the FFA. Students from both St. John’s and Jefferson contribute
to the success of this program. My question is, if Ag. Ed. and
the FFA were a sports team or program with State rankings of
this magnitude; would this program be in line for cuts? We all
know the answer to that.
National studies and even one conducted by a master’s
degree student of the Ag. Ed. program, have proven that students
enrolled in Ag. Science courses score significantly higher on the
science portion of the OGT. This portion of the test has given
our students the most trouble, year in and year out. The Ag. Ed.
program is not only teaching our students science technology
but it is teaching them leadership skills, community involvement
and many life skills that are essential to our young people today.
These students are learning the importance of giving back to the
community and serve our residents in many ways.
Please vote YES, and if you have any questions about the levy,
call the administration office. I have never been denied a copy of
any reports or records of where the money is being spent.
There are many empty chairs at the board meetings and
finance meetings. Either one of the meetings would be the best
place to start getting your information about state funding for
schools or how our local board members make choices that
affect our students.
Sincerely,
Brenda S. Hoersten
One Year Ago
• Dr. Wesley Klir of Fort Jennings has nearly completed the
restoration of the old Fort Jennings TStL&W combination train
depot, Klir, his father and friends “rescued” the depot, torn it
down, labeling all the boards and reassembled it on Klir’s land
south of Cloverdale.
25 Years Ago —1985
• The Elida Future Farmers of America urban team recently
placed third in the soil judging contest at Spencerville. They will
compete at state Oct. 26. Team members are Phil Layman, Jody
Long, Randy Kline and Bob Fricke. The Elida rural team took
sixth place. Team members are Andy Layman, Scott Stewart,
Drew Fields and Eric Martain.
• Crestview downs Fort Jennings 5-15, 15-11 and 15-11 in girls
volleyball play. Amy Lindeman led Fort Jennings with 12 points.
Amy Kehres and Paula Bruskotter each had seven. In service
percentage Lindeman was 18-for-18 and Bruskotter 11-for-11.
Amy Schroeder was 16-for-18 and Kenres 13-for-15 in service
receptions.
• Park Supt. Ken Grothous and Dave Metzger of the Delphos
Maintenance Department planted one of 50 sycamore trees
donated by Al and Nick Wrasman. Nick started the seedlings
three years ago as a Future Farmers of America project, and has
donated the fast-growing trees for planting in the new park by Flat
Fort Creek.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• Mr. and Mrs. Ferman Clinger and Mr. and Mrs. Linus
Schmelzer of Delphos are among those attending the American
Legion convention at Miami Beach, Fla., who will convene to
hear the next President of the United States speak. Sen. John F.
Kennedy, Democratic presidential nominee and Vice President
Richard M. Nixon, the Republican candidate, will address the
opening session of 6,000 delegates. Kennedy and Nixon were
expected to state their views on national defense, Cuba and the
Quemoy-Matsu issue. An estimated 60,000 Legionnaires and
their families saw the Legion’s famed eight-hour, two-mile parade
Monday night. There were 260 units of veterans, representing each
state and eight other departments of the Legion, including France,
Italy, the Philippines and Mexico.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• Toys made at the Delphos Bending Company are being
shipped to all parts of the United States and other countries.
The company has shipped toys to every state in the Union and
orders have been received for Australia, Dutch East Indies, South
America, Cuba, Porto Rico, Curacao and other parts of the West
Indies, Mexico, Canada, South Africa and Panama Canal zone.
• A shipment of fish and birds for restocking field and stream
was received Thursday. The fish included 300 bass, rock bass,
croppies and catfish. They were brought from Lake Erie and have
been placed in the Little Auglaize at the Helmich Quarry. The
shipment included 15 pheasants to be released at the field trial next
Sunday, one mile west and two miles north of Wetzel.
• A Delphos young man has been named as editor in chief of
the “Chow Chow,” student publication of Giffin College at Van
Wert. Norman Hersey has been named to that post. He is also vice
president of the student body of the college.
By LIZ SIDOTI
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama’s
winning coalition from 2008
has crumbled and his core
backers are dispirited. It’s
now Republicans who stand
to benefit from an electorate
that’s again craving change.
Nearly two years after
putting Obama in the White
House, one-quarter of those
who voted for the Democrat
are defecting to the GOP or
considering voting against the
party in power this fall. Just
half of them say they defi-
nitely will show up Nov. 2,
according to an Associated
Press-Knowledge Networks
poll released two weeks
before Obama’s first midterm
elections.
Yet in a reflection of broad
dissatisfaction with politics,
just as many people who
backed Republican presiden-
tial nominee John McCain are
either supporting Democrats
now or still considering how
to vote.
Still, McCain voters — to
borrow Obama’s campaign
rallying cry — are far more
“fired up, ready to go.” Two-
thirds say they are certain to
vote next month.
It’s a wide enthusiasm gap
that’s buoying Republicans,
who are poised for big elec-
toral gains, and worrying
Democrats, who are seeking
to hang onto majorities in
Congress as well among gov-
ernors. Obama’s party hopes
its superior get-out-the-vote
operation, updated from his
groundbreaking campaign,
can overcome Republicans’
energized supporters to miti-
gate expected losses across
the board.
While no president can be
expected to fully rally his sup-
porters when he’s not on the
ballot, the survey illustrates
the wide scope of Obama
voters’ disappointment with
the president and his policies
almost halfway through his
first term — and two years
before he’s likely to seek their
backing again.
“He’s not listening to
the majority of the people
who elected him. It’s like
he’s ignoring his base,”
said SaraSue Crawford
of Jacksonville, Fla., who
points to Obama’s health
care overhaul law. She’s
deciding whether to support
Republicans in the hopes of
“shaking up the status quo”
and restoring a balance of
power in Washington. She
says she may back Obama in
2012 — if he changes course
by listening more.
To find out how the elec-
torate’s political views have
changed since the 2008 elec-
tion, the AP and Knowledge
Networks re-interviewed the
same 1,254 people who were
part of a random sample of
Americans surveyed up to 11
times throughout the 2008
campaign by the two organi-
zations and Yahoo News. The
recent interviews occurred
Sept. 17 to Oct. 7.
Disillusionment with
Obama was evident.
In a reversal from 2008,
the survey found that Obama
backers who expected change
in Washington — 63 percent
— now think nothing ever
will happen. Just 36 percent
still think Obama can do it,
while a majority of McCain
supporters now say things can
change if the right person is
elected.
“I was hoping we’d get
some more civility up in gov-
ernment. That was implicit in
his promise, along with some
change. It turns out that he
was driving more toward the
changes rather than civility,”
said Gerry D. Kramer, 70,
of Georgetown, Texas. He’s
among the Obama voters who
are likely to vote Republican.
Still, he’s not hot on the GOP
either or politics.
Poll: Those craving
change look to GOP
NEW YORK (AP) — This
election will be the first since
the 1990s without a measure to
ban gay marriage on any state
ballot, yet the divisive issue is
roiling races across the coun-
try during a time of tumult for
the gay rights movement.
In Minnesota, New
Hampshire, California and
New York, gubernatorial cam-
paigns have become battle-
grounds for rival sides in the
debate, with the Democratic
candidates supporting
same-sex marriage and the
Republicans opposed.
In Iowa, voters will decide
whether to oust three state
Supreme Court justices who
joined last year’s unanimous
decision making the state one
of five where gay marriage is
legal.
And in Rhode Island and
California, Democratic can-
didates are seeking to become
the fourth and fifth openly gay
members of Congress. The
Californian, Palm Springs
Mayor Steve Pougnet, has a
husband and 4-year-old twins,
and would be Congress’ first
openly gay parent.
The races are unfold-
ing on a rapidly shifting gay
rights landscape, with activ-
ists elated by important court
rulings, irked at setbacks in
Washington and jolted by
high-profile cases of anti-gay
violence and bullying-pro-
voked suicides.
The mixed emotions have
been evident in recent days as
a federal judge ordered a halt
to enforcement of the mili-
tary’s “don’t ask, don’t tell”
policy. The Obama admin-
istration says it agrees with
the judge that gays should
be allowed to serve openly.
Yet to the frustration of gay
activists, the administration
appealed the ruling, saying it
preferred that Congress repeal
the policy.
“It’s the best of times and
worst of times,” said Richard
Socarides, a former Clinton
White House adviser on gay
rights.
By ROGER ALFORD and
BRUCE SCHREINER
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. —
Republican U.S. Senate can-
didate Rand Paul angrily
accused Democratic rival
Jack Conway of gutter pol-
itics for running a TV ad
that questioned Paul’s affili-
ation during his college years
with a group that mocked
Christianity.
Paul demanded an apol-
ogy during a nationally tele-
vised debate Sunday night,
denouncing the commercial
as false and calling himself a
“pro-life Christian.” Conway
offered no apology and even
repeated the accusations in
his ad, which started airing
statewide Friday night.
“Those who stoop to the
level of attacking a man’s
religious beliefs to gain high-
er office, I believe that they
should remember that it does
not profit a man to gain the
world if he loses his soul in
the process,” Paul said, ref-
erencing a scripture from the
Gospel of Mark.
The candidates wrangled
over health care, taxes and
entitlements, but those issues
were overshadowed by a con-
tentious back-and-forth over
the ad.
Conway, the state’s attor-
ney general, defended the
attacks, saying Paul failed to
answer the two “fundamental
questions” raised in the ad.
The ad is based on pub-
lished reports that Paul, during
his college years, was a mem-
ber of a secret society at Baylor
University known as the NoZe
Brotherhood. A narrator in the
ad asks why Paul, while in col-
lege, tied a woman up and told
her to worship an icon called
“Aqua Buddha.” Those claims
by an anonymous woman
were made in articles in GQ
Magazine and The Washington
Post earlier this year.
Paul condemned the tactic,
saying: “How do you respond
to a guy who’s going to quote
somebody anonymously from
30 years ago that’s untrue?
You just out-and-out lie
because you have nothing to
stand on.”
The issue flared again in
the closing moments, when
Paul declared he would not
shake Conway’s hand after-
ward, stating: “I will not be
associated with someone who
attacks my religion.”
“We will try to keep the
debate on a higher tone,” Paul
said. “I hope you will leave
my church, my family and my
religion out of it.”
Paul walked past Conway
without offering his hand or
making eye contact with his
Democratic opponent.
Over the weekend, the
Paul campaign prepared a
response ad that touts the
Bowling Green eye surgeon’s
faith. With TV offices closed
over the weekend, they had to
wait until Monday morning to
begin the process of getting it
on the air.
“Rand Paul keeps Christ
in his heart and in the life he
shares with his wife and his
three boys,” a narrator says
as video plays of him walking
and fishing with his family.
Paul said Sunday night he
was disheartened that the race
had turned so personal.
“We have serious problems
in our country ... and he’s
descended into the gutter to
attack my Christian beliefs,”
said Paul, a Bowling Green
eye doctor. Paul and his family
attend a Presbyterian church
in Bowling Green, where his
wife serves as a deacon.
“Jack, you should be
ashamed of yourself. You
should apologize. Have you
no decency? Have you no
shame?”
During the debate, Conway
kept up his favorite attack
lines, accusing Paul of being
out of touch with Kentucky’s
drug problems and claim-
ing Paul supports a $2,000
deductible for Medicare
recipients — comments Paul
was caught making on video-
tape shown on YouTube. Paul
has said the comment was
taken out of context, and that
he doesn’t support such a high
deductible.
NEW YORK — Witches
vs. bearded Marxists. Actors
vs. hicks. Toon Town vs.
Parodyville.
The world isn’t too much
with us. We have left the
planet.
As we race toward the
midterm elections, our politi-
cal conversation has devolved
beyond the silly to the absurd
— and the sharks are jumping
sharks. Is it even possible to
have a serious conversation
anymore?
In a debate Wednesday
night, Republican Christine
O’Donnell looked at her
opponent for the U.S. Senate,
Chris Coons — a clean-
shaven, shiny-pated Rhodes
scholar/attorney/Yale Divinity
grad — and said that his 1985
op-ed titled, “Chris Coons:
The Making of a Bearded
Marxist” should send shivers
up the spines of all voters.
She was referring to Coons’
own long-ago admission that
he became a Democrat after
discovering economic dispar-
ity during a college-era visit to
Kenya. What is it about Kenya?
Coons’ insistence that he wrote
the op-ed as a joke simply
isn’t credible, if you read it. It
was sincere and thoughtful. He
clearly was transformed by his
experience, which included liv-
ing with a poor Kenyan family
and studying under a Marxist
professor, but this doesn’t have
much bearing on who he is
today.
I can’t speak for an entire
generation, but I had plenty
of Marxist professors and was
deeply moved by the economic
disparities in the world, which
is why I was a Democrat back
in the day. But I grew up
to be a happy capitalist. And
never mind that we’re mean-
while supposed to have equal
patience with O’Donnell’s
youthful declaration that she
had dabbled in witchcraft.
It seems to me the young
Marxist and the young witch
cancel each other out. But
what about now? Can we hold
each responsible for who and
what they are and say today?
If so, then we have ample
cause for shivers. O’Donnell,
when pressed about whether
she believed in evolution,
dodged the question and said
the decision about whether to
teach evolution or creationism
should be left to local school
districts and that what she
believes isn’t relevant. But of
course it is.
Coons’ palpable uneasi-
ness doubtless was owing
equally to his contempt for
her shallow knowledge and
to his inability to challenge
her without seeming a bully.
Instead, he seemed merely
condescending and snarky. If
the witch and Marxist were a
wash, the Everyday American
triumphed over the elite.
Ditto the scene in Las
Vegas Thursday night, where
tea party candidate Sharron
Angle managed to hold her
own against Harry Reid. Of
course, to be fair, all Angle
and O’Donnell had to do was
not be weird — hardly a high
bar for public office.
Political parties, mean-
while, have distilled them-
selves so completely to their
essences that they have cari-
catured themselves into car-
toonish self-parody. Witness
the recent town hall wherein
President Obama’s audience
was culled from a casting call
and the Republican ad cam-
paign in West Virginia that
sought “hicky” people. Oy, as
we say down South.
Republicans and Democrats
are so busy pointing fingers,
they fail to see what is plain-
ly obvious. They are mirror
images of each other and each
is equally cynical and cor-
rupt.
“A Conversation with
President Obama,” the town
hall meeting co-sponsored by
MTV/BET/CMT, featured an
hour-long chat with young peo-
ple, i.e. the president’s base of
last resort. Prior to the event,
the casting website Backstage.
com put out a call for “males
and females 18-plus” to fill out
a questionnaire to include “your
name, phone number, home-
town, school attending, your
job and what issues, if any, you
are interested in, or passionate
about.”
Well, it beats risk-
ing another encounter with
Velma Hart, the middle-aged
African-American woman
who, at another recent, less-
scripted Town Hall meet-
ing told Obama that she was
“exhausted” defending him.
Lest the GOP lose itself
in mirth, let’s turn to the
Republican casting call for
people who are “hicky,” pre-
sumably an endearing adjec-
tive referring to the behavioral
attributes of “hicks” — aka
ignorant, poor whites.
After days of denials,
the National Republican
Senatorial Committee had
to acknowledge that a media
consultant it hired, Jamestown
Associates, had in fact put out
the call for hicks to flesh out
ads for the Senate race. The
political divide between Elites
and Ordinary Americans has
never been starker or more
comical, or more resplendent
with self-loathing. When even
Republicans view their base
as ignorant rednecks — and
Democrats no longer try to
conceal their reliance on arti-
fice and propaganda — farce
has become the new reality.
Kathleen Parker’s e-mail address
is kathleenparker@washpost.com.
Politics today
Senate race turns to ‘Aqua Buddha’
Gay marriage
debate persists
in some races
Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald – 5A
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
First Presbyterian
Church
1
Women’s
Wellness Center
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
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If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
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If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
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If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos
curves.com 000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
000-000-0000
Local Address
Local Address
CURVES WORKS WITH
SILVER SNEAKERS
curves.com
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you moment to moment
feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you motivated like never before.
Limited Time Offer!
Join Now for $30
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart

.
Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo. c.d./e.f.t. program. Discount applies to initial service fee. New members only. Not valid with any other offer.
Valid only at participating locations. CurvesSmart. Powered by MYTRAK. ©2010 Curves International, Inc.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, OH 45833
If your fitness motivation sometimes gets lost, find CurvesSmart
TM
Only Curves has CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that gives you
moment to moment feedback and detailed progress reports. All to keep you
motivated like never before.
coming to Curves soon!
Join Now for $30! Offer ends October 30!
Fall Demands
Color Change!
leave summer behind with:
rich browns
deep reds
copper blondes
Call Holly, Jordan, Sarah or
Amy to save
$
15.
00
on your
Fall color! Oct. 1
st
to 30
th
320 N. Canal St., Delphos
419-692-9871 or 419-69COLOR
www.Studio320Salon.com
Bring coupon in to receive discount.
One coupon per customer.
2103 North Main Street, Delphos, OH
(419) 695-2000 hgviolet@bright.net
Sized Right for Your Workload
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE *Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
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799
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• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
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160
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HONDA
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ELECTRIC START 179CC
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CUB
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CUB
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$
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• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
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OHC/OHV
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$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
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$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products For Professional Use
*Shown with optional attachments
Commercial Products Intended For Professional Use
160
1
HONDA
®
OHC/OHV
ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
1,629
*
• 27 tons of ram pressure
• Diamond-plate steel fenders
• Deluxe wheeled jack stand and light kit
ELECTRIC START 179CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
449
1
• Easy chute rotation
• 21” clearing width and 13” intake height
• High-performance auger assist drive
ELECTRIC START 208CC
2
CUB
CADET
®
OHV
4-CYCLE ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
799
1
• Posi-Steer™ zero-turn power steering
• 4-way joystick extended chute and pitch
control
• 24” clearing width and 21” intake height
Sized Right for Your Workload
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be
additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
2
as rated by engine manufacturer
CUB CADET LOG SPLITTER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
CUB CADET 2010 SNOW THROWER
LS 27 CC
221 HP
524 SWE
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CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
7 p.m. — Washington
Township Trustees meet at
the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Jefferson
Athletic Boosters meet at the
high school library.
Spencerville village council
meets at the mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Area
Visiting Nurses offer free
blood pressure checks at
Delphos Discout Drugs.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Area
Art Guild (DAAG) will meet
at their new location in the
second floor gallery of the
Delphos Postal Museum of
History at 339 N. Main St.
7:30 p.m. — Elida School
Board meets at the high school
office.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
8:30 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Village Council meets at Fort
Jennings Library.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
11:45 a.m. — Rotary Club
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
Sons of the American
Legion meet at the Delphos
Legion hall.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
OCT. 19
Ashley Wolke
Olivia Miller
Devin Wolke
Emily Buettner
Kylee Schweller
Society sets fall
birdseed sale
Tri-Moraine Audubon
Society will hold its annual
Fall Birdseed Sale from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 6 at
DeHaven Home and Garden
Showplace locations in Lima
and Findlay.
Prepaid orders should be
mailed by Friday. Forms avail-
able at both locations. Forms
can also be downloaded at
www.tri-moraineaudubon.
org.
Prepaid orders can also
be picked up in Delphos,
Sydney/Jackson Center and
St. Marys.
Items may be purchased
the day of sale at DeHaven
locations only.
Glandorf’s St. John’s plans
‘St. Bonifest’ Oct. 30
St. John Parish in Glandorf
will celebrate its first annual “St.
Bonifest” fall festival on Oct.
30.
The event will begin with
an outdoor Mass at the Marian
Shrine across from the church
at 4 p.m.
A wedding-style meal will be
served from 5-6:30 p.m. Pre-sale
tickets are available by calling
the rectory at 419-538-6928.
The meal will consist of
beef, mashed potatoes, noodles,
sweet corn that was prepared
and frozen this summer by par-
ish members, dessert, roll, coffee
and lemonade.
Beginning at 4 p.m. under the
beer tent, $10- and $20-bet board
squares will be sold for the OSU
football game. Also, there will
be a 50/50 raffle, money wheel,
church poker, and tip books. Big
screen coverage of the OSU vs.
Minnesota night game begins
with kickoff at 8 p.m.
A silent auction will be held
from 5-9:30 p.m. and kids’
games are from 7-9 p.m. in the
cafeteria.
Bavarian Brass will be play-
ing all types of music includ-
ing polka music, starting at 7:30
p.m.
Evening refreshments include
beer, brats, German potato salad,
chips, pretzels, pop, and water.
St. John’s Parish plans on
making St. Bonifest an annu-
al fundraising event the last
Saturday of October.
Husky to sponsor literacy videos
Huskey Lima Refinery to
Sponsor Video series to pro-
mote Adult Literacy in Lima
Community
Huskey Lima Refinery,
in conjunction with the
Northwest Ohio Literacy
Council and GTV2 is spon-
soring a year long video series
to help area adults improve
their reading skills.
The series is a 26-part pro-
gram that starts with basic
phonics and reading skills
and advances to higher com-
prehension and reading con-
cepts. The individual shows
will be re-broadcast 20 times
per week to make this avail-
able to all viewers.
According to Ken
Blanchard, Director of the
Northwest Ohio Literacy
Council, the hope is that
this series enables adults to
work on their reading skills
at home, while letting them
know that individual tutoring
is readily available through
the Literacy Council.
The series will start the
week of Oct. 25.
Call Ken Blanchard,
Literacy Council at 419-223-
0252.
St. John’s sets
Bible Study
K of C foundation
offers scholarships
Grand Knight of Delphos
Knights Of Columbus
Council 1362 Jim Mesker,
and the Ohio Knights of
Columbus “Christopher
Charity Foundation” have
announced they will again
provide $1,000 high school
scholarships for the 2010-11
school year.
Scholarships are available
for all students in grades
9-12 attending Catholic high
schools in Ohio. A maxi-
mum of 30 scholarships will
be awarded state wide.
This scholarship pro-
gram is one of many pro-
grams partially funded by
the Knights of Columbus
Annual “Charities Tickets”
fundraising program.
The requirements that
will be considered for this
high school scholarship are
based on financial need,
a GPA of 2.5 or higher,
academic awards, commu-
nity and/or parish involve-
ment, offices held and/or
holding, and extracurricu-
lar activities. Preferences
may be given to students
who are sons, daughters, or
grandchildren of Knights
of Columbus members or
of deceased members. An
independent selection
committee representing
the Knights of Columbus
Charity Foundation, Inc.
will make the final selection
of the scholarship winners.
No more than one scholar-
ship will be awarded at any
Catholic high school.
Recent St. John’s
High School scholarship
recipients include: Adam
Kaverman (2008-09), Logan
Haines (2006-07), Adam
Bockey (2004-05), Jeff
Unterbrink (2003-04), Drew
Hohman (2002-03) and
Jason Hageman (2001-02).
St. John’s High School
students currently in grades
9-12 can obtain their Knights
of Columbus Scholarship
application from St. John’s
Guidance Counselor Al
Unterbrink, The application
must be completed by the
student and submitted with
a copy of their current tran-
script of grades no later than
Nov. 15 to the party and
address listed on the appli-
cation.
Anyone with questions
may contact Jerry Backus at
419-695-1768.
Bible Study with Heather
Bonifas, the Rev. Jacob
Gordon and Trina Shultz
will be held in the minis-
try center from 6:30-8 p.m.
beginning on Oct. 28 for six
weeks.
The group will study
Scott Hahn’s book on the
Blessed Mother, “Hail Holy
Queen.”
Call 419-695-4050 to
reserve books so the correct
number can be ordered.
For those already reg-
istered, books are ready.
Chapter 1 will be covered in
the first meeting.
Look to the Delphos Herald for all the latest in
•LOCAL NEWS •LOCAL SPORTS
•LOCAL INFORMATION
2
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Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 7 am-2 am
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Fax: (419) 238-9893
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DELPHOS RECREATION
CENTER
6A – The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Spencerville’s Keith Lenhart and Columbus Grove’s
Alex Shafer are among the leaders of a pack of runners at
Saturday’s Northwest Conference race at the Van Wert
County Reservoir.
Tina Eley photo/Courtesy of Times-Bulletin
By JIM COX
Delphos Herald
Correspondent
VAN WERT — Things
went pretty much according
to the script at the Northwest
Conference Cross Country
meet Saturday morning.
Spencerville, led by indi-
vidual champ Kelli Ley, ran
away with the girls title, after
which Columbus Grove and
Crestview battled on almost
even terms for the boys cham-
pionship -- Grove nipped
the Knights by three points,
a result that wasn’t apparent
until long after the final runner
had crossed the finish line.
Ley, a junior, finished
third in last year’s NWC race
behind teammates Lyndie
Brown and Ashley Gilroy,
both of whom have gradu-
ated. On Saturday, Ley trailed
for the first 100 yards before
taking over the lead, which
she never relinquished, finish-
ing in 20:01. Bluffton junior
Hannah Chappell-Dick was
the only one to stay within
striking distance of Ley, fin-
ishing in 20:07.
Bearcats Claire McConnell
and Cortney Miller finished
3-4 in 20:15 and 20:44, respec-
tively. Crestview’s Courtney
Perrott was fifth in 20:45, her
fastest time ever. After that,
the Bearcats’ and Pirates’
dominance was evident --
it went Allen East (Haley
Perkins - 20:46), Spencerville
(Alexa Brown - 20:48),
Columbus Grove (Amber
Herron - 21:19), Bluffton
(Lydia Guagenti - 21:31),
Bluffton (Julie Althaus -
21:35), Spencerville (Jennifer
Burnett - 21:35), Bluffton
(Evania Bonifaz - 21:36),
Lincolnview (Casey Patterson
- 21:38), Bluffton (Morgan
Humphreys - 21:42) and
Spencerville (Tori Hardesty
- 21:56).
Final score: Spencerville
24, Bluffton (coached by for-
mer Van Wert Cougar Ashley
Blair) 42. Lincolnview took
third with 82 and Crestview
fourth at 99. Columbus Grove
(120), Lima Central Catholic
(123) and Paulding (212)
rounded out the 7-team field.
“The girls went in knowing
they were favored and they
ran well,” said Bearcat coach
Brian McMichael. “When
you have number one on your
back, the other teams go after
you but we responded well.
Our top two, Kelly Ley and
Claire McConnell, ran really
good races today. Our third,
fourth and fifth ran solid races.
We’re not packed up as tight
as we should be but hopefully
we’ll get better next week (at
districts).”
McConnell is the only
senior among the Bearcats’
top seven, so Spencerville’s
dominance will probably con-
tinue. McMichael expects his
team to be one of the four that
advances out of next week’s
district, with Minster being
the favorite.
“This was our best girls
team race this season by far,”
said Lincolnview coach Matt
Langdon. “Our top girl, Kerri
Grothaus, has been sick. She
wasn’t going to run today but
she did. She hasn’t been beat-
en by anybody on our team
this year but she was third on
our team today. We’re thank-
ful she was able to run but
that shows how the other girls
stepped up. Our pack was real
tight. Casey Patterson and
Taylar Boroff, our two seniors,
stepped up. Our top five were
in the top 25. We wanted to
finish top two but we couldn’t
touch Bluffton today -- they’ve
really improved. Still, third is
really good for us.”
For Lady Bulldog coach
Jason Jay, it was a disappoint-
ing fifth-place finish.
“I don’t know why we ran
poorly. I felt we had a good
chance to do well and we just
didn’t have one of our better
days,” Jays added. “We lost
to teams we’d been beating
all season. We talked before
the race today about what we
needed to do. We just need to
forget today and move on to
next week.”
On the boys side,
Spencerville’s Kevin Lenhart
cruised to a win in 16:28, fol-
lowed by Bluffton’s Matthew
Herron (16:42), Grove’s
Jake Graham (16:48), LCC’s
Jim Kesner (16:51) and
Crestview’s Garret Gleckler
(17:06).
The Bulldogs’ other scor-
ers were Kurt Meyer (8th -
17:34), Alex Shafer (10th -
17:42), Devin Luginbill (14th
- 17:57) and Grant Schroeder
(16th - 18:34). Add those five
finishes up and you get a win-
ning score of 51. Crestview’s
54 came from Gleckler (5th),
Joel Genter (7th - 17:25),
Bryce Richardson (9th -
17:34), Micah Brant (12th
- 17:52) and Shelby Ripley
(21st - 18:41).
Spencerville’s boys were
well back in third with 91.
LCC (109), Bluffton (121),
Lincolnview (133), Allen
East (150) and Paulding (195)
went fourth through eighth.
“The two guys who went
beyond expectations were our
number five (Grant Schroeder
- 16th - 18:22) and number
six (Jacob Schroeder (20th -
18:34),” said Grove’s coach,
Terry Schnipke. “I knew it
was going be tight. Crestview
and us have been back and
forth all year. We’re look-
ing pretty good to get out of
districts. It’ll be a bear to get
out of regional, though, so
we’re going have to get better
if we’re going to get beyond
that.”
“Overall our kids ran well,”
said Crestview’s Bagley. “Our
approach and the looks in
their eyes were good. I think
they responded to the chal-
lenge. It was good to see that.
That’s what you want -- to
peak now.”
McMichael was also
pleased about his boys.
“The boys had two or
three runners set their per-
sonal records, which is a good
sign. You want your times
to keep going down as the
season progresses, especial-
ly now,” he added. “Kevin
(Lenhart) won the race over
Matt Herron of Bluffton; he
had lost to him just a week
ago at the Allen County meet.
Our second and third runners
today (Joe Wisher in 11th and
Nick Davisson in 13th) were
solid. Now, as we prepare for
districts next week, we need
our fourth and fifth runners on
both sides to get a little closer
to the front.
“Both teams ran well.
What you start looking for
now is to move your pack up
closer to the front. We’ve had
great practices. However, it
doesn’t always translate onto
race day, especially for the
younger kids, but it’s getting
better.”
That is what Langdon is
also looking for on both sides
of the equation.
“The boys ran well,” he
added. “We were without Jeff
Jacomet, who was sick, and
he’s been in our top five all
year. Our top five has been
solid, so not having one of
them really hurt, but others
stepped up. Austin Treesh
(15th - 17:59) ran his season
best, the first time he’s been
in the 17s. We’re very young
(no seniors in the top seven),
so we’re really set up nicely
for down the road. We just
need to get back to full health
for next week’s districts.”
Both Spencerville and
Lincolnview are in the dis-
trict at Spencerville starting
11 a.m. Saturday. Columbus
Grove is at Ottawa the same
time.
Bearcats’ Ley, Lenhart
take individual crowns
By FRANK GERMAN
The Delphos Herald
fjohngerman@gmail.com
OTTOVILLE — Ottoville
and St. John’s went at it for
five volleyball sets Saturday
morning and into the after-
noon at L.W. Heckman
Gymnasium.
The Lady Big
Green finally sub-
dued their guests
from Delphos 25-22,
23-25, 25-20, 20-25,
15-12.
The match was
tip and tuck the
whole way; the fifth
set was no diferent.
The Jays served
first but Ottoville
scored first with the
Jays hitting the ball out of
bounds. Ottoville returned
the favor with a net serve.
Ottoville had a 3-point run,
putting them up 4-1. The Jays
fought back, scoring four of
the next five points in tying
it up at 5-all. The Big Green
then had another 3-point run,
putting them up 8-5. The Blue
Jays responded with a 3-point
run, tying it back up at 8-all.
Ottoville then started to whit-
tle away at the Jays. Ottoville
got two points, one a gift from
the Jays hitting out of bounds
and the other a spike by senior
Gayle Rayman (7 kills). St.
John’s senior Tiffany Geise
got a kill with a set from
classmate Katie Wallenhorst
but junior Megan Bendele (13
kills, 10/10 serving, 12 digs)
replied with a solo spike.
Wallenhorst stuffed a hitting
attempt but the hosts got two
points on two hitting mis-
cues to go up 13-10. The
Jays scored the next point
with a kill from junior Shelby
Reindel but the Big Green
senior Jamie Rieger (12 digs)
got the hosts to match point
— 14-11 — with a kill. The
Jays fought back with another
kill from Reindel but Ottoville
sophomore Abby Siefker (12
blocks, 4 kills) got a block in
a volley to win the set and the
match.
“It was a very good game
on both sides with aggressive
hitters, with both sides trying
to find the holes,” Ottoville
coach Susan Jones comment-
ed.
Ottoville won set three and
the Jays the
fourth with
the same
margin of
v i c t o r y ,
25-20.
The larg-
est lead
before the
end of the
third set was
five points
for Ottoville
at 17-12 but the Jays fought
back and tied it up 18-all
before the Big Green pulled
away. They did with three
kills and a little help from the
Jays. St. John’s pulled within
22-20 with two carries in a
row from Ottoville. However,
at set point with Ottoville up
24-20, the Jays hit the return
serve out of bounds.
The Jays won the fourth set
with an early 7-point run, giv-
ing them the lead 7-1. Ottoville
started scraping back until the
Lady Jays got another 4-point
run, pulling out to a 9-point
lead of 17-8. Ottoville fought
back, pulling to within three
on a kill by Bendele set up
by senior Natasha Kaufman
(23/24 serving, 15 points, 3
aces; 22 digs; 8 kills), making
the score 22-19, Blue Jays.
The final point for the Jays
came from a kill by Reindel,
tying the match at 2-2 to force
the fifth set.
“We played hard today
except for some down time,
which in volleyball you can’t
have. Volleyball is all about
the momentum. We took
control in the fourth set and
towards the end of it we let
up a little bit but we did fin-
ish and we just have to make
sure we take that into the next
set to finish the match,” St.
John’s Coach Kellie Sterling
remarked.
The two teams played so
evenly which you can tell in
the scores. The first two sets
split between the teams were
a difference of one point.
Ottoville won the first set
25-22 with the score
being tied eight times,
the first time with the
score of 1-1 and the
last tie coming in at
20-all. The Jays got to
within one at the end
with a score of 23-22,
Ottoville, but hit out of
bounds twice to give
Ottoville a 1-0 lead.
The second set
ended up being tied
12 times, with the last at 21.
Reindel got two kills in the
final points, plus a kill to end
the set, giving the Jays a 1-1
tie in the match.
The first two sets set the
tone for the final three.
“I told the girls after the
4th set all we have left is 15
points. We can’t wait around,
we have to go after it right
away. We are a hitting team
and we have to go out and hit
and not roll over and go play
our game,” Jones added.
Junior Kaitlyn Ditto (13
assists), sophomore Tonya
Kaufman (24/24 serving, 1
aces, 15 points; 14 digs) and
senior Bridget Miller (15/15
serving, 7 points) helped
send the Ottoville seniors out
on a winning note at home.
Julie Schmersal and Sarah
Luersman were the other Big
Green seniors.
Both teams play Tuesday
in the opening round of the
Division IV sectional at
Lincolnview: St. John’s (8-14)
versus Jefferson at 6:15 p.m.
and Ottoville (11-10) vs.
Lincolnview in the second
match (approximately 8 p.m.)
Ottoville won the junior
varsity match in two sets:
25-17, 25-12.
Lady Green outlasts Blue Jays
Geise Tasha Kaufman
By JIM METCALFE
The Delphos Herald
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
FORT JENNINGS — Fort
Jennings and Elida warmed
up for the girls soccer second
season on a brilliant Saturday
afternoon, battling even in a
0-0 draw.
The Lady Musketeers
(9-5-2) had five seniors play
their final home matches at
Keith Hamel Memorial Field:
Alyssa Piasecki, Lauren
Verhoff, Melissa Krietemeyer,
Mindy Merricle and Taylor
Wallenhorst.
Both coaches noted how
much this match gets a team
ready for the tournament.
“We closed the season
with some good competition:
today, St. Marys and Ottoville
the previous two matches,”
Jennings coach Rodney
Wagner observed. “Matches
like this are great prepara-
tion for the tournament. Both
teams played hard; it would
have been nice to get a win
but I have nothing to fault my
girls for their effort today.”
Elida coach Brady Overholt
concurred.
“It was a hard-fought match
today, just like you expect and
want heading into the post-
season,” he said. “You knew
coming in it wasn’t going to
be easy and we had to find
a way to get opportunities to
score, as did they.”
Neither team had many
good looks in this matchup,
with the defenses holding
sway.
The Lady Musketeers had
the first at 33:50. Verhoff
and Elida junior keeper
Kaitlyn Morrisey (3 saves
versus 5 shots on-goal) col-
lided outside the box on
Verhoff’s open look, with
senior Maggie Wheeler kick-
ing away Verhoff’s shot at
an open goal; on the resul-
tant foul and free kick from
19 yards, junior Morgan
Schroeder missed just over
the cross bar.
Verhoff missed the rest of
the half with an injury but
returned to start the second
half.
Elida (6-8-2) junior Beth
Boyle had Elida’s first effort
at 27:03, missing just over the
bar from the left wing.
Both teams had one more
good look in a tightly-con-
tested half: Lady Bulldog
sophomore Shannon Boroff
at 15:12 on a 30-yarder that
junior Musketeer netminder
Kelsey Von Lehmden (3
saves vs. 5 shots) denied; and
5:34, when freshman Ashley
Gable’s 19-yarder was denied
by Morrisey.
Both teams had chances in
the second half, though not
many more than in the first.
The best opportunity of
the match came with 4:13
remaining. On a 31-yard free
kick by Elida senior Jordan
Haidle, she forced a leaping
deflection by Von Lehmden;
Eldia tried a follow shot but
couldn’t get control enough
for a legitimate effort and the
scoreless tie remained.
Jennings final chance
to score came at 2:20 with
Schroeder was stymied from
28 yards by Morrisey.
“Neither offense had many
good looks today. You expect
that out of two solid pro-
grams as the two of us have
been over the years,” Wagner
added. “Again, I have no
complaints.”
Elida had four corner kicks
to none for the hosts.
“There weren’t a lot of
open spaces to operate in
front of the net; again, that’s
a tribute to both defenses,”
Overholt added.
Both teams commence
Division II tournament play
Tuesday: Fort Jennings ver-
sus Van Wert at 7:15 p.m.
at Ottoville and Elida versus
Riverdale at 7 p.m. at Bath.
Musketeers, Lady ’Dawgs draw in soccer
Local Roundup
The Delphos Herald
Titans down Putnam County rival
GLANDORF — It may not have been
a Putnam County League matchup but to
Kalida and Ottawa-Glandorf, it didn’t matter.
The two county combatants met up under
the lights at Titan Field in Glandorf for a boys
soccer battle and the visiting Wildcats tuned
up for the playoffs with a 2-0 victory.
Ian Richey and Derek Korte scored the
goals for Kalida (13-0-3) past keeper Jason
Fisher (8 saves versus 10 Kalida shots).
Junior Drew Stechschulte threw a shutout
at the Titans (7-4-5) as he stopped all six shots
on-goal.
Ottawa-Glandorf plays Miller City at 6
p.m. this evening in the opening round of
the Division III sectional at Kalida, with the
Wildcats battling Archbold at 8 p.m.
---
LadyCats tune up for sectionals
CONVOY — It may have been closer
than Kalida girls soccer coach Dave Kehres
wanted but he’ll take Saturday’s 1-0 triumph
over host Crestview at the Crestview Athletic
Complex.
Justine Verhoff scored the only goal for
the LadyCats (10-5-1) as they dominated the
shooting 22-1.
Erika Brinkman had one save for the visi-
tors, while Megan Foster had 16.
Crestview battles Coldwater at 5:15 p.m.
tonight in the first match of the Ottoville
Division II sectional.
Kalida opens the Division II sectional at
(See ROUNDUP page 7)
Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald — 7A
www.delphosherald.com
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Delphos Vikings quarterback Adam Rode hands the
ball off to Tyler Bratton Sunday afternoon versus the St.
Marys Stallions at Stadium Park. The Vikings shut out
the Stallions 18-0, while the Delphos Reds did the same to
the Delphos Mohawks 8-0 in the latter game. Elsewhere:
Delphos Raiders 16, Spencerville Black 12; Columbus
Grove Bulldogs 38, St. Marys Colts 6; Shawnee
Seminoles 14, Shawnee Warriors 0; St. Marys Broncos
8, St. Marys Rams 0; and Spencerville Red 14, Uniopolis
Browns 0.
Dena Martz photos
MIDGET STANDINGS
STANDINGS
BLACK DIVISION
* Delphos Vikings 6-0
Delphos Reds 5-1
St. Marys Colts 3-3
St. Marys Rams 3-3
Spencerville Black 2-4
Shawnee Seminoles 1-5
Uniopolis Browns 0-5
RED DIVISION
* St. Marys Broncos 6-0
Col Grove Bulldogs 5-1
Delphos Mohawks 4-2
St. Marys Stallions 3-3
Delphos Raiders 2-4
Spencerville Red 1-4
Shawnee Warriors 0-6
* - division champions
Sunday’s Playoff Schedule
(at Baughman Stadium, St.
Marys)
1:30 p.m.--Columbus Grove
Bulldogs @ Delphos Vikings
3:00 p.m.--Delphos Reds @ St.
Marys Broncos
2010 NWC CROSS
COUNTRY
CHAMPIONSHIPS
BCS STANDINGS
BCS Standings List
Oct. 17, 2010
Harris USA Today Computer BCS
Rk Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct Rk Pct Avg Pv
1. Oklahoma 4 2486 0.8800 3 1334 0.9044 1 .060 0.9215 —
2. Oregon 1 2774 0.9819 1 1452 0.9844 8 .330 0.8921 —
3. Boise St. 2 2685 0.9504 2 1385 0.9390 7 .260 0.8898 —
4. Auburn 5 2410 0.8531 5 1238 0.8393 3 .140 0.8641 —
5. TCU 3 2516 0.8906 4 1300 0.8814 5 .240 0.8573 —
6. LSU 6 2164 0.7660 6 1132 0.7675 2 .100 0.8245 —
7. Michigan St. 8 1964 0.6952 8 1037 0.7031 4 .150 0.7628 —
8. Alabama 7 2092 0.7405 7 1085 0.7356 12 .520 0.6654 —
9. Utah 9 1925 0.6814 9 1004 0.6807 11 .440 0.6540 —
10. Ohio St. 10 1761 0.6234 10 936 0.6346 14 .580 0.5726 —
11. Missouri 16 1196 0.4234 16 640 0.4339 6 .180 0.5491 —
12. Stanford 13 1455 0.5150 14 689 0.4671 10 .410 0.5374 —
13. Wisconsin 11 1646 0.5827 11 867 0.5878 16 .610 0.5335 —
14. Oklahoma St. 15 1247 0.4414 15 659 0.4468 9 .350 0.5261 —
15. Iowa 12 1511 0.5349 12 785 0.5322 17 .660 0.4824 —
16. Nebraska 14 1322 0.4680 13 768 0.5207 20 .740 0.4295 —
17. Florida St. 17 1124 0.3979 17 608 0.4122 13 .570 0.4267 —
18. Arizona 18 1037 0.3671 18 494 0.3349 15 .600 0.3807 —
19. Texas 22 397 0.1405 22 256 0.1736 18 .690 0.2214 —
20. West Virginia 19 663 0.2347 19 323 0.2190 23 .650 0.1812 —
21. South Carolina 21 576 0.2039 20 284 0.1925 24 .690 0.1555 —
22. Kansas St. 22 143 0.0506 27 53 0.0359 19 .620 0.1422 —
23. Arkansas 20 213 0.2050 21 274 0.1858 28 .000 0.1302 —
24. Mississippi St. 20 129 0.0457 24 133 0.0902 21 .800 0.1253 —
25. Virginia Tech 23 242 0.0857 23 165 0.1119 28 .000 0.0658 —
———
AH RB CM KM JS PW
1. Oklahoma 3 3 1 1 1 1
2. Oregon 9 7 9 8 2 11
3. Boise St. 6 2 7 7 6 7
4. Auburn 2 8 3 5 4 2
5. TCU 7 5 6 6 7 5
6. LSU 1 1 2 4 8 3
7. Michigan St. 4 12 4 3 3 4
8. Alabama 10 4 11 16 20 15
9. Utah 11 6 12 11 12 10
10. Ohio St. 16 14 13 21 14 14
11. Missouri 5 0 5 2 9 6
12. Stanford 12 17 10 10 5 9
13. Wisconsin 18 13 17 19 10 13
14. Oklahoma St. 8 10 8 9 19 8
15. Iowa 19 9 18 17 15 16
16. Nebraska 23 16 23 14 16 19
17. Florida St. 15 15 15 18 11 12
18. Arizona 13 18 16 12 13 18
19. Texas 17 11 25 15 17 20
20. West Virginia 25 22 21 0 0 22
21. South Carolina 22 23 0 24 0 24
22. Kansas St. 14 0 14 13 21 21
23. Arkansas 0 24 0 0 0 0
24. Mississippi St. 20 19 19 22 22 17
25. Virginia Tech 0 25 0 0 0 0
———
Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of
the Harris Interactive, USA Today Coaches and Computer polls. Team
percentages are derived by dividing a team’s actual voting points by a
maximum 2,825 possible points in the Harris Interactive Poll and 1,475
possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll.
Six computer rankings are used to determine the overall computer
component. The highest and lowest ranking for each team is
dropped and the remaining four are added and divided to produce a
Computer Rankings Percentage. The six computer ranking providers
are Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth
Massey, Jeff Sagarin and Peter Wolfe. Each computer ranking
accounts for schedule strength in its formula.
The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 5 1 0 .833 159 101
New England 4 1 0 .800 154 116
Miami 3 2 0 .600 89 112
Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 161
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 4 2 0 .667 153 167
Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 163 125
Jacksonville 3 2 0 .600 107 137
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 132 95
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Pittsburgh 4 1 0 .800 114 60
Baltimore 4 2 0 .667 112 95
Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 102
Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 88 125
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 3 2 0 .600 108 92
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 120 151
Denver 2 4 0 .333 124 140
San Diego 2 4 0 .333 157 126
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 134 118
Philadelphia 4 2 0 .667 153 120
Washington 3 3 0 .500 113 119
Dallas 1 4 0 .200 102 111
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 4 2 0 .667 130 101
New Orleans 4 2 0 .667 130 108
Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 80 111
Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 110
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 112 97
Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 139 112
Minnesota 2 3 0 .400 87 88
Detroit 1 5 0 .167 146 140
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 88 138
Seattle 3 2 0 .600 98 97
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 103 113
San Francisco 1 5 0 .167 93 139
———
Sunday’s Results
Seattle 23, Chicago 20
Miami 23, Green Bay 20, OT
Houston 35, Kansas City 31
Pittsburgh 28, Cleveland 10
St. Louis 20, San Diego 17
N.Y. Giants 28, Detroit 20
New England 23, Baltimore 20, OT
Philadelphia 31, Atlanta 17
New Orleans 31, Tampa Bay 6
N.Y. Jets 24, Denver 20
San Francisco 17, Oakland 9
Minnesota 24, Dallas 21
Indianapolis 27, Washington 24
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona, Carolina
Today’s Game
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
NFL
GOT A SPORTS STORY?
Call Jim Metcalfe, Sports Editor, 419-695-0015
Saturday’s Results
At Van Wert County Reservoir
HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Team Scores:
Columbus Grove 51, Crestview
54, Spencerville 91, Lima Central
Catholic 109, Bluffton 121,
Lincolnview 133, Allen East 150,
Paulding 195.
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Kevin
Lenhart (SV) 16:28; 2. M. Herron
(BL) 16:42; 3. Jake Graham (CG)
16:48; 4. J. Kesner (LCC) 16:51; 5.
Garret Gleckler (CV) 17:06; 6. C.
Burkey (AE) 17:17; 7. Joel Genter
(CV) 17:25; 8. Kurt Meyer (CG)
17:34; 9. Bryce Richardson (CV)
17:34; 10. Alex Shafer (CG) 17:42;
11. Joe Wisher (SV) 17:46; 12.
Micah Brant (CV) 17:52; 13. Nick
Davisson (SV) 17:55; 14. Devin
Luginbill (CG) 17:57; 15. Austin
Treesh (LV) 17:59; 16. Grant
Schroeder (CG) 18:22; 17. J. Kidd
(LCC) 18:23; 18. D. Guarnaschelli
(PA) 18:25; 19. S. Willeke (LCC)
18:32; 20. Jacob Schroeder (CG)
18:34.
Other Local Finishers (89
Runners): 21. Shelby Ripley (CV)
18:40; ... 24. Lucas Myers (LV)
18:42; 25. Nick Schmiesing (CG)
18:43; ... 27. Brandon Jacomet (LV)
18:49; 28. Josh Stephens (CG)
18:52; 29. Will Deubler (CG) 18:54;
30. Zach Merkle (CV) 18:56; 31. Ben
Bilimek (LV) 18:59; ... 33. Brandon
Meyer (SV) 19:05; ... 36. Troy Meyer
(CG) 19:11; ... 38. Tregg
Keysor (CG) 19:23; 39. Caleb
Vogt (SV) 19:24; 40. Tanner Skelton
(CV) 19:27; 41. Drew Schroeder
(CG) 19:31; ... 43. Doug Hicks (LV)
19:36; ... 47. Collin Thompson (CV)
19:57; ... 49. Adrian Camp (CV)
19:58; 50. Cody Reynolds (CG)
20:04; 51. Darrion Gant (CG) 20:04;
... 53. Levi Brake (LV) 20:14; 54.
Matthew Hurles (SV) 20:16; 55.
Angelo Katalenas (LV) 20:21; ...
57. Nick Germann (LV) 20:29; ...
59. Nick Bowen (CV) 20:32; ... 62.
Josh Tussing (CG) 20:38; ... 68.
Kenny Smith (CG) 21:24; 69. Roger
Morgan (LV) 21:35; ... 72. Eric Otto
(CG) 21:39; 73. Jack Frank (LV)
21:57; ... 76. Cody Klinker (CV)
22:32; ... 78. Jared Long (CV) 22:53;
... 84. Zach Keith (LV) 26:23; ... 87.
Josh Solomon (SV) 27:50; ... 89.
Austin Sealscott (LV) 29:33.
Girls Team Scores:
Spencerville 24, Bluffton 43,
Lincolnview 82, Crestview 99,
Columbus Grove 120, Lima Central
Catholic 123, Paulding 212.
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Kelli Ley
(SV) 20:01; 2. H. Chappell-Dick (BL)
20:07; 3. Claire McConnell (SV)
20:15; 4. Cortney Miller (SV) 20:44;
5. Courtney Perrott (CV) 20:45; 6. H.
Perkins (AE) 20:46; 7. Alexa Brown
(SV) 20:48; 8. Amber Herron (CG)
21:19; 9. L. Guagenti (BL) 21:31; 10.
J. Althaus (BL) 21:35; 11. Jennifer
Burnett (SV) 21:35; 12. E. Bonifaz
(BL) 21:36; 13. Casey Patterson
(LV) 21:38; 14. M. Humphreys (BL)
21:42; 15. Tori Hardesty (SV) 21:56;
16. Taylar Boroff (LV) 21:57; 17.
Kerri Grothaus (LV) 22:02; 18. Nikki
Ricker (CG) 22:08; 19. Sabrina
Barnhart (LV) 22:12; 20. S. Andrews
(LCC) 22:22.
Other Local Runners (76
Runners): 21. Layne Callow (CV)
22:26; 22. Karissa Burns (LV)
22:30; 23. Mari Young (CV) 22:31;
24. Chelsea Hancock (CV) 22:34;
... 27. Kayla Parlette (CG) 22:51;
... 30. Janelle May (CV) 23:05; ...
32. Cora Diller (CG) 23:30; ... 39.
Haley McAbee (LV) 24:10; ... 41.
Leah Saylor (CV) 24:26; ... 43.
Kirsten Barnhart (LV) 24:34; ... 45.
Brianna Johnston (LV) 24:40; ...
47. Taylor Miller (LV) 24:48; ... 49.
Micah Stechschulte (CG) 24:50; ...
51. Cece Utendorf (CG) 25:01; ...
56. Sammy Gerardot (CV) 25:42;
... 60. Ashley Keiber (SV) 26:06;
61. Jorgi Schramm (CG) 26:08;
62. Grace Callow (CV) 26:16; 63.
Brooke Schnipke (CG) 26:25; ...
70. Rachael Rex (SV) 28:32; ... 73.
Amanda Lobsiger (CV) 29:11; ... 76.
Madelyn Jones (LV) 32:13.
JUNIOR HIGH
Boys Team Scores:
Lincolnview 34, Lima Central
Catholic 46, Crestview 63,
Columbus Grove 89.
Top 10 Individuals: 1. Bayley
Tow (LV) 11:29; 2. Micah Grandstaff
(CV) 11:51; 3. A. Rigg (LCC) 11:51;
4. Brandon Clayton (CV) 12:06; 5.
Colton Grothaus (CG) 12:08; 6. Alex
Rodriguez (LV) 12:46; 7. S. Currens
(LCC) 12:54; 8. Trevor Neate (LV)
12:54; 9. Austin Leeth (LV) 13:05;
10. Skyler Whitaker (LV) 13:06.
Other Local Finishers (39
Runners): 17. Scott Cowling (LV)
13:48; 18. Tyler Brant (LV) 13:48; 19.
Colin Burns (LV) 13:53; 20. Corbin
Schumm (CV) 14:07; 21. Adam
Saylor (CV) 14:08; 22. Aaron Page
(CG) 14:10; ... 25. Hayden Ludwig
(LV) 14:20; 26. Baily Clement (CG)
14:24; 27. Corey Schroeder (CG)
14:32; 28. Alex Tabler (CG) 14:47;
... 30. Troy Thompson (LV) 14:57;
31. Noah Daugherty (CV) 15:01;
32. Jacob Cook (SV) 15:37; 33.
Ryan Price (CG) 15:49; 34. Braden
Thatcher (LV) 15:56; ... 36. Carter
Gorman (LV) 16:13; 37. Landon
Goins (CV) 16:43; ... 39. Micah
Germann (LV) 19:21.
Girls Team Scores: Lima
Central Catholic 26, Columbus
Grove 29.
Top 10 Individuals: 1. Kacie
Mulholland (SV) 13:40; 2. A. Stoll
(LCC) 14:07; 3. E. Heier (LCC)
14:10; 4. Kennedy Sharp (SV)
14:18; 5. Alexis Ricker (CG) 14:40;
6. Morgan Messer (CG) 14:49; 7.
Lindsey Malsam (CG) 14:59; 8. H.
Keller (BL) 15:04; 9. B. Braun (LCC)
15:24; 10. Hali Finfrock (CV) 15:26.
Other Local Finishers (20
Runners): 12. Whitney Smart (CV)
15:42; 13. Linnea Stephens (CG)
15:57; 14. Kyrah Yinger (CG) 15:57;
15. Megan Miller (SV) 16:14; 16.
Bella Chorvas (CV) 16:58.
-----
Western Buckeye League
Championships
At Elida
Boys Team Scores: Shawnee
55, Ottawa-Glandorf 99, Defiance
104, Celina 109, Van Wert 115,
Wapakoneta 126, St. Marys 141,
Bath 210, Kenton 228, Elida 262.
Top 20: 1. A Flores (DE) 16:19;
2. Jared Fleming (VW) 16:59; 3. G.
Diltz (SH) 17:11; 4. Z. Diltz (SH)
17:27; 5. C. Nusbaum (CE) 17:36;
6. B. Heckman (OG) 17:38; 7. Jon
Schalois (VW) 17:39; 8. B. Sevitz
(SH) 17:40; 9. R. Schadewald (BA)
17:41; 10. N. Durkee (SM) 17:43; 11.
D. Pease (CE) 17:55; 12. C. Hennon
(WA) 17:57; 13. T. Mault (BA) 18:03;
14. M. Greer (WA) 18:03; 15. C.
Mertz (CE) 18:04; 16. A. Fraley (DE)
18:06; 17. C. Walthour (OG) 18:11;
18. J. Lammers (OG) 18:16; 19. J.
Vondran (SH) 18:20; 20. A. Mielke
(SM) 18:21.
Elida Finishers (104 Runners):
47. Ben Kerber 19:28; ... 60. Kane
Brookman 20:14; ... 65. Keaton
Brenneman 20:28; 66. Sam Kerber
20:32; ... 68. Arwin Sayoto 20:39; ...
70. Caleb Moneer 20:43; ... 84. Mike
Lee 21:24; ... 86. Jesse Stauffer
21:35; ... 89. Johnathan Reese
21:52; ... 91. Zee Khan 21:59.
Girls Team Scores: Shawnee
45, Van Wert 56, Defiance 72,
Celina 76, Wapakoneta 120,
Ottawa-Glandorf 172, St. Marys
223, Bath 254, Elida 259, Kenton
266.
Top 20: 1. A. Pohl (SH) 20:02;
2. Andi Foster (VW) 20:03; 3. H.
Fleck (CE) 20:18; 4. E. Wolery
(SH) 20:20; 5. A. Bell (CE) 20:29;
6. K. Fett (DE) 20:30; 7. Katie Bono
(VW) 20:35; 8. D. Lanwehr (OG)
20:50; 9. K. Limbert (WA) 20:56;
10. S. Daeger (DE) 20:56; 11. M.
Scott (SH) 21:01; 12. Allison Rogers
(VW) 21:01; 13. B. Holmes (DE)
21:06; 14. A. Wieser (SH) 21:06; 15.
J. Kuhlman (SH) 21:08; 16. Erika
Smith (VW) 21:09; 17. A. Ramirez
(DE) 21:29; 18. D. Snider (KE)
21:34; 19. Sydney Riethman (VW)
21:39; 20. A. Coon (CE) 21:42.
Elida Finishers (104 Runners):
41. Brenna Hirn 23:32; ... 61. Angela
McVey 25:09; ... 67. Mikki Darling
26:51; ... 76. Rachel Kerber 28:16;
... 85. Torrye Brinkman 30:35; ... 97.
Michelle Theodore 36:28.
By ROB MAADDI
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — Roy
Oswalt was an ace on the
mound, pesky at the plate and
daring on the bases.
Call that a complete game
— sort of.
Oswalt pitched eight domi-
nant innings, Jimmy Rollins
drove in four runs and the
Philadelphia Phillies beat
the San Francisco Giants 6-1
Sunday night to even the NL
championship series at one
game apiece.
A day after Tim Lincecum
outdueled Roy Halladay in
a marquee matchup of aces,
Oswalt beat Jonathan Sanchez.
The series shifts to San
Francisco for Game 3 on
Tuesday afternoon. Matt Cain
faces Philadelphia’s Cole
Hamels, the 2008 World Series
MVP.
Oswalt allowed one run and
three hits, striking out nine.
He also singled using one of
Rollins’ bats and scored a run
after racing through a coach’s
stop sign in the seventh.
Cody Ross hit his third
solo homer in two games for
the Giants, who struck out 10
times.
Rollins busted out of a
1-for-15 postseason slump,
going 2-for-3 with a bases-
loaded walk and a bases-clear-
ing double.
Oswalt showed why the
2-time NL champions got him
from Houston before the trade
deadline, shutting down the
Giants in a crucial spot.
Sanchez gave up three runs
— two earned — and five hits in
6-plus innings. The tough lefty
had dominated the Phillies in
his five previous starts against
them, not allowing more than
four hits in any outing.
Oswalt chased Sanchez
with a line-drive single lead-
ing off the bottom of the sev-
enth. He advanced to second
on Shane Victorino’s sacrifice
off Ramon Ramirez. After
Chase Utley was intentionally
walked, Placido Polanco lined
a single to center. Oswalt ran
through third-base coach Sam
Perlozzo’s stop sign and slid
safely ahead of the relay throw
to give the Phillies a 3-1 lead.
Jeremy Affeldt came in and
struck out Ryan Howard after a
double steal. Jayson Werth was
intentionally walked before
Santiago Casilla entered to face
Rollins. The former NL MVP,
dropped from leadoff to sixth
in the batting order since the
playoffs started, hit a drive off
the right-center field fence to
put the Phillies up 6-1.
An appreciative crowd
chanted “J-Roll! J-Roll!” with
a smiling Rollins standing on
second.
Oswalt didn’t allow a hit
until Ross connected with one
out in the fifth to tie it at 1. He
ripped a 1-0 pitch into the left-
center field seats — nearly the
same spot both of his homers
off Halladay landed.
But the Phillies played
small-ball — a rarity for this
lineup filled with inconsistent
sluggers — to take a 2-1 lead
in the bottom half.
Victorino, one of the few
Phillies with success off
Sanchez, lined a double down
the left-field line. He advanced
to third on Utley’s fly out to
right and scored on Polanco’s
sacrifice fly to center, which
drew a loud ovation.
The Phillies took advan-
tage of Sanchez’s wildness and
third baseman Mike Fontenot’s
throwing error to score an
unearned run without getting a
hit in the first. Rollins walked
to force in a run.
For the third straight post-
season, the city hosted a day-
night football-baseball double-
header with the Eagles playing
early. The sports complex had
a Christmas feel as fans wore
their green and red to support
both teams.
Oswalt, Rollins
help Phillies
even NLCS
(Continued from page 6)
Glandorf 5 p.m. Tuesday
versus Liberty-Benton.
----
Titans finish volleyball
season well
COLUMBUS GROVE
— Ottawa-Glandorf put the
finishing touches on the vol-
leyball regular season with
a 25-15, 25-8, 23-25, 25-18
win over host Columbus
Grove Saturday.
Leading the host Bulldogs
were Julia Wynn (9 kills,
2 blocks), Riley Eversole
(8 kills), Stephanie Etzkorn
(31 digs) and Rachael
Stechschulte and Nicole
Langhals (12 assists each).
Sara Basinger led the
Titans (17-5) with 12 kills
and 15 digs, along with
Melissa Verhoff (9 kills,
14 digs), Kari Schreoder (9
kills), Carrie Kaufman (23
digs), Kristi Jerwers (26
assists) and Kelley Selhorst
(14 assists).
O-G won the junior var-
sity match 25-16, 23-25,
25-15, while Grove took
the freshmen match 22-25,
25-22, 25-22.
Columbus Grove com-
mences the Division IV
sectional at Pandora-Gilboa
by battling Lima Temple
Christian at 6:15 p.m.
Tuesday.
---
Defiance throttles
Earlham 33-0 in
first-ever HCAC meeting
RICHMOND, Ind. –
Defiance College moved
into second place in the
Heartland Collegiate Athletic
Conference with a 33-0 win
at Earlham on Saturday in the
first league clash between the
two programs. The Jackets
piled up 311 yards on the
ground and collected four
interceptions in the lopsided
victory.
The shutout was DC’s
first time blanking an oppo-
nent on the road since scor-
ing a 10-0 win at Adrian on
September 9, 2006 and the
33-point margin of victory
was the highest for a Purple
and Gold squad since wip-
ing out Bluffton, 35-0, in the
2009 season finale.
Along with scoring the
most one-sided road victory
in his eight-year tenure with
Defiance College, Rob Taylor
improved the Jackets to 12-6
all-time against the Quakers
and improved his career win
total to 34. Taylor is now just
two wins shy of tying Malen
Luke for the winningest head
coach in program history and
could tie that mark when
DC hosts Rose-Hulman on
October 30.
It took time for the
onslaught to unfold how-
ever, as Earlham blocked a
35-yard field goal attempt
by the Jackets to preserve
a scoreless tie through the
game’s opening 15 minutes
of action.
EC then marched down
the field to the Defiance
14-yard line early into the
second quarter, before Frank
Furnari slowed the drive with
a 10-yard sack that set up a
third and 19. Kyle Longsdorf
then intercepted the ensuing
pass into the end zone and
returned it 100 yards for the
7-0 Yellow Jacket lead.
Longsdorf’s pick six
opened the flood gates,
as Anthony Sierra ended
Earlham’s ensuing posses-
sion with a 37-yard intercep-
tion return to the EC one-
yard line. Drew Kuesel then
stomped in from one-yard
out to push the spread to
14-0.
Defiance would tack on
another score late in the sec-
ond quarter, as it started its
final drive of the opening
half with 1:32 on the clock.
Rick Powell connected with
Jon Carrabino twice, before
hitting Rashad Hunt to move
the ball to the Earlham eight.
Powell then scored the first
of his two touchdowns with
an eight-yard scamper that
sent the Jackets to the break
with a comfortable 21-point
cushion.
The Jackets continued to
light up the scoreboard in the
third quarter, as Powell broke
loose for a 53-yard touch-
down run on the squad’s sec-
ond series of the half and
Sierra returned a punt 57
yards to pay dirt for the 33-0
lead with 4:55 remaining in
the third.
Powell ended the day with
140 rushing yards on 16 car-
ries and a pair of scores,
while Kuesel added 94 yards
and a touchdown. Garrett
Teague also played well,
racking up 61 yards on nine
fourth-quarter carries.
ROUNDUP
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8A – The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
Engagement
Berelsman/Fisher
Mike and Becky Berelsman of Delphos announce
the engagement of their daughter, Megan Sue, to Dustin
James Fisher, son of Jim and Jeana Fisher of Delphos. The
couple will exchange vows in November at Trinity United
Methodist Church in Delphos.
The bride-elect is a 2005 graduate of Jefferson High
School and a 2008 graduate of James A. Rhodes State
College. She currently works as a certified medical assis-
tant for Family Physicians of Lima.
Her fiance is also a 2005 graduate of Jefferson High
School and a 2009 graduate of Ohio University, with a
bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering. He is employed
by Kokosing Construction Company as a Project Engineer
in Charleston, W.Va.
Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. John Jones
John and Carol Jones of Elida observe 30 years of mar-
riage today.
To celebrate, a trip out West was enjoyed this past sum-
mer and a family dinner was held Saturday.
John and Carol Tenwalde were united in marriage on
Oct. 18, 1980, at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church,
Ottoville, the Rev. Bonifas officiating.
They are the parents of four girls, Tiffany Cross of
Beaverdam and Cory, Trista and Ashley of Elida. They
also have three grandchildren, Danielle, Vanessa and
Branden.
John works at Siglan Can Co. in Napoleon. Carol works
at Ford Motor Co.
By CRISTIAN SALAZAR
and RANDY HERSCHAFT
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The Nazis
stripped hundreds of thou-
sands of artworks from Jews
during World War II in one
of the biggest cultural raids in
history, often photographing
their spoils and meticulously
cataloguing them on typewrit-
ten index cards.
Holocaust survivors and
their relatives, as well as art
collectors and museums, can
go online beginning today to
search a free historical data-
base of more than 20,000 art
objects stolen in Germany-
occupied France and Belgium
from 1940 to 1944, including
paintings by Claude Monet
and Marc Chagall.
The database is a joint
project of the New York-
based Conference of Jewish
Material Claims Against
Germany and the United
States Holocaust Memorial
Museum in Washington, D.C.
The database is unusual
because it has been built
around Nazi-era records that
were digitized and rendered
searchable, showing what
was seized and from whom,
along with data on restitu-
tion or repatriation and pho-
tographs taken of the seized
objects, the groups told The
Associated Press.
The Claims Conference,
which helps Holocaust sur-
vivors and their relatives to
reclaim property, said it had
used the database to estimate
that nearly half of the objects
may never have been returned
to their rightful owners or
their descendants or their
country of origin.
Marc Masurovsky, the
project’s director at the muse-
um, said the database was
designed to evolve as new
information is gathered. “I
hope that the families do con-
sult it and tell us what is right
and what is wrong with it,”
he added.
The database combines
records from the U.S. National
Archives in College Park, Md.;
the German Bundesarchiv, the
federal archive in Koblenz;
and repatriation and restitution
records held by the French
government.
New online resource debuts
for Nazi-era looted art
By CHRISTOPHER
WEBER
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — The
affection people had for
“Leave it to Beaver” many
years after the series ended
was a source of both surprise
and satisfaction for Barbara
Billingsley, who endeared
herself to TV viewers with
her gentle portrayal of
the mother of Beaver and
Wally.
The 94-year-old
Billingsley, who played June
Cleaver in the 1950s-1960s
television series, died
Saturday after a long ill-
ness at her home in Santa
Monica, said family spokes-
woman Judy Twersky.
When the show debuted
in 1957, Jerry Mathers, who
played Beaver, was 9, and
Tony Dow, who portrayed
Wally, was 12. Billingsley’s
character, the perfect stay-
at-home mom, was always
there to gently but firmly
nurture both through the ups
and downs of childhood.
Beaver, meanwhile, was
a typical boy whose adven-
tures landed him in one
comical crisis after another.
Billingsley’s own two
sons said she was pretty
much the image of June
Cleaver in real life, although
the actress disagreed.
“She was every bit as nur-
turing, classy, and lovely as
’June Cleaver,’ and we were
so proud to share her with
the world,” her son Glenn
Billingsley said Saturday.
She did acknowledge
that she may have become
more like June as the series
progressed.
A wholesome beauty with
a lithe figure, Billingsley
began acting in her elemen-
tary school’s plays and soon
discovered she wanted to do
nothing else.
Although her beauty
and figure won her numer-
ous roles in movies from
the mid-1940s to the mid-
1950s, she failed to obtain
star status until “Leave it
to Beaver,” a show that she
almost passed on.
After “Leave it to
Beaver” left the air in 1963
Billingsley largely disap-
peared from public view for
several years.
She resurfaced in 1980
in a hilarious cameo in
“Airplane!” playing a
demure elderly passenger
not unlike June Cleaver.
When flight attendants
were unable to communicate
with a pair of jive-talking
hipsters, Billingsley’s char-
acter volunteered to trans-
late, saying “I speak jive.”
The three then engage in a
raucous street-slang conver-
sation.
She returned as June
Cleaver in a 1983 TV
movie, “Still the Beaver,”
that costarred Mathers and
Dow and portrayed a much
darker side of Beaver’s life.
In his mid-30s, Beaver
was unemployed, unable to
communicate with his own
sons and going through a
divorce. Wally, a successful
lawyer, was handling the
divorce, and June was at a
loss to help her son through
the transition.
“Ward, what would you
do?” she asked at the site of
her husband’s grave. (Hugh
Beaumont, who played
Ward Cleaver, had died in
1982.)
The movie revived inter-
est in the Cleaver fam-
ily, and the Disney Channel
launched “The New Leave
It to Beaver” in 1985.
The series took a
more hopeful view of the
Cleavers, with Beaver win-
ning custody of his two sons
and all three moving in with
June.
In 1997 Universal made
a “Leave it to Beaver” the-
atrical film with a new gen-
eration of actors. Billingsley
returned for a cameo, how-
ever, as Aunt Martha.
“America’s favorite
mother is now gone,” Dow
said in a statement Saturday.
“I feel very fortunate to have
been her “son” for 11 years.
We were wonderful friends
and I will miss her very
much.”
In later years she appeared
from time to time in such TV
series as “Murphy Brown,”
“Empty Nest” and “Baby
Boom” and had a memorable
comic turn opposite fellow
TV moms June Lockhart of
“Lassie” and Isabel Sanford
of “The Jeffersons” on the
“Roseanne” show.
In real life, fate was not
as gentle to Billingsley as
it had been to June and her
family.
Born Barbara Lillian
Combes in Los Angeles
on Dec. 22, 1915, she was
raised by her mother after
her parents divorced. She
and her first husband, Glenn
Billingsley, divorced when
her sons were just 2 and 4.
Her second husband,
director Roy Kellino, died
of a heart attack after three
years of marriage and just
months before she landed
the “Leave it to Beaver”
role.
She married physician
Bill Mortenson in 1959 and
they remained wed until his
death in 1981.
Twer sky sai d
Billingsley’s survivors
include her sons, a stepson
and numerous grandchil-
dren.
Barbara
Billingsley,
Beaver Cleaver’s
TV mom, dies
By MARY LANE
The Associated Press
BERLIN — A rare sheet of
10 stamps depicting Audrey
Hepburn fetched 430,000
($606,000) at a charity auc-
tion in Berlin on Saturday,
two-thirds of which will go to
help educate children in sub-
Saharan Africa.
The mint-condition sheet of
10 stamps featuring Hepburn,
a coy smile on her face and
a long, black cigarette hold-
er dangling from her lips,
brought a profitable outcome
to a botched stamp series that
should have been destroyed
years ago — and evokes
Hepburn’s starring role in the
1963 thriller “Charade,” in
which the characters chase a
set of rare stamps.
Sean Ferrer, 50, Hepburn’s
son with actor and director
Mel Ferrer, and the chair of the
Audrey Hepburn Children’s
Fund, said he was thrilled
that the sale Saturday brought
“focus on children in need,”
but wished the stamps had
sold for a higher price.
Two-thirds of money raised
will go to the Audrey Hepburn
Children’s Fund, and one-third
to UNICEF Germany.
The sale brings a profitable
outcome to a botched stamp
series that should have been
destroyed years ago — and
evokes Hepburn’s starring role
in the 1963 thriller “Charade,”
in which the characters chase a
set of rare stamps.
The German postal ser-
vice printed 14 million of the
Hepburn stamps in 2001 show-
ing the Belgian-born actress in
her most famous role as the
ebullient Holly Golightly in
“Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”
Only after the stamps
were printed was Sean Ferrer,
50, Hepburn’s son and the
chair of the Audrey Hepburn
Children’s Fund, contacted
to grant copyright — but he
refused, arguing that the image
had been altered.
“In the original photo,
she’s got sunglasses hang-
ing from her mouth, but they
had flipped the negative and
replaced the glasses with the
cigarette holder,” he told The
Associated Press.
Ferrer suggested using
either the original photo or
an alternative, but the postal
service ended up scrapping
the stamp and ordering those
produced destroyed.
Deutsche Post says it saved
only two sheets of the stamps
— one for its own archive
and one for the German Post
Museum. But in 2004, a single
stamp with Hepburn smoking,
postmarked Berlin, landed on
auctioneer Andreas Schlegel’s
desk.
“I was obviously very sur-
prised, because they never
were supposed to be used as
stamps at all,” Schlegel said.
Between 2004 and 2009,
four other Hepburn stamps
turned up and were authenti-
cated. They sold at auction for
between 62,500 and 173,000.
After his success selling the
fifth stamp, Schlegel contacted
Ferrer to suggest asking the
German government if they
could sell one of the archived
stamp sheets for charity. But
Ferrer had a better idea: Why
not the pristine sheet Germany
sent him in 2001, which he
still had?
Audrey Hepburn stamps
fetch $606,000 for charity
“She was
every bit as
nurturing, classy,
and lovely as
‘June Cleaver,’
and we were
so proud to
share her with
the world.”
— Glenn Billingsley
Son of Barbara Billingsley
1
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1 - mocca met., cashmere leather
2010 MERCEDES BENZ
CROSSOVER WAGON
Nav., leather, 2K miles, red
2010 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ
White, two tone graphite, heated leather, 6K,
3.6 6 speed auto., loaded
2009 SATURN AURA XR
2.4 4 cyl., silver moon roof, loaded
2009 VISSAN QUEST
Mini Van, every option, silver, gray leather
2009 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
White, lt. gray, 6 pass., hot leather, chrome
pack, 7K
2009 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
Cyber, grey met, tan leather, chromes,
luxury pack, 11k
2009 CADILLAC DTS II Special
red, gray leather, chromes, astro roof, 14k
2009 CHEVY COBALT LT
Ruby red, chromes, loaded, 22K
2008 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
Sport, red met., gray leather, 3800 V-6, 16K
2008 CHEVY TRAIL BLASER
LS, 4x4, white, gray cloth, power sunroof, 23K
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LIMITED SPECIAL EDITION
Hart top convt., special gold paint, lt. butter
leather trim, loaded
2008 CHEVY COBALT LS
4 dr., black, gray cloth, auto, a/c, cruise, tilt,
CD, 44k
2007 CADILLAC CTS
Silver, graphite, leather, loaded, 50K
2007 CADILLAC STS
AWD V-6, cognac, frost met.-cashmere,
leather, loaded, 31k
2006 CADILLAC DTS
Cashmere, tan, hot & cold leather, moon,
chromes, 19K
2006 GMC ENVOY SLT
Ruby red, graphite, leather, full power, moon,
chrome, 88K
2005 CHRYSLER 300C
Hemi, silver, lt. gray, leather, sunroof,
chromes, 99K
2005 CHRYSLER 300C HEMI
Silver, gray, hot leather, sunroof, chromes, 1
owner, 99K, clean
2005 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Lt. Tan-leather, roof, wing 3800 V-6, 82K
2004 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CXL
FWD, two-tone gray, NAV, sunroof, chromes,
quad seats, 70K
2004 CADILLAC DHS
Lt. blue/gray, hot leather, chromes, 71K
2004 PONTIAC GRD. PRIX
GT White, tan, leather, 3800, V-6
2004 NISSAN ALTIMA
S25 4 cyl., diamond, white gray cloth, full
power, 89K
2003 PONTIAC
GRD PRIX GT
Victory red, graphite leather, sunrrof,
crhomes, nice, 94K
2002 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CXL
AWD, two tone gray, leather, sunroof, 145K
2001 CADILLAC STS
D.I., white, tan leather, chromes, moon,
loaded, 99K
2000 SIERRA 3500 CLASSIC
5.7 V8, 4X4, blue met, cloth, one owner, 42k
1995 CADILLAC
ELDORADO COUPE ETC
Diamond white, neutral, chromes, like new, no
winters, 51K
1984 CADILLAC
ELDORADO
Convertible, blue/white leather, 70K
1993 OLDS CUTLASS
SUPREME SL Convert., red/black
top, 3.4 V6, 63K
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Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald — 9A
www.delphosherald.com
By BULLIT MARQUEZ
The Associated Press
CAUAYAN, Philippines — The strongest
cyclone in years to buffet the Philippines
knocked out communications and power as
residents took shelter today, while flooding
in Vietnam swept away a bus and 20 of its
passengers, including a boy taken from his
mother’s grasp by the raging waters.
Super Typhoon Megi, crossing the northern
Philippines, was expected to add to the already
heavy rains that have fallen on much of
Asia. In China, authorities evacuated 140,000
people from a coastal province ahead of the
typhoon.
Megi could later hit Vietnam, where flood-
ing has caused 30 deaths in recent days, in
addition to those missing and feared dead after
a bus was snatched off a road by surging cur-
rents today.
Megi packed sustained winds of 140 miles
(225 kilometers) per hour and gusts of 162
mph (260 kph) as it made landfall midday
today at Palanan Bay in Isabela province,
felling trees and utility poles and cutting off
power, phone and Internet services in many
areas. It appeared to be weakening while
crossing the mountains of the Philippines’
main northern island of Luzon.
With more than 3,600 Filipinos riding out
the typhoon in sturdy school buildings, town
halls, churches and relatives’ homes, roads in
and out of coastal Isabela province, about 320
kilometers (200 miles) northeast of Manila,
were deserted and blocked by collapsed trees
and power lines.
One man who had just rescued his water
buffalo slipped and fell into a river and prob-
ably drowned, said Bonifacio Cuarteros, an
official with the Cagayan provincial disaster
agency.
As it crashed ashore, the typhoon whipped
up huge waves. There was zero visibility and
radio reports said the wind was so powerful
that people could not take more than a step at
a time. Ships and fishing vessels were told to
stay in ports, and several domestic and inter-
national flights were canceled.
Thousands of military reserve officers and
volunteers were on standby, along with heli-
copters, including six Chinooks that were com-
mitted by U.S. troops holding war exercises
with Filipino soldiers near Manila, said Benito
Ramos, a top disaster-response official.
“This is like preparing for war,” Ramos,
a retired army general, told The Associated
Press. “We know the past lessons, and we’re
aiming for zero casualties.”
In July, an angry President Benigno Aquino
III fired the head of the weather bureau for
failing to predict that a typhoon would hit
Manila. That storm killed more than 100
people in Manila and outlying provinces.
This time, authorities sounded the alarm
early and ordered evacuations and the posi-
tioning of emergency relief and food sup-
plies days before the typhoon hit. The capital
was expected to avoid any direct hit, though
schools were closed.
Megi was the most powerful typhoon to
hit the Philippines in four years, government
forecasters say. A 2006 howler with 155-mph
(250-kph) winds set off mudslides that buried
entire villages, killing about 1,000 people.
In central Vietnam, officials said 20 people on
a bus were swept away today by strong currents
from a river flooded by recent rains unrelated to
Megi, while another 18 survived by swimming
or clinging to trees or power poles.
One survivor treaded water for 3 1/2 hours
as the current pushed her downstream and she
was forced to let go of her 15-year-old son due
to exhaustion. The boy is among the missing.
Officials said 30 other people died in cen-
tral Vietnam from flooding over the weekend,
and five remain missing.
Megi could add to the mis-
ery.
“People are exhausted,”
Vietnamese disaster official
Nguyen Ngoc Giai said by tele-
phone from Quang Binh prov-
ince. “Many people have not
even returned to their flooded
homes from previous flooding,
while many others who returned
home several days ago were
forced to be evacuated again.”
Chi na’s Nat i onal
Meteorological Center said
Megi was expected to enter the
South China Sea on Tuesday,
threatening southeastern coastal
provinces. The center issued its
second-highest alert for potential
“wild winds and huge waves,”
warning vessels to take shelter
and urging authorities to brace for emergen-
cies.
Floods triggered by heavy rains forced
nearly 140,000 people to evacuate from homes
in the southern island province of Hainan,
where heavy rains left thousands homeless
over the weekend, the official Xinhua News
Agency reported today.
Thailand also reported flooding that sub-
merged thousands of homes and vehicles and
halted train service. No casualties were report-
ed, and nearly 100 elephants were evacuated
from a popular tourist attraction north of the
capital.
Super typhoon lashes Philippines, knocks out power
By KATHARINE
HOURELD
The Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan —
Gunmen killed nine Afghan
workers who were guarding a
NATO supply convoy in the
south of the country, police
said today.
The attack in Gereshk
district happened on Sunday
night, said the deputy police
chief for Helmand province,
Kamaluddin Khan. Military
supply convoys are regular-
ly attacked in Afghanistan,
where they are seen as an
easier target for insurgents
than NATO bases.
The shootings come about
a week after trucks bearing
NATO supplies for troops
began flowing again through
the important Khyber Pass
crossing from Pakistan into
Afghanistan. Pakistan had
closed the Torkham crossing
in protest at a NATO heli-
copter strike that killed two
Pakistani border guards.
During the 11-day block-
ade, about 150 trucks were
destroyed and some drivers and
police were injured in near-dai-
ly attacks in Pakistan. NATO,
however, said its supplies were
not interrupted as it simply sent
supplies through other routes
— such as crossings in the west
or further south.
Separately, airstrikes by
international coalition forc-
es killed up to 14 suspected
insurgents. An airstrike in
northern Baghlan province
reportedly killed around 10
people Sunday, a NATO
statement said. It had targeted
a leader accused of planting
bombs and supplying cash
and weapons to Taliban lead-
ership in the area. However,
NATO was not able to con-
firm the number of casualties
because neither international
or Afghan soldiers could get
to the area.
Another airstrike in south-
ern Nimroz province killed
four fighters who were plant-
ing a bomb, said provincial
police chief Abdul Jabar
Pardeli. A Taliban command-
er was among those killed by
Sunday night’s strike, he said.
Violence has risen in the
south of the country as NATO
and Afghan forces have for
months attempted to push
insurgents from their strong-
holds in the Taliban heartland
of Kandahar.
Checkpoints have been set
up around Kandahar city in
an attempt to keep insurgents
from entering and carrying
out attacks.
Control of Kandahar is seen
as key to reversing Taliban
momentum in the war. The
nearly 150,000 international
troops and 220,000 Afghan
security forces are still strug-
gling to gain the upper hand
against an estimated 30,000
insurgents.
The nine-year war has
inflicted a mounting toll on
Afghan civilians who are
caught in the crossfire. In
western Afghanistan, a road-
side bomb killed three civil-
ians this morning in Herat
city, police said. Police
spokesman Noor Nikzad said
the bomb was hidden in a
sack in an irrigation ditch.
When officers went to inspect
the object, it exploded. The
three victims had been walk-
ing nearby. Nikzad said one
police officer was wounded.
Meanwhile, NATO forces
say that a detainee captured in
an operation in the south was
found dead in his holding cell
Sunday.
NATO says the man was
being held in Kandahar prov-
ince after being detained
Saturday, and the alliance is
investigating the circumstanc-
es of his death. The interna-
tional military coalition gave
no further information.
———
Associated Press Writer
Mirwais Khan in Kandahar
contributed to this report.
Afghan gunmen kill 9 guards protecting NATO convoy
By CHRISTOPHER
BODEEN
The Associated Press
BEIJING — Chinese Vice
President Xi Jinping has been
promoted to vice chairman of
a key Communist Party mili-
tary committee, state media
reported today, in the clear-
est sign yet he is on track
to be the country’s future
leader.
Party leaders also pledged
to make “vigorous yet steady”
efforts to promote political
restructuring, the Xinhua
News Agency said, citing a
document issued at Today’s
close of an annual meeting
of the ruling party’s Central
Committee.
No specifics were given,
although party leaders rou-
tinely call for administrative
refinements to shore up one-
party rule.
“Work in improving the
CPC ruling capacity and
maintaining the Party’s
advanced nature should be
strengthened to promote the
Party’s competence in leading
the country’s economic and
social development,” Xinhua
said, citing the party docu-
ment.
Xinhua also gave few
details about Xi’s appoint-
ment to the Central Military
Commission that oversees the
2.3 million-member People’s
Liberation Army.
Xi, 57, is the party’s sixth-
ranking leader and has long
been viewed as the anointed
successor to President Hu
Jintao, who is expected to step
down as party chief in 2012.
Appointment to the party’s
military commission, and an
identical one on the govern-
ment side, has been viewed as
a necessary step in preparing
Xi for the top office.
The 11-member commis-
sion already has two vice
chairmen and is chaired by
Hu, who up to now, had also
been its only civilian mem-
ber.
In addition to affirm-
ing Xi’s path to the top, his
appointment bolsters the par-
ty’s absolute control over the
military in a repudiation of
calls for the PLA to become a
national army under govern-
ment, not party, leadership.
China VP Xi promoted to key military commission
2
Name
Where vet is from

Branch of Military
Years Served from to
Phone #
(to be used for information questions only
- not to be published
Please fill out one form for each veteran.
VETERANS
PAST & PRESENT
PHOTOS OF PAST & PRESENT
VETERANS WILL BE PUBLISHED
IN OUR “SALUTE TO VETERANS”
PUBLICATION NOV. 11.
Photos (most any size) can
be submitted to The Delphos
Herald or email with
information to
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publication is in the paper. If you
prefer your photo back right
away, you can bring into
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and wait for it to be scanned.
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Dates of Service
10A – The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
TOP SOIL
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419-339-2771
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Answers to Saturday’s questions:
The Nicaraguan postage stamp showing a belching
volcano convinced the U.S. Congress to build a canal
across Panama rather than the original choice, Nicaragua.
The stamp triggered a fear that an eruption might destroy
the canal.
Manhattan got its name from the Indian word
Manahachtaniek, which means “the island where we all
got drunk,” apparently referring to a spirited encounter
between the Native Americans and some newly-arrived
Dutchmen.
Today’s questions:
What special training was required of the first airline
stewardesses, hired by United Airlines in 1930?
What is the foggiest place in the United States?
Answers in Tuesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Logomachy: a word game
Wheyface; paleface
CPR switch: Chest presses first, then give breaths
By JAMIE STENGLE
The Associated Press
DALLAS — New guidelines out today
switch up the steps for CPR, telling rescuers to
start with hard, fast chest presses before giving
mouth-to-mouth.
The change puts “the simplest step first”
for traditional CPR, said Dr. Michael Sayre,
co-author of the guidelines issued by the
American Heart Association.
In recent years, CPR guidance has been
revised to put more emphasis on chest push-
es for sudden cardiac arrest. In 2008, the
heart group said untrained bystanders or those
unwilling to do rescue breaths could do hands-
only CPR until paramedics arrive or a defibril-
lator is used to restore a normal heart beat.
Now, the group says everyone from profes-
sionals to bystanders who use standard CPR
should begin with chest compressions instead
of opening the victim’s airway and breathing
into their mouth first.
The change ditches the old ABC training
— airway-breathing-compressions. That called
for rescuers to give two breaths first, then alter-
nate with 30 presses.
Sayre said that approach took time and
delayed chest presses, which keep the blood
circulating.
“When the rescuer pushes hard and fast on
the victim’s chest, they’re really acting like an
artificial heart. That blood carries oxygen that
helps keep the organs alive till help arrives,”
said Sayre, an emergency doctor at Ohio State
University Medical Center.
“Put one hand on top of the other and push
really hard,” he said.
Sudden cardiac arrest — when the heart
suddenly stops beating — can occur after
a heart attack or as a result of electrocu-
tion or near-drowning. The person collapses,
stops breathing normally and is unresponsive.
Survival rates from cardiac arrest outside the
hospital vary across the country — from 3 per-
cent to 15 percent, according to Sayre.
Under the revised guidelines, rescuers using
traditional CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscita-
tion, should start chest compressions imme-
diately — 30 chest presses, then two breaths.
The change applies to adults and children, but
not newborns.
One CPR researcher, though, expressed
disappointment with the new guidelines. Dr.
Gordon Ewy of the University of Arizona
Sarver Heart Center thinks everyone should
be doing hands-only CPR for sudden cardiac
arrest, and skipping mouth-to-mouth. He said
the guidelines could note the cases where
breaths should still be given, like near-drown-
ings and drug overdoses, when breathing prob-
lems likely led to the cardiac arrest.
Ewy is one of the authors of a recently
published U.S. study that showed more people
survived cardiac arrest when a bystander gave
them hands-only CPR, compared to CPR with
breaths.
The guidelines issued today also say that
rescuers should be pushing deeper, at least
2 inches in adults. Rescuers should pump
the chest of the victim at a rate of at least
100 compressions a minute — some say a
good guide is the beat of the old disco song
“Stayin’ Alive.”
Dr. Ahamed Idris, of the University of
Texas Southwestern in Dallas, said people are
sometimes afraid that they’ll hurt the patient.
Others have a hard time judging how hard they
are pressing, he said.
“We want to make sure people understand
they’re not going to hurt the person they’re
doing CPR on by pressing as hard as they can,”
he said.
Idris, who directs the Dallas-Fort Worth
Center for Resuscitation Research, said that for
the last two years, they’ve been advising local
paramedics to start with chest compressions
and keep them up with minimal interruptions.
That, along with intensive training, has helped
improve survival rates, he said.
He said they found paramedics hadn’t been
starting compressions until the patient was in
the ambulance and lost time getting airway
equipment together.
“The best chance was to start chest com-
pressions in the house, immediately,” he said.
SAN FRANCISCO(AP) — Yasir Afifi, a 20-year-old com-
puter salesman and community college student, took his car in for
an oil change earlier this month and his mechanic spotted an odd
wire hanging from the undercarriage.
The wire was attached to a strange magnetic device that puz-
zled Afifi and the mechanic. They freed it from the car and posted
images of it online, asking for help in identifying it.
Two days later, FBI agents arrived at Afifi’s Santa Clara
apartment and demanded the return of their property — a global
positioning system tracking device now at the center of a raging
legal debate over privacy rights.
One federal judge wrote that the widespread use of the device
was straight out of George Orwell’s novel, “1984”.
“By holding this kind of surveillance doesn’t impair an indi-
vidual’s reasonable expectation of privacy, the panel hands the
government the power to track the movements of every one of
us, every day of our lives,” wrote Alex Kozinski, the chief judge
of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a blistering dissent in
which a three-judge panel from his court ruled that search war-
rants weren’t necessary for GPS tracking.
But other federal and state courts have come to the opposite
conclusion.
Law enforcement advocates for the devices say GPS can
eliminate time-consuming stakeouts and old-fashioned “tails”
with unmarked police cars. The technology had a starring role in
the HBO cops-and-robbers series “The Wire” and police use it to
track every type of suspect — from terrorist to thieves stealing
copper from air conditioners.
That investigators don’t need a warrant to use GPS tracking
devices in California troubles privacy advocates, technophiles,
criminal defense attorneys and others.
The federal appeals court based in Washington D.C. said in
August that investigators must obtain a warrant for GPS in tossing
out the conviction and life sentence of Antoine Jones, a nightclub
owner convicted of operating a cocaine distribution ring. That
court concluded that the accumulation of four-weeks worth of
data collected from a GPS on Jones’ Jeep amounted to a govern-
ment “search” that required a search warrant.
Judge Douglas Ginsburg said watching Jones’ Jeep for an
entire month rather than trailing him on one trip made all the dif-
ference between surveilling a suspect on public property and a
search needing court approval.
“First, unlike one’s movements during a single journey, the
whole of one’s movements over the course of a month is not actually
exposed to the public because the likelihood anyone will observe all
those movements is effectively nil,” Ginsburg wrote. The state high
courts of New York, Washington and Oregon have ruled similarly.
FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — Soldier after soldier rose
from the witness chair, stared and pointed to an Army psychia-
trist seated a dozen feet away, never wavering as they identi-
fied him as the man who went on deadly shooting rampage at
Fort Hood last year.
“He’s here, sir.”
“That man is right there, sir.”
Twenty-nine witnesses testified last week, and more sol-
diers are expected on the stand today at the start of the second
week of a military hearing to determine whether Maj. Nidal
Hasan will stand trial. Hasan, 40, an American-born Muslim, is
charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts
of attempted premeditated murder in the Nov. 5 shootings at
the Texas Army post.
Some time after the Article 32 hearing ends, the investigat-
ing officer will make recommendations on taking the case to
trial and whether the military should seek the death penalty.
The final decision will be made by Col. Morgan Lamb, a Fort
Hood brigade commander appointed to oversee judicial mat-
ters in Hasan’s case.
It’s unusual to have so many witnesses at such a hearing,
but “it’s a big case and (the investigating officer) is trying to
Oil change ignites privacy debate
Testimony to resume in
Fort Hood suspect’s hearing
More intellectually disabled youth getting higher education
By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH
The Associated Press
WARRENSBURG, Mo. — Zach Neff is all high-fives as
he walks through his college campus in western Missouri. The
27-year-old with Down syndrome hugs most everybody, repeat-
edly. He tells teachers he loves them.
“I told Zach we are putting him on a hug diet — one to say
hello and one to say goodbye,” said Joyce Downing, who helped
start a new program at the University of Central Missouri that
serves students with disabilities.
The hope is that polishing up on social skills, like cutting back
on the hugs, living in residence halls and going to classes with
non-disabled classmates will help students like Neff be more
independent and get better jobs.
In years past, college life was largely off-limits for students
with such disabilities, but that’s no longer the case. Students with
Down syndrome, autism and other conditions that can result in
intellectual disabilities are leaving high school more academically
prepared than ever and ready for the next step: college.
Eight years ago, disability advocates were able to find only
four programs on university campuses that allowed students with
intellectual disabilities to experience college life with extra help
from mentors and tutors. As of last year, there were more than
250 spread across more than three dozen states and two Canadian
provinces, said Debra Hart, head of Think College at the Institute
for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts
Boston, which provides services to people with disabilities.
That growth is partly because of an increasing demand for
higher education for these students and there are new federal
funds for such programs.
The federal rules that took effect this fall allow students with
intellectual disabilities to receive grants and work-study money.
Because details on the rules are still being worked out, the earli-
est students could have the money is next year. Hart and others
expect the funds to prompt the creation of even more programs.
1
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CALL 419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
CERTIFIED
• Major or minor transmission services
Automatic & Standard
Foreign & Domestic
• Differentials •Transfer Case
• Brakes & Tune Up
• Complete Line of Filter Kits & Parts
• Free On Site Estimates
• Warranty On All Rebuilts
The
Fort Jennings
State Bank
“the bank of choice”
www.fjsb.com
120 E. Main Street
P.O. Box 445
Ottoville, OH 45876
419-453-2527
•STEAKS•
•CHICKEN•
•SEAFOOD•
Dew Drop Inn
FAMILY RESTAURANT
CATERING SERVICES
Bob and Mary Lou Hoersten
Ottoville, OH 45876
Octoberfest
OCT. 19
161 W. Canal Street PO Box 458
Ottoville OH 45876
toll free: 1.888.321.7269
ph: 419.453.3448
James H. Niedecken:
Owner C.I.C., L.U.T.C.F.
Lisa Horstman: Agent, C.I.S.R.
Kim Hilvers: Agent,
Life & Health Specialist
Left to Right:
Kimberly Hilvers-Agent;
Cora Kehres-Secretary;
James Niedecken-Owner;
Benny-Public Relations;
Jan Niedecken -
Offce Manager;
Lisa Horstman-Agent.
E
V
E
R
Y

M
O
N
D
A
Y
• Doors open 4:30
• Early Birds 6:30
• Regular Bingo 7:00
INSTANT BINGO TICKETS FOR SALE!!
Van Wert County Council on Aging
Ph. 238-5011
220 Fox Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
Proceeds benefit
Senior Citizens
R
E
F
R
E
S
H
M
E
N
T
S
A
V
A
I
L
A
B
L
E
Cost:
$
10
00
for a night
of fun
123 E. Main St., Ottoville, Ohio
Phone 419-453-3424
Brian Altenburger Randy Altenburger
190 W. Third St., Ottoville, Ohio 45876
419-453-7827
Of Ottoville
After 5pm
Reg. FOOTLONGS
$
5
SOUPS
$1.50
with purchase of 6” Sub
After purchase
of 2 or more
Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald — 11A
www.delphosherald.com
WE SALUTE THESE OTTOVILLE BUSINESSES!
They invite you to visit them and see all that Ottoville has to offer.
See them for the best in customer service, quality and price!
2
NEW 2011 FORD
EDGE SEL
NEW 2011 FORD
FUSION SE
NEW 2011 FORD
FOCUS SE
• 18” chrome wheels
• Rear view camera
• Myford touch
• Sync system
• #9590
• Power moonroof
• Sync system
• Alloy wheels
• CD
• #9583
• Reverse sensing
• 2.5L I4 Engine
• AM/FM CD
• Blind spot mirrors
• #9578
• Sync system
• Cruise control
• SE appearance pkg.
• Spoiler
• #9579
800-262-3866 www.statewideford.com
$
19,928*
$
15,942*
$
1500*
REBATE
$
2000*
REBATE
AT STATEWIDE
* discounts and pricing include national incentives, some rebates may require Ford Credit financing, pricing excludes tax, title & doc fee.
1108 West Main St., Van Wert, OH
800-262-3866 or 419-238-0125
Mon. & Wed. 9 AM - 8 PM;
Tues., Thurs., Fri. 9 AM-6 PM; Sat. 9 AM-3 PM
PERSONAL
SERVICE
LOCAL
OWNERSHIP
THE WAY IT OUGHT TO BE!
StateWide
Visit Our Website: www.statewideford.com
2004 Dodge Caravan
SXT
# 9587A. Local Trade-in, carfax
1-owner, leather, rear DV, low miles!
$
10,990
2008 Ford Escape
Limited
# 9542P. Power moonroof, satellite
radio, heated leather, priced right!
$
17,867
2007 Ford
Ranger
# 9552A. Local trade-in, only 31,000
miles, truck cap to match!!
$
9995
2007 Lincoln
MKX
# 9568P Ultimate pkg, heated &
cooled seats, chrome wheels, low miles!
$
20,987
2008 Ford Taurus
Limited
# 9549P. Power moonroof, chrome
wheels, heated leather, low miles!
$
15,979
2004 Saturn
Vue
# 9560A. Local trade-in, won’t last at
this price!
$
7931
2009 Ford Flex
SE
# 9544P. Only 27,000 miles!
Clean carfax, 1-owner, 7 passenger!
$
22,851
2007 Ford Edge SEL
Plus
# 9548P. Chrome wheels, heated
leather, clean carfax, priced to sell!
$
18,868
USED VEHICLES
2007 FORD FUSION
SE SPORT
# 9539P. Only 33,000 miles! Alloy
wheels, CD, great fuel economy!
$
11,870
2009 Hyundai
Accent
# 94879A. Local trade-in, carfax
1-owner, only 21,000 miles, WOW!
$
9997
2004 Ford Freestar
Limited
# 95609A Rear DVD, quad leather
seats, great color, local trade!
$
7557
2006 Chevy
Silverado
# 9546A. WOW! Carfax 1-owner,
local trade-in, priced to sell!!
$
7999
2005 Ranger
Supercab 4X4
# 94869A. V6, automatic, hard to fnd,
inexpensive 4 wheel drive!
$
8949
2008 Mercury
Milan
# 9535P. 30 miles per gallon plus!
Alloy wheels, CD, 24,000 miles!
$
12,776
2003 Ford Windstar
SEL
# 94629A. Quad seats, rear A/C, local
trade-in, ground effects, spoiler, leather!
$
5995
2002 Ford
Mustang
# 95319A V6 coupe, local trade-in,
ground efeects, spoiler, leather!
$
7224
2008 Lincoln
MKZ
# 9559P. Power moonroof, chrome
wheels, htd & cooled seats, low miles!
$
18,336
2008 Ford
Explorer XLT
# 9564P. 4X4, 1-owner, 3rd row seat,
only 29,000 miles, like new!
$
19,899
2001 Ford F 150
Supercrew
# 9567A.Full 4 door, truck cap to match,
V8, 1-owner, don’t miss it!
$
9995
2007 Ford
Taurus SE
# 9549A Alloy wheels, power seat,
only 57,000 miles, extra clean!
$
8999
NEW 2011 FORD
ESCAPE XLT FWD
12A– The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
1
Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald — 1B
www.delphosherald.com
2B – The Herald Monday, October 16, 2010 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
AMERICAN WAY AUCTION
Saturday, Oct. 23
rd
10:02 a.m.
Van Wert, Ohio
Owners: R&D Brokamp LLC
American Way Auction Facility is located 16477
Convoy Rd. just 3 miles north of Van Wert on
US 127 and then go east on Convoy Road 3 miles
to the auction facility.
Partial Listing: Walnut china cabinet, 5 stack
oak bookcase, oak dressers, oak chest, grand-
father clock, oak crank phone, Victorian chair,
walnut lamp table, Heywood Wakefield end table,
blue glass lamp tables, wood school desks,
double lounger sofa, other sofas, several very
nice recliners, bar stools, Westinghouse chest
freezer, Westinghouse refrigerator, whirlpool lg.
capacity dryer, knee hole desk, lamps & lamp
tables Tell City maple table & chairs, bookcases
card tables. Hoover vacuum, Bissell power
steamer, stereo system, under-the-counter CD
player, CDs, tapes, radios, chrome table & chairs,
full size bed, single bed, color TV sets, portable
TV, cupboards. mirror shadow box, 2 sets of fine
china, dishes & glassware, set of 5 Pyrex colored
mixing bowls, stainless steel bowls, wall pocket
vases, kitchen appliances, electric ice cream
freezer, Kitchen Aid 10 speed mixer, new Presto
Cool Daddy deep fryer, 6 qt. roaster, pots & pans,
blankets & bedding, linens, religious items, toys,
Texaco super service station, match box cars,
International tractor & plow, Tonka wrecker truck,
True Value pickup truck, marbles, Aurora AFX
race set, Jane & Jay West, Geronimo, pictures &
old frames, graniteware, Wapak cast iron skillet,
hay knife, primitives, crocks & jugs, butter churn,
sad irons, Dietz lantern, old Ohio Tool block plane,
iron dinner bell, well pump, hand tools, machin-
ist tool box, tool boxes, yard tools, power tools,
metal shelves, metal cupboards, fiberglass step
ladders, extension ladder, lg. lawn roller, sm. utility
trailer, wheel barrow, porch gliders, red wood lawn
furniture, patio set, snow thrower, older Schwinn
bike, Murray lawn mower, Western Clipper sled,
Charbroil gas grill, cement lawn ornaments, lots of
items not listed.
Items of Special Interest: Like New Broyhill
Queen Size Bedroom Suite
(5) Violins including Hermann Beyer
For pictures go to auctionzip.com,
zip code 45891
Auctioneers: Mike Jackson, Gary Holdgreve
American Way Auction
(419) 968-2955
Let us sell for you the “American Way”
Farm For Sale
117.5 ACRES
(one hundred seventeen and a half)
Selling in 2-40 acre parcels
1 - 37.5 acre parcel
Monterey Township
Putnam County
Phone: 419-230-7761
or 419-331-2186
19176 Venedocia-
Eastern Rd.,
Venedocia
0 down, warranty, free appliances,
Remodeled home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home in Lincolnview school district. Has new carpet, paint,
landscape, new central air, water heater, new lighting, updated plumbing
and electric, some new windows.
OPEN HOUSE
Dawn to dusk Fri., Sat. & Sun.
419-586-8220
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015
TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
CHEVROLET • BUICK • PONTIAC
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
BIG SAVINGS! HURRY IN!!
2006
Chev
Malibu
Maxx
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
Was $11,900
NOW
$
10,500
or
$
157/MO.
$1,000 + tax down
Allied Financial 72 mo. @
6.04 APR w/approved credit
2004 Olds Silhouette
$
11,995
Chrome wheels,
DVD
Was $12,995 NOW
Ally
down payment
assistance $1,000
GM Rebate $4,000
Arps Rebate $1,000
$
6000
$
2000
0
%
TOTAL
SAVINGS
REBATE
OR
UP TO
60 MOS.
2011 CHEVY IMPALA 2011
BUICK
ENCLAVE
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
Sales Department Hours: Mon. 8am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 8:00am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2:30pm
Service•Parts•Body Shop: Mon. 7:30am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 7:30am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2pm
www.raabeflm.com
11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH (419) 692-0055
TRUCKS-VANS-SUVs
CARS
Stock No. NOW
6663A 2010 FORD F150 S. CREW 4x4. .....Full power, chrome pkg., 14,000 mi. .............. $29,995
6744 2009 FORD EDGE. ...................................Limited AWD V/6, full power, leather ............. $27,995
6748 2008 HONDA RIDGELINE RTX 4x4.V/6, full power ................................................... $19,995
6745 2008 FORD F250 S. CAB 4x4. .........Lariat, leather, 6.4L diesel, full power ............ $34,995
6747 2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4x4. .....V/8, full power, moonroof, 3rd seat ................ $20,995
6715 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED ............... FWD, V6, full power, leather, 30,0000 miles. ..... $24,995
6716 2008 FORD EDGE SEL ......................... FWD V/6, full power, leather, 26,000 miles ........ $23,495
6704 2007 MERCURY MARINER LUXURY.FWD, full power, moonroof ............................. $16,495
6671 2007 FORD EDGE SE FWD ................ V/6, full power, clean unit. ............................. $17,495
6673 2007 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED ........... V/6, 4x4, full power, leather, moonroof. ......... $16,495
6674 2007 FORD ESCAPE XLT .................... V/6, FWD, full power, moonroof. .................... $14,995
6753 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT . .........Quad cab, 4x4, 5.7 hemi, 42,000 miles ........... $22,995
6750 2006 GMC ENVOY SLT 4x4................V/6, full power, leather moonroof, 59,000 mi. $17,995
6734 2006 MERCURY MARINER ............. premier 4X4 V/6, leather, moonroof .................. $11,495
6717 2006 FORD FREESTYLE SEL ............. AWD, V/6, full power ........................................ $12,495
6741A 2006 PONTIAC TORRENT. ....................4 dr., FWD, V/6, moonroof, 17,000 miles ........ $15,995
6718 2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT ......... 4x4 V/6, full power, leather ................................ $10,495
6708 2004 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO EXT. CAB Z/71 4x4, V/8, full power ........... $13,895
6659A 2004 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER .... Luxury AWD, V/8, full power ....................... $11,995
6689B 2004 FORD F250 LARIAT CREWCAB 4x4......Leather, Diesel ........................... $17,995
6712 2002 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD.......... V/6, full power, moonroof ................................ $6,195
6713 2001 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4x4.............V/6, full power, moonroof, leather ...................... $7,995
6711 2000 HONDA CR-V........Special edition 4x4, 4 cyl., full power, leather, 78,000 mi. ......... $9,695
6746 1999 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO. .......Ext. Cab 4x4, V/8, full power ............................... $8,995
Stock No. NOW
6754 2008 MERCURY MILAN ................FWD, 4 cyl., full power, moonroof ...................... $13,995
6752 2008 SUZUKI SX4 ...........................5 dr., AWD, 4 cyl, 5 sp, full power....................... $11,495
6743 2008 FORD FUSION SE ..................FWD, 4 dr., 4 cyl., full power, 25,000 mi. ............ $14,995
6735 2008 NISSAN ALTIMA SE .............4 Dr., V/6, full power, moonroof .......................... $16,995
6728 2008 FORD FOCUS SE ....................4 Dr., 4 cyl., AT, power moonroof ....................... $11,725
6668 2008 FORD MUSTANG ..................Shelby Coupe, V8 full power, 8,000 miles .......... $37,895
6628 2008 MERCURY MILAN ................4 Dr., 4 cyl., FWD, full power, 20,000 miles ...... $14,495
6739 2008 TOYOTA PRIUS ......................4 Dr., 4 cyl., Hybrid, AT, full power ................... $16,595
6737 2007 FORD FOCUS SES ..................4 Dr., 4 cyl., AT, air, SC, 46,000 miles ................. $11,495
6732 2007 MERCURY MILAN ................4 Dr., 4 cyl., FWD, full power, moonroof............. $13,995
6742A 2006 SATURN ION-2 ......................4 dr., 4 cyl., AT, full power, moonroof, 39,000 mi. . $8,995
6740 2006 MERCURY MILAN ................FWD, 4 Dr., V/6, full power, 18,000 mi................. $14,995
6705A 2003 CHEVY MALIBU ....................4 dr, 4cy, AT, air ..................................................... $5,495
6730 2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR ..........signature, full power, leather, tu-tone ................ $11,495
6714 2003 DODGE NEON SE ..................4 dr., 4cyl, AT, air, 42,000 miles. .......................... $5,495
6736 2002 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP .Coupe, moonroof, leather, 71,000 miles ................ $7,995
6756 2002 FORD TAURUS SES ..............4 dr., V/6, full power, moonroof, 70,000 mi. ........... $7,995
6722 2001 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE .4 Dr., 4 cyl., AT, full power, moonroof ................. $6,995
6749 2000 BUICK CENTURY ...................Custom 4 Dr., V/6, full power, 4 dr., 87,000 miles .. $4,995
We BUY Used Cars!
Turn Yours into CASH Today!
John Bensman Kevin Lindeman Edward Ditmyer Dave Wilgus
NEW HOURS
Sales: Mon. 8:00-8; Tues.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 9-2:30
Service • Parts • Body Shop
Mon. 7:30-8 p.m.; Tues.-Fri. 7:30-6 p.m.; Sat. 9-2
SATURDAY SERVICE • NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED OIL CHANGES.
*As time allows per service hours*
John Roby
005

Lost & Found
FOUND MEN’S watch in
the Delphos Public LIbrary
Phone: 419-695-4015
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
DELPHOS
TRADING POST
528 N. Washington St.
419-692-0044
BUY•SELL•TRADE
Buy Quality at a
Fair Price or Receive
Fast Cash
at a Fair Value!
Open Tues.-Thurs. 8:30-5,
Fri. 8:30-6, Sat. 9-2
020

Notice
PANCAKE & Sausage
Breakfast
Sat. Oct. 23
7am -1pm
1st Presbyterian Church
310 W. 2nd st.
Donation $6.00
$3.00 for kids
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
ADMINISTRATIVE
SECRETARY
Enrollment Specialist
The Tri County Alcohol,
Drug Addiction and Mental
Health Services Board of
Van Wert, Mercer, and
Paulding Counties is seek-
ing a qualified candidate
to fill the part time position
of Administrative Secre-
tary/Enrollment Specialist.
Responsibilities include
but are not limited to work-
ing closely with the Execu-
tive Director with routine
secretarial duties and daily
data entry into state data-
base. Candidate should
have excellent organiza-
tional skills, detailed ori-
ented, good communica-
tion practices with the
public and self motivated
with a working knowledge
of Microsoft Word, Excel
and other related soft -
ware, as well as routine
office machines. A mini-
mum high school diploma
and 3 years office experi-
ence and/or associate de-
gree in business is de -
sired. Position offers up to
30 hours per week at a
competitive hourly rate.
Send resume to the Tri
County ADAMHS Board,
Attn.: Kathy Miller, 1054
South Washington St.,
Suite A, PO Box 269, Van
Wert, OH 45891 by
5:00pm November 1, 2010
Tri County ADAMHS
Board is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
MANPOWER IS recruiting
for first and second shift
positions in Ottoville. Du-
ties include Robotic Weld-
ing and Production. Quali-
fied candidates must have
previous experience, a
valid driver’s license and a
high school diploma/GED.
Lifting is required. Very
fast- paced environment.
Starting pay is 9.00 hour
with mandatory overtime.
Position may lead to
full-time employment.
Call Manpower today,
419-227-1970.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
270

Auctions
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
CHRISTMAS
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BRAND NEW Crib set,
still in box, never been
opened. Light color wood
finish. Comes with crib,
four drawer dresser and
changing table. Asking
$200. Call 419-741-7132
NEW, QUEEN plush top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75.00. (260)220-1596.
501

Misc. for Sale
CENTRAL BOILER out-
door wood furnaces start-
ing at $4995.00. Up to
$1,000 Rebate, limited
time. (419)358-5342
580

For Rent or Lease
DELPHOS SELF Storage
on Gressel Drive: Maxi-
mum security achieved in-
side our fenced facility
with access via your per-
sonal gate code. Why set-
tle for less? Phone any-
time 419-692-6336.
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, 1 1/2 BA, At-
tached garage. Available
soon. 419-692-3951
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM Apt. 702 N. Main
St., water, sewage and
garbage included. Stove &
refrigerator. $425/mo. plus
deposi t . No Pet s.
(419)236-2722
1 BDRM, downstairs apt.
387 W. 3rd St., Ottoville.
$425/deposit, $425/month.
(419)453-3956
2 BDRM unit. Immediate
possession. Low cost liv-
ing. $395/month includes
st ove, r ef r i ger at or ,
water/trash/sewage. Call
419-203-6810.
2 BR, 2 BA, 1 story Apt.
at Kalida Golf Course. At-
tached garage. No pets.
419-302-7724
ATTRACTIVE AND spa-
cious. Delphos 2 BDRM
wi t h W/ D hook- up.
Off-street parking, yard
and porch. 419-203-2216
LARGE 2 BDRM, 1 1/2
BA Unit, Great location.
Stove/Refrig. included.
$450/mo. & deposi t.
(419)203-6810
600

Apts. for Rent
NICE RANCH Style 2 BR
Duplex. Appliances pro-
vided, C/A, lawn service.
No Pe t s . Ca l l
419-233-6886.
SMALL EFFICIENCY Apt.
includes range, refrigera-
tor, breakfast bar, and
stools. 387 W. 3rd St., Ot-
toville. Rear unit. $375/de-
posit, $325/month. First
month free, lease re -
quired. (419)453-3956
620

Duplex For Rent
2 BDRM Duplex for rent.
St ove, r ef r i ger at or ,
washer/dryer, dishwasher,
all electric, $450/mo. and
deposit and utilities. No
pets. 567-204-0347
FOR RENT, Nice duplex,
2 BDRM, 1-1/2 baths, re-
frig, range, $540/mo. and
deposi t . Cal l Jer r y
(419)659-5385
TWO BEDROOM in Ft.
Jennings. Stove & Refrig-
erator furnished. Washer/
Dryer hookup NO Pets.
References and Deposit.
419-453-3597
800

House For Sale
0 DOWN, warranty, free
appliances, Remodeled
home. A great coun -
try home with a view! A 4
bed, 2 Bath has a master
suite with Jacuzzi tub and
French doors with multiple
decks, 2 car garage, new
cabinets, high efficiency
furnace, C/A, 19206 State
R d . , D e l p h o s ,
419-586-8220.
www.chbsinc.com
FULL REMODEL com-
pleted soon. Can custom-
ize to you. 607 W. 7th St.,
Delphos. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
chbsinc.com
FULL REMODEL com-
plete soon at 829 Moening
St. Delphos. Can custom-
ize to you. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
www.chbsinc.com
0 DOWN, warranty, free
appliances, Remodeled
home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home
in Lincolnview school dis-
trict. Has new carpet,
paint, landscape, new
cent r al ai r , wat er
heater, new lighting, up-
dated plumbing and elec-
t r i c , s ome new
windows, 19176 Venedo-
cia-Eastern Rd., Venedo-
cia. 419-586-8220.
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
Over 85
years serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
✔Genuine Motorcraft
®
bulk
oil and filter change.
✔Rotate and inspect four tires
✔Inspect brake system
✔Test battery
✔Check air and cabin air filters
✔Check belts and hoses
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D E A R
DR. GOTT:
I would
like to know
more about
t r i c u s p i d
r e g u r g i t a -
tion. I’ve been
exercising for
more than 25
years and just
learned I have this condition. It has been called
mild. I see my specialist later this month but
don’t know how to exercise with the diagnosis.
DEAR READER: Tricuspid regurgitation,
also known as insufficiency, occurs when this
particular valve in the heart fails to close properly.
This causes blood to flow backward into the right
atrium (upper-heart chamber) when the right
ventricle (lower-heart chamber) contracts.
There are several reasons this may occur,
including but not limited to injury to the right
ventricle, radiation therapy, carcinoid tumors,
rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic fever, Marfan
syndrome and, in the presence of Ebstein’s
anomaly, a congenital heart disorder.
Without pulmonary hypertension, there
may be no symptoms at all. When pulmonary
hypertension and moderate to severe tricuspid
regurgitation occur together, patients may
experience fatigue, pulsing of the neck veins,
decreased urinary output, weakness, symptoms
of right-sided heart failure and edema of the feet,
ankles and stomach.
A physician can make a diagnosis if he or she
feels a pulse over the liver or swelling of the liver
and spleen, when a murmur or abnormal sounds
are heard through a stethoscope. A physician
may choose to order a chest X-ray, EKG or
echocardiogram to correctly diagnose the
disorder. Laboratory testing may reflect abnormal
liver function and hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice).
Some medications may cause symptoms and
include those for Parkinson’s disease, migraine
headaches and obesity.
Mild cases may not require any treatment
at all. More advanced cases may require brief
hospitalization to verify the diagnosis and
bring symptoms under control. Any underlying
conditions would be addressed during the
hospitalization. Should surgery be required, it
may include repair or replacement of the valve.
Patients should reduce their salt intake and
may find relief by elevating the head of their beds
to combat feelings of shortness of breath. If you
haven’t already, I recommend you engage the
services of a cardiologist and rely on his or her
judgment when it comes to how much exercise
you should undertake. I am unaware of any other
medical conditions you might have and cannot
make that decision.
To provide related information, I am sending
you a copy of my Health Report “Coronary
Artery Disease.” Other readers who would like
a copy should send a self-addressed stamped No.
10 envelope and a $2 check or money order to
Newsletter, P.O. Box
167, Wickliffe, OH
44092-0167. Be sure
to mention the title or
print an order form off
my website at www.
AskDrGottMD.com.
DEAR DR. GOTT:
I’m 81 years young,
actively involved with
work, home and yard.
As I have aged, I have
“met Arthur” in various
parts of my body. Of
tremendous help to me
with knee, shoulder
and back problems is
massaging centrifuge-
extracted virgin coconut
oil into the areas of pain.
The underlying cause
will not be cured but the
pains (that I assume are
caused by inflammation
from arthritis) can be
lessened.
The use of coconut
oil has helped my sister,
two brothers-in-law,
nephew and various
others. One brother-in-
law even uses it to cook
with as well.
DEAR READER:
This material is
extracted from wet-
milled coconut milk that
retains its flavor and
aroma. The cost appears
a little off-putting for me
at about $65 per gallon
and is high in saturated
fats, but if it works to
keep your arthritis at
bay, I am sure it is well
worth it. And I’ll bet
you smell mighty good,
too! Another alternative
is rubbing castor oil
onto the affected joints.
This is just as safe, but
has the added benefit of
being less expensive.
Must quarter century
of exercise be halted?
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PEANUTS
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
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Monday, October 18, 2010 The Herald – 3B
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Working with
older women
not easy
Dear Annie: I’m 23 and
work at an office at a medical
university. I got out of ther-
apy about a month ago and
returned to my job, feeling
better than ever. I’m taking
antidepressants, and they’ve
been working well.
My co-workers are friend-
ly, generous people, and we
get along. The problem is that
I have nothing in common
with any of them.
They are all women
who are substan-
tially older than
I am and married
with children. The
general chitchat is
totally out of my
range of interests.
This is OK during
the regular work-
day, but when I’m
invited to join them
for lunch, I never
want to go. Sometimes they
insist and I agree, but I never
have a good time. I rarely
have anything to say, and
when I do, I must struggle to
make myself heard. And if I
manage to speak, they stare
at me. Even their sense of
humor is different.
My work and school
schedules give me neither the
time nor the money for more
therapy. I’ve tried to find other
friends, but most of them are
school friends, so they are free
when I’m busy and vice versa.
What should I do? -- Sad
Outcast in El Paso
Dear El Paso: The art
of making friends is simply
learning to make someone else
feel special. You do this by
being a good listener, making
eye contact and asking her to
talk about herself. Lunchtime
conversation doesn’t need to
be scintillating, nor does your
participation require more
than a smile and a nod. Your
mere presence is a sign of
friendliness. You also could
see if steering the conversa-
tion toward books, movies,
TV, music or art will give you
more common ground. Please
don’t give up.
Dear Annie: My husband
and I are victims of a “home
invasion.” My 60-year-old
sister, one of 13 siblings,
recently arrived at our house,
unannounced, with her room-
mate and her large dog. (We
have a cat.)
They said they are tour-
ing the country visiting rela-
tives and have no idea how
long they will be staying. My
sister and I have never been
close, and I seldom see her.
Her dog is terrorizing my cat,
and she insists he be fed from
a piece of our good china. As
I speak, she is washing her
sixth load of clothes in three
days. When we go out to eat,
they never offer to pick up
a portion of the check, and
when we’re at home, they
never clean up.
Our guest room is a mess,
and we want them gone. I
love my family, but how do
we get rid of these freeload-
ers? Should we warn the next
victims of this world tour or
mind our own business? --
Sleepless in St. Augustine,
Fla.
Dear Florida: When your
sister showed up at your door,
it would have been reasonable
to ask how long she planned to
stay. So ask her now, making
it clear that you’ve
enjoyed her com-
pany, but you need
a break from the
noise and mess, and
it’s time for her to
visit someone else.
And by all means,
warn the next stop
on the tour.
Dear Annie:
I’m writing about
“Worried Mom
in the Midwest,”
whose 16-year-old was not
interested in grades above
D’s and C’s. I had the same
problem with my son. He
didn’t listen to all my beg-
ging and pleading, so I saw
a psychologist, and then my
son went with me.
First, absolutely no driv-
er’s permit until the grades
were above a B. If the grades
came down, the car could not
be driven until the next report
card came out. I had the coun-
selor deliver this ultimatum,
and we drew up a contract.
He just finished his junior
year and is on the honor roll
and can’t wait to go to col-
lege. Expect them to behave,
take away the things that mean
the most, and show them you
are the boss. -- Didn’t Back
Down in Florida
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Monday, Oct. 18, 2010
Because your ambitions and
abilities will be fusing together in
beneficial ways that could help you
achieve your heart’s desire, the year
ahead looks better for you than past
months. Make the most of things.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - If it’s
at all possible, try to start this week
off working on a labor of love. It will
engender a good mood that will help
you handle everything that confronts
you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Don’t be too busy to meet someone
new whom a friend thinks could be of
some assistance to you. You can never
have too many associates to whom
you can go to for help.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - Instead of clinging to someone
who has proven to be a detriment to
you, turn to new people who have
stretched out the hand of friendship.
You’ll be amazed at how happy your
life could be.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -You could get an opportunity to
spend more time with someone whom
you’ll like as you get to know them.
Don’t be too standoffish to discover
new friends.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Trends are shifting in your favor, so
don’t hesitate to make changes that
could start to turn things around. In
fact, you could even press for a favor
if you see an opening.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
- Fresh life could be breathed into
something that you thought was on its
last legs. Instead of shutting it down,
look for new ideas or ways to refurbish
what you think is worth saving.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) - Something you thought was
unworkable or undoable will prove to
be exactly what you need, so don’t be
so quick to discard things without first
thoroughly checking them out.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -
There is a good chance that you could
meet someone whom you’ll instantly
like. S/he might turn out to be either
a good friend or a person with whom
you could do a lot of business.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
When cohorts see that you’re working
hard to achieve something that would
actually make their job easier as well,
they are likely to pitch in and do
whatever they can to help. Let them.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Have faith in the fact that others like
you for who you are and not for what
they can get from you. You don’t have
to do anything special, just simply be
yourself.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Don’t
be afraid to show those you love how
much they mean to you, even if you
have to do so in front of others. You
won’t embarrass yourself; it’ll only
show how big your heart is.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Stay
alert, because you might get a rare
chance to win someone who could be
important to your cause over to your
side. Should the opportunity open up,
don’t let it slip past.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
Even in this community’s econom-
ic hardships, P & R has committed to
achieving job security and growth. P &
R Home IV Service dba P & R Medi-
cal Connection is a independent family
owned success story! Operating as pro-
viders of durable medical equipment,
supplies and home IV therapies for over
40 counties of NW Ohio as well as some
areas of Indiana. Beginning in the home
of owners Phillip & Robin Farris over
25 years ago, grew into a full service
in home IV pharmaceutical, respiratory
and durable medical equipment provid-
er with over 43 employees working in
four locations throughout Ohio and just
across the state line into Indiana. Under
a required certification program of cred-
ibility, P & R is fully accredited by the
ACHC. P & R provides ongoing educa-
tion for all 43 employees for the best
service possible to each valued patient.
This year growth within the business in-
cludes 5 added employees and a 6400
sq ft building for additional warehouse
and office space which was completed
in July.
During this year of the 25
TH
anniver-
sary, the company added a new Mo-
bility Specialist department. You may
see Kim Utterback, traveling through
town in the P & R Power Rides van.
Kim travels to patients’ homes to evalu-
ate mobility equipment they may need.
She personally works with the patients,
insurance companies, physical thera-
pists and physicians to make sure each
patient receives the equipment that will
best serve their medical need. Custom-
ers may visit any P&R retail show
rooms or call Kim directly at 800-587-
7670 with any mobility questions or to
set up an in-home evaluation of mobil-
ity needs.
Our daily promise to our patients, cus-
tomers and referral sources are as fol-
lows:
• Toaddresseachpatientandhis/her
needs with urgency, care, respect,
and confidentiality
• Todeliverclean,properlyfunction-
ing equipment
• Totrainandeducatethepatientor
caregiver
• Tocoordinatethirdpartybilling
• Tobillinatimelymatter
• To provide 24/7 emergency re-
sponse services
• To comply with all federal, state,
and local laws
This year marks the
25
TH
year in business.
Our Mission
Since 1985, our mission has been
to provide the equipment and products
necessary to help patients stay in their
home, or get back to their home as soon
as possible.
From state-of-the-art infusion phar-
macy with clinical services to the instal-
lation of grab bars, we will continually
strive to provide the highest quality ser-
vice available in a cost effective way.
Some accomplishments include:
1. Business of the year from the Ohio
association of Medical equipment
Services
2. Outstanding member of the year
award for exceptional contribution
& dedication in the Home Medical
Equipment Services Industry
3. Recognized and respected member of
OAMES
4. Recognized for outstanding achieve-
ments by the General Assembly of
the Senate of the United States
5. National Federation of Independent
Business
6. VGM group since 2001
7.Nomineeforthesmall/microbusiness
award of the year 2008 & again 2010
(to be chosen in November)
ORGANIZATION
PARTICIPATION INCLUDE
But are not limited to:
1. OAMES
2. Rotary
3. 4H
4. Relay for Life
5. Pregnancy Life Center
6. Stroke Support Group
7. Chambers of Commerce
There is no place like home. Everyone
has heard the saying, but these words may
hit closer to home if an injury or illness
has prevented you from being there. This
is where P&R enters the equation. P&R
Medical Connection can help you get back
home, or move more easily throughout your
home, with their products and services.
P&R Medical Connection is conve-
niently located inside Adams Memorial
Hospital in Decatur, In, on Ralston Avenue
in Defiance and South Shannon Street in
Van Wert, is a hidden treasure of in home
medical needs. Offering the highest qual-
ity of medical equipment and supply prod-
ucts, exceptional customer service and
friendly faces. P&R has been working
hard for twenty-five years to provide pa-
tients the necessary products to stay or get
back home, as quickly as possible. Aside
from the base of the company’s IV thera-
py, P & R has grown to include medical
equipment rentals as well as an extensive
uniform shop, mastectomy fittings, re-
spiratory products, diabetic supplies and
wound care.
Although times, products and even the
health of their own employees have under-
gone serious changes and obstacles, the
mission of P&R has remained the same…
to provide quality products at a cost-effec-
tive price and to treat customers with ur-
gency and respect.
One of the largely popular services of
P&R is the availability of personal respira-
tory care.
If diagnosed with sleep apnea, CPAP and
BiPAP machines are set up by our Licensed
Respiratory Therapists. Special care is
given to ensure proper mask fit and optimal
patient comfort. Routine patient follow ups
are conducted to maintain compliance and
adequate supplies. The staff works directly
with the patient’s insurance companies and
provides on-going support. P & R is proud
to keep in stock a large inventory to meet
each patient’s individual need.
P&R offers free delivery as well as 24
hour response for medical emergencies,
working hand in hand with the areas dis-
charge planners and visiting nurses.
You can reach any P&R staff member
by dialing 1-800-587-7670. Thats right!
Live people still answer our phones and
are happy to speak with you about your in
home medical needs.
P & R Medical connection
1-800-587-7670
Van Wert & Defiance: M-F 9-5 and Sat. 9-1; Decatur M-F 8:30-4:30
www.prmedicalconnection.com
There is no place like home
Some of the faces that go with the voices behind the scenes to keep everything going on a day to day 24 hour basis...
Respiratory Therapists
Nancy Knotts, CRT
Bobbi Turner, RRT
Billing Department
Back row Lt- R, Pam Echols, Natalie Mox, Amy Schroeder.
Front row: Mary Kay Elling, Christine Jewell
Pharmacy staff
Laura Henkaline, R.Ph; Phil Farris, Owner & R.Ph in charge; LuAnne Lehman, IV billing
specialist, Rebecca Lare, R.Ph, Ray Karcher and Lori Ward, C.PhT
Accounting Assistant &
Directional Phone Intake
Tricia Utterback
Co-owner & Treasurer
Robin Farris
P & R Home IV Service dba
P & R Medical Connection
is Patient Preferred provider
Owner & President
Phil Farris
1113 S. Shannon, Van Wert, OH • 1018 Ralston Ave., Defiance, OH • 1100 Mercer Ave., Decatur, IN
4B– The Herald Monday, October 18, 2010
www.delphosherald.com

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