NIAP - Project Document | International Union For Conservation Of Nature | Environmental Impact Assessment

National Impact Assessment Programme

Ministry of Environment Planning Commission of Pakistan IUCN Pakistan

22 October 2009

Contents
1. Introduction 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 2. Background Rationale for Donor Involvement Programme Implementation Partners 1 1 2 4 6 6 6 7 11 12 12 13 14 16 16 16 17 17 18 20 20 20 31 31 31 32 32

Situational Analysis, Issues and Opportunities 2.1. Environmental Impact Assessment 2.1.1. Current Situation 2.1.2. Issues 2.1.3. Opportunities 2.2. Strategic Environmental Assessment 2.2.1. Current Situation and Issues 2.2.2. Issues 2.2.3. Opportunities

3.

The Programme 3.1. Scope of the Programme 3.1.1. Programme Justification 3.2. 3.3. Programme Beneficiaries Programme Approach and Strategy 3.3.1. Deliverables during the Inception Period

4.

Programme Implementation 4.1. 4.2. Overall Objective Outcomes

5.

Programme Organisation and Management 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Institutional Arrangements Programme Advisory Committee (PAC) Programme Coordination Unit

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5.5. 5.6. 5.7.

Programme Implementation Units Risks and Mitigation Sustainability 5.7.1. Sustainability Indicators

32 34 36 37 37

5.8.

Duration and Budget

Annexes
I. II. III. IV. Logical Framework Matrix Terms of Reference for Programme Positions Overall Year-wise Budget and Work Plan Partner-wise Budget

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Acronyms
ADB AJK CBBIA CBD CEP CIDA DAC ECNEC EDCG EIA EKN EMP EPA EPRC ES ET EU EW GDP GIS GMS GoP HIA IAIA IEE IMC IUCN JICA M&E MoE MoU MTDF NAs NCEA NCS NEP NEQS Asian Development Bank Azad Jammu and Kashmir Capacity Building in Biodiversity and Impact Assessment Convention on Biological Diversity Core Environment Programme Canadian International Development Agency Development Assistance Committee Executive Committee for the National Economic Council Environmental Donor Coordination Group Environmental Impact Assessment Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands Environmental Management Plan Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Protection and Resource Conservation Environment Section, Planning Commission of Pakistan Environmental Tribunals European Union Environment Wing, Ministry of Environment Gross Domestic Product Geographic Information System Greater Mekong Sub-region Government of Pakistan Health Impact Assessment International Association of Impact Assessment Initial Environmental Examination Independent Monitoring Consultants International Union for Conservation of Nature Japan International Cooperation Agency Monitoring and Evaluation Ministry of Environment Memorandum of Understanding Medium Term Development Framework Northern Areas Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment National Conservation Strategy National Environment Policy National Environmental Quality Standards

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NGOs NIAP NIPA NOC NWFP OECD-DAC P&D P&DD PAC Pak EPA PC PCU PDs PEAA PELA PEPA’97 PEPO’83 PIAC PIUs PMC PRSP PSDP PSNP SDC SEA ToRs TPM UNDP WHO

Non Governmental Organizations National Impact Assessment Programme National Institute of Public Administration No Objection Certificate North West Frontier Province Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – Development Assistance Committee Planning and Development Planning and Development Division Programme Advisory Committee Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Planning Commission of Pakistan Programme Coordination Unit Programme Directors Pakistan Environmental Assessment Association Pakistan Environmental Law Association Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 Pakistan Environmental Protection Ordinance 1983 Pakistan Impact Assessment Council Programme Implementation Units Programme Management Committee Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Public Sector Development Programme Programme Support for Northern Pakistan Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation Strategic Environmental Assessment Terms of Reference Third Party Monitoring United Nations Development Programme World Health Organisation

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1.

Introduction

In partnership with the Government of Pakistan (GoP), International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is proposing a National Impact Assessment Programme (NIAP) that aims to contribute to sustainable development in Pakistan through strengthening the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process and introducing Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in national development planning. The Programme has four implementation partners: Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency (Pak EPA) and Environment Wing (EW) of the Ministry of Environment (MoE), Planning Commission of Pakistan (PC), and IUCN Pakistan. Additionally, the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) would have an advisory role in the Programme and will provide technical backstopping on need basis. The total duration of the Programme is four and a half years with an inception period of one year and implementation period of three and a half years.

1.1.

Background

Pakistan has achieved an impressive level of economic growth. However, this growth is coming at a price. It is estimated that environmental degradation costs the country at least 6% of GDP, translating to about Rs. 365 billion per year (World Bank 2006). For the current level of growth to be sustained, it will be necessary to protect the environment and better preserve the country’s natural resources. There are two very effective tools available that can help achieve sustainable development, i.e., EIA and SEA. EIA is the process of assessing the environmental effects of proposed projects, in order to identify opportunities that avoid or mitigate the negative impacts in the project design, and to inform governmental decision-making on the project. EIA was introduced as a requirement in Pakistan under Pakistan Environmental Protection Ordinance (PEPO) 1983. Later PEPO was replaced by Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 (PEPA’97), which further strengthened EIA as a legal requirement and also introduced IEE / EIA Review Rules 2000. It has come a long way since then, but there is still ample scope to strengthen its practice. Although some landmark projects (e.g. oil and gas development in Kirthar National Park) put EIA in the limelight and helped recognise the importance of the EIA process, the momentum created towards the betterment of EIA in the country could not be maintained for certain apparent reasons. SEA, on the other hand, is somewhat new to Pakistan. Like EIA, SEA aims to integrate environmental considerations into decision-making. But while EIA is applied at the project level, SEA is applied during the development of policies, plans and programmes. SEA complements the planning process with a solid assessment of environmental considerations, as well as identification of the interlinkages with social and economic considerations. Because there is great variation in the types of plans and programmes to which SEA could be applied, it is not represented by one specified procedure, but a range of analytical and participatory approaches. Some of the key advantages of applying SEA to the planning process are as follows:
 SEA gets in earlier so that the strategic actions can influence the type of projects to be

implemented.
 SEA deals with impacts that are difficult to consider at the project level. It deals with cumulative

impacts of multiple projects, as well as the larger scale impacts such as those on biodiversity or global warming.
 SEA promotes a better consideration of alternatives. SEA affects the decision-making process at

a stage where more alternatives are available for consideration.
 SEA incorporates environmental and sustainability considerations in strategic decision-making.

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 SEA facilitates public participation in strategic decision-making. At a minimum, SEA provides one

opportunity for the public to comment on a strategic action before it is formally agreed. At best, it allows the public to be actively involved throughout the strategic decision-making process. Over the years orientation workshops on SEA have been organised in Pakistan for government, private sector, civil society and academia, to raise awareness on SEA as a tool and a process. Currently, there is a need to take SEA forward in Pakistan in a more programmatic manner, to explore its potential as deterrence against environmental degradation at the planning level. The Programme that is presented here has the dual aim of improving the practice of EIA in Pakistan, and introducing SEA into development planning in the country. The Programme approach includes an analytical (inception) stage, during which the status of EIA practice will be closely analysed, and the most promising opportunities for SEA will be identified. The following (implementation) stage concentrates on the development of tools, on capacity building, and on undertaking pilot SEAs and EIAs that demonstrate the value of good practice. To be most effective, SEA and EIA should be part of a sound environmental management system that includes components such as enforcement and environmental monitoring. Also, there needs to be a general level of awareness on the need to protect resources, and a willingness to give it priority. This Programme intends to build on the significant efforts that are currently underway to improve Pakistan’s environmental management system. It will also benefit from the growing awareness of environmental effects that is the result of increasing availability of information on the state of Pakistan’s environment. In essence, this Programme is very timely and this view is shared by the various stakeholders that were consulted during the preparation of the Programme. The stakeholders also responded positively to the overall Programme approach. The consultation process included a workshop, a range of meetings, and distribution of the draft proposal for comments. Consultation also ensured that the Programme is coordinated with other activities in the environment sector. The proposed Programme is further explained in subsequent sections. A detailed description of the problem analysis, the Programme approach and implementation arrangements are given, in addition to elaborated Programme planning and monitoring arrangements. A report on the consultation undertaken has already been shared with EKN.

1.2.

Rationale for Donor Involvement

NIAP is a unique initiative which intends to use a multi-pronged strategy to improve effectiveness of EIA and introduce SEA in the country. The Programme involves interventions at the policy level through introduction of SEA, capacity building at all levels and sectors, development of tools, procedures and mechanisms, improved understanding of impact assessment processes, and advocacy. Some of the key reasons which make NIAP unique, as compared to previous and current initiatives, and for donor involvement are as follows: 1. Since the enactment of PEPO 1983 and later PEPA 1997, GoP has been investing regularly on strengthening the EIA process in the country, through establishing EPAs at the federal and provincial level, strengthening the legal regime (IEE/EIA Review Rules 2000), preparing implementation tools (IEE/EIA guidelines for difference purposes), building capacity of EPAs, and raising awareness. GoP has undertaken these initiatives from various sources, including using its own money, and grants and loans from different institutions and donors such as World Bank, Swiss Agency for International Development (SDC) - sub-sectoral guidelines under Programme Support for Northern Pakistan (PSNP) - and Embassy of the Kingdom of
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the Netherlands (sub-sectoral guidelines for coal, mining and dairy farms) under its project with IUCN Pakistan in Balochistan. However, despite being committed to improvement of EIA process in the country, the government has been overstretched financially, due to existence of other more pressing and urgent issues in the country, such as being a frontline state on war on terror, and facing internal security problems and poverty, to name a few. On top of it, global financial crises and escalating fuel prices have put an added constraint on the already meagre resources of GoP. Hence, despite strong political will, GoP is finding it hard to dedicate resources to the betterment of EIA process in the country. This is the time when GoP needs the assistance of the donor community, in its efforts to promote sustainable development in the country. 2. The Government of Netherlands is a pioneer in the development and improvement of impact assessment process globally. It is the key donor on impact assessment in the world and has filled a critical gap, which existed because of less attention of the donor community towards tool development - necessary to address critical environmental issues at the source. Since EIA is the first line of defence against environmental degradation, it was considered necessary by the Government of Netherlands to strengthen it globally. It provides funds directly to impact assessment projects globally and also through multilateral institutions, such as the World Bank. IUCN has been involved in other Government of Netherlands’ funded impact assessment initiatives, such as Capacity Building in Biodiversity and Impact Assessment (CBBIA) - a project of International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA), and capacity building in impact assessment (IAIA). Therefore, there is a need and precedence to support this Programme. 3. In the past, World Bank provided support to the EIA process in the country through Environmental Protection and Resource Conservation (EPRC) project which helped in the preparation of PEPA’97 and in strengthening of EPAs. In 2006, the World Bank released Pakistan Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Report which also looked at the EIA process in the country critically. However, except for the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, no donor is providing support towards the improvement and strengthening of the EIA process in the country or introduction of SEA in Pakistan. 4. The World Bank and Asian Development Bank (ADB) also support the EIA process in the country by ensuring that the EIA process is followed in projects funded by them. However, so far no programme has focused on combining policy level interventions (SEA) with the ground level implementation (EIA), developing tools and mechanisms to supplement capacity development, and working with multiple sectors and players to improve EIA process in the country. This multi-pronged strategy is the key to a well balanced and effective programme, and NIAP has adopted this approach. 5. Unlike earlier initiatives, NIAP aims to employ a combination of planning and project level interventions to strengthen the EIA regime in Pakistan. Until and unless issues are addressed at the planning level, it is difficult to have an effective EIA process in the country. It is due to this very reason that NIAP intends to introduce SEA at the planning level to address issues at the source, rather than focusing on end-of-the-pipe treatment, which has proved to be not very effective in the past. 6. Majority of the previous initiatives on EIA improvement have focused on and been with the MoE. However, not much attention has been paid on other ministries and institutions which have high stakes in the EIA process, such as the Planning Commission and the Planning and Development (P&D) departments; they have not been involved in the initiatives on EIA improvement. NIAP is planning to use a very different approach. It intends not only to strengthen MoE, but also other relevant institutions which can play a very significant role in

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making EIA effective. Keeping this in consideration, NIAP has a very diverse set of partners – MoE, Pak EPA, PC, IUCN Pakistan and NCEA. During the course of the Programme, it will also involve other ministries and departments which can play a role in EIA process, but are currently out of the loop. The Programme also intends to involve provincial EPAs and P&D departments, which have been rarely involved in initiatives, despite the fact that environment is more of a provincial rather than a federal subject. 7. In the past, majority of the initiatives have only worked with the government institutions and have not adequately involved civil society, private sector or academia. NIAP intends to involve all relevant sectors which have stakes in the EIA process. IUCN Pakistan, as a partner in NIAP, will not only bring in the civil society perspective but will also serve as a bridge between the government and other sectors. The Programme will also build capacity of all the relevant sectors so that they can play their assigned role effectively in the EIA process. 8. One of the key strengths of NIAP is that it pays considerable emphasis on the development of tools and mechanisms which have not been paid much attention to in the past. Except for the Environmental Protection and Resource Conservation (EPRC) Project, majority of the initiatives have only focused on capacity development, and that too primarily of MoE. NIAP realises that capacity development of the relevant institutions alone would not be very effective until and unless the relevant tools, procedures and mechanisms are strengthened and developed. NIAP is also the only initiative which plans to improve institutional coordination between federal and provincial departments, which is necessary for effective implementation of EIA in the country. Similarly, EIA review mechanism, which is the backbone of the EIA process, will be strengthened under NIAP. 9. The involvement of NCEA as a technical partner in the Programme, gives NIAP a unique edge, which other programmes have lacked. NCEA is a very competent and world renowned impact assessment organization with vast experience in supporting similar programmes in other parts of the world. Hence, their involvement will be a key factor in the effective and quality delivery of the Programme.

1.3.

Programme Implementation Partners

NIAP will be led by GoP and managed by IUCN Pakistan. The main Programme partners from the government are MoE (Pak EPA and EW) and PC. In addition, the NCEA will be providing technical assistance, where needed, through its own resources whereas the Programme would have to bear only the cost of other international consultants engaged to support NCEA in meeting its obligations under the Programme. The Planning and Development Division (P&DD) / PC has played a key role in putting the country on the sustainable development path. P&DD was the main force in the preparation and approval of National Conservation Strategy (NCS), which represented the official policy document by GoP on environment, before the approval of the National Environment Policy 2005. In the early 1990s, P&DD showed its commitment to streamlining environment in the GoP planning processes, through creation of the Environment Section (ES). Considering SEA's focus, P&DD is certainly the logical home of SEA. MoE has an integral role to play in the overall Programme as it is mandated to be the guardian of the country’s environment. MoE strives to implement the environmental policies and legislation of the country, and ensure that mainstream development in the country is environmentally sustainable. It also possesses the necessary legislative (e.g., PEPA’97) and physical infrastructure (e.g., EPAs) to effectively oversee the process of SEA introduction in GoP’s planning processes.

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As a technical section of the Ministry, EW plays an important role in the formulation of environmental policies and legislation; coordinating and following up on GoP's obligations, commitments to various Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and protocols; and providing guidance and support to line ministries and provincial governments in the implementation of environmental policies, legislation and guidelines. Due to its strategic position within the Ministry, the Wing will play an active role in the strengthening of the EIA process as well as in the introduction of SEA in the country. Pak EPA, functioning under MoE, represents the main federal institution responsible for implementing PEPA’97. The Agency also provides technical assistance to MoE for the formulation of environmental policies and programmes. Pak EPA, supported by its provincial counterparts, and the EPAs of Northern Areas (NAs) and Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) represents the designated authority for the review of EIA reports and monitoring compliance with environmental rules and regulations. As such, it is the most appropriate department within MoE to undertake the implementation of NIAP. The Ministry contemplates strengthening the linkages amongst its various parts to effectively pursue the integration of environment and economic development. To this end, work remains to be done in creating the necessary awareness not only among people but also among the authorities responsible for enforcing PEPA’97. In particular, this warrants increasing the outreach of the Programme and involving the federal and provincial EPAs through MoE. The capacity of the federal and provincial EPAs, and the coordination among them, remains weak and is a major impediment in effectively implementing PEPA’97. NCEA is an independent expert body that provides advisory services on environmental assessment. Since 1987, it has a legal status to act as an independent advisor in Dutch EIA and SEA processes. Also, since 1993, it provides advisory services in the context of international cooperation. These services include advice on Terms of Reference (ToRs) and reviews of environmental assessments for complex plans, programmes and projects. NCEA also contributes to strengthening of impact assessment systems and capacity development, for both EIA and SEA. The work of NCEA is based on two principles: expertise and independence. Its advisory services are provided in the context of national legislation and regulations for environmental assessment. However, if these are not available, international norms and standards are applied. In 2006, NCEA prepared just under 160 advisory reports on Dutch EIAs and SEAs. In the international context, 25 advisory reports have been prepared. IUCN Pakistan brings unique leadership and technical qualities to this Programme. It is acutely aware of the need to engage and work with mainstream development planning processes in Pakistan, as the environment is directly and indirectly impacted by economic and social development sectors. IUCN Pakistan engages the government at the national and sub-national levels, as well as with the larger civil society. It brings two main qualities to this initiative: leadership in advocating for environmental policy through dialogue, interaction and consensus building with various actors; and support to the implementation of environmental policy by providing assistance in policy and legislative reforms, capacity development, environmental assessment, awareness, education and selected field projects.

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2.

Situational Analysis, Issues and Opportunities

Despite more than ten years of operation on environmental initiatives in the country, there is meagre visible improvement in environmental conditions. Indeed, it may be argued that environmental indicators are on a downward trend. Nevertheless, the changes introduced through these environmental programmes have helped lay the basis for a more effective strategy in the current period. The pursuit of environmental objectives in Pakistan have been likened to “grafting the sustainable development agenda” onto the mainstream development agenda. It has become evident that if environmental objectives are to achieve a breakthrough and acceptance, environment has to be acceptable to the policy communities around the three broad development agendas, namely economic growth, poverty reduction and human development – the mainstream development agenda. EIA and SEA represent very effective tools for environmental screening at various levels of decision making. Unfortunately, one of the critical handicaps to the implementation and enforcement of EIA and SEA is that many higher level decision-makers see environmental considerations as an impediment to economic growth. This is not unique to the Pakistani context, but it is particularly pronounced here due to the current emphasis on economic growth. In addition to raising awareness on the importance of environmental goods and services, there is a need to produce and provide decision makers the information that clearly illustrates the economic repercussions following environmentally unsound decisions. Such information is more likely than any other to capture their attention and influence the decision-making process favourably. The Programme builds on the existing experience with EIA and strategic planning within Pakistan. This chapter gives an analysis of this experience, and identifies opportunities for strengthening both areas. Following is a brief situational analysis of EIA and SEA in Pakistan.

2.1.

Environmental Impact Assessment

2.1.1. Current Situation EIA has come a long way in Pakistan, after becoming a legal requirement under the PEPO’83. Pakistan was among the first countries in the region to frame an environmental legislation in 1976– 77, but due to the political situation in the country, it took another seven years before the first environmental ordinance was enacted, in 1983. As shared earlier, following the promulgation of PEPO’83, the Environmental Assessment Guidelines was prepared in 1986 to support the EIA process in the country. In the late eighties and early nineties EPAs, both federal and provincial, were established, along with other supporting infrastructure. In addition to the federal and provincial institutions, AJK EPA was established in 1996 and NAs EPA in 2002. Later, PEPA’97 was enacted and replaced the existing PEPO’83 and subsequently IEE / EIA Review Rules 2000. Other supporting rules and regulations were notified in 2000. To strengthen the capacities of the newly established EPAs, the World Bank funded the EPRC project. The project was quite successful in enhancing the capacities of staff and providing material resources (laboratory equipment, computers etc.). It not only helped in establishing EPAs, but was also very instrumental in making EPAs technically competent. The staff members were trained, keeping in view the technical competence required by each EPA. Once the project ended and the second phase of the project did not materialise, realising the importance of the initiative GoP absorbed a significant number of staff hired under the project, to keep the teams intact. It must be mentioned here that GoP has technical cadre staff in each department which does not get transferred and stays in the parent department, to provide the necessary technical support.

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However, due to financial constraints faced by GoP post 1998 nuclear experiments, the progress made could not be built upon for continued benefits. Although the EPAs continued to function to the best of their abilities, despite financial and capacity constraints, the overall implementation of the EIA process suffered in the country. In 1999, Pakistan Environmental Assessment Association (PEAA) was established to improve the impact assessment resource base in the country and provide technical backstopping and support to the EPAs. PEAA is a neutral forum of EIA practitioners and academics that aims to provide support to EPAs in EIA implementation. It is established on the same pattern as NCEA. However, it is currently inactive and needs to be revived under NIAP. This chronology indicates that Pakistan was well on its way to effectively establishing EIA systems in the country. However, despite a robust start and all the hard work that followed, EIA has not been able to accomplish its full potential of incorporating environmental concerns into development planning. This is apparent from the results of, among others, the Pakistan Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Report (World Bank / MoE GoP, 2006) and the Mid Term Report of the Punjab Resource Management Programme (2007. A.F. Ferguson & Co Chartered Accountants and Hassan & Hassan Advocates). Both documents include discussion and analysis of the legislative and institutional mechanisms in place for environmental compliance. The common conclusion reached is that although legislation and requisite enforcement systems are adequate, the primary reason for non-compliance and the resultant environmental degradation is ineffective implementation. However, this does not imply that the enforcement systems cannot be improved upon, and so their analysis is also needed. Interestingly, the Consultative Workshop held in Islamabad (on 21 March 2007) for the development of NIAP’s proposal also brought forth similar feedback from stakeholders. 2.1.2. Issues Following is a brief description of issues faced in the EIA implementation: 1. Lack of understanding regarding EIA as a process: Although EIA is a ‘cradle to the grave’ type of process, in Pakistan it is considered to be only a one-time activity. The main emphasis of EPAs and proponents is to submit and get the EIA report approved. Once the report is approved and a No Objection Certificate (NOC) has been issued, it is shelved and never revisited again to assess the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) implementation. This is mainly due to poor understanding of the purpose of the EIA and also lack of capacity of EPAs. In majority of cases in Pakistan, EIA is done once everything has already been decided, and in many instances project has started and is nearing completion, which defeats the purpose of an EIA. However, due to various reasons, EPAs are left with no other option but to accept the EIA and also approve it. Although the private sector is complying with the EIA requirement to a certain extent, the public sector in Pakistan is the most non-compliant among all sectors. A majority of the public sector projects are not subjected to EIA process, which makes it difficult to implement the process in the country. Despite being a legal requirement in Pakistan for over twenty five years, EIA is still not a well understood concept in the country. Even consultants and academics practicing and teaching EIA are not fully aware of the concept and philosophy behind EIA. This is one of the reasons why EIA has not been able to take root in Pakistan. Although several EIA workshops have been conducted by different institutions in the past, many more workshops and seminars are needed still, to enhance understanding on EIA, especially for the policy- and decision-makers who often consider EIA an anti-development mechanism. Although understanding on EIA has improved considerably over the years, there is still plenty of room for improvement especially regarding sensitization of media, academia, judiciary and other

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relevant groups. Increasing awareness and understanding on EIA is a dynamic process and should continue in parallel with other programme activities. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 3.1, 3.4 and 3.7. 2. Inadequate institutional capacity: Though GoP has made consistent efforts to improve the situation, weak institutional capacity remains the primary factor responsible for the ineffectiveness of the EIA process in Pakistan. There are six EPAs functional in Pakistan, including: Federal EPA, Balochistan EPA, North West Frontier Province (NWFP) EPA, Punjab EPA, Sindh EPA, and NAs EPA; and AJK EPA. Although the staff strength of majority of EPAs is quite impressive, very few are in the technical cadre and only one or two are responsible for the implementation of the EIA process at a national or provincial level. In the Federal EPA, two staff members are responsible for looking after the EIA process; in Balochistan there is one employee, who has been recently transferred to the Governor’s Secretariat; in NWFP one staff member has been assigned the job; Punjab has one staff member managing the job; Sindh also has one employee hired for the task; and AJK has no one specifically. Considering the technical expertise required and the numerous steps involved in the EIA process, one or two people are extremely insufficient for effective and efficient implementation of the process. For EIA process to be successful in the country, EPAs will have to designate more people to the EIA process, who will subsequently be trained under NIAP. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 3.4 and 3.8. 3. Institutional coordination: One of the key issues vis-à-vis EIA process, identified at the findings of the Consultative Workshop held in March 2007 for the development of NIAP’s proposal, was the lack of coordination among the relevant organizations i.e. federal and provincial EPAs and P&DD and provincial Planning and Development Departments (P&DDs). Interestingly, this was pointed out by the relevant institutions themselves. The only EPA created under PEPA’97 is Pak EPA and no provision for the provincial or territorial EPAs exists in the Act. However, realising later that environment is more of a provincial than federal subject; the Government established provincial EPAs and delegated some of the powers of Pak EPA to them. Despite provincial EPAs being spin-offs of the federal EPA, no formal coordination mechanism exists between them. It was pointed out at the meeting that it was the first time in many years that all EPAs assembled under one roof. At some of the issues in the past (e.g. cement factories in Kahun Valley), there has been considerable friction between the federal and provincial EPAs, mainly due to lack of proper coordination mechanism. In addition to the need for improved coordination between relevant EPAs and P&DDs, there is also a need for improved coordination between EPAs and P&DDs, especially in the case of public sector projects. Improved coordination at provincial level between provincial and district governments is also very essential. If a proper mechanism exists at the appropriate levels, it will be useful in addressing environmental issues, particularly EIA process implementation, more effectively. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under output 1.3. 4. Lack of accreditation system and capacity / quality of EIA experts: The weakest link appears to be the EIA review process, which is mainly due to sub-standard EIA reports and inadequate competence of consultants who produce those reports. It is a common belief that by improving the EIA review system, we can automatically improve quality of EIA consultants and subsequently EIA reports. However, it is also necessary to bring some type of quality control in the consultants conducting EIA in Pakistan. One of the mechanisms used in other parts of the world is accreditation of EIA consultants by the relevant authorities. At present, anyone can be an EIA consultant in Pakistan, even if she/he has no relevant educational qualification, training or relevant experience. Many problems that were encountered by the EIA system in Pakistan

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have been due to poor quality of consultants. A proper accreditation system will bring quality control in EIA consultants and subsequently in the EIA reports and process. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 3.6 and 3.10. 5. Inadequate EIA review mechanism, and relevant tools and procedures: Although the relevant laws and rules pertaining to EIA process exist in the country (i.e. PEPA’97, IEE / EIA Review Rules 2000, sectoral and sub-sectoral guidelines), the mechanisms required to support the process are either weak or non-existent, such as the EIA review process. The EIA review process can be described as the backbone of EIA system in a country. The success of EIA process in any country depends on the quality of the review process. Although a review process is outlined in the IEE / Review Rules 2000, a proper review process does not exist, which is one of the main reasons for ineffective implementation of EIA process in Pakistan. The existing process is mainly on volunteer basis, where EIA reports are sent to a group of organizations and individuals on the review panel who are requested to review the report pro-bono. However, since the review is volunteer and not binding, majority of the members give the review a lesser priority, resulting in very few quality reviews of the report sent to EPAs. Since EPAs lack the capacity, strength or time, the review process has only become a formality and adds no value to the process. It is therefore extremely important to develop a proper review mechanism which adds value to the EIA process. At present, no system is in place to review the EIA process in the country to identify weaknesses and subsequently suggest corrective measures. Some reviews are held on and off under different initiatives (e.g. Pakistan Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Report) to review the exiting system and point out weaknesses in it. However, none of these reviews have gone far enough to suggest practical corrective measures which can be put into implementation by the relevant authorities. It is therefore utmost necessary to have a dynamic review system developed which is undertaken at regular intervals to assess the health of the EIA process in the country. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 1.2, 1.4 and 1.5. 6. Public hearings / consultations: Public participation in the EIA process has also been a misunderstood concept. Instead of being taken in its true spirit, it only represents a mandatory requirement of the process. Furthermore, the proponents choose to share only selected information during stakeholder consultations, which raises the expectations of communities. Unfortunately, these expectations are seldom met, causing not only disillusionment but also outbreak of violence occasionally. The lack of transparency in the process has resulted in stakeholders losing their confidence in public participation. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 1.2, 1.4 and 1.5. 7. Poor quality, monitoring and implementation of Environmental Management Plans (EMP): EMP preparation is considered a vital part of the EIA report. EMPs provided in EIA reports are very generic and not practical enough to be implemented easily. The main reason why EMPs are generic and poorly drafted is because consultants, proponents and EPAs know that it is only a formality and would not be implemented. Except for few instances in Pakistan (e.g. oil and gas exploration in Kirthar National Park), EMPs are generally neither implemented nor monitored. Although some EPAs (Sindh EPA), donors/ financing institutions (e.g. Asian Development Bank)and proponents of projects (e.g. Premier Oil) have introduced innovative measures, such as employing Independent Monitoring Consultants (IMC)/ Third Party Monitoring and have achieved very good results, such initiatives are limited in scale and do not present a long-term solution.

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The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 3.2 and 3.4. 8. Lack of capacity of relevant stakeholders: The capacity of relevant stakeholders, i.e. civil society (particularly media), private sector and academia, has been a major factor in the ineffectiveness of the EIA process implementation in the country. Although the civil society, especially media, has played an important role in successfully highlighting inadequacies of the EIA process in the country (e.g. oil and gas exploration in Kirthar National Park, New Murree housing scheme, cement factories in Kahun Valley) which has received positive results, the civil society has generally not played the watchdog role it is expected to play. This has mainly been due to lack of capacity of the civil society organizations in the country on technical issues, such as EIA. Over the years, civil society has matured and has started to deal with issues on technical grounds and is thus gaining respect in the government and other sectors. Some sections of the civil society have moved from being confrontational and creating issues out of nothing, to being responsible and taking united stance on issues of national importance; they basing their campaigns on solid technical grounds. However, such organizations are few and the majority of the civil society continues to be on the confrontational path, and is still emotional in nature. Since technical capacity of majority of the civil society is very limited and at times non-existent, it results in misunderstanding of the technical issues, with wrong stances taken, at times protecting vested interest groups. The other factor is the silence of academia in addressing environmental and other social issues. It is mainly due to their perceived understanding that their only role is to impart education and conduct research; somehow they have not been able to understand their wider role in the society, which includes application of their knowledge to the issues confronted by the society. In the case of environment in general and EIA in particular, academia has not emerged as a major stakeholder and has not been able to provide the necessary technical advice or guidance, when needed. One of the key reasons of this behaviour is the lack of capacity of the academia itself. Therefore, it is of utmost important to strengthen civil society, academia and other players, through trainings on EIA and other technical matters, so that they can play their assigned role effectively. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 3.1–3.4, 3.7, 3.8. 9. Poor quality of EIA education: In Pakistan, very few tertiary level institutions offer courses in EIA. Often, quality of the course material is poor and outdated. Majority of the instructors are academic, with no practical experience and without current updates on the latest developments in EIA. There are no training institutes which provide quality training on EIA. Off and on, international organizations organise one off trainings which some of these consultants and students attend. They consider these trainings to be enough to qualify them as consultants and trainers. However, there are some quality consultants with sound educational background and considerable experience in EIA, but these are very few. To be able to promote EIA in Pakistan, it is absolutely necessary to improve quality of EIA trainers and course material. Until and unless the quality of EIA training in the country is improved, it would be very difficult to improve EIA implementation in the country. Another significant factor contributing not only to the poor quality of EIA reports but also to the apathy of consultants who produce these reports is the lack of capacity among stakeholders to understand and comment upon the documents. The consequent dearth of meaningful feedback does little to provide any impetus to consultants for improving the quality of EIA reports. The other reasons for poor quality of feedback from public hearings are: medium of EIA report is English and not in any of the local languages; location of public hearings is usually quite far from the project site where the actual affected people cannot reach easily; only positive aspects of the project are presented to the public and at times exaggerated especially when it comes to providing employment to the local population; negative aspects of the project are not presented

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to the public to avoid any controversies; and no follow-up hearing is arranged to share the revised report with the feedback incorporated. Public hearing is only treated as a formality and not undertaken to improve environmental and social performance of the project. Solution: The solution to this issue under NIAP is provided in output 3.7, 3.8 and 3.10. 10. Ineffectiveness of Environmental Tribunals: Although judicial activism in the country has resulted in several Sue Moto actions for environmental protection (e.g., New Murree Project), the Environmental Tribunals (ET) established under PEPA’97 are almost dysfunctional. Initially, two tribunals were established – one in Lahore to support Northern Pakistan (i.e. NWFP, Punjab and NAs) and one in Karachi to support Southern Pakistan (i.e. Balochistan and Sindh). Later, tribunals were set up in all provinces, but they are not very effective so far the main reason is that not many people are aware of ETs and even if they do know that ETs exist, they do not know how to register cases. Most people still take the route of normal courts, which defeats the reason for establishing ETs. The other problem is that judges appointed in ETs are not very knowledgeable about environmental issues in the country and have not been very proactive. Thereupon, it is utmost necessary to study the ETs in the country and build capacity of the judges appointed in ETs. Likewise, building capacity of lawyers is also very essential. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under output 3.5. 2.1.3. Opportunities Globally, the use of EIA is strongly recommended by Agenda 21. The enforcement of international agreements (e.g. Convention on Biological Diversity) and the accelerating scales and rates of environmental deterioration and resource depletion, considerably higher now than when EIA was initially introduced, have greatly augmented the significance of this tool. Also, Pakistan’s NCS advocates the use of EIA as a tool for environmental screening. A further testament to GoP’s commitment to mainstreaming environmental concerns in development planning (in other words introducing SEA), is the objective of NEP 2005, which aims “to integrate environmental considerations in policy making and planning processes”. NEP also lists “integration of environment into development planning” as one of the key policy instruments for achieving the policy’s objectives. This entails, among others, the following actions (NEP 2005, MoE, GoP):
 Environmental considerations would be integrated into sectoral policies and plans;  EIA related provisions of PEPA’97, would be diligently enforced for all development projects; and  SEA would be promoted as a tool for integrating environment into decision making.

Consequently, all national and provincial level policies and plans currently being formulated recommend EIA screening of new initiatives. The decisions of the Executive Committee for the National Economic Council (ECNEC) dated 2004 and 2006 also reinforce the importance being given to EIAs by the government. Both decisions make the inclusion of EIAs mandatory for all eligible projects at the time of submission of proposals. Many donor funded initiatives aimed at strengthening the government’s ongoing EIA related responsibilities are currently underway in Pakistan. These include Japan International Cooperation Agency’s (JICA) effort to increase the monitoring capacity (including environmental reporting) of Pak EPA, and several World Bank and ADB funded programmes. One example of such is ADB’s Punjab Resource Management Programme, the Mid Term Report of which has been referred to earlier. ADB has also introduced Third Party Monitoring (TPM) in Pakistan, under its Emergency Earthquake Assistance Programme and engaged IUCN Pakistan as the third party monitor. Other donors, for
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example the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (EKN) and the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation (SDC), have also been supporting initiatives over the years, to strengthen the EIA process in Pakistan, such as through development of sectoral and sub-sectoral environmental guidelines of small scale developmental initiatives not covered under screening criteria developed by Pak EPA. The environmental safeguard policies of most donors and multilateral and bilateral funding institutions now require compliance with national EIA legislation. In fact, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) also necessitates compliance with Canadian EIA legislation, for CIDA funded projects. The combination of all these factors provides a very conducive environment for the initiation of a nationwide Programme to support impact assessment. In terms of EIA, the advantages are that the requisite legislation, infrastructure and institutions are already in place and functional. The need is to strengthen them and streamline their implementation. The discussions that took place at the Consultative Workshop for NIAP’s proposal development clearly exhibited the high level of support of all stakeholders and partners, and their awareness on the need to address EIA for achieving better and sustained development.

2.2.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

2.2.1. Current Situation and Issues SEA is currently not a legal requirement in the Pakistan and to date no formal SEA has been undertaken to assess the environmental repercussions or effects of policies, programmes or development plans. In fact, during the past 63 years, many policies and programmes, including those at the sectoral level, have been developed in complete isolation from one other, without participation and with limited analysis of the possible effects. This has led to environmental degradation and extensive costs to a country that is largely natural resource based. One such example is the Power Policy for Independent Power Producers of 1994. The policy gave blanket exemptions to independent power producers, such as no restriction on site of the plant, and permission to use any fuel (i.e. furnace oil, diesel, natural gas). Such exemptions undermined PEPO’83 and also the spirit of EIA. This resulted in setting up of several power projects without submission of any EIA. Since the advent of participatory strategy development processes in 1992 in Pakistan, manifested by NCS, participatory processes on plans, policies and programmes have become increasingly acceptable. This philosophy is a fundamental part of SEA and provides opportunities for public involvement. More recently, and because of a more effective environmental lobby and concerns for environmental issues, Pakistan’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) was also subjected to an informal SEA, the result of which was the inclusion of poverty-environment linkages in the final document. Additionally, environmental issues regarding trade are also on the rise and are providing space for further ascendancy of SEA. The continued acceptance and undertaking of participatory approaches presents an evolving path for the incorporation of SEA in Pakistan’s planning processes. In 2005, P&DD developed their five year development framework document, the Medium Term Development Framework (MTDF), which provides a guideline for translating the national development vision, the VISION 2030, into action during 2005-10. MTDF includes policy solutions for sustained high long term economic growth. It aims to consolidate macro economic stability and rationalise the public–private mix in the development process. The Framework contains a chapter focusing on environment, which was developed following an extensive consultative process initiated by P&DD, and involved civil society organisations, private sector and environment specific government departments. After a

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consultative process spanning several months, a focussed chapter was developed, which presented the MTDF strategy for environmental conservation, management and use. This is based on a threepronged approach: equitable sharing of benefits of environmental management; increasing community management of natural resources; and integrating environmental issues into socioeconomic development planning, in order to achieve sustainable development. In Pakistan, steps have already been taken to understand and explore SEA. This has largely involved holding awareness-raising workshops for various tiers of decision-makers in key divisions / departments, e.g., P&DDs, at both federal and provincial levels. A South Asia regional SEA workshop was jointly organised by PC and IUCN in Islamabad in 2000, with the assistance of the Government of Netherlands. The workshop was conducted by SEA experts from NCEA. More importantly, SEAs are being initiated in Pakistan by agencies other than those which are part of GoP. The recent Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Study for Pakistan undertaken by the World Bank in collaboration with MoE, GoP, also reviewed the EIA process in the country and highlighted the need to introduce SEA in development planning in Pakistan. Currently, World Bank is undertaking SEA on the National Trade Corridor Improvement Programme. The Bank is also planning to conduct SEA of mining plans and programmes in Balochistan. Furthermore, with reference to the Asian region, ADB is promoting SEA in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS), through its Core Environment Programme (CEP). ADB are also planning to promote SEA as a planning tool in other Asian regions. Under NIAP, GoP can engage with regional initiatives and benefit from them. 2.2.2. Issues Following are some of the issues associated with the introduction of SEA in Pakistan: 1. SEA is a new tool and more complex than EIA and is not understood by many, in Pakistan. Majority of the environmental professionals still think of it as a product and not a tool or a process. The tool and materials with specific context to Pakistan are also not available. For instance, the World Bank prepared its Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Report to highlight key environmental issues in Pakistan. Since the name of the report had strategic environmental assessment in it, many professionals and decision-makers during the initial consultations for NIAP argued that since SEA has already been undertaken by the World Bank there is no need to introduce SEA in Pakistan. When IUCN started conducting orientation workshops on SEA in nineties, many argued why introduce SEA when EIA is still very weak. Similar arguments were also given when initial consultations for the development of NIAP were undertaken. However, on the contrary, the argument given in SEAs support is that the introduction of SEA will take considerable pressure off EIA process. The reason being projects resulting from policies, plans and programmes developed through SEA would take care of major environmental issues which later have to be addressed at project level when at times it is too late. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under outputs 2.1, 2.2, 3.1 and 3.3. 2. Although SEA is not a legal requirement in Pakistan, it can be argued that in the long run it is in the benefit of SEA implementation in Pakistan. It is counter productive to make tools such as SEA a legal requirement without fulfilling the pre-requisites such as understanding of the tool among decision-makers, judiciary and other relevant stakeholders, and required capacity within the country (e.g. consultants / experts, EPA officials) to implement the tool effectively. This problem is being encountered by China and Vietnam where SEA is a legal requirement but not enough understanding and expertise within the countries to implement it effectively. On the other hand, NIAP’s approach is to address the pre-requisites first before jumping into the legislative part of it. One of the main areas the Programme will address is the institutionalisation of SEA in the
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relevant institutions such as Planning Commission of Pakistan so that they are ready to incorporate SEA in the planning process once GoP decides to make it a legal requirement. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under output 2.4 and 3.2. 3. Another constraint in realisation of the need for SEA is lack of capacity within the public sector as well as civil society. The relevant government officials are not aware of the tools and techniques to be used for conducting SEA and such expertise is also almost non-existent in impact evaluation experts outside the public sector. The media and judiciary, which play the role of a watchdog, are also deficient of adequate understanding of SEA. Hence, there will be need to make concerted efforts to build capacity of these relevant stakeholders. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under output 2.5, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9 and 3.10. 4. Although Planning Commission is the hub of planning in Pakistan, other ministries and provincial governments are not only involved but prepare their plans and programme which are later approved by the respective federal or provincial Planning and Development Division /departments. This is an issue when it comes to institutionalising SEA at all key levels of Planning in Pakistan. This issue can be resolved through formation of a multi-disciplinary Task Force on SEA which has representation from federal and provincial governments and also other major sectors i.e. civil society, private sector and academia. This will not only make the process inclusive, it will also assist in effective integration of SEA at all levels of planning in Pakistan. The proposed actions to address this issue are covered under output 2.3. 2.2.3. Opportunities Due to the initiatives mentioned above, and the level of awareness that has been established, a momentum for formally introducing SEA in Pakistan’s development planning process has been created. Although ECNEC’s decision (mentioned previously in the context of EIA) is EIA specific, it also underscores the importance being attributed to impact assessment by GoP. Additionally, the interest of donors, such as EKN, in supporting SEA related initiatives provides further incentive to embark upon interventions such as NIAP. The need is to capitalise on this momentum and utilise it optimally for instituting SEA in Pakistan. Awareness of the economic value of environmental goods and services, including both the costs and the benefits associated with conservation, is also on the rise. This awareness is largely confined to water resources and loss of agricultural production but nevertheless presents an important aspect of SEA acceptance. SEA can be used to make more meaningful economic arguments to decisionmakers, by presenting links to sustainable development concerns, particularly poverty reduction. Therefore, macroeconomic and sectoral policies, prices and markets can be formulated in ways that consider impacts as well as investment in conservation and sustainable use of environment in support of sustainable development and poverty reduction. Equally importantly, environmental policy initiatives show a growing willingness on the part of government agencies, private sector and the civil society to work together. While this would not have been possible without direct financial support to the government, the drive towards much of this action has come from civil society. IUCN has been advocating on various forums on the need to develop policies, plans and programmes which are complimentary, do not contradict other GoP policies and legislation, and are environment and people friendly. This has gotten support of government, civil society and private sector and has created a very conducive environment to consider application of SEA in Pakistan’s planning process.

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In conclusion, GoP, in 2005, recognises that both EIA and SEA are necessary tools to promote sound environmental management. As mentioned previously, EIA has already taken root in Pakistan and is to be considered an effective tool for mainstreaming environment into development at the project level. The necessary regulatory and institutional frameworks have been established and EIA is being practiced to a considerable extent. However, its implementation is weak and often fails to achieve the desired objectives. It is therefore necessary to streamline the EIA process through strengthening the relevant institutions and regulatory frameworks, and raising the awareness of stakeholders. On the other hand SEA still needs to be introduced formally, through integration in the development planning process. The acceptance and undertaking of participatory processes has in a way already facilitated an informal introduction to SEA in the country. The proposed Programme seeks to build on the participatory model, to advocate the formal introduction of SEA in Pakistan’s planning process. GoP’s MTDF 2006-10 identifies SEA as an important tool, which needs to be explored for inclusion in the country’s development planning process. GoP also seeks to further strengthen the EIA process in the country by addressing key concerns at the policy level (through SEA), which at times are difficult to address at the project level. It is hoped that with the introduction of SEA in Pakistan:       the planning process will become more inclusive; contradictions between different policies, plans and programmes will be minimized; inter-sectoral cooperation and coordination will improve; pressure on project level EIA will decrease; there will be more acceptance of government policies, plans and programmes among people; and planning will become more economically viable and cost effective in the long run.

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3.
3.1.

The Programme
Scope of the Programme

The thematic scope of the programme is EIA and SEA. For EIA, the programme will cover the entire process and its application to all levels of projects. However, considering the time and resource limitations, EIAs of any mega-projects (e.g. large dams) will not be undertaken under the programme. Only EIAs of small and medium sized initiatives, as agreed upon between partners, will be undertaken as demonstration EIAs under the programme. SEA is currently applied on plans and programmes and some examples exist where SEA has also been applied on policies. However, this programme will only undertake SEA of plans or programmes, not policies. Although there are several constraints in EIA implementation in the country, this four and half year programme cannot address all those constraints during this short duration. It will primarily focus on the improvement and development of tools and mechanisms which are necessary for better implementation of EIA process and introduction of SEA in Pakistan. It will also focus on strengthening the relevant institutions in the country which have a direct stake in the EIA and SEA processes, with a specific focus on capacity development. The programme will also address institutional strengthening, advocacy and awareness-raising through practical demonstration of EIA and SEA processes. The programme will work with the existing institutions and no new institutions will be setup under this programme. The primary focus of the programme will be on those institutions which have the mandate of EIA implementation in the country i.e. federal, provincial, AJK and NA EPAs, PC, and provincial, AJK and NA P&DDs. In addition, the programme will also work with consultants, private sector, academia, judiciary and civil society institutions. It is of utmost importance to build capacity of EIA consultants for betterment of EIA in the country. Consultants will also be trained to be able to effectively undertake SEAs, once introduced in Pakistan. Additionally, tertiary level academic institutions will be targeted, since they are the nursery for impact assessment professionals in the country. A lot of emphasis will be put on private sector which is the main user and beneficiary of an improved EIA system in the country. The private sector also has a high stake in SEA since it will help in taking pressure off EIA by addressing key issues at source, which will save private sector problems at later stages. The programme will also involve chambers of commerce and industry to bring majority of the private sector in the programme fold. Realising the importance of judiciary in effective implementation of EIA and SEA processes, the programme will work with judiciary in raising its understanding of EIA and SEA processes. Select civil society institutions will also be involved in the programme with a direct stake in the programme. Furthermore, the programme will work with other ministries and departments which have a direct stake in EIA and SEA, such as Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources, Ministry of Industries, Ministry of Communications and National School of Public Policy. However, to keep the programme focused, the focus will remain on the direct beneficiaries as mentioned above. The geographical scope of the programme is entire Pakistan (Balochistan, NWFP, Punjab, Sindh and Northern Areas) and Azad Jammu & Kashmir. 3.1.1. Programme Justification EIA is a legal requirement under PEPA’97. Currently, in Pakistan EIA is the first and most effective line of defence against environmental degradation as a result of development. Until and unless the EIA process in the country is strengthened, it is highly unlikely that the environmental degradation can be slowed or mitigated in the country. GoP has shown its commitment to the process by making

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it a legal requirement. GoP is also a partner in this programme, which is a testament of its desire to improve EIA in the country. Globally, SEA is considered to be the first line of defence against environmental degradation, because it addresses problems which can lead to environmental degradation at source. Majority of the environmental problems currently faced by Pakistan are because of environment not taken into consideration at the planning stage. If SEA is introduced, it will help address majority of the environmental issues at source and will also take considerable pressure off EIA. GoP has included SEA in MTDF, and as a partner in this initiative, GoP has shown its commitment towards considering introduction of SEA in Pakistan.

3.2.

Programme Beneficiaries

The foremost beneficiaries, though indirectly, of this programme are the people of Pakistan who as a result of the programme will have a safer and healthy environment to live in. The programme will benefit the immediate beneficiaries of the programme through better understanding of EIA and SEA processes, training and placement of competent staff to effectively perform its functions, and strengthening of institutions to effectively implement and enforce EIA process in the country. The programme will ultimately lead to consultants producing quality reports, civil society organizations contributing positively through inputs in the process and as watchdogs, academia producing quality graduates to be able to implement the EIA process in every area / sector they choose to serve, and private sector able to comply and benefit effectively from the EIA process. The main aim of the programme is to help beneficiary institutions get a better understanding of the EIA process, understand their responsibilities and roles in the process, and build their capacities so that they are able to effectively perform their respective functions in the EIA process. The immediate beneficiaries of the programme are MoE, specifically EW Pak EPA, and provincial EPAs; NAs EPA; AJK EPA; ES-PC, provincial P&D departments (Environment Sections), NAs P&D department, and AJK P&D department; tertiary level academic institutions (institutions will be selected at the beginning of the Programme); private sector through chambers of commerce and industry; EIA consultants; judiciary especially ETs and civil society organizations such as IUCN (others will be selected at the beginning of the Programme). The other direct, but not immediate beneficiaries, include Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources, Ministry of Industries, Ministry of Communication and National School of Public Policy.

3.3.

Programme Approach and Strategy

NIAP is a partnership programme aimed at strengthening EIA process and promoting SEA in Pakistan through a dynamic partnership of public sector organizations – Planning Commission of Pakistan, Ministry of Environment (Environment Wing, Pak EPA) and IUCN Pakistan. NCEA would have an advisory role and will provide technical backstopping to the Programme. The Programme intends to engage relevant stakeholders at both federal and provincial levels. At the same time, it would reach out to judiciary /legal fraternity and academia to work seamlessly towards a common objective of environmentally sensitive development in the country. As mentioned earlier, the Programme approach includes an analytical stage, during which the status of EIA practice will be closely analysed, and the most promising opportunities for SEA will be identified. The following (implementation) stage concentrates on the development of tools, on capacity building, and on undertaking a number of pilot SEAs and EIAs that demonstrate the value of good practice. The Programme will conclude with an evaluation stage, in which the lessons learned will be drawn out, and plans will be made for the future of SEA and EIA in Pakistan.

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The strategy for the Programme evolves from its approach. In the inception period focus will primarily be on establishing the Programme through activities which will help in laying a solid foundation and building momentum for the Programme. Some of the key activities which will be undertaken are establishing programme secretariat and implementation units, signing MoUs amongst the implementation partners, in-depth assessment of provincial EPAs’ capacity needs, development of TORs for the provincial EPA coordinators accordingly, training needs assessments of the partner institutions, development of a comprehensive training programme, development of advocacy strategy, EIA Mapping, and improving understanding of SEA. The detailed terms of reference of provincial EIA Experts will ensure that right people are hired for the positions and everyone concerned has a very clear idea of programmes expectations from the positions. At the end of the inception period, a detailed work planning exercise will be undertaken resulting in a detailed operational plan which sets out the activities in more detail for the implementation period. The duration of the inception period will be one year. The inception period will be followed by a comprehensive three and a half year implementation period. This period will focus on delivery of the detailed work plan developed at the end of inception period. The proposed approach for EIA differs from the one suggested for SEA. Since EIA regulation is already in place, NIAP will focus on strengthening its implementation. However, for the SEA component, the Programme will concentrate on demonstrating the value of the instrument through pilots, and garnering the support of people who have positive experience with the tool and support its wider application in Pakistan. Option of introducing SEA as a regulatory requirement will be assessed through a study. Hence while the SEA pilots will introduce a new instrument, the EIA pilots will serve to provide best practice examples for an existing instrument. The Programme includes awareness raising and capacity building activities for both EIA and SEA. Any guidance or information material that is developed in the course of the Programme can be tested in the pilots being conducted. Conversely, the pilot cases will become illustrations for use in guidance, and in awareness raising material and events. The Programme intends to strengthen the existing institutions and will avoid creating any new ones. Similarly the Programme will focus on the implementation of existing EIA law – no new law will be drafted under the programme. 3.3.1. Deliverables during the Inception Period The following deliverable would be ensured during inception period (one year) of the Programme: 1. Establishment of Programme secretariat and implementation units 2. Memorandums of Understanding amongst the implementation partners 3. In-depth assessment of provincial EPAs’ capacity needs 4. TORs for the provincial EPA coordinators according to assessed needs 5. Training needs assessments of the partner institutions 6. A comprehensive training programme 7. Awareness-raising and advocacy strategy 8. EIA mapping report

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9. Detailed Operations Plan for the implementation period

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4.
4.1.

Programme Implementation
Overall Objective

NIAP aims to contribute to sustainable development in Pakistan through strengthening of the EIA process and introduction of SEA in development planning. Improved EIA will lead to more environmentally conscious development at the project level, while the introduction of SEA will facilitate improved planning, not only by the integration of potential impacts into plan development and decision-making, but also through improved coordination between the authorities involved in planning.

4.2.

Outcomes

The Programme intends to achieve the following outcomes: 1. Improved implementation of EIA procedure, through development of tools and guidance material, and piloting; 2. SEA introduced and piloted in planning processes and practices; 3. Understanding and capacity for EIA and SEA enhanced; and 4. Effective programme management systems and mechanisms developed and introduced. Outcome 1: Improved implementation of the EIA procedure, development of tools and guidance material, and piloting

For any kind of management and continued improvement of EIA, it is necessary to have a good understanding of how the process operates. To map EIA process in a given country, NCEA has developed a methodology called “EIA-mapping”. It consists of a two-day questionnaire based workshop with relevant stakeholders, and subsequent analysis and discussion of the questionnaire results. It will be important that the results provide a baseline against which improvement of the EIA system can be tested towards the end of the Programme, and in future. This activity will be undertaken during the inception period. The analysis will be followed by the development of guidance material and tools, to meet the needs identified. It has become clear from the Consultative Workshop for NIAP proposal development that there is less need for new guidance material on EIA, than there is for regularly updated material that is illustrated with recent EIA cases. Web-based EIA resources might represent a suitable solution here, since these can easily be updated and additional illustration material added when available. Review of EIA studies has already been identified as a weakness in EIA practice, and will be addressed directly. Another practice challenge that has been identified, and will be addressed under Outcome 1, is coordination on EIA between authorities involved in its implementation. Discussions at the Consultative Workshop for NIAP proposal development indicated that special attention is needed for enhancing such coordination between the provincial and district level, as well as between federal and provincial level departments (i.e. between PC and provincial P&D departments, and Pak EPA and provincial EPAs). Further, there is also the need for improving coordination between institutions at provincial level, i.e., provincial P&D departments and EPAs. Since both of these departments are involved in EIA implementation, it is crucial that strong coordination mechanisms exist between them. Under NIAP, consultations will be undertaken and based on the results of these appropriate

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mechanisms for coordination will be developed. Such mechanisms will also play a key role in the introduction of SEA in Pakistan. Finally, the development of an EIA procedure performance monitoring system is proposed under Outcome 1. Currently, EIA procedure monitoring does take place, but is limited to the collection of basic data, such as the number of EIAs processed. The system set up under NIAP should aim to provide information on the quality of EIAs, the level of participation, and the implementation of mitigation measures identified in EIA reports. This monitoring system should become a structural component of the EIA process in Pakistan, so that it can continually provide insight into the evolution of EIA practice. It can also provide very relevant information to GoP for reviewing the effectiveness of its environmental management system, and identifying policy priorities. The monitoring system will also be used to assess any changes (positive or negative) in federal and provincial EPAs’ EIA monitoring capacity. Pilot EIAs The various EPAs at the federal and provincial level are responsible for reviewing the quality of EIA reports. Since the EPAs are constrained both in terms of human resource as well as technical expertise, it becomes very difficult if not impossible, for them to adequately review all EIAs being submitted. Especially in the case of complex public sector projects that entail significant environmental and social impacts, thorough reviews are seldom undertaken. The EIAs undertaken for piloting will be conducted by proponents and their consultants. The piloting under NIAP will be for the review of the EIA reports and other components of the review process, which will be done by the designated EPA. The EPA officials will be guided in the entire review process through coaching and provision of technical expertise as a ‘training on the job’ exercise. A total of two pilot EIAs will be undertaken during the Programme. An overview of outputs, and their respective activities, under Outcome 1 is provided in Table 1. Table 1: Outputs under Outcome 1 Output 1.1. Mapping of EIA practice  (This output will be achieved during the  inception period)   1.2. EIA review mechanism (including  tools to support its effective implementation) developed  (The activities towards achieving this output will be initiated during the  inception period)   Activities Customise NCEA’s mapping tool for Pakistan Undertake EIA mapping (NCEA analytical tool) Conduct a workshop to verify EIA mapping outcomes and priorities for improvement Disseminate conclusions and recommendations of the study Develop review mechanism and relevant tools / guidance Pilot test the review system and tools/guidance on selected ongoing EIAs Finalise review mechanism and tools / guidance Disseminate review mechanism and tools / guidance Monitor and evaluate EIA review mechanism

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Output 1.3. Coordination mechanism between federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments established      1.4. EIA procedure performance monitoring system established        1.5. Two good practice EIAs undertaken 

Activities Hold consultations between EPAs and P&D departments Develop report outlining possible coordination mechanisms and share with concerned departments Finalise report Review and revise coordination mechanism (if needed) Monitor implementation of coordination mechanism Conduct research and analysis of systems operational in countries with conditions similar to Pakistan Undertake consultations with relevant departments Develop draft EIA procedure performance monitoring system Share with stakeholders and pilot test Revise system (if needed) based on results of pilot testing Support data collection and processing during the Programme Initialise and implement the database software of environmental information system Identify two suitable pilot EIAs for provision of technical guidance and expertise and develop detailed Terms of Reference for each EIA Support EIA process with technical / procedural expertise Document and disseminate the lessons learnt

 

Outcome 2:

SEA introduced and piloted in planning processes and practices

Experience has shown that SEA is most effectively introduced through its practical application to existing planning processes. When undertaking SEA pilots, the stakeholders and relevant decision makers get an opportunity to be introduced to SEA in a guided learning-by-doing process. They gain a good understanding of SEA and its added value to their planning process, and often become SEA enthusiasts. Therefore, the SEA activities in this Programme will start with the identification of opportunities for the application of SEA to current practice. This activity will be initiated during the inception period. The key activity to be undertaken is a study to understand Government of Pakistan’s planning process at the federal, provincial and district levels. Since SEA of policies is more complex, time consuming and experience in other parts of the world has been mixed, this Programme will only consider plans and / or programmes for pilot SEAs. Although sectors for pilot SEAs will be selected in consultation with partners and other relevant stakeholders, some of the sectors which could potentially be good candidates for pilot SEAs are oil and gas, land-use planning, transport, trade and power. A country wide assessment should be carried out to:

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 Assess the experience with planning in the relevant agencies;  Assess the agencies that are interested to be involved in the process of SEA introduction; and  Identify a number of policies, plans or programmes of interested agencies that could serve as

subjects for the application of SEA. During this analytical stage the Programme team will be closely following the SEA pilots being undertaken by World Bank (see Section 3.4), which should provide relevant case material, and also an opportunity to identify SEA champions in the Pakistani context. The Programme will also include the development of guidance material on SEA. This material will be based on existing good practice guidance that is available internationally, including the recent OECDDAC SEA guidance. In the beginning it will be adequate to adapt existing SEA guidance to the Pakistani context (in the form of a manual), and make it available for pilot SEAs. Two pilot SEAs will be conducted in NIAP. Pilot SEAs will be conducted of plans or programmes (not policies). Some of the potential sectors for SEA pilots could be oil and gas, land-use planning, transport, trade and power. The guidance material (manual) will be tested and subsequently improved and expanded with more illustration and explanatory information to be drawn from the pilot SEA experiences. The manual can be a ‘layered’ document, consisting of concise explanatory information, supported by more detailed guidance on specific aspects of SEA, and should be made available on the web. Towards the end of NIAP implementation, the Programme partners will hold discussions with relevant stakeholders for introducing SEA as a legal requirement. SEA legislation ideally should be based on the practical experience with SEAs to ensure that it is feasible, realistic and therefore more effective. The Kiev SEA protocol and the EU-SEA directive can serve as a starting point for the legislation’s drafting. At this stage, the institutionalisation of SEA will also be addressed. This will include a clear division of responsibilities for different aspects of SEA, co-ordination and communication mechanisms for SEA, and identification of SEA information sources within Pakistan. Also under this Outcome, a SEA Task Force will be formed at PC to oversee the SEA pilots. The Task Force will be established at the start of the SEA introduction process, and will be responsible for the coordination and steering of SEA activities in Pakistan. The Task Force team will also act as trainers for other staff in relevant agencies and will become the ambassadors for SEA within and outside the government. Coaching of the SEA Task Force team and of the pilot SEAs will be conducted by a University or Research Institute, preferably international with experience in SEA research and implementation, together with the NCEA throughout the duration of the SEA introductory process. The first year of the process will necessarily require more intensive and frequent coaching than the latter years. Pilot SEAs The selection and execution of two pilot SEAs for plans and programmes is foreseen. Under this programme policies will not be selected for SEA pilots mainly due to operational and technical reasons. The criteria for the selection of pilots include the potential for SEA to influence the plan or programme, the willingness of the plan owners to work with SEA and resources available for the SEA. Although the sectors for SEA pilots will be selected in consultation with the project partners and other relevant stakeholders, some potential sectors could be oil and gas, industries, minerals, trade, and transport. The pilots will be spread out over the whole Programme duration. In each pilot process the SEA should be carried out by Pakistani experts, either from the planning team or external experts, or a mix of both. As much as possible, these experts should be coached by experienced SEA experts during the pilot process. This will not only improve the SEA outcome, but

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will also help the individuals and organisations involved to develop their SEA skills and understanding through a guided ‘learning-by-doing’ process. An overview of outputs, and their respective activities, under Outcome 2 is provided in Table 2. Table 2: Outputs under Outcome 2 Output Improved understanding of SEA  application to planning practice (This output will be achieved during the inception period)  2.1. Activities Hold two stakeholder workshops at federal and provincial levels to understand planning process at a federal and provincial level Initiate study of Pakistan’s development planning process for identification of areas / stages for SEA incorporation Hold one national workshop to share draft study report and obtain feedback Incorporate feedback and finalise study report Hold stakeholder meetings, in particular to disseminate SEA pilot progress and lessons, and encourage wider application of SEA Customise NCEA’s mapping tool and develop guidance material Test and finalise mapping tools and guidance material through pilot SEAs (Output 2.5) Develop ToRs for Task Force based on consultations carried out under Output 2.1 Assist in organising biannual meetings of the Task Force Support Task Force with technical advice, discussion documents, international examples, and exposure to best practices Conduct study for the identification of regulatory or other mechanisms for institutionalising SEA in Pakistan Hold 1 national and 3 provincial stakeholder workshops for sharing of report on regulatory mechanisms, obtaining feedback, and finalising the study Hold consultations / workshops with relevant federal and provincial ministries / departments, and district level authorities to identify SEA pilots Prepare and finalise ToRs for each pilot Undertake assessment for each pilot Review and analyse pilot SEA reports Disseminate results

  

2.2.

Develop tools and guidance material to support SEA application Facilitate formation of a SEA Task Force

    

2.3.

2.4.

Legislative and regulatory requirements for SEA assessed

 

2.5.

Two pilot SEAs undertaken

   

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Outcome 3:

Understanding and capacity for EIA and SEA enhanced

Although improving understanding of the relevant stakeholders on EIA and SEA is also included in this outcome, a greater focus of the activities is on decision makers (parliamentarians, bureaucrats); officials involved in policy formulation and impact assessment practitioners (both in public and private sectors). In essence, improving understanding is a continuous process, but a number of activities can be identified that should take place in the next few years to raise the level of support for EIA and SEA amongst relevant groups. These include relevant line departments (ministries and departments of industry, agriculture, water and power etc.), private sector, civil society organisations and academia. An understanding improving Strategy will be developed in consultation with partners, which will determine the mechanisms and tools (e.g. information material, website, use of printed and electronic media, meetings and seminars) to be employed for each of the target groups. This output will be achieved during the inception period. PEAA is a national network of impact assessment professionals. Having a country wide outreach, this organisation can provide an excellent forum through which impact assessment in Pakistan can be promoted and capacity building initiatives launched. It can also serve as a neutral technical body, such as NCEA, to provide advice on EIA and SEA processes and practices. Although functional, PEAA requires strengthening, to be able to function as an effective institution and serve as a resource base of impact assessment professionals in Pakistan. The capacity building component of NIAP will also cater to this need. PEAA’s activities such as annual general meeting, conferences, seminars, PEAA newsletter, and dissemination of information on good case examples would also be supported. A number of targeted EIA and SEA activities are included in NIAP and are described below. Capacity will also be developed through the EIA and SEA demonstration pilots conducted under Outcomes 1 and 2. Capacity Building for EIA Human resource constraints in departments responsible for EIA implementation in Pakistan have emerged as one of the primary factors responsible for EIAs' poor implementation. This was increasingly apparent from the consultations undertaken for NIAP development, as well as in the analysis of EIA practice in the Pakistan Strategic Country Environmental Assessment Report (World Bank / MoE GoP, 2006). NIAP can contribute to the capacity building of relevant departments by offering training and coaching. It can also provide temporary human resource at different authorities to undertake EIA activities. However, this capacity problem will need to be addressed more structurally. Before embarking on any capacity building initiative, it is important to assess the existing capacity of each partner institution. This will be done through a very comprehensive training needs assessment of all partner institutions. Based on the findings of the assessment, a comprehensive training programme will be developed. This activity will be undertaken during the inception period. Experts will be engaged for the PIUs established in ES-PC, Pak EPA and EW-MoE, and will provide assistance in the EIA process. Efforts will be made to enhance the strength of P&D departments and EPAs, by hiring technically trained staff instead of transferring staff from other departments, which is the usual procedure in most government agencies. However, initially only one EIA Expert will be hired in Pak EPA. The remaining provincial EIA Experts will be hired during the implementation period after understanding needs of the provincial EPAs during the inception period. Furthermore, a close collaboration between EPAs and academic institutions will be promoted, to ensure a regular source of trained personnel and expert advice.

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The Programme proposes a capacity boost for selected authorities. The new and existing EIA staff at the authorities will be supported by an intense training and coaching programme, following the model used by the ADB. The staff will be supported by an international expert with relevant expertise. A detailed capacity building programme for EIA related stakeholders would be developed based on identified needs. At this stage the identified target groups include government officials, consultants, academia, media and civil society organizations. For regional coordination of training activities, the Programme will explore using existing knowledge and information centres. For example, the EIA centre established by the NWFP EPA may provide a useful venue. Under Pakistan’s legislative system, ETs are now functional in all four provinces of the country, and have a crucial role to play in enforcing the EIA regulatory framework. NIAP also proposes a training programme for strengthening these Tribunals and related judiciary. The Pakistan Environmental Law Association (PELA) is a very active civil society organisation that promotes continued development and effective application of environmental laws in Pakistan. The organisation concentrates on environmental law education and training, and environmental litigation. NIAP will collaborate with PELA for the strengthening of ETs and for assistance in the legal aspects of EIA and SEA. During the meetings held with various government departments and also in the Consultative Workshop in Islamabad, suggestions were put forward for the introduction of an accreditation system for EIA consultants. Although some workshop participants expressed their reservations against such a system (for example the concern that education alone does not determine suitability for EIA and practical experience may hold greater importance), it was agreed that an accreditation system would help in bringing uniformity and quality to the EIA process, and its establishment should be considered. Internationally, considerable experience exists with respect to accreditation systems for EIA experts, both in developing and developed countries, which can be drawn upon for instituting such a system in Pakistan. PEAA, which represents a national body of impact assessment professionals, will be involved in the development and operationalisation of an accreditation system. Capacity Building for SEA Initially, training and coaching will concentrate on the different stakeholders involved in the SEA pilots. One of the key principles of SEA good practice is that these assessments should be the direct responsibility of the ‘owners’ of the policies, plans and programmes for which the SEA is carried out. These institutions therefore should have sufficient knowledge, skills and capacity to conduct the SEA process and carry out assessments. Five additional groups play an important role in ensuring that SEAs play a meaningful role: local consultants, NGOs, academics, media and the court system. Although the capacity of the last three groups will be developed further through other NIAP outputs, such as 3.3 and 3.7, these groups will not be directly targeted for training. However, training consultants to prepare SEAs, and strengthening civil society organisations including NGOs to speak up during SEAs, is an important part of SEA capacity development by this Programme. Training of consultants is required, because they are not used to drafting SEA reports, since it is not yet a legal requirement in Pakistan. Hence, training for them will focus on preparing SEA reports. On the other hand, NGOs should be trained on the role they can and should play in the SEA process. The main focus of SEA trainings will include (a) scoping and integration of environmental considerations into planning; and (b) decisions based upon SEAs are characterised by negotiations between interested (government) parties. Training in negotiation can therefore be a useful means to strengthen the position of negotiators who are responsible for environmental issues in the decision
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making process. Such training is available through the Programme on the Management of Sustainability, by the Sustainability Challenge Foundation, and can likely be incorporated into the training programme at no additional costs. The NCEA can facilitate this. The Programme will build on the available training material as much as possible. In particular, the SEA training modules that have been developed by GTZ may be relevant. These are based on the OECD-DAC guidance for SEA in development cooperation, which represent current research and thinking in SEA. GTZ is currently looking for opportunities to apply the training modules in different settings, in cooperation with NCEA and local trainers. The SEA training programme will be staggered, which means that training will be offered to each target group at the time when they are, or are about to be, confronted in practice with the specific SEA aspects that the training addresses. This makes the training more pertinent to the daily work of the training participants. Academia can play an important role in promoting SEA in the country and in training qualified personnel for relevant departments. Hence, efforts will be made under NIAP to involve the academics in capacity building for both SEA and EIA. The curricula of select academic institutions across Pakistan will be reviewed and analysed for incorporation of courses on impact assessment. Later, such courses will be developed and introduced in these institutions. In addition, activities under Output 3.10 focus on building linkages with international and regional impact assessment institutions. This would help introduce current impact assessment research and its application in Pakistan, and establishing networks, and exchanging experiences at the regional and international level. Such linkages may also lead to joint initiatives / projects among regional and international counterparts. These initiatives may include cooperation for the development of impact assessment tools and guidance, sharing of expertise, collaboration for research in areas of common interest etc. CBBIA project’s Asia component is a good example of such cooperation for strengthening impact assessment practices through tools development. Under this project, experts from five South Asian countries collaborated for the integration of biodiversity in EIA practice through the development of EIA Practitioners and Reviewers Guide. The document has been launched at the 2007 Conference of IAIA ’07. An international research conference on impact assessment would also be helpful in bringing in new thinking and providing the local experts an opportunity to interact with international expertise. An overview of outputs, and their respective activities, under Outcome 3 is provided in Table 3. Table 3: Outputs under Outcome 3 Output Strategy for Improving Understanding, for promotion of EIA and introduction of SEA developed and implemented (This output will be achieved during the inception phase) 3.1.   Activities Hold consultations with partners and experts on designing the Strategy Develop strategy, including the identification of target groups (such as high-level decision-makers, civil society, etc.). The Strategy may include regular seminars and newsletter, EIA / SEA website (incorporating a Q&A section and listserv), and information material Implement the strategy Develop an operational strategy for PEAA Support PEAA’s activities (including General Body Meetings)

 3.2. A national network of impact assessment professionals strengthened  

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Output 3.3. Print and electronic media actively  involved in highlighting issues / concerns related to EIA and SEA 

Activities Organise workshops, seminars etc. for educating / involving print and electronic media Establish a Media Coordination Cell for keeping the media informed of current development related issues Provide regular updates to media through Media Coordination Cell Facilitate promotion of EIA / SEA through print and electronic media Undertake comprehensive training needs assessment of all partner institutions Develop comprehensive training programme based on the identified needs Integrate EIA tools and mechanisms (1.3 and 1.4) in the training programme Implement training programme Undertaken training needs assessment of the relevant legal professionals Develop training programme for strengthening ETs based on identified needs Implement training programme Conduct a review, in collaboration with PEAA, of accreditation practices elsewhere Develop a suitable accreditation approach Hold consultations with stakeholders Implement accreditation system, together with PEAA Undertake promotion and advocacy for the accreditation system Undertake situational analysis / review of academic institutions and EIA and SEA related courses being offered Organise and implement exchange visits with relevant universities Revise courses based on the recommendations of the situational analysis (only for select institutions) Hold meetings with relevant institutions to assess the need for EIA and SEA incorporation in the curriculum Arrange guest lectures for introduction of EIA / SEA delivered at select institutions Design and incorporate courses on EIA / SEA in curriculum, using training material from 3.5

  3.4. Enhanced capacity of stakeholders  (including federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments, NGOs,  environmental professionals (consultants) to participate in the  EIA process  3.5. Increased effectiveness of ETs in enforcing the EIA regulatory framework    3.6. Accreditation system for EIA consultants      3.7. EIA and SEA in select academic institutions courses introduced or upgraded according to international standards / developments 

 

3.8.

EIA and SEA introduced as a course  component in training institutes for public administration (e.g., NIPAs, Administrative Staff College,  Civil Services Academy and National Defence University etc.) 

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Output 3.9. Enhanced capacity of relevant institutions and stakeholders to conduct and review SEAs     3.10. Collaboration established with international and regional impact assessment institutions (e.g. IAIA) 

Activities Undertake training needs assessment of the relevant institutions Develop training programme based on identified needs Integrate SEA tools and guidance material (from 2.2) in the training programme Implement training programme Establish contact and information sharing with international and regional impact assessment institutions for future collaboration Organise an international conference on impact assessment in Pakistan Facilitate participation of relevant professionals in international impact assessment events Organise exchange visits for international exposure Organise lectures / training programmes on SEA by international experts from collaborating and other institutions

   

Outcome 4:

Effective programme management systems and mechanisms developed and put in place

The institution of effective programme / project management systems is crucial to the achievement of the objectives of the Programme. An Inception Workshop will be organised at the start of NIAP to define implementation strategies and develop detailed work plans of all partners for the inception period. The workshop will also discuss the modalities for the establishment of PCU within ES-PC, PIUs (in IUCN, Pak EPA and EW-MoE) and the constitution of PAC and PMC to govern the overall implementation of the Programme. Lead role for various outputs would be assigned to the implementation partners and accordingly budget allocation would be made. At end of the inception period another detailed work planning exercise would be undertaken, which would result in an operational plan for the implementation period. Comprehensive work planning would be an annual exercise, matching with the EKN’s requirement for submission of the annual work plan, normally by 1st of November in the preceding year. The role and responsibilities, and budget allocation for the implementation partners would be determined through annual work planning. The Programme would be governed by a Programme Advisory Committee, which would be constituted in consultation with the relevant authorities and the implementation partners. A comprehensive monitoring framework would be developed to monitor and report the progress of the Programme. An overview of outputs, and their respective activities, under Outcome 4 is provided in Table 4. Table 4: Outputs under Outcome 4 Output Activities

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Output 4.1. PIUs / PCU operationalised (This output will be achieved in the inception phase) 4.2. 

Activities Establish PCU in ES and PIUs in EW, Pak EPA and IUCN, including contracting and training staff Organise inception planning and workshop Institute and operationalise PAC Develop an overall work plan for the inception and implementation periods and annual work plans Develop and implement programme monitoring, evaluation and reporting systems

Implementation mechanisms for  the programme instituted  (This output will be initiated during  the inception phase) 

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5.

Programme Organisation and Management

The implementation of NIAP will be undertaken in a period of four and a half years with an inception period of one year and full implementation in three and a half years. During the inception period, preparations for establishing the Programme will be undertaken and momentum will be created for promoting and establishing EIA and SEA processes in the country. A detailed work plan for the entire implementation period would also be developed through a consultative process with all partners and key stakeholders at the end of the inception period. Rest of the Programme period (three and half years) would follow this detailed work plan.

5.1.

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

NIAP includes a coherent M&E approach that will provide insight into the degree to which the Programme is achieving results. Programme M&E will ensure accountability, informed decisionmaking and learning. It will conform to EKN’s and IUCN Pakistan’s requirements and procedures. PCU will be responsible for internal planning, monitoring and reporting. PCU will develop a Programme monitoring framework, which will include but not be confined to the following:
 Overall and annual work planning;  Progress reporting on results on annual basis, employing detailed indicators (both quantitative

and qualitative);
 Financial reporting and liquidity planning on six-monthly basis;  Mid Term Review in 2 year of the implementation period;  End of the Programme Evaluation in last year of the Programme;  External monitoring commissioned by EKN on regular intervals (optional to EKN);  Evaluation of all training activities by questionnaires to be filled in by the participants (findings
nd

will be presented in the progress report);
 Evaluation of EIA and SEA effectiveness through mapping tools; and  Media analysis throughout the duration of the Programme to provide an overview of the

attention given to EIA / SEA in the media and the type of discussion / debate generated. This is an indicator for the effectiveness of awareness raising activities. It is planned that the continuous learning from Programme initiatives will feed into the design and implementation of activities on an ongoing basis. Regular M&E of Programme implementation will be carried out by PCU and augmented by M&E expertise from IUCN Pakistan Country Office.

5.2.

Institutional Arrangements

In determining the implementation and execution modalities of NIAP, the following factors have been taken into account:
 The technical capacity, relevant field experience, cost effectiveness and past performance;  The existence and availability of managerial personnel and organisational support capacity to

carry out the functions associated with execution and implementation of the Programme; and

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 The willingness and commitment of the cooperating institutions to undertake the

responsibilities. The Programme will be jointly implemented by EW-MoE, Pak-EPA (MoE), ES-PC and IUCN Pakistan. NCEA will be the key international partner in this Programme. Its main role would be to provide technical support to the programme. This technical assistance would be through NCEA’s own financial resources whereas the Programme would have to bear the cost of international consultants from NCEA’s network that will be engaged on need basis. IUCN Pakistan will be entrusted with management of the Programme, assuming ultimate responsibility for the achievement of Programme objectives. However, PCU will be housed in ES-PC. Once the Programme is approved by the donor and a contract is signed, Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs) will be signed amongst the four Programme partners (EW, Pak EPA, ES and IUCN Pakistan), clearly specifying the functions, responsibilities, deliverables, measures for ensuring financial accountability and reporting requirements of each of the partners. A MoU will also be signed between IUCN Pakistan and NCEA clearly specifying NCEA’s role and responsibilities in the Programme. The Programme will be headed by a National Programme Director (PD) who will be appointed by the Planning Commission of Pakistan from its own staff as their contribution to the Programme. The NPD will be responsible for providing strategic guidance to the Programme. A Project Manager will be appointed by IUCN Pakistan, as the focal person responsible for liaising with the donor and the partners, overall management of the Programme, ensuring overall accountability to the donor through PAC, coordinating with government line agencies, and reporting. He/she would be assisted by four Deputy Project Managers; one in each of the Partner would undertake management support responsibilities in addition to their core technical responsibilities.

5.3.

Programme Advisory Committee (PAC)

PAC will oversee, guide and advise on Programme activities, and monitor its progress and performance. The Member (Infrastructure and Environment), PC, will chair the PAC while the Secretary for Environment, MoE will be the co-chair of PAC. The ToRs for PAC will be developed during the inception period, and it is envisaged that members will include government agencies, relevant experts and the implementation partners.

5.4.

Programme Coordination Unit

The Programme will be implemented by the respective implementation units established within the four partners, i.e., ES, EW, Pak EPA and IUCN. Since PCU will primarily be responsible for creating ownership of the Programme within the public sector, coordinating amongst the Programme partners and ensuring post-programme sustainability of the efforts, it will be housed in the Planning Commission of Pakistan. As the Programme will be managed by IUCN Pakistan, PCU will work in close liaison with IUCN for smooth operations of the Programme.

5.5.

Programme Implementation Units

Separate PIUs will be established in Pak-EPA, EW-MoE and IUCN Pakistan to support Programme implementation. Operational facilities for NIAP implementation will be provided by the partners housing PIUs. PIUs will be headed by the respective Programme Directors – designated by the respective departments/agencies as their in-kind contribution to the Programme.

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The PIUs will be responsible for facilitating NIAP implementation in liaison with their respective provincial departments/organizations and ensuring coordination with other partners in the Programme (see Programme’s institutional organogram at Figure 1). Figure 1: Programme’s Institutional Organogram
Programme Advisory Committee

Programme Coordination Unit (Planning Commission) Project Manager

Programme Implementation Unit (IUCN) DPM/Advocacy Coordinator

Programme Implementation Unit (EW) DPM/Policy Coordinator

Programme Implementation Unit (Pak EPA) DPM/EIA Expert

Programme Implementation Unit (PC) DPM/SEA Coordinator

Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment

Provincial Environment Departments

Provincial EPAs

Provincial P&D Departments

Provincial Interface

Judiciary

Acadeima

Public Administration Training Institutes

Media

Private Sector

Civil Society Interface

The Programme’s management would primarily be responsibility of IUCN under the contract with the Embassy. The Project Manager would be overall in-charge of the project. In accordance with the needs of the respective Partners, other project staff will be hired and deputed in the respective PIUs. They would have a direct reporting relationship with the Project Manager as well as the Programme Directors in the respective implementation partners (see Programme’s management organogram at Figure 2). EIA Experts will be appointed in federal and provincial EPAs to assist in the implementation of Programme activities and also to provide support to respective EPAs in EIA related activities. However, only one EIA Expert will be hired during the inception period for Pak EPA. Remaining EIA Experts will be hired after assessing the required expertise for each of the EPA. He/She would also serve as Deputy Project Manager within his/her implementation unit. A SEA Expert will be appointed in PC to provide support in SEA related activities of the Programme to PC and other project partners. He/She would also serve as Deputy Project Manager within his/her implementation unit. In addition to the above identified staff, the Programme may hire other professionals for short durations for certain specialised inputs, e.g., legal experts, institutional experts etc. Such individuals will be hired for short-term assignments which will feed into the Programme and will be engaged as consultants.

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Figure 2: Programme’s Management Organogram
National Programme Director (Planning Commission)

Project Manager

DPM/Advocacy Coordinator

Finance & Admin Officer IUCN Programme Implementation Unit

Programme Assistant

Support Staff

DPM/Policy Coordinator Programme Director (Environment Wing) EW Programme Implementation Unit

Programme Assistant

Support Staff

DPM/EIA Expert

Programme Assistant

Programme Director (Pak EPA)

Pak EPA Programme Implementation Unit

Support Staff

EIA Expert Punjab

EIA Expert Balochistan

EIA Expert NWFP

EIA Expert Sindh

EIA Expert Northern Areas

EIA Expert AJ&K

DPM/SEA Coordinator Programme Director (Environmemt Section) ES Programme Implementation Unit

Programme Assistant

Support Staff

5.6.

Risks and Mitigation

The key Programme risks can be grouped as follows: Risk Estimated Probability Possible Corrective Measures

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Risk Due to the current political turmoil within the country and the prevailing security situation, attention of the decision makers may be shifted. However, this risk might not be of major concern since people have learnt to deal and live with the existing situation. Pakistan’s geopolitical situation and political developments in the region may reduce the focus on environmental priorities.

Estimated Probability Medium: till political parties resolve their differences and security situation improves. Probability will be low thereafter, based on the reconciliation between political parties and multiple measures taken to address the security situation in the country.

Possible Corrective Measures Continue close dialogue with policy makers during implementation. IUCN’s involvement in the Programme will also serve to minimise risk, due to it being a membership based organisation of which government departments are also members. As such, there is room for dialogue and the possibility of conflict resolution through debate. Three of the four NIAP partners are from the government, which will help in maintaining GoP’s ownership of the Programme. In addition, continued dialogue will be maintained with the relevant federal and provincial institutions to minimize this risk.

Low: Although political developments may negatively affect the importance of environment, it is not very likely that NIAP implementation will be impacted. In addition, the ruling party has included environment as one of its priorities in its manifesto and has a good track record in environmental governance. Medium: Discussions held during the Consultative Workshop for NIAP’s proposal development added to the already strong perception that environment related departments of the federal and provincial governments are grossly under staffed and lacking in financial resources.

Institutional limitations (such as lack of human and financial resources) of various departments will fully benefit from the Programme. The absorption capacity of the relevant provincial and district level departments may not be sufficient to optimally benefit from the Programme.

Measures to address this shortcoming / risk are built into the NIAP framework. GoP has shown commitment to provide resources for the Programme, both financial and human, which will help in minimising this risk. The Programme will also aim to enhance the structural and resource capacity of the EPAs and P&DD. However, the economic recession is real and all developed and developing countries are in the grip of this problem. This is the time when GoP needs support of the international community to assist it in meeting its national and international commitments. In order to reduce this risk further, the programme will start with an inception period. This will allow the Programme course correction in case the expectations from the partners are not met during the inception period.

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Risk Continued emphasis on economic development may lead to less willingness on the part of decision makers to consider environmental aspects.

Estimated Probability Medium: This is a commonly encountered risk in countries with low rates of economic development, where governments tend to overlook the environmental impacts of developmental policies and projects. Several such examples are evident, particularly in the public sector, where environmental considerations have been disregarded in favour of economic imperatives.

Possible Corrective Measures Despite the emphasis on economic development, the environmental movement has gained momentum in Pakistan and has made significant gains. GoP has also shown commitment to environment by preparing national, provincial and district level sustainable development strategies. GoP budgetary support for environmental initiatives has increased fourfold in the last few years, which is an evidence of GoP’s commitment to environment. The international pressures both bilateral and multilateral would also not let GoP falter on its national and international commitments. In addition, awareness raising and capacity building exercises will be undertaken at all levels, including for parliamentarians and key decision makers. Of special importance in this regard are components focusing on the linkages between environmental degradation and economic costs that will be incorporated into the curricula of public administration training institutes.

5.7.

Sustainability

The design of NIAP makes strong provision for ensuring institutional, operational and financial sustainability of the Programme. The housing of PCU in PC would provide a strong basis for intra governmental coordination on EIA and SEA, as well as sustainability of the effort after the completion of the Programme. NIAP is a joint initiative of Pak-EPA, EW, PC (GoP) and IUCN Pakistan (with technical assistance provided by NCEA), and will be institutionalised in the three key government agencies responsible for environmental assessment in Pakistan. This mechanism will promote the integration of impact assessment in national and provincial planning procedures, and encourage maximum GoP ownership of the Programme objectives. As PC would have primary responsibility for SEA, it will enhance the probability of SEA being integrated in plans and policies across all sectors. Similarly, Pak EPA along with the provincial EPAs, with the mandate of monitoring the EIA process in the country, will be rightly placed for EIA related activities. EW will be responsible for the Programme activities from a policy perspective. Furthermore, initiatives under NIAP will be synchronised / dovetailed with ongoing GoP interventions. In this way, various activities started through NIAP can be taken over by government departments under their own initiatives.

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The tools developed under NIAP, and the capacity building and awareness raising initiatives undertaken will serve to strengthen key institutions responsible for and involved in impact assessment in Pakistan. The Programme will strengthen the technical capacity of partnering institutions, which will enable them to internalise and apply the learning to their work. Enhanced capacity (both technical and staffing strength) will lead to better performance, a greater recognition of institutional roles and the sustainability of relevant institutions. Also, since the Programme will be working at the provincial and district levels through provincial EPAs and other departments, it will benefit stakeholders across all levels / tiers of government. The capacity building imparted to the relevant departments / agencies during the course of NIAP will contribute to its institutional sustainability. During consultations held for the development of NIAP, GoP has expressed its willingness to cofinance the Programme during its implementation. In addition to this, the government has also shown its commitment to ensuring the long term sustainability of NIAP by including it in its MTDF. Such endorsement and commitment assures the financial sustainability of NIAP after donor assistance has ended. NIAP is a long term Programme. The current proposal is donor funded but as mentioned previously, mechanisms for incorporation in GoP’s planning and budgeting systems have been built in. The partnering institutions will also continue to raise funds from the government’s budget as well as other donors to ensure the continuity of the Programme. 5.7.1. Sustainability Indicators Based on the above measures, the following sustainability indicators will be measured during and at the end of the Programme:
 Impact assessment is integrated in national and provincial planning procedures and evinced by

government correspondence;
 Ownership of the Programme objectives is evinced by GoP’s budget allocations for

strengthening impact assessment in Pakistan;
 SEA is integrated in plans and policies across all sectors, through a formal mechanism of PC;  Initiatives under NIAP are synchronised / dovetailed with ongoing GoP interventions; and  The institutional mechanisms established under the Programme are integrated as the regular

functions of the government institutions.

5.8.

Duration and Budget

The total duration of the NIAP will be four and a half years split into inception (one year) and implementation periods (three and half years). The total budget for NIAP is Pak Rs. 358,612,543. An overall work plan and detailed year-wise budget is given as Annex III, and the partner-wise budget is given at Annex IV. The cost of technical assistance to be provided by NCEA is not included in the budget and would be met through its own resources whereas the Programme may bear the cost of international consultants engaged on need bases.

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Annex I Logical Framework Matrix
Outputs 1.1. Mapping of EIA practice (This output will be achieved during the inception period)    Activities Customise NCEA’s mapping tool for Pakistan Undertake EIA mapping (NCEA analytical tool) Conduct a workshop to verify EIA mapping outcomes and priorities for improvement Disseminate conclusions and recommendations of the study Develop review mechanism and relevant tools / guidance Pilot test the review system and tools/guidance on selected ongoing EIAs Finalise review mechanism and tools / guidance Disseminate review mechanism and tools / guidance Monitor and evaluate EIA review mechanism   Indicator EIA map developed 4 provincial and 1 national workshops (of 30-35 participants each) held to verify EIA mapping Results disseminated in the form of a paper / report presented at IAIA International Conference, PEAA meeting and via web to at least 100 relevant professional EIA review mechanism revised and documented Endorsement / notification by PakEPA of review mechanism Inclusion of review mechanism in IEE / EIA Review Rules At least 3 EIAs pilot tested under the review mechanism 4 provincial and 2 national workshops (of 30-35 participants each) in held to get feedback on the review mechanism Local experts are engaged for the assignment      Means of verification Annual progress report EIA mapping document 5 workshop reports Meeting NFRs List of professionals with whom reports / results are shared Outcome 1: Improved implementation of EIA procedure, through the development of tools and guidance material, and piloting

 1.2. EIA review mechanism (including tools to support its effective implementation) developed (The activities towards achieving this output will be initiated during the inception period)     

    

       

Annual progress report Pak EPA’s notification Review reports of 3 EIAs Revised IEE/ EIA Review Rules EIA procedure performance monitoring system 6 workshop reports Meeting NFRs Local experts’ ToRs

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Outputs 1.3. Coordination mechanism between federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments established  

Activities Hold consultations between EPAs and  P&D departments Develop report outlining possible  coordination mechanisms and share with concerned departments Finalise report Review and revise coordination  mechanism (if needed) Monitor implementation of coordination mechanism 

Indicator Co-ordination mechanisms studied, revised and documented Adoption / publication in the Gazette of Pakistan of the notified co-ordination mechanism by federal and provincial EPAs and P&DDs At least 12 consultations held with EPA and P&DDs (each consultation 5-10 people) At least 1 national workshop (3035 participants) held to review study findings on coordination mechanism Local expert engaged for the assignment EIA monitoring system developed and documented Relevant departments use the monitoring system Procedure performance monitoring system is included in the IEE / EIA Review Rules and notified Workshop held to verify the system Database of Environmental Information System is initialised Local expert engaged for the    

Means of verification Annual progress report EIA procedure performance monitoring system Report outlining revised coordination mechanisms Notified co-ordination mechanism and Gazette of Pakistan where it appears Meeting NFRs / minutes of consultations Workshop report Coordination mechanism report Local experts’ ToRs Annual progress report Monitoring system document EIS Database Revised IEE/ EIA Rules Meeting NFRs Workshop report Pilot testing report Local experts’ ToRs

  

           

 1.4. EIA procedure performance monitoring system established  Conduct research and analysis of systems operational in countries with conditions similar to Pakistan Undertake consultations with relevant departments Develop draft EIA procedure performance monitoring system Share with stakeholders and pilot test Revise system (if needed) based on results of pilot testing Support data collection and processing during the Programme Initialise and implement the database   

     

  

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Outputs

Activities software of environmental information system   

Indicator assignment Stakeholders are using the database Detailed Terms of Reference for 2 EIAs 2 model EIAs successfully conducted by international and local consultants with the assistance of project staff EIA experience disseminated and integrated into guidance material 3–4 public hearings held of 25–30 people each to share the draft EIA reports 2 EMP implementation visits undertaken by 5-6 persons Local experts engaged for the assignment Study is conducted and documented 1 provincial and 1 national workshops (of at least 30–35 participants at each event) held At least 5 stakeholder meetings held of 10–15 participants each At least 80% of the participants in the workshops and meetings show       

Means of verification

1.5.

Two good practice EIAs undertaken

 

Identify two suitable pilot EIAs for provision of technical guidance and expertise and develop detailed Terms of Reference for each EIA Support EIA process with technical / procedural expertise Document and disseminate the lessons learnt

 

2 EIA Terms of Reference Annual progress report Follow-up interviews for each EIA pilot 2 EIA reports 3–4 public hearing reports 2 EMP implementation reports Local experts’ ToRs

  Outcome 2: SEA introduced and piloted in planning processes and practices 2.1. Improved understanding of SEA application to planning practice (This output will be achieved during the inception period)  Hold two stakeholder workshops at federal and provincial levels to understand planning process at a federal and provincial level Initiate study of Pakistan’s development planning process for identification of areas / stages for SEA incorporation Hold one national workshop to share draft study report and obtain feedback Incorporate feedback and finalise study  

    

 

Annual progress report Study report 2 workshop reports Minutes of stakeholder meetings Local experts’ ToRs

 
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Outputs 

Activities report Hold stakeholder meetings, in particular  to disseminate SEA pilot progress and lessons, and encourage wider application of SEA Customise NCEA’s mapping tool and develop guidance material Test and finalise mapping tools and guidance material through pilot SEAs (Output 2.5) 

Indicator keen interest in SEA Local experts engaged for the assignment

Means of verification

2.2.

Develop tools and guidance material to support SEA application

 

 

 2.3. Facilitate formation of a SEA Task Force  Develop ToRs for Task Force based on  consultations carried out under Output 2.1  Assist in organising biannual meetings of the Task Force  Support Task Force with technical advice, discussion documents, international examples, and exposure to best practices Conduct study for the identification of regulatory or other mechanisms for institutionalising SEA in Pakistan  

Tools and guidance material including SEA map developed and documented 2 provincial workshops (of at least 30–35 participants at each event) held Endorsement / notification of tools and guidance materials by GoP Tools and guidance material are actually used by the Planning Commission Consultations (5–10) held for the development of tools and guidance Terms of Reference of the Task Force developed Task Force notified by the Planning Commission Biannual meetings (2 per annum) of the Task Force are held

       

Annual progress report 2 workshop reports Endorsement statement / notification SEA mapping document Survey of target groups Number of downloads for tools and guidance material Published guidance material 5–10 minutes / NFRs of consultations Annual progress report Terms of Reference of Task Force Notification of the Task Force Minutes of 2 Task Force meetings per annum Annual progress report Study report

   

 

2.4.

Legislative and regulatory  requirements for SEA assessed

Study conducted and documented  2 provincial workshops of 30–35  people each held to develop

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Outputs 

Activities Hold 1 national and 3 provincial stakeholder workshops for sharing of report on regulatory mechanisms, obtaining feedback, and finalising the study

Indicator legislative and regulatory  mechanisms  At least 80% of the participants in the workshops/consultations show keen interest in SEA legislative and regulatory mechanisms Local experts are engaged for the assignment 2 plans / programmes selected for piloting SEA 2 SEAs successfully undertaken 15–20 follow-up interviews conducted during the process for each SEA 2 evaluation exercises conducted SEA experience disseminated and integrated into guidance material Local experts engaged for the assignment Awareness raising strategy developed Supporting material developed and disseminated Webpage of the Programme developed and updated regularly 1 provincial workshops (30–35 persons each) held to assist in the    

Means of verification 2 workshop reports Local experts’ ToRs

 2.5. Two pilot SEAs undertaken  Hold consultations / workshops with relevant federal and provincial ministries / departments, and district level authorities to identify SEA pilots Prepare and finalise ToRs for each pilot Undertake assessment for each pilot Review and analyse pilot SEA reports Disseminate results   

   

  

Annual progress report 2 SEA reports 2 evaluation exercise reports 15–20 follow-up interviews / meetings NFRs for each SEA pilot Local experts’ ToRs

Outcome 3: Understanding and capacity for EIA and SEA enhanced 3.1. Strategy for Improving Understanding, for promotion of EIA and introduction of SEA developed and implemented (This output will be achieved during the inception phase)   Hold consultations with partners and experts on designing the Strategy Develop strategy, including the identification of target groups (such as high-level decision-makers, civil society, etc.). The Strategy may include regular seminars and newsletter, EIA / SEA website (incorporating a Q&A section and listserv), and information material            Annual progress report Programme website / web activity report Awareness raising Strategy 2 workshop reports 2 seminar reports every year 2 newsletters every year Published awareness raising
Annex I: Page 5

National Impact Assessment Programme

Outputs 

Activities Implement the strategy 

Indicator preparation of strategy  1 national workshop (30–35 persons) held to share draft strategy for feedback 2 seminars held every year to raise awareness on impact assessment 2 Programme newsletters every year to disseminate research and other work done under the Programme increased awareness verified through independent sources, like Gallup Project’s website developed and uploaded 2 provincial and 1 national  workshops (30–35 persons) to  develop PEAA operational strategy  2 PEAA General Body Meetings of 20–30 members per year  2 seminars held on impact assessment for 30–35 media people 2 training workshops held on impact assessment for 20–25 media people per workshop At least 10 articles published every year on impact assessment by media persons trained under the      

Means of verification material Project’s website

 

 3.2. A national network of impact assessment professionals strengthened   Develop an operational strategy for PEAA  Support PEAA’s activities (including General Body Meetings)  Organise workshops, seminars etc. for  educating / involving print and electronic media Establish a Media Coordination Cell for  keeping the media informed of current development related issues Provide regular updates to media through  Media Coordination Cell

Annual progress report 3 workshop reports 2 PEAA GBM minutes per year PEAA operational strategy Annual progress report Media analysis 2 workshop reports 2 seminar reports 10 published articles every year 30 – 40 trained media persons on impact

3.3.

Print and electronic media  actively involved in highlighting issues / concerns related to EIA  and SEA 

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Outputs 

Activities Facilitate promotion of EIA / SEA through print and electronic media 

Indicator Programme Experts with experience in training  media engaged to facilitate training program Training needs assessment undertaken Training programme / modules developed Delivery of training programme –9 training workshops of 20–25 participants each At least 80% of the participants in the training workshops show satisfaction over their learning and relevance of training At least 60% satisfactory potstraining application of skills by the participants Training needs assessment undertaken Training module based on identified needs developed 3 training sessions of 20–25 participants in each of the training conducted At least 80% of the trainees are satisfied with content and learning from the trainings % increase in public interest      

Means of verification assessment Local experts’ ToRs

3.4.

Enhanced capacity of stakeholders (including federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments, NGOs, environmental professionals (consultants) to participate in the EIA process

 

 

Undertake comprehensive training needs assessment of all partner institutions Develop comprehensive training programme based on the identified needs Integrate EIA tools and mechanisms (1.3 and 1.4) in the training programme Implement training programme

  

Training needs assessment report Annual progress report Training programme / modules 9 training workshop reports Training evaluation questionnaires Follow-up interviews

3.5.

Increased effectiveness of  ETs in enforcing the EIA regulatory framework 

Undertaken training needs assessment of  the relevant legal professionals Develop training programme for  strengthening ETs based on identified needs  Implement training programme 

      

Training needs assessment report Annual progress report Training evaluation questionnaires Follow-up interviews Minutes / NFR of meetings held 3 training session reports Local lawyer/consultant’s

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Outputs

Activities 

Indicator litigation cases in a given year Local lawyer as consultant engaged for the assignment Accreditation procedure developed and notified 2 workshops for 30–35 people each held to share the draft accreditation system Local expert engaged for the assignment     

Means of verification ToRs

3.6.

Accreditation system for EIA consultants

    3.7. EIA and SEA in select academic institutions courses introduced or upgraded according to international standards / developments 

Conduct a review, in collaboration with PEAA, of accreditation practices elsewhere Develop a suitable accreditation approach Hold consultations with stakeholders Implement accreditation system, together with PEAA Undertake promotion and advocacy for the accreditation system

 

Annual progress report Notification of accreditation procedure 2 workshop reports Local experts’ ToRs

 

Undertake situational analysis / review of  academic institutions and EIA and SEA related courses being offered  Organise and implement exchange visits with relevant universities  Revise courses based on the recommendations of the situational analysis (only for select institutions)

Review / situational analysis undertaken and documented Quality EIA/SEA content for inclusion in course curriculum developed 10–15 professors and the relevant Programme staff visit 2 countries (e.g., Netherlands and UK) to review successful academic programs 2–3 exchange visits of 5-6 impact assessment professionals / students per visit to and from Pakistan 10–15 meetings held with select academic institutions

       

Annual progress report Survey of course coordinators Academic peer review of course content Student evaluations by course co-ordinators 2 international visit reports 2 – 3 exchange visit reports 10–15 minutes / NFR of the meetings Local and /or international impact assessment experts’ ToRs

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Outputs

Activities 

Indicator Local and if required international impact assessment experts engaged for the assignment Course content of EIA/SEA developed and included in curriculum 5-6 visits to public administration institutions held by consultants / Programme staff 1–2 international visits of relevant staff of these institutions to public administration institutions where EIA/SEA is successfully integrated in the curriculum 3–4 internationally renowned impact assessment expert guest lectures arranged in public administration institutions Local impact assessment experts engaged for the assignment Training needs assessment undertaken Training programme developed 3 training sessions of 20–25 participants each conducted At least 30 trained professionals on SEA At least 80% of the trainees are satisfied with content and learning       

Means of verification

3.8.

EIA and SEA introduced as  a course component in training institutes for public administration  (e.g., NIPAs, Administrative Staff  College, Civil Services Academy and National Defence University etc.)

Hold meetings with relevant institutions  to assess the need for EIA and SEA incorporation in the curriculum Arrange guest lectures for introduction of  EIA / SEA delivered at select institutions Design and incorporate courses on EIA / SEA in curriculum, using training material  from 3.5

Annual progress report Course contents per se Course evaluations 5–6 visit reports 1–2 international visit reports 3–4 guest lecture presentations and reports Local and/or international impact assessment experts ToRs

 3.9. Enhanced capacity of relevant institutions and stakeholders to conduct and review SEAs     Undertake training needs assessment of the relevant institutions Develop training programme based on identified needs Integrate SEA tools and guidance material (from 2.2) in the training programme Implement training programme     

    

Training needs assessment report Annual progress report Training programme / modules 3 training reports Training evaluation questionnaires of 5–6 sessions with total of around

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Outputs

Activities

Indicator from the trainings 

Means of verification 100 participants Follow-up interviews of approximately 100 participants Annual progress report 8–10 Participant reports every year Papers / presentations prepared for international events 2 follow-up seminars every year of the Programme by participating persons Proceedings of the international conference

3.10. Collaboration established  with international and regional impact assessment institutions (e.g. IAIA)  

 

Establish contact and information sharing  with international and regional impact assessment institutions for future collaboration  Organise an international conference on impact assessment in Pakistan Facilitate participation of relevant  professionals in international impact assessment events Organise exchange visits for international exposure Organise lectures / training programmes on SEA by international experts from collaborating and other institutions Establish PCU in ES and PIUs in EW, Pak EPA and IUCN, including contracting and training staff 

8-10 relevant experts participate every year in international events (e.g. IAIA) Participants prepare papers and deliver presentations on NIAP research / findings at international events One international conference on impact assessment organised

  

Outcome 4: Effective Programme management systems and mechanisms developed and put in place 4.1. PIUs / PCU  operationalised (This output will be achieved in the inception phase) PCU in ES, PIUs in EW, Pak EPA and  IUCN operationalised  Annual progress report Official correspondence/ notifications regarding establishment of PCU in ES, and PIUs in EW and Pak EPA Equipment, furniture and other consumables purchase orders and receipts Annual progress report

4.2.

Implementation mechanisms for the

Organise inception planning and workshop

Inception workshop held

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Outputs programme instituted  (This output will be initiated  during the inception phase and most of it would be achieved except annual work planning  and reporting, which is continuous activity)  

Activities Institute and operationalise PAC Develop overall work plans for the inception and implementation periods and annual work plans Develop and implement programme monitoring, evaluation and reporting systems Arrange Mid Term Review of the Programme Arrange End of the Programme Evaluation       

Indicator PAC meetings held twice a year Overall and annual work plans developed and submitted on time MoUs amongst implementation partners signed Detailed Operations Plan for implementation period developed PMER system followed regularly Mid Term Review in Year 2 of the implementation period End of the Programme Evaluation       

Means of verification Inception workshop report PAC meetings attendance and minutes Overall and annual work plans MoUs amongst implementation partners Detailed Operations Plan for implementation period MTR report EPE report

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Annex II Terms of Reference for Programme Positions
Project Manager
The Project Manager has responsibility for the overall management and coordination of the Programme. He/she would manage the Programme through its Deputy Project Managers in the respective Programme Implementation Units.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Plan and manage programme implementation. 2. Supervise and coordinate production of programme outputs according to the programme proposal approved by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (EKN); 3. Select, recruit and supervise the project staff; 4. Ensure that all MoUs are prepared, negotiated and signed with programme partners; 5. Supervise preparation and revision of the programme work plans, budgets and financial plans; 6. Organise and coordinate programme activities according to the work plan in order to produce outputs; 7. Coordinate internal monitoring, mid term review and end of the programme evaluation; 8. Maintain contact and smooth working relations with all programme partners and EKN; 9. Timely prepare and submit six monthly financial reports, annual progress reports and any other reporting requirements by the donor; 10. Provide regular updates to National Programme Director (NPD) on the progress of the programme; 11. Identify and resolve conflict situations with the assistance of the NPD, if necessary; 12. Work closely with the partners to establish an effective results-based monitoring and evaluation system; and 13. Represent the Programme on the Programme Advisory Committee.

Selection Criteria
1. Post-graduate degree in environmental engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences or natural resource management with at least 15 years relevant professional experience preferably in EIA development and implementation; 2. Ability to effectively coordinate a large, multi-disciplinary project involving multiple partners; 3. Ability to use tact and diplomacy to resolve conflicts and achieve results; and 4. Excellent communication skills both in English and Urdu.

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Deputy Project Manager/Advocacy Coordinator
Reporting to the Project Manager, the DPM/Advocacy Coordinator will provide support in the implementation of programme activities in IUCN Pakistan with a specific focus on advocacy. In addition to his/her technical functions, he/she would perform management support functions for smooth implementation of the Programme in IUCN Pakistan.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Develop an awareness-raising and advocacy strategy for the Programme; 2. Design media campaigns for the Programme to promote EIA and SEA; 3. Liaise with media and relevant professionals for awareness-raising and advocacy for the Programme; 4. Provide support in development and implementation of the capacity building programme; 5. Maintain contact and smooth working relations with all project staff; 6. Assist PIU in the production of programme outputs according to the work plan; and 7. Assist PM in the preparation and revision of the programme work plans, budgets and financial plans related to IUCN Pakistan.

Selection Criteria
1. Post-graduate degree in environmental engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences or natural resource management with at least 8 years relevant professional experience; 2. Ability to work with multiple partners in a multi-disciplinary project especially international organization; and 3. Excellent communication skills both in English and Urdu.

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Deputy Project Manager/Policy Coordinator
Reporting to the Project Manager, the DPM/Policy Coordinator will provide support in implementation of the Programme activities in the Environment Wing of the Ministry of Environment with a specific focus on policy review and development. In addition to his/her technical functions, he/she would perform management support functions for smooth implementation in the Environment Wing.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Support review and development of policy documents related to EIA and SEA; 2. Liaise with provincial Environment Departments for inputs and support for policy review and development; 3. Maintain contact and smooth working relations with all project staff; 4. Assist PIU in the production of programme outputs according to the work plan; 5. Assist PM in the preparation and revision of the programme work plans, budgets and financial plans related to the Environment Wing; and 6. Represent the PIU Environment Wing at relevant forums.

Selection Criteria
1. Post-graduate degree in environmental engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences or natural resource management with at least 8 years relevant professional experience; 2. Ability to work with multiple partners in a multi-disciplinary project especially government institutions; and 3. Excellent communication skills both in English and Urdu.

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Deputy Project Manager/SEA Coordinator
Reporting to the Project Manager, the DPM/SEA Coordinator will provide support in implementation of the Programme activities in the Environment Section of the Planning Commission of Pakistan with a specific focus on SEA. In addition to his/her technical functions, he/she would perform management support functions for smooth implementation in the Environment Section.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Provide support to the Programme in general and Planning Commission of Pakistan in particular in the conceptualisation and introduction of SEA process in Pakistan; 2. Support review and development of policy documents related to SEA; 3. Assist NCEA and relevant consultants in the development of SEA material; 4. Assist NCEA in conducting training programmes on SEA; 5. Develop hand-on capacity regarding in SEA of the attached staff; 6. Liaise with provincial Planning & Departments for inputs and support regarding promotion of SEA; 7. Maintain contact and smooth working relations with all project staff; 8. Assist PIU in the production of programme outputs according to the work plan; 9. Assist PM in the preparation and revision of the programme work plans, budgets and financial plans related to the Environment Section; 10. Represent the PIU and the Environment Section at relevant forums.

Selection Criteria
1. Post-graduate degree in environmental engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences or natural resource management with at least 8 years relevant professional experience preferably in SEA; 2. Excellent understanding of EIA process, its implementation status in Pakistan and new developments / research in EIA and SEA; 3. Ability to work with multiple partners in a multi-disciplinary project especially government institutions; 4. Ability to assist professional trainers in conduct training programmes on SEA; and 5. Excellent communication skills both in English and Urdu.

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Deputy Project Manager/EIA Expert 1
Reporting to the Project Manager, the DPM/EIA Expert will provide support in implementation of the Programme activities in Pak EPA with a specific focus on EIA. In addition to his/her technical functions, he/she would perform management support functions for smooth implementation of the Programme in Pak EPA.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Review EIAs received in Pak EPA and build hands on capacity of the attached staff; 2. Provide support to the Pak EPA in the effective implementation of EIA process; 3. Conduct trainings on EIA as and when required; 4. Maintain contact and smooth working relations with all provincial EIA Experts; 5. Assist PIU in the production of programme outputs according to the work plan; 6. Assist PM in the preparation and revision of the programme work plans, budgets and financial plans related to Pak EPA; 7. Provide regular updates to Programme Director (NPD) on the progress of EIA related activities; 8. Represent the PIU and respective organization at relevant forums.

Selection Criteria
1. Post-graduate degree in environmental engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences or natural resource management with at least 8 years relevant professional experience preferably in EIA development and implementation; 2. Excellent understanding of EIA process, its implementation status in Pakistan and new developments / research in EIA internationally; 3. Ability to work with multiple partners in a multi-disciplinary project especially government institutions; 4. Ability to conduct training programmes on EIA; and 5. Excellent communication skills both in English and Urdu.

1

During the implementation period, one EIA Expert is proposed to be placed in each of the provincial EPAs. However, their need and required expertise would be established after a detailed assessment of provincial EPAs during the inception period. Their TORs would then be developed accordingly.

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Finance & Admin Officer
Reporting to the Project Manager, the Finance & Admin Officer will provide support in implementation of the Programme.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Handling cash and bank transactions and check budget lines to ensure that all transactions are correctly booked to the project and is duly approved by the Project Manager and authenticity of the bills are scrutinised for payment; 2. Maintain Petty Cash Imprest System; 3. Preparation/Authorization of Vouchers (Cash, Bank, Receipt, Journal); 4. Ensure the daily postings of entries into accounting system as per the guidelines; 5. Ensure that Project Advances Accounts and all Staff Accounts checked and deductions are made on monthly basis; 6. Complete monthly close off and send back up to IUCN Finance with the checklist; 7. Complete year-end accounts in accordance with the instructions issued from IUCN; 8. Prepare Bank Reconciliation statements on monthly basis; 9. Ensure that Debit/Credit notes for Partners are prepared and send as and when they incur; 10. Prepare current account reconciliations for partners on a monthly basis and report for any two months long reconciling item; 11. Prepare funds request on monthly basis and send to IUCN Finance for transfer of funds; 12. Transfer funds to partners as per their fund request; 13. Prepare monthly payroll for the staff, payroll reconciliation, disburse the salaries and distribute the salary slips on monthly basis; 14. Calculate/deduct the tax from the payroll and deposit on a monthly basis; 15. Prepare staff personal accounts reconciliation on a monthly basis 16. Prepare and distribute Project Analysis Reports to the Project Manager on monthly basis; 17. Preparation of six monthly and yearly financial reports for the project according to the donor requirement; 18. Coordinate the internal/external audits of the project in coordination with IUCN Finance and submission of report to IUCN for further submission to the donor; 19. Project budgeting in consultation with the Project manager; 20. Assistance in preparation of work plans for linking it to the budgets of concerned projects; 21. Improve systems and procedures to enhance internal controls to satisfy internal audit requirement;

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22. Administer security related functions in project related premises/locations; 23. Maintain project assets inventory; 24. Handle field level financial matters, i.e. petty cash/bank transactions; 25. Ensure effective and efficient administrative services are available; 26. Ensure effective and efficient administrative services are available; 27. Support in organisation of workshops, seminars etc and meetings along with coordination and follow up; and 28. Carry out any other relevant tasks as required by and mutually agreed with the line manager.

Selection Criteria
1. Graduate in financial discipline 2. 3–5 years of project related relevant experience 3. Knowledge of basic administrative and financial practices and procedures is essential. 4. Self-driven personality with credibility and aptitude & ability for problem solving and decision making. 5. Strong public relations, presentation, negotiation and interpersonal skills 6. Proficient in related computer software (Word, Excel and Power Point) 7. Ability to deliver under pressure, multi tasking and possess emotional stability 8. Well versed in written and spoken English/ Urdu

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Programme Assistant – one each at IUCN, EW, Pak EPA and ES
Reporting to the respective Deputy Project Manager, the Programme Assistant will provide support in implementation of the Programme.

Duties and Responsibilities
1. Provide secretarial support including typing, faxing, mailing, filing and handling correspondence; 2. Handle the visitors and telephone related matters; 3. Arrange logistics/travel related matters; 4. Maintain attendance and leave records; 5. Maintaining up to date list of files and reports etc. 6. Ensure adequate supply of stationery for staff, its distribution and inventory of stocks; 7. Ensure daily cleanliness of office rooms and upkeep of premises; 8. Maintenance of office equipment and premises such as fax machine/photocopier/telephone exchange and computer; record of courier receipts; 9. Supervise of support staff, check overtime claims of support staff before Project Director signs them; 10. Support the professional staff in composing, formatting and circulating technical reports; 11. Liaise with Finance & Admin Officer for work; 12. Carry out any other relevant tasks as required by and mutually agreed with the line manager.

Selection Criteria
1. Graduate in any discipline; 2. 2–3 year of relevant experience; 3. Good communication and interpersonal skills. 4. Ability to deliver under pressure. 5. Proficient in related computer software especially MS Office. 6. Well versed in written and spoken English/Urdu.

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Annex III Overall Year-wise Budget and Work Plan
Currency: Pak Rs. Code Description Unit Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0 Total Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Notes

A A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Staff Project Manager DPM/Advocacy Coordinator, IUCN DPM/Policy Coordinator, EW DPM/SEA Coordinator, ES

0%
Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month 245,000 90,000 90,000 125,000 12 12 12 2,940,000 1,080,000 1,080,000 12 12 12 12

10%
3,234,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 1,650,000 12 12 12 12

10%
3,557,400 1,306,800 1,306,800 1,815,000 12 12 12 12

10%
3,913,140 1,437,480 1,437,480 1,996,500 6 6 6 6

10%
2,152,227 790,614 790,614 1,098,075 15,796,767 5,802,894 5,802,894 6,559,575 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X To be contracted by IUCN and to work under the National Programme Director X To be placed in IUCN X To be placed in Environment Wing, MoE X To be placed in Environment Section, Planning Commission of Pakistan X To be placed in Pak EPA X To be placed in Punjab EPA X To be placed in Sindh EPA X To be placed in NWFP EPA X To be placed in Balochistan EPA X To be placed in AJK EPA X To be placed in NA EPA X To be placed with the Project Manager X One Programme Assistant in each of the units, i.e., IUCN, Environment Wing, Pak EPA & Environment Section X One Support Staff in each of the units, i.e., IUCN, Environment Wing, Pak EPA & Environment Section

A-5 A-6 A-7 A-8 A-9 A-10 A-11 A-12 A-13

DPM/EIA Expert, Pak EPA EIA Expert, Punjab EPA EIA Expert, Sindh EPA EIA Expert, NWFP EPA EIA Expert, Balochistan EPA EIA Expert, AJK EPA EIA Expert, NA EPA Finance & Admin Officer Programme Assistant (1+1+1+1) IUCN, EW, EPA, ES Support Staff (1+1+1+1) IUCN, EW, EPA, ES Sub-Total A

Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month Person-month

125,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 45,000 40,000

12 12 48

1,500,000 540,000 1,920,000

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 48

1,650,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 1,188,000 594,000 2,112,000

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 48

1,815,000 1,306,800 1,306,800 1,306,800 1,306,800 1,306,800 1,306,800 653,400 2,323,200

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 48

1,996,500 1,437,480 1,437,480 1,437,480 1,437,480 1,437,480 1,437,480 718,740 2,555,520

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 24

1,098,075 790,614 790,614 790,614 790,614 790,614 790,614 395,307 1,405,536

8,059,575 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 2,901,447 10,316,256

X

X

X

X

X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

A-14

Person-month

18,000

48

864,000

48

950,400

48

1,045,440

48

1,149,984

24

632,491

4,642,315

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

9,924,000

19,694,400

21,663,840

23,830,224

13,106,623

88,219,087

B B-1 B-2 B-3 B-4

Operations Premises (rent, utilities, janitorial, security) Communications (tel, fax, internet) Consumables Repairs & Maintenance Sub-Total B

month month month month

85,000 140,000 200,000 170,000

12 12 12 12

1,020,000 1,680,000 2,400,000 2,040,000 7,140,000

12 12 12 12

1,122,000 1,848,000 2,640,000 2,244,000 7,854,000

12 12 12 12

1,234,200 2,032,800 2,904,000 2,468,400 8,639,400

12 12 12 12

1,357,620 2,236,080 3,194,400 2,715,240 9,503,340

6 6 6 6

746,691 1,229,844 1,756,920 1,493,382 5,226,837

5,480,511 9,026,724 12,895,320 10,961,022 38,363,577

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X This budget is for 1 PCU and 3 PIUs X This budget is for 1 PCU and 3 PIUs X This budget is for 1 PCU and 3 PIUs

C C-1 C-2

Travel Airfare & Accommodation Vehicle running & rental Sub-Total C

Person-trips Per km

45,000 15

75 180,000

3,375,000

75

3,712,500

75

4,083,750

75

4,492,125

50

3,294,225 2,196,150 5,490,375

18,957,600 14,726,850 33,684,450

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

2,700,000 180,000 6,075,000

2,970,000 180,000 6,682,500

3,267,000 180,000 7,350,750

3,593,700 100,000 8,085,825

X It covers air ticket, accommodation & daily subsistence allowance X This budget is for 1 PCU, 3 PIUs and 6 coordinators placed at provincial EPAs

D D-1

Capital Items Laptops

Laptop

120,000

9

1,080,000

7

924,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,004,000

X

X

This equipment would fulfil needs of all professional staff in PCU, 3 PIUs and 6 provincial placements

D-2 D-3 D-4

Multimedia projectors 3kVA UPS Colour laser printers

Multimedia projector UPS Printers

240,000 75,000 200,000

4 4 4

960,000 300,000 800,000

-

-

-

-

960,000 300,000 800,000

X X X

This equipment would fulfil needs of all professional staff in PCU, 3 PIUs and 6 provincial placements X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X This equipment would fulfil needs of all professional staff in PCU, 3 PIUs and 6 provincial placements

D-5 D-6

Dual-side black & white printers Other IT Accessories

Printers LS

70,000 250,000

9 1

630,000 250,000

7 1

539,000 275,000

1

302,500

1

332,750

1

183,013

1,169,000 1,343,263

X X

Sub-Total D E E-1.1 Outputs Mapping of EIA practice

4,020,000

1,738,000

302,500

332,750

183,013

6,576,263

3,185,000

-

-

-

-

3,185,000

Visit to 4 provincial capitals for meetings to share EIA mapping tool and data collection for mapping exercise. One national workshop to share findings of EIA mapping exercise. This includes involvement of NCEA experts, local consultants and partners. EIA mapping report to be published. X X

E-1.1a

Provincial Workshops

580,000

4

2,320,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,320,000

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 1

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 X

Notes

E-1.1b E-1.2

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate National Workshop EIA review mechanism (including tools to support its effective implementation) developed

0%
865,000 1 865,000 2,175,000 -

10%
3,217,500 -

10%
-

10%
-

10%
865,000 5,392,500 NCEA experts, Local consultants, and select project staff visit provincial capitals for consultations. Workshop in Islamabad to share the draft review mechanism with the relevant stakeholders. Pilot testing of the tool on three ongoing EIAs which will require travelling of at least 7-8 people from different EPAs to project locations, and boarding / lodging. One workshop held to get feedback on the review mechanism (30-35 people). The relevant partners may also require resources to implement the system in their respective organizations. All reports/tools to be published. X X X

E-1.2a E-1.2b E-1.2c E-1.2d E-1.3

Local Consultant Provincial Workshops National Workshop Publishing Coordination mechanism between federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments established

300,000 580,000 865,000 750,000

1 2 1 -

150,000 1,160,000 865,000 -

1 2 1 1

165,000 1,276,000 951,500 825,000 1,941,500

-

907,500

-

-

-

-

315,000 2,436,000 1,816,500 825,000 2,849,000

X

X X X Project staff travel to provincial capitals, AJK and NA to get a better understanding of the existing coordination mechanism. The draft report is later shared with a select group in a workshop (30-35) to get the feedback. There will be other meetings and travel required to finalise the system before putting into implementation. Later the partner organizations may also require resources to implement and monitor the new system. The report developed under this activity will be published. X X X X X X X NCEA and consultants review the existing EIA procedure performance monitoring system within Pakistan, and other regional countries. This would require travelling to provinces, AJK and NA to first understand the existing system, develop / improve the system and later to monitor. System to be piloted in select EPAs. A workshop will be held to get the feedback on the system. Consultants engaged to develop computer based monitoring system. X X X X X X X This will require engaging local consultants for undertaking EIAs. NCEA will provide technical guidance in undertaking the two EIAs. All partners will also be involved in this activity. This will also include laboratory expenses, meetings and public hearings. Local consultants and partners will also be involved in every step to build their technical capacity in undertaking quality EIAs. X X X X X X X X X X X X NCEA experts and Local consultants hired to undertake study of Pakistan's planning process both at federal and provincial level. This would require extensive travelling and meetings within the country. One workshop will be held in provinces to get a better understanding of the planning process in the country. Later a national workshop is held in Islamabad to share the draft study for feedback and finalisation. The study report is to be published.

E-1.3a E-1.3b E-1.3c E-1.4

National Workshop Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Publishing EIA procedure performance monitoring system established

865,000 75,000 750,000

-

-

1 12 -

951,500 990,000 1,320,000

1

907,500 2,317,150

-

-

-

-

951,500 990,000 907,500 3,637,150

E-1.4a E-1.4b E-1.4c E-1.5

Local Consultant National Workshop Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Two good practice EIAs undertaken

300,000 865,000 75,000

-

-

1 12

330,000 990,000 -

2 1 6

726,000 1,046,650 544,500 1,815,000

-

1,996,500

-

-

1,056,000 1,046,650 1,534,500 3,811,500

E-1.5a E-1.5b E-1.5c E-2.1

Local Consultant Lab investigations/analysis Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Improved understanding of SEA application to planning practice

300,000 300,000 75,000

-

1,480,000

-

2,601,500

3 1 4

1,089,000 363,000 363,000 -

3 1 4

1,197,900 399,300 399,300 -

-

-

2,286,900 762,300 762,300 4,081,500

E-2.1a E-2.1b E-2.1c E-2.1d E-2.1e

Local Consultant Provincial Workshops Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits National Workshop Publishing

300,000 580,000 75,000 865,000 750,000

1 1 8 -

300,000 580,000 600,000 -

1 6 1 1

330,000 495,000 951,500 825,000

-

-

-

-

-

630,000 580,000 1,095,000 951,500 825,000

X X

X X X

X X X

X

X X

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 2

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2

Notes

E-2.2

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Develop tools and guidance material to support SEA application

0%
-

10%
-

10%
1,064,800

10%
1,969,880

10%
3,034,680 SEA mapping exercise will be conducted by NCEA and local experts / consultants. SEA mapping exercise will require travelling of experts to different parts of the country. The guidance material will be developed jointly by NCEA, consultants and project people. SEA mapping study and guidance material will be workshoped at 2 locations in Pakistan before being finalised. All the material developed will be published. The development and testing of tools and guidance material will also require travelling of project staff to different locations in the country. X X X X X This would require development of ToR of the Task Force. Meetings of the Task Force will be held on bi-annual basis or the frequency decided by the Task Force. Task Force members will travel from all over the country to participate in its meetings. X X X X X X X A study will be conducted by a prominent lawyer to explore options of legislative and regulatory framework for SEA in the country. This will require travelling of the consultant, NCEA expert and project staff to different provincial capitals, AJK and NA to get feedback of the relevant stakeholders. The draft report will be shared with the relevant stakeholders at 2 provincial workshops. Based on the feedback received the study will be finalised. The finalised study will be published. X X X X X X X X Since no expertise in SEA exists in Pakistan, NCEA and other international experts (if needed) will be involved in undertaking the two SEAs. Local consultants and partners will also be involved every step of the way. This will require extensive travelling all over the country, meetings (3-5 during SEA preparation and later 2-3 for feedback) and several meetings. Two evaluation exercises will also be conducted. Reports will later be printed and disseminated.

E-2.2a E-2.2b E-2.2c E-2.3

Provincial Workshops Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Publishing Facilitate formation of a SEA Task Force

580,000 75,000 750,000

-

-

-

165,000

1 4

701,800 363,000 181,500

1 2 1

771,980 199,650 998,250 199,650

-

109,808

1,473,780 562,650 998,250 655,958

X

X

X

X

E-2.3a E-2.4

Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Legislative and regulatory requirements for SEA assessed

75,000

-

-

2

165,000 -

2

181,500 -

2

199,650 1,969,880

1

109,808 3,045,328

655,958 5,015,208

E-2.4a E-2.4b E-2.4c E-2.4d E-2.5

Local Consultant Provincial Workshops Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Publishing Two pilot SEAs undertaken

300,000 580,000 75,000 750,000

-

-

-

-

-

2,359,500

1 1 8 -

399,300 771,980 798,600 3,593,700

1 1 6 1

439,230 849,178 658,845 1,098,075 1,098,075

838,530 1,621,158 1,457,445 1,098,075 7,051,275

E-2.5a E-2.5b E-2.5c E-3.1

Local Consultant Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Publishing Strategy for Improving understanding, and promotion of EIA and introduction of SEA developed and implemented

300,000 75,000 750,000

-

1,305,000

-

1,716,000

2 18

726,000 1,633,500 840,950

2 18 1

798,600 1,796,850 998,250 925,045

1

1,098,075 453,871

1,524,600 3,430,350 2,096,325 5,240,866

X X

X X X

X X

X X X Strategy formulation will require extensive consultations with partners and other relevant stakeholders in Islamabad and other parts of the country. This will require one provincial workshop during the course of strategy formulation and later 1 national workshop to share the draft strategy. At least 2 seminar will be held every year in different parts of the country meaning 7 seminars during course of the project. Similarly 2 newsletters will be taken out every year meaning 8 during course of the project. In addition, website will be designed for which a consultant will be hired. Understanding improving material will be developed by a consultant / project staff in consultation with NCEA and partners for dissemination which will later be published.

E-3.1a E-3.1b E-3.1c E-3.1d

Provincial Workshops National Workshop Local Seminar Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits

580,000 865,000 160,000 75,000

1 6

580,000 450,000

1 2 3

951,500 352,000 247,500

2 3

387,200 272,250

2 3

425,920 299,475

1 1

234,256 109,808

580,000 951,500 1,399,376 1,379,033

X

X X X X X X X X X X X X

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 3

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 X X X X X X X X X X

Notes

E-3.1e E-3.1f E-3.2

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Newsletter Website A national network of impact assessment professionals strengthened

0%
75,000 200,000 1 1 75,000 200,000 2 -

10%
165,000 968,000 2 -

10%
181,500 1,609,300 2 -

10%
199,650 2,921,545 1 -

10%
109,808 988,268 730,958 200,000 6,487,113

Development of an operational strategy for PEAA will require consultations with PEAA members all over the country and also with other stakeholders. This will also require 2 local workshops of 30-35 members to get the feedback and later finalise the operational strategy. Bi-annual meetings of PEAA General Body will be held every year meaning at least 8 meetings during course of the project. One national conference would be organised during the course of the project. At least one PEAA member will also attend IAIA meeting every year during course of the project. X X X X X X X X X X X X X Print and electronic media will be engaged in promoting impact assessment in the country. This will require seminars for media and training workshops. Training workshops will be held in collaboration with NCEA and other internationally renowned IA experts with experience in training media. 2 seminars will be held on impact assessment for media (25 - 30 people). At least 2 training workshops will be held during course of the project. X X X X X X A very detailed training program will be developed by a consultant based on identified training needs. The training program will be conducted all over the country during the course of the Project. At least 9 training workshops / sessions will be conducted during the project for 20 - 25 participants. The training material developed will be published. The workshops will be conducted through NCEA (need basis) and local consultants. X X X X X X X X X X X X X A prominent lawyer will be hired to conduct study on the effectiveness of ETs. This will require travelling to cities where ETs are functioning. A training module will be developed by a consultant for ETs. The training program will be spread over the entire project duration which will include between 3 training sessions (20-25 participants) on different aspects of impact assessment. The study and training material developed will be published. X X X X X X A local consultant will be hired to conduct review of accreditation systems in other countries specifically South Asia. The exercise may require travelling to other parts of the country to get feedback from different stakeholders. The draft accreditation system will be shared with the relevant stakeholders in 2 workshops (30-35 people each) for their feedback. The system will be later notified and published. X X X X X X X X X X X X

E-3.2a E-3.2b E-3.2c E-3.2d E-3.3

Provincial Workshops National Workshop Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits International Visit Print and electronic media actively involved in highlighting issues / concerns related to EIA and SEA

(IAIA)

580,000 865,000 75,000 300,000

-

-

1 4 -

638,000 330,000 517,000

1 2 2

701,800 181,500 726,000 1,101,100

1 1 2 2

771,980 1,151,315 199,650 798,600 1,836,780

1 2

109,808 878,460 -

2,111,780 1,151,315 820,958 2,403,060 3,454,880

E-3.3a E-3.3b E-3.4

Training Workshops National Seminar Enhanced capacity of stakeholders (including federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments, NGOs, environmental professionals (consultants) to participate in the EIA process

910,000 470,000

-

300,000

1

517,000 1,650,000

1 -

1,101,100 1,815,000

1 1

1,211,210 625,570 1,996,500

-

1,098,075

2,312,310 1,142,570 6,859,575

E-3.4a E-3.4b E-3.4c E-3.5

Local Consultant Training Workshops Publishing Increased effectiveness of ETs in enforcing the EIA regulatory framework

300,000 300,000 750,000

1 -

300,000 -

2 3 -

660,000 990,000 2,062,500

2 3 -

726,000 1,089,000 2,008,600

2 3

798,600 1,197,900 1,211,210

1

1,098,075 1,332,331

2,484,600 3,276,900 1,098,075 6,614,641

E-3.5a E-3.5b E-3.5c E-3.5d E-3.6

Legal expert Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Training Workshops Publishing Accreditation system for EIA consultants

1,500,000 75,000 910,000 750,000

-

-

1 5 -

1,650,000 412,500 -

1 1

1,101,100 907,500 3,853,850

1 -

1,211,210 -

1 -

1,332,331 -

1,650,000 412,500 3,644,641 907,500 3,853,850

E-3.6a E-3.6b E-3.6c E-3.6d

Local Consultant Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Provincial Workshops Publishing

300,000 75,000 580,000 750,000

-

-

-

-

2 9 2 1

726,000 816,750 1,403,600 907,500

-

-

-

-

726,000 816,750 1,403,600 907,500

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 4

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2

Notes

E-3.7

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate EIA and SEA in select academic institutions courses introduced or upgraded according to international standards/ developments.

0%
-

10%
-

10%
2,904,000

10%
2,795,100

10%
1,098,075 6,797,175 Local consultants, and if required, NCEA experts will be engaged to review key tertiary level institutions all over the country with respect to their curriculum vis-à-vis impact assessment, with respect to existing capacities and training needs. This will require travelling to select institutions in different parts of the country, organizing workshops in each institution (not more than 10) of 10-15 people each and later compiling a report based on the mission findings with recommendations. People from select institutions plus project staff (10-15) will be sent to institutions in other countries preferably in Netherlands and UK to get a first hand understanding of the current successful practices. Exchange visits (2-3) with other universities will be arranged which will also provide an opportunity for professors / students (5-6 per visit) from other countries to visit Pakistan.

E-3.7a E-3.7b E-3.7c E-3.8

Local Consultant Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits International Visit EIA and SEA introduced as a course component in training institutes for public administration (e.g. NIPAs, Administrative Staff College, Civil Services Academy and National Defence University etc.)

300,000 75,000 300,000

-

-

2 8 4

726,000 726,000 1,452,000 2,359,500

1 8 4

399,300 798,600 1,597,200 2,495,625

2 2

219,615 878,460 -

1,125,300 1,744,215 3,927,660 4,855,125

X X

X X X

X X X X

X X X

X

X Local and/or international consultants in impact assessment will undertake the review of public administration institutions in Pakistan. This will require travelling to cities where public administration institutions are located (Islamabad, Karachi, Lahore, Quetta, Peshawar, Muzaffarabad and Gilgit) to hold meetings. The consultants will prepare a report on existing situation, existing capacity, training needs and other recommendations. Selected staff (10-12) of the select institutions will be sent to similar institutions in countries (1-2) where such curriculums are being successfully taught. Guest lectures (3-4) by national and international experts will also be arranged at these institutions which will require travel, honorarium and boarding/ lodging.

E-3.8a E-3.8b E-3.8c E-3.9

Local Consultant Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits International Visit Enhanced capacity of relevant institutions and stakeholders to conduct and review SEAs

300,000 75,000 300,000

-

-

1 8 4

181,500 726,000 1,452,000 1,373,350

1 7 4

199,650 698,775 1,597,200 1,510,685

-

1,332,331

381,150 1,424,775 3,049,200 4,216,366

X X

X X

X X X

X X

X X

X A training program based on identified needs will be developed for the relevant institutions. This will require travelling all over the country to meet with the relevant institutions by a 3-4 member team. Later the training program will be implemented which would require around 3 training sessions of 20-25 people. The training sessions will be conducted by NCEA experts and if required some renowned international SEA expert(s) will be engaged.

E-3.9a E-3.9b

Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Training workshops

75,000 910,000

-

-

-

-

3 1

272,250 1,101,100

3 1

299,475 1,211,210

1

1,332,331

571,725 3,644,641

X X

X X

X X

X X

X

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 5

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2

Notes

E-3.10

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Collaboration established with international and regional impact assessment institutions (e.g. IAIA)

0%
-

10%
2,640,000

10%
2,904,000

10%
10,514,900

10%
3,513,840 19,572,740 Under this output, linkages will be established and further strengthened with international impact assessment institutions of repute e.g. International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA). This will include sending partners and project people to IAIA meetings during the course of the project. Each year at least 5-6 local experts will be sent to IAIA international conferences to get a better understanding of IA related issues. Partners and project people will also be sent to IAIA and other international IA events (4-5 people) to stay current on recent developments in IA. However, anyone going for these events will be required to make a presentation on some aspect of NIAP in a session at the conference to get the maximum benefit out of the conference. this will also help in disseminating work done under the Project. During the course of the Project, one international conferences will be organised mainly to promote IA in the country, bring fresh thinking to existing IA practices and also to inform national and international audiences about the quality work being done in NIAP.

E-3.10a International Visit E-3.10b International Visit E-3.10c International Conference E-4.1 PIUs / PCU operationalised

IAIA meetings for exposure

300,000 300,000 5,500,000

-

-

4 4 -

1,320,000 1,320,000 -

4 4 -

1,452,000 1,452,000 -

4 4 1

1,597,200 1,597,200 7,320,500 -

4 4 -

1,756,920 1,756,920 -

6,126,120 6,126,120 7,320,500 X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X X X

X

E-4.2

Implementation mechanisms for project instituted

3,540,000

1,210,000

2,420,000

1,464,100

2,086,343

10,720,443

This output will require setting up of PCU and PIUs which will include procurement and operationalisation of the units. Equipment, furniture and other necessary items will be purchased. Operationalisation will require paying rent and utilities. Inception workshop is held which will involve inviting participants from all over the country and Netherlands. Programme Advisory Committee will be set up which will require holding quarterly meetings. Monitoring and evaluation will include regular internal monitoring, mid term review and end of the programme evaluation. X X X X

E-4.2a E-4.2b E-4.2c E-4.2d

Inception Workshop Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Annual work planning Project monitoring & reporting Sub-Total E International Consultant Person-month

2,515,000 75,000 500,000 300,000

1 3 1 1

2,515,000 225,000 500,000 300,000 11,985,000 7,200,000

4 1 1

330,000 550,000 330,000 20,009,000 7,200,000

4 1 4

363,000 605,000 1,452,000 31,835,100 7,200,000

4 1 1

399,300 665,500 399,300 37,401,100 7,200,000

3 4

329,423 1,756,920 16,156,344 3,600,000

2,515,000 1,646,723 2,320,500 4,238,220 117,386,544 32,400,000

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X

X X

X X

F

600,000

12

12

12

12

6

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

G

Audit Sub Total (A-G)

350,000

1

350,000 46,694,000 704,670 1,740,375 2,334,700 51,473,745

1

385,000 63,562,900 1,038,477 2,171,025 3,178,145 69,950,547

1

423,500 77,415,090 1,142,325 2,950,320 3,870,755 85,378,489

1

465,850 86,819,089 1,256,557 3,370,039 4,340,954 95,786,639

1

512,435 44,275,626 730,088 1,495,452 2,213,781 48,714,947

2,136,785 318,766,705 4,872,117 11,727,210 15,938,335 351,304,368

X

X

X

X

X

H I J

Overheads (3% of A, B, C & G) Overheads (7.5% of D, E & F) Contingencies (5% of A-G) GRAND Total (A-J)

Unit Cost Breakup at Year 0
Inter Provincial Meetings/Visits Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Supplies Round trip Person-night Lump sum 15,000 8,000 6,000 3 3 1 45,000 24,000 6,000 75,000

Local Seminars Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Venue

Round trip Person-night Per day

15,000 8,000 25,000

2 2 1

30,000 16,000 25,000

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 6

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2

Notes

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Material Meals

0%
Lump sum Per person 14,000 1,500 1 50 14,000 75,000 160,000

10%

10%

10%

10%

National Seminar Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

15,000 8,000 25,000 25,000 1,500

15 15 1 1 50

225,000 120,000 25,000 25,000 75,000 470,000

Provincial Workshop Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

15,000 8,000 15,000 10,000 1,500

10 30 3 1 90

150,000 240,000 45,000 10,000 135,000 580,000

National Workshop Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

15,000 8,000 25,000 25,000 1,500

15 45 3 1 120

225,000 360,000 75,000 25,000 180,000 865,000

Training Workshops Air/Land Fare Boarding & Lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

15,000 8,000 25,000 25,000 1,500

15 45 3 1 150

225,000 360,000 75,000 25,000 225,000 910,000 300,000

Local Consultant International Expert Fee Air Fare Boarding & Lodging Visa Other travel costs

man-month

300,000

1

Person-days Round trip Person-night Lump sum Lump sum

55,000 125,000 20,000 5,000 20,000

30 1 30 1 1

1,650,000 125,000 600,000 5,000 20,000 2,400,000

International Visit Air Fare Boarding & Lodging Visa Other travel costs

Per person average visit of 8 days Round trip 125,000 Person-night 20,000 Lump sum 5,000 Lump sum 10,000

1 8 1 1 11

125,000 160,000 5,000 10,000 300,000

Publishing Editing Design Layout Printing Dissemination

Average 100 pages, 500 copies Per job 300,000 Per job 50,000 Per job 75,000 Per job 300,000 Per job 25,000

1 1 1 1 1

300,000 50,000 75,000 300,000 25,000 750,000

International Conference International airfare Domestic air/land fare Boarding & lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

125,000 15,000 15,000 50,000 100,000 2,000

20 40 120 2 1 200

2,500,000 600,000 1,800,000 100,000 100,000 400,000 5,500,000

Inception Workshop International airfare Domestic air/land fare Boarding & lodging Venue Material Meals

Round trip Round trip Person-night Per day Lump sum Per person

125,000 15,000 15,000 50,000 100,000 2,000

5 30 70 1 1 120

625,000 450,000 1,050,000 50,000 100,000 240,000 2,515,000

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 7

Currency: Pak Rs. Code

Description

Unit

Inception Period Implementation Period Year 0 (1 to 12 months) Year 1 (13 to 24 months) Year 2 (25 to 36 months) Year 3 (37 to 48 months) Year 4 (49 to 54 months) Unit Cost in Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Quantity Amount Year 0

Total

Inception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2

Notes

Forecasted Annual Inflation Rate Work Planning Domestic air/land fare Boarding & lodging Material Meals

0%
Round trip Person-night Lump sum Per person 15,000 15,000 30,000 1,000 10 20 1 20 150,000 300,000 30,000 20,000 500,000

10%

10%

10%

10%

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex III: Page 8

Annex IV Partner-wise Budget
Currency: Pak Rs. Code A A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 A-5 A-6 A-7 A-8 A-9 A-10 A-11 A-12 A-13 A-14 Description IUCN Ministry of Environment EW Pak EPA 5,802,894 2,579,064 1,160,579 9,542,537 8,059,575 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 2,579,064 1,160,579 40,136,582 PC ES 6,559,575 2,579,064 1,160,579 10,299,218 Total

Staff Project Manager DPM/Advocacy Coordinator, IUCN DPM/Policy Coordinator, EW DPM/SEA Coordinator, ES DPM/EIA Expert, Pak EPA EIA Expert, Punjab EPA EIA Expert, Sindh EPA EIA Expert, NWFP EPA EIA Expert, Balochistan EPA EIA Expert, AJK EPA EIA Expert, NA EPA Finance & Admin Officer Programme Assistant (1+1+1+1) IUCN, EW, EPA, ES Support Staff (1+1+1+1) IUCN, EW, EPA, ES Sub-Total A Operations Premises (rent, utilities, janitorial, security) Communications (tel, fax, internet) Consumables Repairs & Maintenance Sub-Total B

15,796,767 5,802,894 2,901,447 2,579,064 1,160,579 28,240,751

15,796,767 5,802,894 5,802,894 6,559,575 8,059,575 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 4,722,894 2,901,447 10,316,256 4,642,315 88,219,087

B B-1 B-2 B-3 B-4

5,480,511 3,510,393 2,637,679 1,946,350 13,574,932

1,103,266 1,172,302 1,946,350 4,221,918

3,309,799 6,643,044 5,121,973 15,074,815

1,103,266 2,442,295 1,946,350 5,491,911

5,480,511 9,026,724 12,895,320 10,961,022 38,363,577

C C-1 C-2

Travel Airfare & Accommodation Vehicle running & rental Sub-Total C Capital Items Laptops Multimedia projectors 3kVA UPS Colour laser printers Dual-side black & white printers Other IT Accessories Sub-Total D Outputs Mapping of EIA practice EIA review mechanism (including tools to support its effective implementation) developed Coordination mechanism between federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments established

6,228,925 4,719,090 10,948,015

3,249,875 3,335,920 6,585,795

6,228,925 3,335,920 9,564,845

3,249,875 3,335,920 6,585,795

18,957,600 14,726,850 33,684,450

D D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 D-5 D-6

480,000 240,000 75,000 200,000 280,000 164,855 1,439,855

240,000 240,000 75,000 200,000 140,000 100,745 995,745

1,044,000 240,000 75,000 200,000 609,000 976,918 3,144,918

240,000 240,000 75,000 200,000 140,000 100,745 995,745

2,004,000 960,000 300,000 800,000 1,169,000 1,343,263 6,576,263

E E-1.1 E-1.2

3,185,000 5,392,500

3,185,000 5,392,500

E-1.3

2,849,000

2,849,000

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex IV: Page 1

Currency: Pak Rs. Code E-1.4 E-1.5 E-2.1 E-2.2

Description

IUCN

EIA procedure performance monitoring system established Two good practice EIAs undertaken Improved understanding of SEA application to planning practice Develop tools and guidance material to support SEA application Facilitate formation of a SEA Task Force Legislative and regulatory requirements for SEA assessed Two pilot SEAs undertaken Strategy for Improving understanding, and promotion of EIA and introduction of SEA developed and implemented A national network of impact assessment professionals strengthened Print and electronic media actively involved in highlighting issues / concerns related to EIA and SEA Enhanced capacity of stakeholders (including federal and provincial EPAs and P&D departments, NGOs, environmental professionals (consultants) to participate in the EIA process Increased effectiveness of ETs in enforcing the EIA regulatory framework Accreditation system for EIA consultants EIA and SEA in select academic institutions courses introduced or upgraded according to international standards/ developments. EIA and SEA introduced as a course component in training institutes for public administration (e.g. NIPAs, Administrative Staff College, Civil Services Academy and National Defence University etc.)

Ministry of Environment EW Pak EPA 3,637,150 3,811,500

PC ES

Total 3,637,150 3,811,500

4,081,500 3,034,680

4,081,500 3,034,680

E-2.3 E-2.4 E-2.5 E-3.1

655,958 5,015,208 7,051,275 5,240,866

655,958 5,015,208 7,051,275 5,240,866

E-3.2

6,487,113

6,487,113

E-3.3

2,312,310

1,142,570

3,454,880

E-3.4

1,398,075

2,730,750

2,730,750

6,859,575

E-3.5

6,614,641

6,614,641

E-3.6 E-3.7

3,853,850 6,797,175

3,853,850 6,797,175

E-3.8

4,855,125

4,855,125

E-3.9

E-3.10

Enhanced capacity of relevant institutions and stakeholders to conduct and review SEAs Collaboration established with international and regional impact assessment institutions (e.g. IAIA)

4,216,366

4,216,366

19,572,740

19,572,740

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex IV: Page 2

Currency: Pak Rs. Code E-4.1 E-4.2

Description

IUCN 9,073,720 40,380,750 32,400,000 2,136,785 129,121,088

Ministry of Environment EW Pak EPA

PC ES 1,646,723

Total 10,720,443 117,386,544 32,400,000 2,136,785

PIUs / PCU operationalised Implementation mechanisms for project instituted Sub-Total E International Consultant Audit Sub Total (A-G)

13,336,961

39,452,740

24,216,093

F G

34,682,955

107,373,900

47,588,762

318,766,705 4,872,117 11,727,210

H I J

Overheads (3% of A, B, C & G) Overheads (7.5% of D, E & F) Contingencies (5% of A-G) GRAND Total (A-J) 6,456,054 135,577,142 1,734,148 36,417,103 5,368,695 112,742,595 2,379,438 49,968,200

15,938,335 351,304,368

National Impact Assessment Programme

Annex IV: Page 3

Pakistan Country Office 1 Bath Island Road Karachi 75530 Pakistan tel +92 (21) 35861540-3 fax +92 (21) 35861448/35835760 cro@iucnp.org www.iucnp.org

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