Contents

coaching center
issue 3
summer 2007
8 coaching education
By Danny Hotochin
10 coaching schools
By Danny Hotochin
14 League administrator Profle
By Ed Passino
16 offciating education
By Danny Hotochin
18 goal Line mechanics
By Bill Lemonnier
19 offcials Profle
By A.D. McPhilomy
20 safety F.a.Q.
By Dr. David Joyner
21 Background screening
By Cynthia Hobgood
4 Chief
Seminole
Bobby Bowden
turned a childhood
dream into one of
the most successful
coaching careers in
football history
6 One Voice,
One Message
usa Football’s
experiences with
youth football
coaches and
volunteers across
the country
helped to develop
three valuable
membership
packages
By Brian Feener
12 Dodgeball,
Texas Style
todd Dodge, one
of the nation’s
most talked
about coaches,
understands the
importance youth
football plays in a
young person’s life
By Tim Polzer
24 U-S-A! U-S-A!
U-S-A!
team usa to play for
World championship
of american Football
By Danny Hotochin &
Cynthia Hobgood
Features
League enhancement center
oFFiciating center
2 Kickoff

3 audibles
22 Future star
26 usa Football
calendar &
resources
28 usa Football
Pigskin
Portraits

30 gear up
32 coaches in the
crowd
DePartments
Front Cover
AP Photo/Steve CAnnon
heaLth & saFety center
1
USAFootball.com
Chairman
Jack kemp
Executive Director
Scott Hallenbeck
Usa football
editorial staff
Managing Editor
cyntHia Hobgood
Contributors:
natHan boUdReaUX, bonnie
doWning, bRian FeeneR, ValeRie
golden, danny HotocHin, ed
paSSino, damon pHillipS
To contact USA Football:
(703) 918-0007
traction media staff
Publisher
RUdy J. klancnik
Editorial Director
tim polzeR
Designer
William bRidgeFoRtH
Traction Media
Editorial Offces
7115 Tartan Trl.
Garland, TX 75044
Tractionmedia@aol.com
Editorial Department Phone
(972) 896-8006
Custom Publishing
(972) 898-8585
USA Football Magazine is published by Traction
Media, LLC©. All rights reserved. Traction Media
does not accept unsolicited manuscripts. Publisher
assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited
manuscripts or art. No part of this magazine may
be reprinted or otherwise duplicated without the
written permission of the editor.
dear Readers,
as we head into an exciting summer at USa Football, i would like to thank all of you for
your eforts in the sport of football. i have great respect for the vital role you play at all levels of
the sport, especially youth and high school.
We are proud to announce that we recently
launched several innovative education products as
part of our new membership program. Tese tools
were developed specifcally for coaches, league
administrators, ofcials and parents volunteering their
time to youth football.
on usafootball.com, you will now fnd coaching
and ofciating education courses and products
including a new drills library, interactive playbook,
and ofciating rules interpretations with video and
animations among other exciting new features.
in addition, we have created tools for use by those
managing leagues and clubs including a state-of-the
art Web network that is highlighted by free access to
build league, club and team web sites. you will be able
to manage your rosters, schedules, upload photos, and
communicate with parents and other coaches. i urge you to take advantage of this unique
opportunity.
please take some time to read through this magazine to learn more about the membership
program, as well as gain some insight into why these products are important to keep this great
sport fun, safe and accessible.
also this summer, USa Football is thrilled to be sending the frst U.S. national team to
the World championship of american Football in kawasaki, Japan. you can learn more about
team USa, made up of players from colleges across the country, in this magazine.
Finally, we have begun our third annual play Football campaign in partnership with the
nFl and nFl players association to celebrate the sport and support those involved. Trough
the summer we will be ofering resources including registration kits, equipment grants, safety
awareness including an extensive background checks program, and celebration kits for you to
use as you begin your fall season. you can learn more about play Football in this issue of the
magazine, as well as future issues and as always, on usafootball.com.
enjoy your summer and we look forward to seeing you back on the feld this fall!
Sincerely,
Scott Hallenbeck
executive director, USa Football
2 USA Football Magazine
I am a youth football coach,
the offensive coordinator
for ages 9 thru 11. Can you
recommend a way in which
I can call audibles into my
offense without the other
sideline picking them up?
– Coach Rob
Like most everything in
football, if you practice it and
give it enough repetitions you
can come up with an audible
system that will work for you
and your team.
Te easiest way to implement
an audible system from the
sideline is to come up with four
to fve audible plays that you
incorporate into your practice
schedule for the week and make
them part of your game plan.
You can assign a number to each
audible play 1-5 and then have a
live color to trigger the call.
For example, if the bomb
pass to the uncovered wideout
is audible number 3 and the
live color for the half is Red,
you can call out from the
sideline “RED 783” and your
players will know that
when they hear RED an
audible is being called
and they are listening
for the last number to
know which play
is being called.
Te key to keep
your opponent
on its toes is to
call out colors
and numbers
on other
plays that
don’t mean
anything, like
“BLUE 561.”
You can change
the color at halfime or with
each series.
Te key to this working is
to incorporate this into your
practice and make sure the
players understand what the
live color is at all times.
– Larry Canard,
USA Football Youth
Coaching Task Force
As a dad and assistant
coach in a large youth program,
who is also a physician, I
am asked what pre-practice
warm-up and stretching should
be done. Would you advise
me where I can fnd the best
information to be printed and
distributed among the teams?
– Ralph Tremaglio
Tis is a great question
and one that I am asked by
coaches on a regular basis.
Unfortunately, I do not have
a specifc resource I can
recommend, so I’ll give you
the same advice I give our
coaches. Generally speaking,
the warm-up should
include an activity
designed to
elevate the heart
rate followed
by a period of
stretching.
Many
coaches will ask
their players to run a lap or two
around the feld to elevate their
heart rate. While this can work
well, you may want to consider
having the members of your
team play a game like tag. Not
only will this elevate their heart
rate and warm their muscles,
but it’s also fun. You can keep
everyone together by using
cones to designate boundaries.
Start with a relatively large
area, gradually moving the
cones closer together to create
a more confned space. As
the size of the area decreases,
your players will need to rely
on their quickness and agility
to avoid being caught. Plan
to spend 5-10 minutes of each
practice on this type of activity.
You can consider several
types of stretching, some
more complex than others.
Generally speaking, your
stretching routine should
be designed to target the
major muscle groups of
the body such as: calves,
hamstrings, quadriceps, hip
fexors, low back, chest, and
shoulders. Static stretching
is usually the safest. Its basic
principle is simple: place
the muscle in a stretched
position and hold for 10 to
30 seconds. Make sure the
players understand to stretch
only until they feel slight
resistance; if they feel pain,
they’ve stretched too far. Just
remember to
encourage
your
team to
hold the
stretch
rather than
“bounce.” Te bouncing
motion is called ballistic
stretching and it is not
recommended.
– John Reynolds,
USA Football Health &
Safety Consultant
Do I need a license to become
a football coach from youth to the
college level? What experience
do I need to become a head
coach in youth football?
– Christopher Mendez
Tank you for your
question and your interest
in becoming a youth football
coach. Te youth game
is always in need of more
quality coaches who can
provide a positive experience
for youth players. To become
a youth football coach there
is no standardized license or
certifcation but more and
more leagues are requiring that
their coaches are educated and
attend a clinic or online course.
USA Football is working to
provide educational products
designed for youth-league
coaches. Our new membership
program includes our online
course level 1 and 2 along
with a number of additional
tools including our Practice
Planner, Drills Library and
Coaching Sofware program.
Most college programs
require you to have served as
a graduate assistant for two
years prior to becoming a full-
time coach.
Tank you for considering
becoming a youth coach.
– Ed Passino,
USA Football Regional
Manager, East Region
audibles
E-mail address:
tractionmedia@aol.com
Mailing
address:
USA Football, attn: USA Football Magazine,
8300 Boone Blvd., Suite 625, Vienna, VA 22182
3
photo: cynthia hobgood
photo: tom Dipace
Bobby Bowden’s frst
experience with football was
as a young, curious boy in
Birmingham, Ala. peaking
through his back fence, watching
his neighborhood high school
team practice. He eventually
grew old enough to practice on
those same felds as a teenager,
and turned his childhood dreams
into one of the most successful
coaching careers in the history of
college football.
Bowden became an
outstanding quarterback at
Woodlawn High School and went
on to Alabama, fulflling a lifelong
dream to play for the Crimson
Tide. He lasted one semester in
Tuscaloosa before high school
sweetheart Ann Estock lured
him back to Birmingham where
Bowden transferred to Howard
College. Tough Bowden’s playing
days were limited, he could not
leave the game and decided to
become a coach. In 1976, he
accepted the job as head coach at
Florida State University…and he’s
never lef.
While at FSU, Bowden
became the all-time winningest
coach in major college history in
2003 and will enter next season
with 366 wins. He has coached
two national championship
teams (1993 and 1999) and is the
only coach to lead his team to 14
straight seasons that ended with
a top-5 Associated Press ranking.
He was elected to the College
Football Hall of Fame in 2006.
Bowden’s success is even more
impressive considering he took
over an FSU program in 1976 that
had won just four games during
the previous three seasons.
Te 76-year-old plans to
keep coaching “as long as I feel
good and FSU still wants me”
and the Seminoles still do. As
Coach Bowden prepared for his
32nd season at Florida State,
USA Football Magazine took the
opportunity to ask him about
the issues and experiences he’s
faced along the way.
Why do you coach?
I want to help the players I
coach with their lives, physically,
academically and spiritually.
Players need a male fgure in
their life, and I am happy to be
that role model.
What made you want to be a
football coach?
Environment played a big
role. Te frst fve years of my
life, I lived adjacent to high
school football feld. Te next 13
years I lived a half-block from
college football feld. Plus, I
loved playing football.
What do you enjoy most
about coaching?
I enjoy molding a winning
team and watching players
develop.
What was your frst
coaching job?
Assistant football coach and
head track coach at Howard
College, 1953-54.
Do you recall a game or
instance in your career that
made believe you could be a
good football coach?
No. I always thought I would
be a good coach.
What is the greatest
challenge any football coach
faces?
Not hurting your players
physically or emotionally. You
must see that they succeed in life.
What values and
experiences does football
offer to young men?
One of the greatest virtues
of life is personal sacrifce for
others. To be a winner, you must
be willing to sacrifce for the
good of the team.
After players leave your
program, how do you want
them to remember you?
I want them to remember me
as a coach that was fair to them
and loved them.
Do you remember a coach
who impacted your youth?
Kenny Morgan, my coach at
Woodlawn High School, greatly
impacted my life. We still meet
each June for a banquet in his
honor. He’s been coaching for
60 years.
Chief Seminole
Bobby Bowden
head coach
Florida State
Bobby Bowden turned a childhood dream into one of the most successful
coaching careers in football history
Bobby Bowden
Career: 366-113-4 (.762) 41 Years
FSU: 293-81-4 (.780) • 31 Years
Florida State W L T Pct
1976 5 6 0 .455
1977 (Tangerine) 10 2 0 .833
1978 8 3 0 .727
1979 (Orange) 11 1 0 .917
1980 (Orange) 10 2 0 .833
1981 6 5 0 .545
1982 (Gator) 9 3 0 .750
1983 (Peach) 8 4 0 .667
1984 (Citrus) 7 3 2 .667
1985 (Gator) 9 3 0 .727
1986 (all-amer.) 7 4 1 .625
1987 (Fiesta) 11 1 0 .917
1988 (Sugar) 11 1 0 .917
1989 (Fiesta) 10 2 0 .833
1990 (Blockbuster) 10 2 0 .833
1991 (Cotton) 11 2 0 .846
1992 (Orange) 11 1 0 .917
1993 (Orange) 12 1 0 .923
1994 (Sugar) 10 1 1 .864
1995 (Orange) 10 2 0 .833
1996 (Sugar) 11 1 0 .923
1997 (Sugar) 11 1 0 .923
1998 (Fiesta) 11 2 0 .846
1999 (Sugar) 12 0 0 1.000
2000 (Orange) 11 2 0 .846
2001 (Gator) 8 4 0 .667
2002 (Sugar) 9 5 0 .643
2003 (Orange) 10 3 0 .769
2004 (Gator) 8 3 0 .727
2005 (Orange) 8 5 0 .615
2006 (emerald) 7 6 0 .538
Total (31st year) 293 81 4 .780
4 USA Football Magazine
5
One Voice, One Mes sage
League administrator
• 2007 Introductory PrIce:Free!
• Web netWork–Anunlimitednumberofcustomwebsitesfor
yourentireorganization.Tewebsitesenableyoutomanageyour
roster,practice&gameschedules,postphotos,andmore.
• background check dIscount–USAFootballhaspartnered
withtheNationalCenterforSafetyInitiativestooferadiscount.
• regIstratIon Month kIts–Freesigns,posters,CDwith
sampleregistrationforms,andmore.
• usa Football MagazIne-Subscriptiontoyouthfootball’s
premieremagazine.
F
romCaliforniatoMassachusetts,USA
Footballhasvisitedandtalkedtoyouth
footballvolunteerstofndoutexactlywhat
theirorganizationsneedtoenhancetheexperiencefor
youngplayers.
“Allcoachesandcommissionersarevolunteers
andtheyneedtobeeducatedconstantly,”said
MarkMeana,Chairman,FairfaxCounty(Va.)
YouthFootballLeague.“USAFootballprovides
thoseresourcesandit’seasilyaccessibleontheir
website.”
Something For Everyone
TeWebNetworkisaseriesoffreeleague,club,
andteamwebsites.Teyareinteractivewebsites
whereyoucanpostyourschedule,storeyourrosters,
keepcontactinformation,andcommunicatetoyour
playersandtheirparents.Tesitesarecustomizable
andleagueadministratorscanallowtheircoachesto
edittheirownteams’sites.
Coachescanlearnmoreaboutcommunicationand
X’sandO’swiththeCoachingCourse.Startingfrom
thebasicsandmovingintoadvancedyouthfootball
strategy,theCoachingCoursewillhelpagoodcoach
becomeagreatcoach.
TheRulesInterpretation&VideoLibrarylets
officialsdecideforthemselveshowtheyseeaplay.
Aftereachvideoiscomplete,thereisaudioand
videocommentaryonpropermechanics.With
hundredsofplaystolearnfrom,thereissomething
foreverysituation.
6 usa Football Magazine
One Voice, One Mes sage
USA Football’s experiences with youth football coaches and
volunteers across the country helped to develop three valuable
membership packages By Brian Feener
MEMBERSHIP
coaching
• 2007 IntrodUctory PrIce:$14.99
• coAchIng coUrSe LeveL 1 & 2 –Learn
howtoestablishgoodcommunication
andteachsomeofthebasicfundamentals.
Completewith3-Danimation,audio
instruction,andend-of-chapterquizzes.
• PrActIce PLAnner –UseUSAFootball
templatesorcreateyourownpracticesfromscratch.
• InterActIve PLAybook–Createyourown
playsorusepre-loadedplaysfromUSAFootball.
Aferwards,e-mailtheplaystoyourcoaches.
• drILLS LIbrAry –Hundredsofdrillstokeep
yourpracticesinterestingandfunforyourkids.
• USA FootbALL MAgAzIne-Subscriptionto
youthfootball’spremieremagazine.
• ASk the exPert –AskUSAFootball
anythingyouneedtoknowaboutcoaching.
• Pro FootbALL hALL oF FAMe PASS–One
freeadmissiontotheProFootballHallof
FameinCanton,Ohio.
• MeMberShIP cArd
officiating
• 2007 IntrodUctory PrIce: $19.99
• onLIne oFFIcIAtIng coUrSe–
Increaseyourknowledgewithan
innovative
course
created
byNFL
umpire
Tony
Michalek
andBig
TenrefereeBillLeMonnier.Covers2-to
5-mancrews.
• rULeS InterPretAtIon & vIdeo
LIbrAry–Videoexamplesofhigh
schoolandcollegeplayswithaudio
discussingpropercallsandmechanics.
• WeekLy oFFIcIAtIng
QUIzzeS–Designedto
keepyourskillssharp.
• ASk the exPert
–AskUSAFootball
anythingyouneedto
knowaboutofciating.
• Pro FootbALL hALL oF FAMe PASS
–OnefreeadmissiontotheProFootball
HallofFameinCanton,Ohio.
• $10 honIg'S WhIStLe StoP*
•$10GifCard
•10%Discount
*Honig’sdiscountsmustbeusedseparately.
• 10 USA FootbALL gAMe cArdS
• USA FootbALL bULLet PencIL
• USA FootbALL LAPeL PIn
• USA FootbALL MeMberShIP cArd
7
C
O
A
C
H
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
O
F
F
I
C
I
A
T
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
L
E
A
G
U
E

E
N
H
A
N
C
E
M
E
N
T

C
E
N
T
E
R
H
E
A
L
T
H

&

S
A
F
E
T
Y

C
E
N
T
E
R
C
O
A
C
H
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
[ ]
School’s Never Out
For Coaches
Youth football coaches and their teams can benefit from continuing education
BY DANNY HOTOCHIN
Like any other profession, coaching breeds a continual need for education.
First-rate coaches, especially those who operate in the youth ranks, are continually
learning how to improve the quality of play and experience for their players. In order to
develop their players, coaches are constantly acquiring knowledge that will improve their
ability to mentor, teach and, of course, coach.
“Te first step in becoming a successful football coach starts with developing a solid,
fundamental coaching philosophy that is centered on creating a positive environment
to develop your players,” said Nick Inzerello, director of football development for USA
Football. “Football coaches are always looking to improve and our goal is to provide the
best tools and resources to help them on the field.
Like shepherds, coaches have the power to gather players in by the herd if they are
successful and smart with their approach. However, some coaches can, and have had,
deterred many players from wanting to play the game ever again because of their lack of
coaching skills and education.
“Educated
coaches should be
confident in the
X’s and O’s and
the fundamentals,
as well as the
motivation and
leadership. It’s
critical,” said
Chris Coughlin,
longtime youth
coach in Colorado.
“If you talk to any
athlete they’ll tell
you the positive
or dramatic effects
that they had on
their lives. You can find other ones who’ve turned tons of kids away from the game because
they were never able to capture the values of the game.”
Even when coaches aren’t attending clinics or gluing their eyes to game film or online
articles, they learn a great deal by just doing their job as a coach.
“It happens on the field, as you’re being out-coached, as you’re struggling with parents
and it happens in the offseason depending on your motivation,” said Coughlin, who started
MEGA Clinics in 1996, aimed mainly at
high school coaches.
In order to ensure youth-league parents
that credible coaches will be coaching their
children, leagues are making participation
in coaching education mandatory.
“We are seeing a trend where more youth
football leagues are looking to integrate a
mandatory youth football coaching education
program,” Inzerello said. “Both independent
leagues and Pop Warner are looking to
standardize and improve the level of coaching
within their programs as they are requiring
attendance at a USA Football coaching school
or taking the online course.”
Technology’s Role
In the Age of Technology we live
in, computers and online media have
become integral to the way we learn
— no matter what the subject is.
Inzerello, others at USA Football
and clinicians around the country are
combining different media platforms
to take advantage of what online
media has to offer in order to further
the coaching education process. By
doing so, it enables coaches to learn
more efficiently and conveniently.
“Our Coaching Schools are
designed for youth coaches,
providing them the opportunity to learn
in the both the classroom and on the
field,” said Inzerello, who has been with
USA Football since 2003. “We realize not
everybody is going to be able to attend a
clinic and that’s why we created our online
Soldiers of the 16th Engineer Brigade were recruited to play a simulated flag football game to
give officiating students a feel for the speed of the game. A lack of grass in Iraq did not slow
the players or officials. Training sessions were delayed while soldiers left on missions.
8 USA Football Magazine
courses that deliver a high-quality education
that can be accessible at anytime.”
Beginning this month, USA Football will
launch extensive online courses designed to
promote the continuing education of coaches.
Clinics Offer Valuable
Learning Opportunities
While the Internet is becoming a useful
and easily-accessible tool for many, a
multitude of coaches still attend coaching
clinics, which provide in-depth lectures
that delve into a variety of topics in the
classroom and on the field.
“I think it starts with fundamentals,”
said Inzerello, who helps run and organize
youth coaching clinics for USA Football. “We
want to make sure that all of our education
programs start with fundamentals, being able
to teach the proper fundamentals for each
position, teaching the proper drills in terms
of how you execute a drill.”
But it doesn’t end there. Organization is
a challenge for many youth coaches, who are
also juggling full-time jobs, family and other
responsibilities. “Coaches who are organized
are going to be successful on the field, so we
spend a lot of time with how you set up your
practice plan so that you run an efficient
practice,” Inzerello said.
Another area coaches look for help in their
development is effective communication with
players, fellow coaches and parents.
“Today, parents are playing a bigger
role than they ever have in youth sports so
it’s important that coaches have a positive
relationship with parents,” said Inzerello.
“It’s important that coaches interact with
the parents as much as they can. Parents can
really make or break a season.”
Finally, youth coaches of all experience
levels are constantly looking for offense,
defense and special teams schemes on offense.
“We want to provide a base set of schemes
to understand what is a good offensive or
defensive scheme,” Inzerello said.
Real Rewards of Coaching
In addition to his position at USA Football,
Inzerello moonlights as a youth football coach
of the Vienna Cardinals, coaching seven- and
eight-year olds in Vienna, Va.
Despite having success with the teams
that he’s coached, Inzerello believes the real
rewards of coaching come in other forms
besides wins and championship victories.
“Te most important thing for me is that all
of the kids that I’ve coached have come back the
next season to play, so that means they enjoyed
their experience,” said Inzerello, who has five
years of experience coaching youth football.
Coughlin said he has been an assistant
coach for head coaches who are tyrants
and has seen the negative effect that has on
young players. But he also points out that he
has worked with coaches who may have a
losing season and still be great with the kids.
“Tat’s a lot better than technically-smart
coaches who are terrible with the kids,” said
Coughlin, who has experience as a basketball
and soccer youth coach.
“I think if coaches focus their philosophies
on that their kids have a great time playing the
game and they’re able to teach the fundamentals
and the skills needed to play the game, then
they’ll be farther ahead than coaches who just
focus on wins and losses,” Inzerello said.
With all that is available out there for coaches
to improve their game, who is to say that they
can’t have as much fun as the players?
9
C
o
a
C
h
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
o
f
f
i
C
i
a
t
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
l
e
a
g
u
e

e
n
h
a
n
C
e
m
e
n
t

C
e
n
t
e
r
h
e
a
l
t
h

&

s
a
f
e
t
y

C
e
n
t
e
r
C
o
a
C
h
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
[ ]
By Danny HotocHin
“How would you go double with the Wing?” asked one curious youth football coach.
Questions like that were asked and answered with intuitive advice during the USA Football
Coaching School at Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va. Tis spring, youth football
coaches from surrounding areas in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington D.C. gathered to soak
in efective tactics on how to teach proper stances, how to develop a practice, how to execute
position drills and other imperative knowledge from the experienced coaches at the clinic.
Besides receiving a complementary gif bag at the end of the full-day clinic, the 150
coaches and commissioners who attended also departed with a better education in
football, as the attendees were shown how to teach proper on-feld techniques, efectively
communicate with players, parents and fellow coaches, and devise profcient ofensive and
defensive schemes in both classroom and on-the-feld sessions.
“It’s always helpful to get together and see some techniques,” said Randy Barwley, who
coaches 75-pounders in Vienna, Va. “Tere’s some things that I learned during the one-
hour sessions that if I knew a year ago I could have tweaked my team.”
morning Kickoff
Attendees frst took part in a large group session aimed at building efective practice
plans. Mark Gowin, who serves as Episcopal’s athletic director and head coach of their
football program gave an informative and animated presentation on implementing
meaningful blocking and tackling drills.
Keynote speaker, J.B. Brown, former Miami Dolphins defensive back, praised attendees
for their service to youth. Brown, who is about to become a high school football coach for
the frst time, is a graduate of DeMatha high school and the University of Maryland. Afer a
8-year NFL career, he will join the coaching ranks, hoping to make a positive impact on his
young players, as his coaches did for him.
“Youth football is very important. You
have a lot more infuence on your players
than what you think you may have,” said
Brown. “While on the feld, give them
some lessons in life. Never miss a moment
to develop these kids into more than
football players.”
Wrapping up the morning session,
a communication seminar was held to
enlighten the attendees on some of the
problems that might arise between coaches
and their players and parents, and how to
constructively resolve them.
Veteran Vienna Youth Football Coach
Larry Canard, who also taught techniques
such as gap penetration, shedding blocks,
and keeping leverage during the defensive
linemen drills, preached the importance
of not only maintaining a positive coach-
player and coach-parent relationships, but
also how to preserve positive relationships
with fellow coaches as well.
“Communicate in a positive manner.
Believe me, it works,” Canard said. “Be
upbeat. Never embarrass any player. Teach a
player what to do instead of what not to do.”
Canard also explained to coaches that
they need to have an understanding of
what their players know. In many cases,
coaches should assume young players
know nothing.
“I thought this session was good. I
want to email him to get information for
our organizations because there are a lot of
things that he touched on that we should
be doing,” Walter Florence, an 85-pound-
weight-class coach and athletic director for
the Southern Maryland Youth Association,
said of the communication session.
Back to school
In order to establish strong foundations
for youth football players that they can build
on and eventually carry to their next level of
competition, the clinic’s classroom sessions
photo: cynthia hobgood
Coaching Schools
10 USA Football Magazine
allowed the attendees to establish a better
comprehension and learn multiple ways to
implement a three-step passing game, Wing-T
ofense, and defensive alignments such as the
4-4 and 5-3 in their own scheme. In a smaller
group setting, attendees were able to interact
with speakers, ofen asking questions and
sharing their experiences during the sessions.
“It was great because we were able to pick
up some schemes that we could use during
the regular season; the information that we
were able to get was good,” said Mark Brown,
who serves as an assistant coach on a 65-
pound team that’s run by the South Bowie
Boys and Girls Club in Maryland.
By covering all of these schemes during the
classroom sessions, the participating coaches
were able to accumulate unique knowledge
that would allow them to efectively teach their
players how to play and comprehend any of the
four aforementioned systems.
Hitting the Fields
Tutelage took place on the feld as well,
as attendees gathered outside to collectively
watch the same high school-level coaches
who taught during the classroom sessions
demonstrate how to instruct players during
practice, and how to run live-action drills for
quarterbacks, running backs, wide receivers,
ofensive linemen, defensive linemen,
defensive backs, and linebackers.
“I think it’s a great idea that USA Football
has put this clinic on for youth level coaches,”
said Kenny Lucas, who is currently transitioning
himself from Gonzaga High School to coach at
Annapolis Area Christian School.
“I think the more we learn, the better
of we’re going to be, and ultimately, the
better the kids are going to be. It’s a good
opportunity to share football stories and
learn a little bit more about the game and
just share anything because we’re all just still
learning – whether you’re a high school level
coach or a youth coach – we’re all learning,”
said Lucas, who participated as an orator
for the clinic’s 5-3 classroom session and the
ofensive linemen and defensive back drills.
Te attendees soaked in the on-feld
information, notebooks and clipboards in hand,
ofen participating in drill demonstrations by
throwing and catching passes.
“You hope, as a presenter, that a couple
people get something out of it. When I go myself
as an observer, I like to get one thing from each
coach that I can go back and actually use and
make my team better,” said Gowin. Gowin,
who has 32 years of coaching experience at
both Episcopal and Gonzaga, also served as
a presenter for the three-step drop classroom
session and the on-feld quarterback drills.
“[Clinics] are a wonderful way to get back
to the young coaches and allow their athletes
to know some of the latest techniques and
ideas,” Gowin said.
Presenters Beneft, Too
Although the clinic was catered to beneft
the coaches who attended the program, the
clinic’s presenters enjoyed and benefted
from it as much as the attendees.
“It’s a great opportunity to get the high
school coaches to speak to the youth coaches
and gives us a chance to teach what we do at the
next level and have them understand that, and
can relay that to the boys club level and the Pop
Warner level. It’s something that needs to be
done throughout the country. I wish we could do
more of it,” said Bishop McNamara High School
coach Bryce Bevill, who assisted with the clinic
as a presenter for the 4-4 classroom session and
the running back and defensive drills.
“Tese guys are giving their time; they
don’t get paid like I do for doing this. Tey’re
ofentimes volunteers and you have to
love them for the time they put in,” said
Gowin of the coaches who attended the
clinic. “Anything we can do to help them and
to make their jobs a little easier, I couldn’t
spend enough time doing it; I love it.”
completed clinics:

USA Football Coaching School
presented by the new orleans saints
Date: July 14, 2007
Location: Metairie, LA

USA Football Coaching School
(boise area)
Date: July 21, 2007
Location: Eagle, ID

USA Football Coaching School
presented by the new york Giants
Date: July 28, 2007
Location: East Rutherford, NJ
USA Football Coaching Schools have been completed in the following areas:
Alexandria, Va.; Buffalo, N.Y. (Bills); Indianapolis (Colts); Minnesota (Vikings);
Omaha, Neb. (University of Nebraska-Omaha); Foxboro, Mass. (New England Patriots);
St. Louis, Mo. (Rams); Pittsburgh (Steelers); San Francisco (49ers); Nashville, Tenn.
(Tennesee Titans); Charlotte, N.C. (Carolina Panthers); Chicago (Bears), San Diego,
Calif. (Chargers); Denver, Colo. (Broncos); and Seattle, Wash. (Seahawks).
11
Todd Dodge, one of the
nation’s most talked about
coaches, understands the
importance youth football
plays in a young person’s life
BY TIM POLZER
12 USA Football Magazine
AP PHOTO/TONY GUTIERREZ
In Southlake, Texas, every youth football player wants
to be a Dragon some day. Tat’s the mascot for Southlake
Carroll High School’s football team, one of the most
successful programs in the nation. Every kid in Southlake
also knows Coach Dodge. Tat’s Todd Dodge, who, for five
years, spent many hours working with football players of all
ages with the Dragons.
Afer a record of 79-1 as coach of the Dragons, Coach
Dodge was picked to be the head coach for the University of
North Texas. He is one of the nation’s most respected coaches,
but he still remembers what it’s like to play youth football.
WHO: Coach Todd Dodge
2006 TEAM: Southlake Carroll Dragons High School
Football Team
WHERE: Southlake, Texas (near Dallas-Fort Worth)
2006 USA TODAY NATIONAL RANKING: #1
2006 RECORD: 16-0
WINNING STREAK: 48 games in a row
ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Four Texas State
Championships; Under Armour Undeniable High
School football program; #1 national ranking in
USA Today (2004, 2006); #1 national ranking in
PrepNation.com (2005)
ABOUT PLAYING YOUTH FOOTBALL: It was third grade
in Houston. I remember the first day of school. Tere was
a flier about youth football and I played for the Edgewood
Panthers. I can’t remember the name of my third grade
teacher, but I can remember my first football coach – Clyde
Knight – and I’ll never forget him.
ON COACHING HIS SON, RILEY, WHO QUARTERBACKED
THE DRAGONS TO THE STATE TITLE AS A JUNIOR LAST
YEAR: Riley started playing youth football, probably about
third grade, and landed in the Dragon youth football
program in fifh and sixth grade. It was fun to sit back
during his youth days and just be a dad, and then a thrill to
be able to coach him in high school.
ADVICE FOR PARENTS OF YOUTH FOOTBALL PLAYERS:
My advice to parents is to research the youth football
program. Make sure they are teaching tackling the right
way. I think everything else falls into place. As a parent, I
would want to know if the program is in it for the kids or in
it for the ego of the parents.
ADVICE FOR YOUTH COACHES: One thing our coaches
at Carroll tried to do was encourage the youth coaches to
keep it fun for the kids. Our youth program at Southlake did
a great job of preparing our kids for when they would start
playing high school ball and join our program.
WHAT THEY ARE SAYING ABOUT COACH DODGE:
“Te thing about Southlake is that they are not known for
producing a great number of Division I college athletes.
Tere’s something special about Coach Dodge and the
program. We really like what they’re about.”
– Shannon Ferbrache, Under Armour Director of Sports
Marketing.
13
C
o
a
C
h
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
o
f
f
i
C
i
a
t
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
l
e
a
g
u
e

e
n
h
a
n
C
e
m
e
n
t

C
e
n
t
e
r
h
e
a
l
t
h

&

s
a
f
e
t
y

C
e
n
t
e
r
[ ]
l
e
a
g
u
e

e
n
h
a
n
C
e
m
e
n
t

C
e
n
t
e
r
ootball dreams run deep through Idaho’s Treasure Valley, a stretch of land that glides
through the Sawtooth Mountain Range and engulfs the city of Boise.
For many youths living in a region dominated by rivers, mountains and wildlife,
fantasies of football stardom and achievement begin in Boise Noon Optimist Youth Football.
Since its inception in 1949, Boise Noon Optimist Youth Football has been the dream-
maker for more than 65,000 youth football players. Over the years, the program has had
its share of former players advancing to college and NFL stardom, such as former NFL
quarterback Jake Plummer and Houston Texans tight end Jeb Putzier.
However, the most infuential alumnus just might be its current executive director, Jerron
Moore.
Moore, a veteran youth coach of 27 years in the program, frst became involved as a player
more than four decades ago as a fourth-grader.
“As a youth player you never think to yourself, ‘one day I’m going to coach or be the
commissioner of the league,’” stated Moore, who played in the Optimist program from 1965-
1968 and later excelled at Meridian High School before playing junior college football at
Walla Walla Community College.
But, afer three knee surgeries
ended his college playing career, Moore
found himself back in “Te Valley,” as
the area is commonly referred to by
locals. It was at that time Moore, who
was attending Boise State University,
decided to give back to the youth
football program that had given him
a lifetime of positive memories and
experiences as a youngster.
“You get hooked, and quickly,” said
Moore about his frst year of coaching.
Twenty-seven years later Moore
is still engaged in the sport and can
By Ed Passino
The 25-acre Optimist Youth Sports Complex in Boise, Idaho is home to
nine felds, a stocked pond, a concession stand and equipment facility
built in large part because of fundraising led by Jerron Moore.
Jerron Moore
14 USA Football Magazine
be found each autumn on the sidelines. In
1994, Moore became the Optimist program’s
executive director.
As the executive director, Moore works
with a 72-member staf that oversees
nearly 200 teams, 4,000 youth players and
countless cheerleaders.
Under Moore’s leadership and the help
of a strong, supportive executive board
of volunteers,
the Optimist
program forged a
partnership in the
mid-1990s with
the City of Boise
to build a 25-acre
community park
with sports felds
to support the
growing football
program. Te
agreement was
simple – if the
Optimist program
raised the funds,
developed the
land and built
the felds, the
program would receive exclusive use of it
in the fall and spring. Te remainder of the
time the Optimist Youth Sports Complex
would be a city park to be used by anyone.
Ground broke in 1997 and two years later
the nine-feld, 400-parking space sports
complex, which also includes a stocked
pond, a concession stand and equipment
facility, became the ofcial home of Boise
Noon Optimist Youth Football.
Te facility was built at no cost to
taxpayers. Instead, Moore and the Optimist
team of volunteers hit the streets of Boise
with a fundraising campaign that included
going door-to-door to corporations,
businesses and community members.
“Te community stepped up,” says Moore.
“You walk anywhere in this Valley and talk
to people about Optimist football you’ll fnd
most everybody has been touched by it.
“Te community has been amazing. We
went out and knocked on doors and began
raising money, a number of people have
stepped up. We’ve had close to $400,000 in
donated time, labor, and services in-kind.”
Moore is quick to point out that Plummer
continues to give the program tremendous
support and has donated $100,000 and
sponsored the development of a feld. Plummer
also routinely returns to conduct the Jake
Plummer Youth Football Camp for local youth
players during the summer months.
Te sport complex has had a positive efect
on the Optimist program as participation
numbers have steadily increased each year by
10 percent. Shortly afer the completion of the
25-acre complex, the Optimist program worked
with the City of Boise to secure 27 additional
acres of land adjacent to the current facility.
Te additional land will produce seven
more football felds and an additional 600
parking spaces. When completed later this
summer, the entire 52-acre sports complex
will house 16 felds, 1,000 parking spaces,
two stocked ponds, two tennis courts, a
concession stand and equipment shed.
“When we’re done with this project we will
have raised $3 million that has been donated
for kids of this community to play football. I’m
not sure there are many places in the country
that can say that,” says Moore, who in 2003
was honored with the Don Simplot Idaho
Award, which is given annually to an Idaho
resident who demonstrates leadership and
selfess service to sport.
Moore believes this sports complex project
can be mirrored anywhere throughout the
country where there is accessible land, and a
passion for youth football.
“Don’t underestimate the power of your
community. For me it was easy to walk
into corporate ofces, homes and sell our
program,” Moore says.
“For us we had a tremendous program to
sell – our program is not about championships
or excluding kids – its about kids living in the
community, playing
together on the same
team with the same
coaches for four years.
Our program is not
about the best kids;
it’s about all kids –
that resonates with
kids, parents and
corporate America.
We are about
competition – it’s not
a bad word – but we
do it in a context that
is very healthy and
very positive. When
you have a product
like that, it’s easy to
sell. You just have to
believe in it.”
Moore is quick to defect the recognition
for the healthy state of the Optimist
program and the sports complex.
“I get way to much credit for what has
happened here with this program and feld
project, the reality is the work, the efort was
way more than just one person,” he says.
“Tere are so many people in the Valley
and in our football program that made this
happen, I’m just fortunate because I’m a
better person for having been with them and
worked with them.”
Editor’s note: If you would like more
information about the Optimist Youth
Sports Complex and details about Boise
Noon Optimist Youth Football agreement
with the City of Boise check out: http://
www.cityofoise.org/parks/parks_facilities/
parks/index.aspx?id=OYSC_park_facts
and http://www.boiseoptimist.com/ . You
can also send an email to Ed Passino at
leaguedevelopment@usafootball.com for
more information about the project.
15
C
o
a
C
h
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
o
f
f
i
C
i
a
t
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
l
e
a
g
u
e

e
n
h
a
n
C
e
m
e
n
t

C
e
n
t
e
r
h
e
a
l
t
h

&

s
a
f
e
t
y

C
e
n
t
e
r
[ ]
o
f
f
i
C
i
a
t
i
n
g

C
e
n
t
e
r
Back to Stripes School
The pressure-flled game situations offcials often face call for constant
education By Danny HotocHin
Tough few people will admit it, everybody, in some way, shape or form has room
to improve themselves – either personally or vocationally. Te same can be said
about football ofcials at all levels, who improve their ability to ofciate by educating
themselves and others on a continual basis.
“No matter what level you work, you can always learn something new,” said director
of USA Football ofciating Tony Michalek.
“It’s one of those avocations that there’s always a way to get better. Whether you
do it through flm study, go to clinics or association meetings, you can learn from the
experience of others and apply it so that you don’t make the same mistakes in your game
that others have made,” said
Michalek, who currently
works as an NFL umpire and
has 25 years of experience as
an ofcial.
Another tactic that
ofcials are using to educate
themselves is the Internet, as
more and more online content
about ofciating has become
available.
“More and more people
are taking a lot of time out of
their day to surf around, and you can always pick up on a tip to become a better ofcial,”
Michalek said.
Preparation Beats Pressure
Te rigorous and pressure-flled situations ofcials ofen face during games calls for
constant education among ofcials.
Michalek, who worked a multitude of high-profle games during his fve-year stint as
an ofcial in the Big Ten Conference, was recently a member of the crew that ofciated
the 2006 AFC Championship game that saw the Indianapolis Colts earn a stunning
come-from-behind victory over the New England Patriots.
As the pressure mounted for Colts quarterback Peyton Manning to make a comeback
in the second half, Michalek’s background in another career helped him perform with a
cool demeanor in a tense environment in front of a nationally-televised audience.
“For me, I never feel any pressure as far as working a ball game because of my
background in trade. Tat kind of takes away any kind of the pressure if you’ve done
that,” said Michalek, who has also had experience as a high school ofcial.
Whether calling a game that decides who goes to the Super Bowl or the state
championship, ofcials at all levels agree that countless hours of education helps them
prepare for these pressure-packed situations and enables them to perform successfully
when duty calls.
“Te thing you want to do is give them an honest game so that the better that you’re
prepared and the better you’re trained you
can give them a better quality product,”
said Fairfax County Football Ofcials
Association commissioner Don Stitt.
With more than 20 years of experience
under his belt, Northern Virginia Football
Ofcials Association member Jonathan
Kosarin agreed.
“Understanding the rules and knowing
what they say is one thing, applying them
in a game situation is a diferent story.”
‘you always learn

something new’
Ofciating clinics are a valuable
resource for educating ofcials as those
who attend look forward to hearing
lectures and receiving classroom
instructions on how to improve their
interactions between themselves and
game-day scenarios, the rules, coaches,
players and other ofcials.
“Basically, it’s a great thing to sharpen
up on mechanics and also for a lot of
quality control that I can pass down to my
people when I come back to Virginia,” said
Stitt, who is entering his eighth year as the
commissioner of the FCFOA.
Stitt, who has participated in a number
of clinics feels his participation has been
nothing but benefcial, even though he has
been a youth football ofcial for 15 years.
“I learn a lot, especially the one USA
Football had in Minnesota,” Stitt said. “All
of the times we weren’t ofciating games
on the feld, we were in the classroom
going over the flm and looking at things
like position and game-type situations.”
From his experience as an ofcial
and a clinician, Michalek feels that the
knowledge ofcials can pick up at a clinic
is endless.
“What you want to do is you always
16 USA Football Magazine
want to be the best you can be when you go
into these clinics,” said Michalek, who serves
as an instructor at clinics associated with the
NFL and USA Football. “You always learn
something, even as a presenter. I listen to
other people and you pick up other things,”
Michalek said.
Reviewing Rules
A major process in educating ofcials
is to familiarize rookies and veterans alike
with new rules and calls.
“Continuing education for us is absolutely
vital because the rules are constantly changing
or being tweaked. It’s necessary for us to keep
an eye on what the changes are, how they afect
diferent aspects of the game and to see what
the afect will be over the years,” said Kosarin,
who has worked as an ofcial in the youth and
high school ranks since 1975.
In addition to that, ofcials involved
with the education process also believe
it’s extremely imperative to review old
rules and game-day situations in order to
refresh their memories because of the long
ofseason that lies in between the regular
season and the playofs.
“Te key to us learning this stuf every
year is to not only learn the new stuf, but
also going over the rule book cover-to-
cover every year and going over each rule
individually to see how it works--especially
afer you’ve been laid of for about 7-8
months and haven’t worked in football,”
Kosarin said.
“Te rules are always changing,
equipment changes and points of emphasis
change every year so I think its good – no
matter how long you’ve been out there – that
everybody takes a refresher course,” Stitt said.
Also, ofcials review and teach the more
discrete rules — rules that deal with game
time and equipment that coaches, players
and the audience ofen take for granted.
“A lot of people think what we do relates to
a lot of the play stuf like passing plays, running
plays and kicking plays which are vital, but
also rules that very few people understand like
timing rules,” Kosarin said. “Late in the game, it
makes a big diference to a coach when the clock
starts and when it doesn’t.”
With all that is available for ofcials to
learn from and the rate that they are being
educated, there is no reason for anyone to
think the performance of ofcials should go
anywhere but up in the near — and distant
— future.
USA Football offciating director Tony Michalek advises youth football offcials on the feld after a preseason game.
Photos: Cynthia hobgood
17
C
O
A
C
H
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
O
F
F
I
C
I
A
T
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
L
E
A
G
U
E

E
N
H
A
N
C
E
M
E
N
T

C
E
N
T
E
R
H
E
A
L
T
H

&

S
A
F
E
T
Y

C
E
N
T
E
R
[ ]
O
F
F
I
C
I
A
T
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
Referee Position
How to accurately rule a runner’s forward progress BY BILL LEMONNIER
When discussing goal line mechanics, a
lot of pre-game time is spent talking about
the goal line going in. Equally important is
the goal line going out. Accurately ruling on
a runner’s forward progress in the field of
play or the end zone is the difference between
maintaining possession of the ball by the
offense or awarding two points for a safety
to the defense and the subsequent change of
possession following the free kick afer safety.
From the goal line to the 5-yard line,
wing officials have primary responsibility for
forward progress and the goal line. Where
things get tricky is when the ball is snapped
from the 6-yard line to the 10-yard line. Tis
five-yard area leaves the goal line in limbo for
the wing officials who have responsibility for
offensive and defensive pass receivers. Here’s
where the referee has to adjust his initial
position prior to the snap.
Normally the referee begins 12 to 14
yards deep and a little wider than the tight
end. When the ball is snapped between the
5 and 10-yard line, the referee should do two
things: widen out and begin only 10 yards
deep. Adjusting wider and closer to the snap
will allow the referee to get a better look at
the quarterback, who drops back to pass
around the goal line and is in danger of being
sacked. Referees who stay back deeper and
tighter have no chance to rule on forward
progress. Te two wing officials may read the
sack and start back to help, but they have no
true angle being up to 10 yards ahead of the
action. By adjusting closer to the goal line and
staying wider than normal, the referee can
avoid being in the way if the quarterback gets
out of the pocket and scrambles toward him.
Remember one of the key philosophies
of sound officiating…“Don’t award cheap
points!” If you can’t be sure the ball in
possession is in the end zone, don’t award
a safety. Spot the ball in the field of play
when you have doubt or are not on the
goal line. It’s one thing to rule a safety
when you have good position and there is
no doubt. It’s another thing to guess and
award points with a change of possession.
Another goal line mechanic for
referees and wing officials to discuss is
reverse goal line mechanics when an
interception, fumble return, or punt return
are threatening the goal line. Normally
the wing officials have the goal line going
in. Now the play goes the other way and
who really is primary on the goal line? Te
referee is primary. When the play is tight as
far as ruling touchdown or down short of
the goal line, wing officials must remember
to look for the referee in boxing in the
potential score. Nothing looks worse than
one official ruling the runner down short of
the goal line by inches and another official
signaling touchdown. Avoid dueling signals
by getting that eye contact on tight goal line
plays involving reverse mechanics.
Bill LeMonnier is a USA Football
Officiating Consultant, Big Ten and Arena
Football Referee.
OFFICIALS PROFILE:
USA FOOTBALL
PHOTO: CYNTHIA HOBGOOD
18 USA Football Magazine
“Hey look, the Ref is a girl.”
Annalee McPhilomy hears it all the time in the North
Florida Offcials Association By A.D. McPhiloMy
As the crew takes the feld, the pointing
and whispers begin.
“Hey look, the Ref is a girl.”
Actually, she’s a woman.
Tirteen years ago, Annalee D.
McPhilomy was the only
woman at the spring football
ofcials meeting for the North
Florida Ofcials Association in
Jacksonville, Florida. Today, she
is a crew chief, the elected vice-
president in charge of training,
and the rules interpreter.
Despite being a woman, the
association has been extremely
fair. Te assigning commissioner,
Jim Tucker said, “Annalee wasn’t
the frst female in NFOA. Tree
others came and went, and I
thought she might, too. I treated her like
everyone else. She was given a chance just
like any other new guy.”
McPhilomy looked at these chances a little
diferently. “Even now, I’m more likely to be
scrutinized for my performance than the men
I work with simply because I am a woman
ofciating football,” said McPhilomy. “Every
assignment is a chance to prove that a woman
can do this, and do it well. I strive to be the
best ofcial on the feld every game I work.”
One aspect of ofciating Annalee
chose to master early was a thorough
understanding of the rules. She asked the
rules interpreter hundreds of questions
her rookie year.
“Van Royal would see me coming and
just start smiling, like ‘So what don’t you
understand today...,’” McPhilomy said.
Over the years it has paid of. Now, she
is the rules interpreter and has written a
book simplifying high school rules called
“Football Rules: Simply Stated.” Annalee
is also the assigning commissioner for the
local Pop Warner association.
“I love football, especially football rules
and ofciating,” McPhilomy said. “My best
friend, Ken, and I constantly talk about
rules, philosophy, plays and positioning. I
enjoy teaching the new guys and watching
them emerge into good ofcials.”
Playing football has helped her
ofciating as well. Annalee has played
middle linebacker and defensive tackle for
the Jacksonville Dixie Blues, a women’s
tackle football team for two seasons.
“Playing has given me a new perspective
in my football ofciating,” said McPhilomy.
“As a line judge, I knew I was supposed
to key on the tackle, but now knowing
that their initial movement and blocking
technique clearly defnes where the play is
supposed to go is helpful when I work. I fnd
the point of attack much faster now. Also, I
didn’t understand what a ‘waggle’ or a stunt
meant until I started to play football.”
Te experience playing
football wasn’t without
consequence. McPhilomy tore her
ACL last May and aggressively
followed the physical therapy
regimen, returning to the feld in
mid-September.
“Moments afer my injury, I
thought how my ofciating would
be afected,” refected McPhilomy. “I
was in a real funk until the surgery,
but once it was fnished, I knew I
had to recover so I could ofciate
again. I hobbled my frst few games
back, but was more grateful that ever
before to be ofciating football again.”
Her relationship with her crewmates
is equally important. “My best friends are
football ofcials. My crew and I forward
to working together every Friday night
during the season,” McPhilomy said. “We
usually meet early, ride together, pick on
each other and laugh, but then we get into
game mode. Afer the game we hit a local
restaurant for dinner and to watch the
football highlights, especially to see who
made it on TV. Each year we make a crew
shirt with a logo: ‘4 Dudes and a Chick.’”
A Dixie chick that is, who loves to work
football.
If you have an ofcial profle suggestion,
email MSREF4E@aol.com.
Officials prOfile:
annalee Mcphilomy
Usa fOOtball
19
C
O
A
C
H
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
O
F
F
I
C
I
A
T
I
N
G

C
E
N
T
E
R
L
E
A
G
U
E

E
N
H
A
N
C
E
M
E
N
T

C
E
N
T
E
R
H
E
A
L
T
H

&

S
A
F
E
T
Y

C
E
N
T
E
R
[ ]
Youth Football
Safety
PHOTO: CYNTHIA HOBGOOD
H
E
A
L
T
H

&

S
A
F
E
T
Y

C
E
N
T
E
R
Is youth football a safe sport?
It is my belief that youth football is a safe endeavor which
compares very favorably to other youth sports that our kids
may be playing. Any sport carries with it risk; there is no way
of getting to a completely risk-free environment. However, the
younger the age group, research shows, really are injured even
less than the older, more experienced,
elite level players.
What can parents and coaches do
to keep youth football as safe as
possible?
I think it is very important that
coaches and parents prepare their
young athletes by focusing on proper
equipment fitting. It’s one thing to
have shoulder pads and a helmet, but
if they don’t fit properly – if the helmet
or shoulder pads are too loose or too
tight – then the athlete increases the
chance for injury. It’s very important
to have someone who knows how to fit
these athletes.
What do I need to know about youth
football in the heat?
When football starts in the late
summer, youth may be playing in a
very hot, humid environment. Coaches and parents should know
that athletes need access to water. Water is the most important
hydrating element you can provide. Tey need to be able to drink
whenever they want. And remember to be forward-thinking. An
athlete must continue to hydrate so that they don’t get thirsty. If
you’re thirsty, you’re already behind in water consumption and
getting into a potentially problematic situation.
What else can keep my son or daughter safe on the field?
Foremost in our minds needs
to be teaching these kids proper
techniques so they are learning to
do things the correct way. One of
the great ways to prevent injury is
to have proper techniques that are
learned from a very early age so
they become natural. Tis is youth
football. I would remind coaches to
please remember that youth football
is a learning experience and I would
have parents survey the coaches and
make sure that your child is around
someone who has the proper thought
process in mind of safety and
learning and not treat the program
like it is a professional program.
Where can I learn more about
football health & safety?
Articles at usafootball.com would
benefit parents and coaches as they
prepare to do a better job this football season and the seasons
to come including hydration, proper nutrition, and proper
coaching techniques.
DR. DAVID JOYNER is the chairman of USA Football’s Health
& Safety Committee, a group of experienced medical professionals
that has been tasked with the mission of helping the young football
players have a better and safer experience. Dr. Joyner, who has a long
background in football as a player at Penn State University and as
sports medicine physician, took some time to answer some frequently
asked safety questions from parents and coaches.
20 USA Football Magazine
[ ]
USA Football launched a new initiative this June
in an efort to keep children who play youth football
safe. Te organization will partner with the National
Center for Safety Initiatives (NCSI), a leader in
professional development and advocacy for the
youth sports industry, to have background checks
performed on youth football coaches and volunteers.
One in four girls and one in six boys will be
sexually abused before age 18. Sadly, child sexual
abuse and molestation is occurring everyday in
organizations and communities across the globe. It
is a truly sobering statistic but one all volunteers and
parents involved in youth sports must be aware of.
The goal of the USA Football background
screening program is to check the backgrounds
of 100,000 youth coaches and volunteers over
a two year period. In order to help achieve that
goal, USA Football is investing $500,000 to
ensure kids participating in youth sports are safe
from child predators.
“Recognizing that the issue of sexual predators
is a societal one, the fact is youth sports are not
immune,” said USA Footbal Executive Director
Scott Hallenbeck. “It’s that reality that has led
USA Football to take a proactive stance and
provide access to the gold standard screening at
a subsidized price. We care who’s coaching these
kids and we encourage all sports organizations to
join us in this efort and help protect our children.”
Representing the Professional Football Players’
Mothers Association, Betsy Hasselbeck, mother of
NFL quarterbacks Matt and Tim Hasselbeck, is the
spokesperson for the campaign.
“With USA Football’s eforts, and hopefully,
the eforts of other young sports organizations,
we can help our children enjoy all that sports
have to ofer,” said Betsy Hasselback. “Trough
this innovative program we can help parents feel
secure about who is coaching their children and
that value cannnot be overstated.”
NCSI’s Fully Managed Background Screening
Program for USA Football Members is the Gold
Standard for background checks in the youth-
serving industry. Tis program is a combination
of comprehensive searches for criminal and
sex ofender information along with full
administration of the process by NCSI to provide
maximum protection for the kids at a reasonable
cost to the organization.
Te program is included as part of USA
Football’s League Administrator membership
program. To learn more about how to gain access to
this new program, please visit www.usafootball.com.
Highlights of the program
Background Screening Search
componentS
NCSI’s Check-it-Twice™ searches are the
foundation for the program and are run through
two independent, screened and selected national
database providers. Tese searches are:
• NationalCriminalDatabaseSearch
• AllAvailableStateSexOfenderRegistriesSearch
• SocialSecurityNumber&AddressVerifcation
• OFACFederalTerroristDatabaseSearchin
addition to the Check-it-Twice™ searches
• CountyCourthouseSearchofcountyofmost
recentandlongestresidencyinthepastfveyears
Fully-Managed Program Features
• “RedLight/GreenLight”results
• Identityverifcation
• Fullfollow-upandinvestigationofrecords
• Secureonlineself-registrationformfor
collectionofconfdentialinformationand
consent directly from applicants
• Safeandconfdentialstorageofrecords
• Assistanceonpolicydevelopmentandlegalissues
• AutomaticrecheckofoneNationalCriminal
Database and all available State Sex Ofender
Registries 12 months afer initial search is
conducted.
uSa Football Launches Background
Screening program By Cynthia hoBgood
THe STaTiSTicS:
• 1in4girlsand1in6
boys will be sexually
abusedbeforeage18.
• Approximately50%
are abused by someone
outside of the family whom
theyknowandtrust.
• Nearly70%ofchildsex
offenders have between
1and9victims;atleast
20%have10to40victims.
• Anaverageserialchild
molester may have as
manyas400victimsin
his/herlifetime.
• Thereareapproximately39
million survivors of sexual
abuseinAmericatoday.
AbouTNCSI
NCSIMission:Toserveasa
leadingresourceinanoverall
efforttoeradicateharmto
youth in organizations and
communitiesacrosstheglobe
throughincreasedawareness,
thecreationofnational
standards,andtheintegration
offully-managedbackground
screeningprograms.
• NCSIwasformedin
partnership with the
NationalCouncilofYouth
Sports(NCYS),withthe
goalofsignifcantly
increasingthelevelof
safetyforouryouth.
• NCSI'sbackground
screeningprograms
arerecognizedasthe
"Standard of care" in the
youth-servingindustry.
21
Name: Greyson Torain
Position: Wide Receiver
Ht: 5-0 Wt: 90
Age: 11
Team: GORC Wildcats
League/Association: Anne Arundel Youth
Football Association (AAYFA)
City/State: Odenton, Maryland
Other sports played: Lacrosse, Track
Favorite NFL Players: Chad Johnson,
Terrell Owens, Michael Vick
H H
When did you start playing football?
i started when i was 5 playing fag, and then i moved to tackle.

What do you like about playing football?
i like tackle better (than fag) because you can be more elusive playing tackle.
Why is Chad Johnson one of your favorite players?
i like Chad Johnson because he has a lot of style.

What did it feel like to sCore your first touChdoWn?
When i frst started playing football i didn’t score a touchdown at all my frst year.
but, then i got a lot better and scored four or fve touchdowns my second year. the best
thing about football is running and trying to score. When you score a touchdown it’s the
best feeling.

tell us about your teammates.
We know each other pretty good. i go to school with most of my football friends. We
communicate a lot in football. logan hill (my quarterback) is such a good player it’s hard not to catch the
ball when he throws it. We have a good rhythm.

What his CoaCh said:
“greyson is a joy to coach. he has a great attitude, gives good effort and is the total team player. he has a supportive family
and has a very bright future in athletics.” – rick peacock, head Coach gorC Wildcats

you might have seen greyson on television…
greyson became a star for usa football’s public service announcement to celebrate the football season. his team
volunteered to take part in the commercial shoot last summer. greyson is featured in the commercial several times,
showing off his best Chad Johnson moves and touchdown-scoring ability.
22 usa football magazine
In 2007, USA Football for the frst time assembled a National Team to represent the United
States in worldwide competition. Te roster consists of 45 players who exhausted their college
eligibility afer the 2006 season and represents all levels of college football.
“Tis team is a complete cross section of U.S. football,” Team USA head coach John
Mackovic said. “We’re excited that we were able to blend every level of college football and put
together a team of players from schools of every size. We hope to represent our country in the
highest fashion and be great ambassadors for football around the world.”
For more information and World Championships of American Football tournament
results, log on to www.usafootball.com.
Team USa Player SPoTlighT
A National Team of 45 Players
Takes on the World By NathaN Boudreaux
Jeff Ballard
Ht: 6-1
Wt: 214
Position: Quarterback
College: tCU
HigH sCHool: Friendswood Hs
HometoWn: Friendswood, tX
Second-team All-Mountain
West Conference selection in 2006
... Was TCU’s career leader in
winning percentage by a starting
quarterback (90.5, 19-2) and
completion percentage (61.1) ...
Named Poinsettia Bowl Ofensive
Most Valuable Player afer running
for three touchdowns and passing
for one in a 37-7 victory over
Northern Illinois.
Jeremy Van Alstyne
Ht: 6-4
Wt: 260
Position: Defensive end
College: University of michigan
HigH sCHool: Center grove Hs
HometoWn: greenwood, in
Was a four-year letterman at the
University of Michigan ... Appeared
in 37 career games, making two
starts at defensive end ... Contributed
24 tackles, three tackles for loss,
one sack, one fumble recovery and
one pass breakup during career ...
Four-time Academic All-Big Ten
Conference (2003-06) ... Five-time
U-M Athletic Academic Achievement
(2002-06) ... Earned the Paul
Schmidt Award in 2006 as the
U-M player that displays
an unshakable courage
and love for the game.
s
s
24 UsA Football magazine
Team USA Roster
Wide ReceiveR: Greg Aker, Minnesota-duluth; Bobby
Awrey, Saginaw valley State; Jon drenckhahn, Williams;
Marcus Lewis, North Alabama; Steve Odom, Toledo
TiGhT eNd: d’Monn Baker, california (Pa.); Brian
Thompson, Michigan
OffeNSive LiNe: Alex Atkins, Tennessee-Martin; Marcel
Burrough, San Jose State; Rick drushal, Wooster; darrin
Johnson, SMU; Kris King, Gardner-Webb; david Livengood,
indiana (Pa.); chris Lundin, Adams State; Matt Padron;
Texas State; Brad Poston, coastal carolina
RUNNiNGBAcK: doug Blakowski, hobart; cody
childs, Wisconsin-Stevens Point; Taylor craig, Yale;
Kyle Kasperbauer, Nebraska-Omaha; Wendell Johnson,
fairmont State
QUARTeRBAcK: Adam Austin, Arizona; Jeff Ballard, TcU;
Rocky Pentello, capital
defeNSive LiNe: Michael cobbins, Missouri Western;
dustin dlouhy, Montana; Ryan Kleppe, Wisconsin-
Whitewater; Matt Ludeman, Western Michigan; Shawn
Moorehead, iowa State; chris Thorner, Syracuse;
Jeremy van Alstyne, Michigan
LiNeBAcKeR: dan Adams, holy cross; demetrius eaton,
Northwestern; Adam Paulson, Sioux falls; Ryan Tully,
harvard; Brig Walker, Princeton
SecONdARY: Manauris Arias, Maine; diezeas calbert,
Northwest Missouri State; Kenny chicoine, cal Poly;
Jason hoffschneider, North dakota; Josh Kubiak, Mary
hardin-Baylor; Rob Rodriguez, christopher Newport; Steve
Teeples, Wisconsin-La crosse; cary Wade, virginia Tech
KicKeR: craig coffn, Southern illinois
25
USA Football Membership
USA Football’s Membership Program enables administrators, coaches, and ofcials
to enhance their skills. Innovative tools and resources help make their jobs easier, more
rewarding, and enhance the participants’ experience. Please visit www.usafootball.com to
learn more about the USA Football Membership program and sign up.
Coaching Schools
USA Football’s Coaching School, in partnership with NFL teams, is designed specifcally for youth
football coaches who teach the game to players ages 7-14. Te clinics help teach the game of football
in order to create a positive experience for their players. Te one-day clinic ofers coaches the best
techniques for communicating with players, coaches, and parents; teaching fundamentals; organizing
the season with practice planning; establishing the best drills for individual, group and team periods;
and developing a scheme for defense, ofense and special teams. Te clinicians include successful high
school and youth coaches with special guests from the collegiate and professional ranks.
USAFootball.com
USAFootball.com is a portal for youth, high school and international football
that ofers online programs and resources for coaches, administrators, ofcials
and parents. It features content, web sites and a membership hub. Elements of
USAFootball.com can be included in existing web sites. Tese features will allow
users to keep up with the latest topics and developments in coaching, league
administration, ofciating, and health and safety.
State Leadership Forum
Te USA Football State Leadership Forum is an annual gathering of youth football
leaders in each state to discuss topics impacting the sport.
High School Programs
USA Football is involved with developing the sport at the high school level through a number of unique programs and events,
including the creation of a high school task force, online resources, equipment grants, and life skills symposia for high school
students. In addition, the annual Governor’s Cup Award is given to the nation’s “Best High School Football State.”
International Programs
Serving as the national governing body for the sport of football internationally, USA Football’s international programs include
managing the Senior National Team; managing the U-19 National Team; and operating an International Student Program that
enables high school-aged international students to study and play American football at college prep schools. USA Football is the
designated United States representative to the International Federation of American Football, which consists of 45 member countries.
USA Football also presides over the Pan American Federation of American Football, consisting of the U.S., Canada, Mexico,
Guatemala, Panama, Argentina, and Uruguay.
26 USA Football Magazine
2007 Play Football
Te Play Football campaign is USA Football’s marquee promotional event which runs
from June through September each year and is highlighted by a youth football registration
drive, safety awareness education and football season kickof
celebrations in conjunction with NFL teams. Here are some of
key components of Play Football:
Registration Drive
Each spring and summer, USA Football runs a football registration drive to help youth football
programs increase participation. As part of the program, USA Football ofers league administrators
a free registration help kit which includes yard signs, posters, a USA Football league operating guide,
a CD with sample registration and other administrative forms, and Youth Football 101 brochures for
prospective parents and players.

Safety Awareness
USA Football launched a background checks program in partnership with the National Center for Safety Initiatives with a goal of
getting 100,000 youth football volunteers checked through a thorough screening service. Additionally, a safety awareness campaign
will encourage players, parents and coaches to take the necessary safety precautions when playing football including a focus on
hydration, equipment ftting, and injury prevention/treatment.

Kickoff Celebration
USA Football, in conjunction with the NFL and NFL Players Association, will team up to celebrate the kickof of the football
season. Along with various NFL team events, youth football teams from across the country can sign up online to receive a free
celebration kit which includes water bottles and a protective script holder for coaches. Play Football Month showcases how diferent
communities from across the country celebrate the start of the football season.
Equipment Grants (July - September):
Applications for youth and high school equipment grants will be accepted from July to September. Eligible (federal or state
nonproft) youth, high school, and school-sponsored football organizations may apply for an equipment grant online at www.
usafootball.com. Youth organizations are eligible for a $1,000 grant and high school organizations are eligible for a $1,500 grant.
Applications are considered on need and merit, and consist of a league profle and a short essay section.
World Championship of
American Football
U.S. National Team played in its frst World Championship of American Football in Kawasaki,
Japan from July 7-15. For tournament results log on to www.usafootball.com.
Team USA Schedule:
July 10 – USA vs. South Korea
July 12 – USA vs. Germany
July 15 - possible medal round game
27
pigskin portraits
Broomfeld Youth Football Association
(Broomfeld, Colo.)
Black Hills Youth Football League
(Olympia, Wash.)
AYF Billings Broncos
(Billings, Montana)
South Germantown Panthers
(Germantown, Md.)
Pop Warner Boston Bengals
(Boston, Mass.)
South Beauregard Football League
(Longville, La.)
YMCA Plano
Football League
(Plano, Texas)
28 USA Football Magazine
Wildcats Jr Pee Wee
(Florence, Ala.)
USA Football
attn: Jenny Hofer,
8300 Boone Blvd., Suite 625
Vienna, VA 22182
E-mail: jhofer@usafootball.com
Send uS your photoS!
North Carroll Panthers Youth Football Program
(Westminster, Md.)
Pop Warner Petaluma Panthers
(Novato, Calif.)
Red Raiders
(Hingham, Mass.)
Reeds Spring Rams Boys & Girls Club
(Branson, Mo.)
Oak Grove Athletic Association
(Durham, N.C.)
European Youth Services
Football League
(Hohenfels, Germany)
Popamno All-Stars
(Popamno Beach, Fla.)
29
SCHUTT YOUTH EQUIPMENT BAG
Designed for the youth football player the Youth
Equipment Bag will carry all football gear, helmet,
shoulder pads, hip, thigh and knee pads, shoes,
uniform, etc.
• Additional pockets for wet /dirty clothes,
personal items, etc.
• Heavy-duty construction with reinforced handle
• Hidden backpack straps
GILMAN SIDELINE MARKERS
The Gilman Sideline Marker stands out on the field.
The markers won’t fold up or blow over because they
are made from a solid foam triangle with a weighted
bottom. The bold black numbers stand out against a
background of fluorescent orange. The markers, which
come in a set of 11 or 22, have a convenient carrying
handle at bottom and are stackable for compact
storage. For more information, visit www.gilmangear.com.
SCHUTT FORMATION
TEACHER: A COACH’S
BEST FRIEND
Teaching multiple schemes
and formations can be difficult at
any level of football. The Schutt
Offensive and Defensive Formation
Teacher simplifies the process by
making it more visual. It helps
teach proper alignment, line splits,
spacing, and depth for every player
position, and accounts for all
types of offensive and defensive
formations. The offensive set
includes 1-C, 2-G, 2-T, 2-TE, 5-WR,
3-RB, and 1-QB multiple sets. The
defensive set includes 2-NT, 2-DT,
2-OLB, 2-ILB, 2-MLB, 2-CB, and 2-S
multiple sets. Learn more at www.
schuttsports.com.
UNDER ARMOUR DEMOLITION MID CLEAT
The speed shoe for the Power player! Lightweight upper materials combine with
HeatGear® lining for optimum moisture management and breathability. Integrated
strapping system maximizes stability and support, durable mesh repels dirt and
water. Under Armour’s signature Progressive Traction provides outstanding ground
penetration and push-off, while innovative Pebax outsole technology ensures
a lightweight, flexible performance. This is the most updated football cleat yet.
Available colors: white/black, black/silver, white/red, white/midnight navy. Visit
www.underarmour.com for more details.
UNDER ARMOUR YOUTH
PLAY MAKER
Execute your game plan with
cool, dry performance. UA wristband
construction drives moisture transport.
Clear window sleeve. Embroidered logo.
GEAR UP
The latest, coolest, must-have, must-see youth football equipment, tools and clinics
30 USA Football Magazine
��������� �������� ����� ��� ����� ����� ����� ���������
��������������������������������������������������
����� ���� ������ ����� ���� ������� ������� ����� ����� ��
����� ��� ���� ��������� ��������� ������ ����� ������
���������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
����� �������� ������ ����� ������� ��������� ��������
�������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������
��������������������������
www.gilmangear.com
CALL 800-243-0398 TO REQUEST A GILMAN GEAR 2006-2007 CATALOG.
GET GILMAN FOR YOUTH GEAR!
Youth Sled: 1-man, 2-man, 3-man, 5-man & 7-man sleds • Youth Gauntlet • Youth Pop-up
Youth Chute: 1-stall, 2-stall, 3-stall & 5-stall chutes • Youth Shield • Youth Dummy • Youth Step-over
Mech 3346 USA Football Ad 8/10/06 7:52 PM Page 1
Bill Redell
School: Oaks Christian High School
location: Westlake Village, Calif.
RecoRd: 172-56-3
MeMbers of the UsA footbAll high school tAsk force
expeRience: 19 years as high school
head coach, two years as assistant in
college, two years as an assistant in USFL.
During his 19-year career as a high
school football head coach, Oaks
Christian High School coach Redell
has amassed an overall record of
172-56-3, along with fve California
Interscholastic Federation titles and two
state championships.
Redell has served as Oaks Christian’s
coach since the school opened in 1999.
During his tenure with the Lions, Redell
has developed Oaks Christian into one of
the most prominent and successful high
school football programs in the nation.
on being a football coach:
“Te only thing I ever wanted to do
was become a football coach. When
I was about six-or-seven-years old
walking home from school, [I] saw
a football game and went home and
asked my dad what that was. Ever
since that, I’ve known what I’ve wanted
to do to do with my life.”
on football:
“My whole experience in football to me
is that I’ve never had to grow up. Anytime
I was involved in football it never felt like it
was work. It felt like it was fun.”
on hiS induction into the
college football of fame:
“Tat was the most rewarding and
exciting that ever happened to me as far
as my football career.”
expeRience: 25 years (all with DeMatha),
heading into 26th year
Since 1982, Bill McGregor has brought stability
and credibility to DeMatha Catholic High School’s
football program by winning 11 Washington
Catholic Athletic Conference Championships.
Although the Pittsburgh native has led
DeMatha to plenty of on-feld success while
leading the Stags to an overall record of 239-
32-3, McGregor is also a strong advocate of
succeeding of the feld as well, as he and
his staf at DeMatha work hard to teach and
implement ways for their players to learn the
importance of excelling in the classroom.
on being a football coach:
“We’ve established such a tremendous
report with the guys. Some of the kids come
back time-afer-time and talk about football
and what it meant to them, and how we had
such a great impact on their lives.”
on the leSSonS of football:
“If you take a look at the work world today,
no matter what profession, they’re either looking
for a person who is dedicated, hard-working,
loyal and who is willing to make sacrifces for
the company. Tey’re also looking for someone
who exhibits good character, leadership and
class. I think they are all the intangibles that a
young person can get from playing football or
for any type of great athletic program.”
on JunioR playeR development:
“What I like about it is that it’s a free
program for the kids, they have full equipment
to work with, and it’s a teaching program where
they can be taught all positions.”
expeRience: Head coach (2003-present),
secondary coach (1993, 1996-1997), special
teams coordinator (1997), defensive
coordinator (1998-2002)
Coach Steve Specht has led the St. Xavier
Bombers to a record of 36-3 and Division
I state championship since becoming their
head coach in 2003.
Specht, who was promoted to head
coach afer Ohio high school football legend
Steve Rasso retired, has carried St. Xavier’s
winning traditions into a new era of Bomber
football.
Specht has been on the Bombers’ staf
since 1993, where he started out as St.
Xavier’s secondary coach.
on becoming a football coach:
“I know I wanted to coach when I was in high
school. I had the good fortune of playing under
some great coaches. My coaches had a direct
impact on my passion for the game.”
on the influence of hiS foRmeR
coach, ex-St. xavieR head coach
Steve RaSSo:
“He had a huge infuence on my life,” Specht
said of his former mentor. “I learned an awful lot
from him about football and an awful lot about
life. When I talk about my football philosophy
as far as teaching these kids about football [and
life]; that’s what [Rasso] did for me,”
on the SpoRt of football:
“Tis game is a focus on life. We try to
teach life lessons frst and foremost. Tis
sport is the ultimate sport to [use to] teach
teamwork.”
Steve Specht
School: St. Xavier High School
location: Cincinnati, Ohio
RecoRd: 36-3
Bill McGReGoR
School: DeMatha Catholic High School
location: Hyattsville, Md.
RecoRd: 239-32-3
32 uSa football magazine
On sidelines since 1965.
PCWGSM60651 Pepsico/Sports Marketing
Title: ”Tested in Labs” – (Cooler)
Space/Color: Std. page – 4/CB
Bleed Size: 8.625 in x 11.375 in
Trim Size: 7.625 in x 10.5 in
Live Size: 6.875 in x 9.5 in
Media: Consumer Print 2006
Creative Director: D. Schuman, J. Burke
Art Director: M. Lyons
Copywriter: T. Goodrich
Print Producer: A. Kubala
Project Manager: K. Johnson
Art Buyer: S. Cartland
Keyliner: S. Roseberry
Billing #: PCWGSM62430 Supplier #: Schawk - 109249 Retoucher: Schawk
©

2
0
0
6

S
-
V
C
,

I
n
c
.
C
§
F
i
l
e

C
u
s
t
:
D
a
t
e
:

S
c
a
l
e
:
M
Y
K
`
1
0
9
2
4
9
_
a
0
3
E
l
e
m
e
n
t

7
9
8
/
0
4
/
0
6
1
"

=

1
"

D
e
s
i
g
n
e
r
:

B
E
Log onto VTBGPPUCBMMDPN today to ñnd out more!
2VBOUJUJFTBSFMJNJUFE,JUTBSFBWBJMBCMFXIJMFTVQQMJFTMBTU
,JDLPõUIFGPPUCBMMTFBTPO
wlth USA Pootball and partlclpate ln the world's largest
youth football celebratlon.
Order a '3&&$FMFCSBUJPO,JU for your team that
lncludes USA Pootball water bottles, tradlng cards,
and scrlpt sheet holders for coaches.
Learn how your youth organlzatlon or hlgh school can
apply for &RVJQNFOU(SBOUT up to $l,500.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful