Page 1 of 19 

Naked Put Strategy 

Following is an outline on how to analyze stock/s to find a Naked Put position. This is a brief outline, and does  not take into consideration your investment goals or personal Risk analysis. 

Action: Selling (Writing) a Put option  Expectation: Stock/Market will be Neutral/Mildly Bullish  Profit: Limited to premium received  Loss: Unlimited, however stock price can only retrace to zero. If exercised, maximum loss is the strike price  minus the premium received  Breakeven: Strike price – premium received 

Index  Description:................................................................................................................................................... 2  Strategy Outline ............................................................................................................................................ 2  Margin .......................................................................................................................................................... 3  Naked Put Guidelines.................................................................................................................................... 4  Analyzing for Naked Put positions ................................................................................................................ 5  Chart ......................................................................................................................................................... 5  Fundamental Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 8  Market Analysis ........................................................................................................................................ 9  Returns/Risk............................................................................................................................................ 11  Placing Naked Put orders ............................................................................................................................ 14  Exiting a Naked Put position ....................................................................................................................... 15  Naked Put Don’ts!....................................................................................................................................... 17  Resources.................................................................................................................................................... 18  Disclaimer................................................................................................................................................... 19

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 2 of 19 

Description: 
The writer (seller) of a put option is obliged to buy the underlying shares, at the exercise price. But only if the  taker (buyer) exercises the option. For accepting this obligation, the writer receives and keeps the option  premium paid by the taker (buyer). This is whether or not the option is exercised. 

Strategy Outline 
The Naked Put strategy is one of the higher risk strategies. Profit potential is limited, while Risk (if unattended)  can be unlimited. Due to this high risk, this strategy also has a correlation with high returns.  It is a relatively simple strategy to understand. You Sell to Open a put option contract. If the option expires at  the end of its term, you profit from the position.  It is a brilliant strategy if a few key guidelines are adhered to. But the complacent trader who does not respect  this strategy can lose far more than the money they put into the position. 

First, let’s recap what a Put option entails: 

The put option contract gives the Taker (buyer) the right to Sell their shares, at a set  price, on or before the expiration date. As the option writer (seller), you must buy  shares if you are exercised, however, you receive premium from the taker for the  contract. 

You Sell the option, to receive premium. Because a majority of options expire, there is a high probability you  will not have to close the trade before expiration.  If the share price is trading below the strike price of the option contract, there is a high probability you would  be exercised, and forced to purchase shares. For this very important reason, we use the Strike price as our Stop  Loss Exit point. As Naked Put writers, we do not want to be exercised and forced to purchase shares (unless  this is the reason you are entering the strategy – stock accumulation).  FMR Analysts also places profit taking orders on this strategy. If we can close out of this strategy early, we  will.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 3 of 19 

A put option increases in value as the share price falls. It decreases in value as the share price rises. Because we  write the position at the crust of Time Decay beginning to affect the option value, we also benefit as time draws  closer to the expiration date.  After the position is written, we want the share price to remain steady or to rise in value. This will decrease the  value of the put option. If we need to close the position, it will be cheaper for us to Buy to Close.  Remember: we are selling the option before we buy it. Think of it as a “reverse trade”. First we sell the option  and receive the premium. We then buy the option and have to pay the premium. For this reason, it stands to  reason that if we first sell it at a high price and then buy it back at a low price, we will profit from the  difference.  The old saying “Buy low and Sell high” also applies here. Only we Sell first and Buy later. 

Margin 
“The seller of an option has the obligation to deliver the underlying of the option if it is exercised. To ensure he  can fulfil this obligation, he has to deposit collateral. This premium margin is equal to the premium that he  would need to pay to buy back the option and close out his position.”  Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margin_%28finance%29 

Because the Naked Put strategy does not own the stock, when you enter into the position your broker will  require some “collateral” just in case the position shifts against you. We call this margin.  Each broker has different specifications for how much margin is required, however, the following are some  guidelines: ·  25% of the underlying market price + the premium ­ amount out of the money OR ·  10% of the underlying market price (or strike price for O­T­M puts) + the premium, whichever is  greater. 

The alternative to using margin for a Naked Put position is to ensure you have enough cash in your account to  fully “cover” the position.  For example; ·  You write (sell) 10 contracts on the 20.00 put option ·  To fully cover this position with cash (assuming US options), you will require 10 contracts x 100 shares  per contract, x $20 = $20,000

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 4 of 19 

Naked Put Guidelines
·  Choose Fundamentally strong stocks ·  Beginners: only write Naked Puts on stock you are willing to purchase, and ensure you have the cash to  cover the position ·  This strategy relies on Time Decay to profit. Only enter positions between 3 to 6 weeks out from  expiration ·  Bullish to Neutral trend. Ideally, a stock that is trading in a sideways trading range, preferably after a  downwards trend. Upwards trends are ok, but definitely not a downwards trending stock. ·  Identify a position where the strike price of the option is below your strongest support level. ·  Use the support level as your first point to exit. If the stock price closes below this level, consider an  early exit. ·  If the share price closes below your option strike price, exit the trade. ·  Do not hold the position below the strike price as there is a higher probability to be exercised ·  Place a limit order at the lowest possible price (above zero), that you can close the option for. If there is  a rally in the share price, you could be closed early for a profit, allowing you to continue writing naked  puts for the remainder of that expiration period.  Example chart; 

Example Naked Put Criteria  Fundamentally strong  Stock  √  company  Outlook:  Time to expiration  25 days  Support  Above $20  Strike price  $20.00  Premium  Downside b/e  $19.75

Neutral  Bullish  Bearish  $0.25 

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 5 of 19 

Analyzing for Naked Put positions 
When analyzing for a Naked Put position, there are 3 categories to consider:  1.  Chart  2.  Fundamental Analysis of company  3.  Market Analysis  4.  Returns/Risk 

Chart 
Many people will try to create automatic search engines with mathematical algorithms that will find “text book”  trading opportunities. However, for the Naked Put strategy, you will still need to evaluate the chart of the stock  before making your final decision of whether or not to enter the trade.  Don’t try to cut corners. Spend the time to methodically check the chart of any position you are considering for  a Naked Put. Over time, when you have had plenty of practice evaluating charts, this will become a very quick  process. 

When evaluating the chart, there are 3 factors we need to consider:  1) Trend  2) Support and Resistance  3) Candlesticks  Trend  The ideal situation for a Naked Put position is one where the stock is trading in a sideways range. Preferably, if  the stock price has retraced and then formed the sideways trading range, this would suggest that any bear  (downward) trend has ended.  An upwards trend is still ok for Naked Put writing, however, the option premium is likely to be lower and will  affect your return/risk evaluation, and a change in trend could result in a larger loss. Therefore, increasing the  risk of the position.  The Naked Put strategy is a Neutral to Bullish outlook. Therefore, a downwards trend is not suitable for this  strategy. By nature, there is higher risk that a stock trading in a downwards trend has a greater probability of  continuing in that trend, and this could lead to a loss position with the Naked Put.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 6 of 19 

In the above example, IDCC has been trending in a sideways trend since mid­2004, through to the right hand  side of the chart (early 2006). There is a clear support level just below $15.00, while through the second half of  2005, there is a secondary support level at approximately $17.00.  As long as there is sufficient premium to warrant the risk associated with this strategy, IDCC (technically)  would meet our charting expectations. 

Support and Resistance  By definition, a sideways trend has both a support and a resistance level clearly defined. Finding a stock with a  very strong support level is ideal for the Naked Put strategy (as identified in the above chart)  The strategy is a “time” strategy. We are writing options to receive premium income. We do this 3 to 6 weeks  out from expiration of the option contract. Over the remaining few weeks of the option contract, we want the  Time component of the option to decay. This will allow our position to profit as the put option decreases in  value.  A position that has a strong support level has a lower probability of turning into a loss position. Especially if the  strike price of the Naked Put is below the support level. Should the support level be breached, we have a clear  signal that buyer strength was not able to hold the stock position up. Which would result in a change in trend.  If the stock has strong resistance, or multiple layers of resistance, there is a lower probability that we might  close the position early on a short­term rally. The resistance will act as a barrier to the stock pushing upwards,  hindering our trade.  However, as long as the resistance does not cause the stock to change into a downwards trend, resistance is not  as important as support in this strategy.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 7 of 19 

Candlesticks 

If the stock price has recently retraced towards a support level, we would find solid red candles denoting selling  pressure. The naked put writer needs to identify that buyers are willing to hold the share price at support,  however, candles denoting sellers will produce higher premiums for the put option writer. 

Ideally, if the stock has recently retraced, but has formed neutral candlestick patterns such as a Doji or Spinning  Top pattern, the naked put writer would be able to produce a reasonable premium return. 

Numerous open green candlesticks would denote buyer activity and may not suit the naked put option writer. 

Using the same IDCC chart from before, we have zoomed in closer to look at December 2005. Notice the  circled area in late December where solid red candles represent a retracing share price towards the support level  around $17.00. Open green candles have then begun to form on the support, showing buyer accumulation. 

It is this period around the support level, when buyers begin to re­enter the stock, that is ideal for entering into a  Naked Put position.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 8 of 19 

Fundamental Analysis 
The Naked Put strategy is a Bullish/Neutral Strategy. Therefore, Fundamentally stronger companies are  preferable. 

The trick is that a Fundamentally strong company is usually trading in an upwards trend. For this reason, it is  sometimes difficult to identify a company that is suitable to adopt the risk associated with the Naked Put  strategy.  If a Fundamentally strong company has retraced (for whatever reason), and begun to consolidate, there is a  strong probability that investors will perceive the stock to be trading at a discounted price. Therefore, the stock  price is likely to either maintain the sideways movement, or, find buyer demand and rally.  When searching for a company to enter a Naked Put position, we prefer those companies that are  Fundamentally sound. Some of the guidelines we use to measure this are as follows: ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  Increased Revenue Increasing Earnings per Share Positive EPS Growth rate Are market leaders (usually the top 5 companies within their sector) Conduct business in industries that have a positive (bullish) outlook 

From websites such as http://moneycentral.msn.com/investor/StockRating/srsmain.asp, there are Stock Rating  systems that you can use as further evaluation. Based on historical performance, and in some cases, future  earnings estimates, you can quickly define whether or not the company is fundamentally sound.  In addition to evaluating company Fundamentals, you should also scan through recent company announcements  and articles. This will give you an insight into analyst and researcher views of the company (and industry), and  offer alternative evaluations. Websites such as http://moneycentral.msn.com/home.asp and  http://finance.yahoo.com are perfect sites that gather articles from multiple sources. 

Writers Tip:  Because finding fundamentally strong companies that are trading sideways  after a retracement is quite difficult, you may need to look for companies that  are relatively strong (fundamentally), but are in a weak industry. Or vice  versa: a strong industry, but not an industry leader. As long as the stock price  has ended its downwards trend and there is potential for future growth …

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 9 of 19 

Market Analysis 
It is imperative that you have a market opinion at all times. Whether you are writing or trading options, you  must be aware of what might affect market conditions. Outline when the next earnings season is, what major  economic reports are scheduled for release, or whether the market is trending in favor to the outlook of the  stock price you are evaluating.  FMR Analysts provides a weekly US market report  evaluating market trends, economic reports, major  company activity and market sentiment evaluations. If evaluating the market conditions for yourself, the easiest method is to evaluate the chart trend of the major  indexes. For example; if you were considering a Naked Put position on AAPL, you would evaluate the  NASDAQ index because AAPL is a leading Technology company.  Simple trend definition can help identify the current conditions of the markets. An upwards trend is more likely  to continue finding bullish sentiment, which will help the Naked Put strategy. A downwards trend is more  likely to find continued selling pressure through the markets in general.  Remember, the Naked Put strategy is a Bullish/Neutral strategy. The stock price could trade sideways, upwards  and in some cases slightly downwards, and still produce a profit. However, a neutral to bullish market outlook  is far more beneficial for entering new Naked Put positions.  If your analysis suggests that there is a good probability that the markets may retrace, then it is probably best  you don’t enter into the Naked Put position straight away. A falling share price increases the value of the  written put, forcing us to close it at a higher value (loss).  Market timing for a Naked Put position does not need to be exact, however, bad timing (entering just before a  market fall) can be costly.  The perfect time to write Naked Puts is shortly after a stock has retraced, then found some support, finding  some consolidation before it starts to show buyer accumulation. Due to the fall in stock value, the put option  will have a higher premium, and if the stock rises in price, you will find the put option will decrease in value at  a faster rate.  When the markets are bullish (trending upwards), they will offer lower put premiums for Naked Put writing.  Therefore, we may be forced to look almost 2­months out for a reasonable return during Bullish market  conditions. Writing 2­months out from expiration means your Risk will increase due to the longer time­frame,  however, a Bullish market is also more likely to see share prices rallying, and this could help the position profit  from early closure at the profit target. 

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 10 of 19 

The above chart is that of the S&P500 index. It is considered one of the benchmark performance indexes for the  US markets. 

We can clearly identify different market conditions in this chart ·  From the left hand side, a Bull (upwards) market persisted until early 2000 where a market top formed ·  From 2000 through to early 2003, a Bear (downwards) market was established ·  After several months of consolidating at the market bottom, a new Bull (upwards) market began. It  carried through to the right side of the chart (October 2007) 

The Bear market from 2000 to 2003 is not an ideal time to be writing. The probability that the stock price of  any position entered will fall, is very high. Therefore, it is best not to write Naked Puts during a Bear market.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 11 of 19 

Returns/Risk 
Returns  When evaluating a position for a Naked Put strategy, the final check is the potential return and risk associated  with the trade. From years of experience in writing Naked Puts, we have developed our own guidelines for  potential returns. 

FMR Analyst expected returns for Naked Put positions:  Our minimum guideline for return is that the Naked Put strategy should produce a 1.2% return for a 1 month  period.  To calculate this return, we divide the premium by the strike price of the written option. For example; you have  received 25 cents per share after writing the 20.00 put option. Therefore; 25 cents divided by 20.00 = 1.25% 

Alternative calculation  While the above calculation is correct for identifying the return on the position, there is an alternative  calculation that is also correct. Some analysts would suggest this second calculation is more correct, and in fact,  it is the preferred calculation of FMR Analysts.  The second evaluation depends on the amount of margin your broker requires for you to cover the position on  entry. Margin was discussed earlier in this document. It is the amount of cash your broker requires as collateral  for you to enter the Naked Put position.  Typically, the margin you require for a Naked Put position will not completely cover the cost of the position if  you are exercised. That is, if you were exercised and forced to purchase the shares from the written put options,  the margin set aside would not cover the cost to purchase the shares.  The amount of capital required to enter the position is the more realistic benchmark for calculating the  return/loss of the position:  Return = (Premium received x (number of options x 100)) divided by margin required.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 12 of 19 

Let’s say the margin required for 10 contracts = $2,100  Premium received is 25 cents per share.  Therefore, the calculation would be: 

Return = (25 cents x (10 contracts x 100)) divided by $2,100  Return = (25 x 1000) divided by $2,100  Return = $250 divided by $2,100  Return = 11.9% 

In calculating our expected return based on margin requirements, FMR Analysts expects a minimum 8% for a  1 month cycle, per position. Quite regularly, however, we can achieve an average of 10% per position. Returns  will depend on market cycles, and volatility. 

Risk  One extremely important consideration is the Risk associated with the trade. This is something that many do not  consider. If, for example, the share price is trading at $34 and you are considering the $30 strike to write as a  naked put, the “Buffer Zone” for this position is $4 (the difference between current price and strike price).  If the stock price were to retrace after you have written the naked put, then it is likely the option will increase  by the intrinsic value. In this example, we might see the put option increase by $4.  This is the risk of the trade, because we use the strike price as our exit point.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 13 of 19 

The Buffer Zone is a dynamic level. It will contract as the stock price falls, and expand as the stock price rises.  For monitoring purposes, it is a good guideline to evaluate how close the share price is to your exit point – the  strike price. 

In the above example of RIMM, we have a support level just above $20.00. The last traded price is $22.04. If  we were considering the 20.00 Naked Put position, our Buffer Zone would be:  Buffer zone = difference between stock price and strike price  Buffer zone = $22.04 ­ $20.00  Buffer zone = $2.04 or 10.2% 

When evaluating the chart, if your analysis suggests there is some weakness from buyers, or that sellers may  easily enter the stock, then this will increase the Risk of your trade. You may find that it is better to monitor the  position while it continues to retrace a little further, before deciding to enter the Naked Put.  Remember, if you are not comfortable with the trade for any reason, do not enter into it!

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 14 of 19 

Placing Naked Put orders 
Some traders like to use automatic facilities through their brokers to place trading orders, including Naked Put  positions. This is usually because of accessibility to placing orders live. For US citizens, many employees  frown upon additional activities during work hours, whilst international traders must deal with the US markets  trading during odd hours (the US market open for Australian citizens is at 11.30pm)  At FMR Analysts, we believe it is imperative to place your orders for Naked Put positions live on the markets.  For the Naked Put trader, it is highly likely that most of your positions will be entered between 4 to 6 weeks out  from expiration. Because this is a Time strategy, we have found that there is very little market action required.  Simply put, you only need to be active on the markets when placing entry orders, and for a small percentage of  trades, for exit orders.  When the markets open, we check the stock price and news announcements, just to ensure that returns are as  expected and that the share price has not shifted too drastically. We then place “Market” orders.  If the option price is not trading at our previously evaluated “expected” levels, we would not place the trade. If  the value is too low, then the return is not worth the risk of entering. If the return is too high, then you are likely  to have found that the stock price has fallen in value. Remember, a falling stock price is not the ideal entry for a  Naked Put strategy. 

FMR Analysts’ experience with this strategy is to produce an average rate of 7 winning trades out of 10.  Depending on the market conditions, this rate will increase. At this rate, our returns average from 4.5 to 5% per  month for this strategy.  It is a great “cashcow” strategy, but one that requires a good amount of practice before implementing.  Remember, there is high risk associated with this strategy as the loss can exceed 100% of the money required  to hold the position.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 15 of 19 

Exiting a Naked Put position 
The Naked Put strategy is relatively simple. You sell a Put option, receive premium, and it will either expire or  you need to close it out. 

Expiration of the option  Naked Puts should be written 4 to 6 weeks out from the expiry date. During the final 3 weeks of the option  contracts life, Time Decay will help the value of the option decrease. This will make the option cheaper to close  (Buy).  If the stock market and/or share price remains steady during the period you have written the Naked Put, then  your position has a high probability of expiring worthless. As long as the share price remains above the strike  price of your written option contract.  On the final day of trading for the Naked Put, you need to monitor the price of the underlying share into the  closing bell, to ensure that the share price remains above the strike of the option contract. If it does remain  above, your position will expire worthless, and you will not need to take further action.  When an option expires worthless, it is literally closed (bought) at zero. If, like the example we had above, you  had written (sold) the option for 20 cents, you have basically created a profit out of nothing! 

Profit Target is Triggered  The Naked Put strategy is a Neutral to mildly Bullish outlook. We hunt for fundamentally strong companies  that have been consolidating at low levels, or trading on medium to long­term support.  These types of stock have a reasonable potential of rallying. When a stock price rises, the value of a put option  decreases. This is exactly what we want with the Naked Put strategy – for the value of the option to decrease.  We write the option, and because we have to Buy it back to close, we want to buy to close the option at as low a  value as possible.  Because of the reasonable potential that the stock price might rally during the tenure of writing the Naked Put,  we place a profit taking order with the broker. This order should be set at the lowest possible price that the  option could be bought to close at, other than zero.  The order is as such (assuming the lowest price to buy back the option is at 5 cents):  Buy to Close, Dec 20.00 puts (code), at Limit of $0.05

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 16 of 19 

The above order means that if the value of the put option decreases to 5 cents, we will buy back the option at a  5 cents. Again, if we had written the option for 20 cents, we profit with the difference = 15 cents. 

From our experience with this strategy, we find that 5 out of 10 Naked Put positions will be closed early.  If the stock price rallies and there is still time left until expiration, it is best for us to exit the position (at the  lowest possible price), rather than holding the position and risking the potential that the share price might fall  back down. 

Forced Close on Exit Stop  If  the stock price (and/or the markets) trend down during the tenure of you holding the Naked Put, you may be  forced to close the position. FMR Analysts uses the strike price of the written option as our exit point.  Many articles suggest using the breakeven level as your exit point should the share price move against you. The  breakeven point is calculated by subtracting the premium received from the strike price of the written option.  Using the breakeven level is fine, however, if a Naked Put is entered according to the plan FMR Analysts has  presented in this document, then we have already had 2 signals to exit. Firstly, to breach the breakeven level the  stock price will have to have breached a strong support level. This suggests that buyer demand has failed and  that sellers are dominating the stock price. Secondly, once the support has been breached, the stock will have to  have breached the strike price. The Naked Put is at risk of being Exercised when the share price begins trading  below the strike, and this is further reason to exit the position.  Approximately 2 out of 10 Naked Put positions will breach their strike price and require forced closure.  During market conditions where there is a major negative fundamental that causes a market correction, you are  at higher risk of your exit points being triggered. In these situations, you need to decide whether or not the  correction is likely to lead to your positions breaching the support and strike prices, or if you can hold the  positions through to expiration.  The amount of time left until expiration will have a major influence on your decision in this scenario. If there is  less than a week until expiration, you may hold the positions through to expiration if there is still a good Buffer  Zone.  If, however, you still have 3 weeks until expiration, there is too much time where the stock (and the market)  could continue to correct and force you to exit your positions at a greater loss.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 17 of 19 

Naked Put Don’ts!
·  Don’t enter into long­term Naked Put positions unless you are 100% cash covered. Preferably, do not  enter into long­term Naked Put positions at all! ·  Don’t chase profits. There are plenty of put options that can be written for high returns, but this usually  means that the stock has already fallen in value (and more likely to continue doing so), or that there is a  high expectation that it will. ·  Don’t use this strategy on risky stocks. Stick to well established positions. ·  Don’t enter Naked Puts on stocks trading in risky Industries either. ·  Don’t trade this strategy on extremely high volatility. Some volatility is required so that we can receive  reasonable premium return, however, during conditions where the markets are falling and market  volatility (measured by the CBOE VIX indicator) is extremely high, do not write Naked Puts. ·  Don’t hold positions through your exit points. No matter what your outlook for the stock is, the risk of  being exercised is high when the stock price breaches the strike price. Remember: as Naked Put writers  we do not want to be Exercised!

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 18 of 19 

Resources 
The information contained in this article portrays all the basic information you require to understand options.  However, your understanding may not yet be completely clear.  Most of the information you will need to completely understand options is available for free on the internet.  FMR Analysts has researched the best resources for you to complete your learning of options. 

Chicago Board Options Exchange – Learning Centre  Go straight to the exchange to learn about options. At the CBOE online Options Institute, you can: ·  View self­guided online tutorials ·  Conduct self­paced interactive online courses ·  Watch live interactive educational webcasts, or ·  Book to attend a live seminar.  http://www.cboe.com/LearnCenter/default.aspx 

Books  There are many books written on options, and how to understand them. The following are selections FMR  Analysts recommends for the beginner:  Options for Equity Investors  Author: Wendy Newton 

The Secrets of Writing Options  Author: Louise Bedford 

Options: A complete guide for Australian investors and traders  Author: Guy Bower 

FMR Bookstore: http://fmranalysts.blogspot.com/2006/09/bookstore.html

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 19 of 19 

Disclaimer 
Trading involves risk of loss and may not be suitable for you. Past performance is no guarantee or reliable indication of future  results. This advertisement is of the nature of general information only and must not in any way be construed or relied upon as  legal, financial or professional advice. No consideration has been given or will be given to the individual investment objectives,  financial situation or needs of any particular person. The decision to invest or trade and the method selected is a personal  decision and involves an inherent level of risk, and you must undertake your own investigations and obtain your own advice  regarding the suitability of this product for your circumstances. Please ensure you obtain and read the current offer  documentation prior to acquiring the products advertised herein, so you are fully informed regarding the key risks and costs  associated with these products.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved.