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BY ORDER OF THE COMMANDANT OF CADETS

BY ORDER OF THE COMMANDANT OF CADETS AIR FORCE CADET WING MANUAL 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

AIR FORCE CADET WING MANUAL 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Incorporating Through Change 2, 25 January 2010

Personnel THE CADET SIGHT PICTURE

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS INSTRUCTION IS MANDATORY

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the Commandant of Cadets Stan/Eval Community of Practice located at:

https://afkm.wpafb.af.mil/ASPs/CoP/OpenCoP.asp?Filter=AFOT0039.

Links to this address may be found on the USAFA Portal, Commandant’s Page, and the Cadet Portal, Military Tab.

RELEASABILITY: There are no restrictions on release of this publication.

OPR: CWVVV Supersedes AFCWMAN36-3501, 2 January 2008

Certified by: CWVV (Lt Col Elizabeth A. Orie) Pages: 138

This manual implements AFPD 36-35, United States Air Force Academy and AFPD 36-29, Military Standards. It applies to all cadets assigned to the United States Air Force Academy Cadet Wing, USAFA/CW personnel identified within this manual, and is written to foster an environment in which each cadet's concept of duty will be further developed and strengthened through the Officer Development System (ODS). Standards in this manual apply during the academic year and summer periods. The responsibility to perform one's duty applies to each cadet at all times, 24 hours per day, in or out of uniform, and at or away from the United States Air Force Academy. Duties and responsibilities always take precedence over privileges and may be academic, physical, or military. Duties and responsibilities may not necessarily appear in writing and may be explicit or implicit. The Cadet Sight Picture provides inspiration, expectations, and guidance to the Air Force Cadet Wing (AFCW), outlines the minimum acceptable performance standards for all cadets, and promotes good order and discipline throughout the institution. The omission of subject matter does not constitute authorization for cadets to participate in an activity or to conduct themselves contrary to the "warrior ethos" or "leaders of character" standards expected of the cadet wing. This document is subordinate to all higher headquarters publications. In the absence of written or oral instructions, or when unable to determine a proper course of action, a cadet should seek guidance from his or her chain of command, Air Officer Commanding (AOC), Academy Military Training (AMT) Noncommissioned Officer (NCO), or Officer-in-Charge (OIC). The Commandant of Cadets is the waiver authority for all sections of this manual. However, the AOC/AMT has limited waiver authority throughout this manual. This manual is punitive. Violations of this manual may be punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and the Cadet Disciplinary System (CDS).

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Submit recommended changes on AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication,

through your chain of command to USAFA/CWVV, 2354 Fairchild Drive, Suite 6A44F, USAF

Academy CO 80840.

SUMMARY OF CHANGES

Disposing of over-the-counter medication, upon expiration date, has been added. Body/Physical

Appearance Modification Standards have been added. Requirements to button and zip uniforms

have been clarified. Flight suit t-shirt color specified. PT Gear headbands have been clarified

and authorized watch cap colors corrected. Cadet room arrangement diagram and military hat

configuration diagrams have been corrected. SAMI procedures have been revised.

Authorization/restrictions for large popcorn machines have been added. Hazardous activity

coordination memo example has been revised. Use of 72 and 96-hr non-chargeable passes have

been clarified. Baseline passes have been updated. Vehicle registration information has been

updated. The term Restriction has been defined. Changes are identified by a margin bar.

Chapter 1—PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

 

8

  • 1.1. Introduction …………………………………………………………

 

8

  • 1.2. Conduct Expectations.……………………………………

..

………

...

8

  • 1.3. Customs and Courtesies .……………………………………………

 

9

  • 1.4. Moral, Ethical and Healthy Conduct ……………………………….

11

  • 1.5. General Situations ..

…………………………………………………

12

  • 1.6. Illegal or Prohibited Activities……………………

………………

18

  • 1.7. Spirit Missions………………………………………………………

23

  • 1.8. Academic and Athletic Class Standards……………………………

..

24

  • 1.9. Auditorium Presentation/Lectures/Classroom Guest Speakers……

..

25

  • 1.10. Mitchell Hall Conduct and Decorum………………………………

..

25

  • 1.11. Conclusion…………………………………………………………

..

28

Chapter 2— PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE

 

29

2.1.

Introduction ..

……………………………………………………… ..

 

29

2.2.

Uniform of the Day…………

..

..

………………………………… ...

29

2.3.

General Appearance Standards……………………………………

...

30

Table 2.1.

Personal Grooming Standards ………………………………………

30

Table 2.2.

Body/Physical Appearance Modification Standards………………

..

32

2.4.

Prohibited Uniform Wear…………………………………………

....

35

2.5.

Miscellaneous Policies… …………………………………………

...

35

2.6.

Uniform When Traveling………………………………………

.........

37

2.7.

Civilian Clothing…………………………………………………….

37

Table 2.3.

Appropriate Dress (Military/Civilian Equivalent)……….…………

..

38

2.8.

Service Dress Uniform……………………………………………….

40

Figure 2.1.

Service Dress……

………………………………………………….

40

Table 2.4.

Men’s Service Dress Accouterment Placement………….…………

..

41

Table 2.5.

Women’s Service Dress Nametag/Ribbon Alignment……………….

42

Figure 2.2.

Women’s Service Dress Nametag and Ribbon Alignment.………….

 

42

2.9.

Service Uniform…………………………………………….………

..

43

Figure 2.3.

Service Uniform……………………………………………………

..

43

2.10.

Airman Battle Uniform (ABU)……………………………………

...

44

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

3

Figure 2.4.

Airman Battle Uniform (ABU)………………………………………

 

44

Figure 2.5.

ABU Patrol Cap……………………………………………………

..

45

Figure 2.6.

Rank Placement on ABU/BDU……………………………………

..

46

 

2.11.

Battle Dress Uniform (BDU)………………………………………

..

47

Figure 2.7.

BDU………………

...

………

...

……………………………………

..

47

Figure 2.8.

BDU/ABU Sleeves Up……………………………………………….

 

48

Figure 2.9.

BDU/ABU Pant Blousing…………………………………………….

48

 

2.12.

Flight Dress Uniform………………………………………………

..

49

Figure 2.10.

Flight Suit………….………………………………………………

..

49

 

2.13.

Physical Fitness Uniform……………………………………………

 

51

Figure 2.11.

Physical Fitness Uniform (PT Gear)………………………………

..

 

51

 

2.14.

Mess Dress Uniform………………………………………………

...

53

Figure 2.12.

Mess Dress…………………………………………………………

..

53

Figure 2.13.

Mess Dress Badge/Ribbon Alignment………………………………

 

54

 

2.15.

Parade Uniform……………………………………………………

...

55

Figure 2.14.

Parade Uniform ……………………………………………………

..

55

Table

2.6.

Parade Uniform Wear Instructions………………………………….

 

56

2.16.

Outer Garments……………………………………………………

...

57

Figure 2.15.

Overcoat……

...

……………………………………………………

...

57

Figure 2.16.

Parka….……

...

……………………………………………………

...

57

Figure 2.17.

Flight Jacket

....

……………………………………………………

...

57

Figure 2.18.

Athletic Jacket. ……………………………………………………

...

57

Figure 2.19.

Gortex Jacket Rank Placement.……………………………………

...

58

Table 2.7.

Outer-garments (to include optional items) and Issued Accessories

..

59

Table 2.8.

Clothing/Accessory Standards ……………………

………………

 

60

 

2.17.

Patches …………………………………………………

…………

 

62

Table 2.9.

Authorized Special Activity Patches ……………………

………….

 

63

Figure 2.20.

Cadet Rank Insignia ……………………………………

…………

64

Figure 2.21.

Cadet Merit Badges …….………………………………

…………

65

Table 2.10.

Exchange Cadet Equivalent Uniforms …………………

…………

66

 

2.18.

Conclusion………………………………………………….………

 

...

66

Chapter 3— CADET DORMITORY STANDARDS

 

67

 

3.1.

Introduction ……………………………………………….………

....

67

3.2.

General Dormitory Policies….……………………………….………

..

67

3.3.

Room Assignments……………………………………………………

70

3.4.

Prohibitions…………………………………………………………… 71

3.5.

Squadron Authorizations………………………………………………

72

3.6.

Class Authorizations…………………………………………………

..

72

Table

3.1.

Authorized Items by Class ………………………………………

...

 

..

72

3.7.

Inspections……………………………………………………………. 73

3.8.

AMI Room Standardization …………………………………………

..

73

Figure

3.1.

Standard Room Arrangement .………

...

……………………….……

...

74

Figure 3.2.

Bed in Airing Configurations ……….………………………………

...

76

 

3.9.

SAMI Room Standardization ……………………………

………….

78

Figure 3.3.

SAMI Bed and Comforter Display ………………………………

79

Figure 3.4.

Military Drawer Arrangement .………………………………………

..

80

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Figure 3.5.

Military Footwear Alignment, Three-Cadet Room……………………

82

Figure 3.6.

Military Footwear Alignment, Two-Cadet Room……………………

..

82

Figure 3.7.

Military Hat Configurations …………………………………………

..

82

Figure 3.8.

Wardrobe Arrangement ……………………………………………….

83

 
  • 3.10. SAMI Procedures ……………………………………………………

..

83

  • 3.11. Conclusion……………………………………………

……………

85

Chapter 4—SAFETY AND SECURITY

 

86

 

4.1.

Introduction …………………………………

……………………

 

86

4.2.

Emergency Response Measures…

..

…………………………………

..

86

4.3.

Operational Risk Management…………………….…………………

86

4.4.

Mishap Reporting Procedures………………………….…………….

87

4.5.

The Cadet Illness/Injury Report…………………….….……………

87

4.6.

Ground Safety…………… …………………………….…………

...

88

4.7.

Vehicle Safety……

..

…………………………………….………….

 

89

4.8.

Fire Prevention and Response. ………………………….…………

...

91

Table

4.1.

Cadet Duty Area Bldgs/Phone Numbers…………………….………

 

91

4.9.

Hazardous Activities…………………………………………………

95

Figure 4.1.

Sample Hazardous Activity Coordination Memorandum ………….

97

 
  • 4.10. Security Measures ………………………………………………….

98

  • 4.11. Reporting Criminal Activity ………………………………………

..

101

  • 4.12. Computers and Networks …………………………………………

..

102

  • 4.13. Telephone Usage …………………………………………………

...

106

  • 4.14. Personal Property Storage…………………………………………

..

107

  • 4.15. Conclusion…………………………………………………………. 108

Chapter 5—CADET LIMITS, LEAVE, PASSES, AND PRIVILEGES

 

109

 

5.1.

Introduction ………………………………………………………

...

109

5.2.

Cadet Limits………………………………………………………

..

109

5.3.

Standard Limits……. ……………………………………………….

 

109

Figure 5.1.

Cadet Duty Area ……………………………………………………

110

Figure 5.2.

Extended Limits …………………………………………………….

111

 

5.4.

Prohibited Areas……………………………………………………

..

111

Figure 5.3.

Eagle Peak Off Limits Area…………………………………………

 

112

 

5.5.

Cadet Leave, Scheduling Committee Action (SCA), and Attendance

 
 

at Home Varsity Athletic Contests During ACQ ……

…….……

 

113

 

5.6.

Passes ………………………………………………………

………

114

Table

5.1.

Chargeable/Accountable Passes ……………………………

………

117

5.7.

Privileges ……………………………………………….….………

...

118

Figure

5.4.

Cadet Area Parking Lots

……… …………………………….……

 

125

Figure 5.5.

Northeast Vandenberg Hall Parking Lot …………………………….

125

Figure

5.6.

Northwest Vandenberg Hall Parking Lot ….……………

…… …

 

126

Figure

5.7.

North Arnold Hall Parking Lot ………………………………

…….

126

Figure 5.8.

Upper West Sijan Hall Parking Lot …………………………………

..

126

Figure 5.9.

Upper East Sijan Hall Parking Lot ……………………………….…

..

127

Figure 5.10.

Lower Sijan Hall Parking Lot …………………………………….…

..

127

Figure 5.11.

Visitors Center Parking Lot ……………………………………….….

128

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

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  • 5.8. Conclusion…………………………………………………………….

128

Chapter 6—PRESCRIBED AND ADOPTED FORMS

129

  • 6.1. Prescribed Forms

129

  • 6.2. Adopted Forms

129

Attachment 1 – GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING

130

INFORMATION

Attachment 2 – UCMJ Articles

134

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

THE AIRMAN’S CREED

  • I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN.

I AM A WARRIOR.

I HAVE ANSWERED MY NATIONS CALL.

  • I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN.

MY MISSION IS TO FLY, FIGHT, AND WIN.

I AM FAITHFUL TO A PROUD HERITAGE,

A TRADITION OF HONOR,

AND A LEGACY OF VALOR.

  • I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN.

GUARDIAN OF FREEDOM AND JUSTICE,

MY NATION’S SWORD AND SHIELD,

ITS SENTRY AND AVENGER.

I DEFEND MY COUNTRY WITH MY LIFE.

  • I AM AN AMERICAN AIRMAN.

WINGMAN, LEADER, WARRIOR.

I WILL NEVER LEAVE AN AIRMAN BEHIND,

I WILL NEVER FALTER,

AND I WILL NOT FAIL.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

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UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CORE VALUES

INTEGRITY FIRST

SERVICE BEFORE SELF

EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO

USAFA MISSION STATEMENT

To educate, train, and inspire men and women to become officers of character, motivated to lead

the United States Air Force in service to our nation.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Chapter 1

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

  • 1.1. INTRODUCTION.

This chapter outlines the expected behaviors of all cadets at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA). The

described behaviors mirror the Air Force’s expectations of its officers. Each cadet must exemplify the

highest standards of conduct and embrace the Air Force Core Values of “Integrity First, Service Before

Self, and Excellence in All We Do.” The Core Values must always be remembered and should be

reflected in everything that you do.

  • 1.2. CONDUCT EXPECTATIONS.

Cadets are expected to live by the Air Force Core Values and comply with the substance, spirit, and

intent of all directives as well as avoiding conduct that could discredit themselves, USAFA, or the U.S.

Air Force. Cadets exhibiting unacceptable behavior on a continuous basis may not be recommended for

retention.

1.2.1. Responsibilities. Cadets of integrity welcome the challenges of leadership, supervision, and

command, but with these duties come responsibilities. Every cadet must utilize the Personal Leadership,

Interpersonal Leadership, Team Leadership, Organizational Leadership (PITO) model, based on the

Leadership Growth Model according to their class year, to prepare for a career of continual professional

development as an officer of character. Reference USAFAPAM 36-3527, The Officer Development

System: Developing Leaders of Character, 11 August 2008.

1.2.1.1. First-class cadets. The official term of address is cadet first class or cadet. As the leaders of

the Cadet Wing, first-class cadets are responsible for:

  • 1.2.1.1.1. Being an exemplary role model for the lower three classes.

  • 1.2.1.1.2. Setting high, but achievable goals and standards regarding unit and team performance.

  • 1.2.1.1.3. Motivating and providing support to all classes.

1.2.1.2. Second-class cadets.

The

official term of

address is cadet

second class or cadet. As

Workers/Mentors, second-class cadets are responsible for:

  • 1.2.1.2.1. Facilitating instructions regarding USAFA standards to third and fourth class cadets

through positive reinforcement and helping them discover better techniques through lessons learned

and personal experience.

  • 1.2.1.2.2. Taking action to positively recognize those who exemplify proper self discipline and

behavior or correcting behavioral discrepancies in those who do not meet standards.

  • 1.2.1.2.3. Recommending cadet officer level involvement in rewards/discipline as required.

  • 1.2.1.2.4. Providing advice and counsel to cadet leadership regarding changes and improvements to

USAFA standards.

1.2.1.3. Third-class cadets.

The official term of address is cadet third class or cadet.

third-class cadets are responsible for:

As Coaches,

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

9

1.2.1.3.1. Setting the example for all cadets junior in rank and class status and for enforcing USAFA

standards to fourth class cadets through positive reinforcement and helping them discover better

techniques through lessons learned and personal experience.

  • 1.2.1.4. Fourth-class cadets. The official term of address is cadet fourth class or cadet. As Followers,

fourth class cadets are responsible for:

1.2.1.4.1. Monitoring their own actions to ensure the maintenance of personal and professional

standards of excellence.

1.2.1.4.2. “Buddy checking” others. Positively reinforcing proper behaviors and respectfully

addressing and correcting substandard conduct. Reporting continued misconduct or outstanding

performance, regardless of rank, through their chain of command.

  • 1.2.2. Accountability.

Every cadet has the power of choice and exercises free will when making

decisions regarding his/her conduct.

  • 1.2.2.1. Individual.

Each cadet is accountable for his/her own actions, both in the performance of

duties and in personal conduct.

  • 1.2.2.2. Peer. For the overall good of the Air Force and the nation, each cadet must insist that fellow

cadets adhere to the highest moral and ethical standards.

  • 1.2.2.3. Team/Organizational. Cadets who are entrusted to supervise other personnel and resources

are ultimately accountable for the performance of the team/organization and the actions of its members.

  • 1.2.3. In the absence of written or oral instruction, cadets must exercise good judgment.

Keep the Air

Force Core Values in mind and use the following guidelines to help make the best possible decisions:

  • 1.2.3.1. Always consider safety when making choices.

  • 1.2.3.2. Provide mutual support; don’t let a fellow cadet do something wrong.

  • 1.2.3.3. Never sacrifice your personal integrity or honor.

  • 1.2.4. The Cadet Honor Code. "We will not lie, steal, or cheat, nor tolerate among us anyone who

does." One of the most fundamental precepts of USAFA is its Honor Code. Doing the right thing and

living honorably must be the cornerstone of each cadet’s life. Individuals must agree to live under and

internalize it as part of their personal value system. Reference the Air Force Cadet Wing Honor Code

Handbook for more information.

  • 1.2.5. USAFA traditions. Traditions should have a sense of history and a ‘why’ answer. Our USAFA

traditions, to include Spirit Mission and Banners, are acceptable if they are socially acceptable, not

harmful or destructive in nature, and they contribute in a positive manner to the identity of USAFA

graduates.

  • 1.3. CUSTOMS AND COURTESIES. Military customs and courtesies are proven traditions that explain what should and should not be done in many situations. They are an extension of the cultural norms that form the foundation for this great nation's society. In addition, military customs and courtesies are attributes of the noble, military

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

profession that do not end upon graduation from USAFA. Many of our customs and courtesies can be

found in AFMAN 36-2203, Drill and Ceremonies. As a member of the profession of arms it is our duty

to always apply customs and courtesies in our everyday lives.

  • 1.3.1. Introductions. All cadets must include their class when introducing themselves (i.e., Cadet First

Class Smith or Cadet Third class Jones).

  • 1.3.2. Appropriate Titles. When addressing superior officers or civilian faculty members, cadets must

use "Sir" and "Ma'am." Cadets must address NCOs and Airmen using "Sergeant" or "Airman" with the

surname as appropriate. For Chief Master Sergeants, it is appropriate to use "Chief" with the surname.

When addressing a civilian professor with a doctoral degree, cadets may use the titles of "doctor" or

"professor." For other Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, employees, and contractors, cadets must

use "Sir," "Ma'am," "Mister (surname)," "Miss (surname)," “Ms. (surname),” or "Mrs. (surname)," as

appropriate unless directed otherwise.

  • 1.3.3. Rising to Address Superiors. It is common courtesy to rise from a seated position when

addressed by any person who is standing. Cadets shall immediately rise from their seats when addressed

by a superior who is standing unless directed to remain seated. Superiors are defined as those

possessing a higher rank, grade, or position; military or civilian.

  • 1.3.4. Saluting and Greeting. Saluting distinguishes our professional military culture. Cadets must

remain attentive to their surroundings and appropriately salute and verbally greet superiors while

maintaining eye contact. If a cadet's hands are full, it is appropriate to render a professional greeting

only. When passing superiors while indoors, cadets must extend a simple, professional greeting. In

addition, cadets shall render appropriate professional greetings to civilians in the cadet area.

  • 1.3.5. Personal Appearance. Cadets must abide by the rules of personal and professional appearance

standards outlined in Chapter 2 of this manual. Inappropriate wear of the uniform or careless activities

such as failing to wear headgear, leaving garments unbuttoned and unzipped, or placing hands in pockets

forms a poor first impression and must be corrected immediately. In civilian settings, you are an Air

Force ambassador and should make a good impression. Your civilian wardrobe should match this

objective. Use your good judgment in selecting appropriate, dignified attire for each occasion.

  • 1.3.6. Room Entry. Whenever an officer enters a cadet room or common use area, the first cadet to see

the officer must sharply call the room occupants to attention. The ranking cadet then appropriately greets

the officer. All cadets must remain at attention until the officer departs or commands otherwise. When

an NCO or civilian enters a cadet room or common use area, all cadets must simply stand.

  • 1.3.7. Indoor Reporting. Prior to reporting to any office, cadets must ensure their uniform choice is

appropriate (UOD or better) and dress and appearance standards are acceptable. Note: Per military

protocol, cadets must inform their chain of command prior to requesting meetings with group level

commanders or higher.

1.3.7.1. Cadets who report to an office must remove their headgear and any outer garments and tuck

them under their left arm, unless there is a place outside the office to hang these items. Cadets shall

then knock once and enter when directed to do so. If more than one cadet is reporting, the ranking

cadet shall report for the group as appropriate.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

11

  • 1.3.7.1.1. After entering the office, cadets shall take the most direct path to and halt approximately 2

paces from the desk. For an officer, a cadet must salute and simultaneously give a reporting

statement, “Sir/Ma’am, Cadet

______

reports as ordered.” (If the cadet was not ordered to the office

but stopped by to make a statement or ask a question, the reporting statement shall be “Sir/Ma’am

Cadet ____

reports.”) The cadet must hold the salute until a salute is returned by the officer.

  • 1.3.7.1.2. Once business is concluded, the cadet must come to the position of attention, render a

customary greeting such as “Good morning, afternoon or evening Sir/Ma’am,” salute, then make the

appropriate facing movement and take the most direct path to the door and depart.

  • 1.3.7.1.3. For an NCO, cadets shall follow the same procedures except cadets shall not salute and in

the reporting statement Sergeant is substituted for Sir or Ma’am, example “Sergeant, Cadet _____

reports as ordered.”

  • 1.3.7.1.4. For a civilian professor’s or other civilian federal employee’s office, cadets shall follow

the same procedures except cadets do not salute and must use appropriate greetings in place of

reporting statements.

  • 1.3.7.1.5. Service academy exchange cadets shall follow the traditions and/or rules of their service

academy.

  • 1.3.8. Outdoor Reporting. Procedures for reporting outdoors is the same as reporting indoors, except

cadets wear headgear, render salutes and appropriate greetings to all officers or appropriate greeting to

all NCOs and civilians. Military members must remember to salute after concluding conversation and

before walking away from officers.

  • 1.3.9. Tardiness. Report for required duties and social gatherings at the appropriate time. Tardiness

reflects a lack of planning and professionalism. It is always appropriate to arrive at least 5 minutes early

for planned activities. Doors will close 5 minutes prior to any event involving an entire cadet class or

cadet group.

  • 1.3.10. Watch Alarms, Pagers, and Cellular Phones. During official meetings, briefings, or classes,

cadets must turn off all alarms and signals. These noises can be disruptive to speakers and guests.

  • 1.3.11. RSVPs and Thank You Notes. Cadets must promptly respond to invitations and remember to

say thank you. Whether you are invited to a formal or informal gathering you must R.S.V.P. even if you

can’t attend. This is referred to as "sending regrets." Additionally, as soon as possible following the

event or upon receipt of a gift, cadets should send a written thank you note to express their gratitude. In

addition, although most events are not mandatory, it is discourteous to turn down an invitation if you

don’t have a higher priority engagement, especially invitations from superiors.

1.4. MORAL, ETHICAL, AND HEALTHY CONDUCT.

To be successful at USAFA, each cadet must understand the Air Force’s basic rules of moral and ethical

conduct. DoDD 5500.7, Standards of Conduct (“The Joint Ethics Directive”) and DoD 5500.7-R, The

Joint Ethics Regulation, provide guidance to Air Force personnel on standards of conduct. USAFA

directives and guidance originate from the Air Force Core Values, Air Force instructions, and joint

publications. The Cadet Honor Code and rules within this chapter also mirror the same values and

instruction system and are intended to provide the necessary tools for success.

12

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

  • 1.4.1. US CODE, Title 10, Section 8583. The requirement of exemplary conduct is not just a USAFA

directive. The United States Congress mandates all Air Force personnel to adhere to this code which

states, “All commanding officers and others in authority in the Air Force are required:”

  • 1.4.1.1. “To show in themselves a good example of virtue, honor, patriotism, and subordination;”

  • 1.4.1.2. “To be vigilant in inspecting the conduct of all persons who are placed under their command;”

  • 1.4.1.3. “To guard against and suppress all dissolute and immoral practices, and to correct, according to

the laws and regulations of the Air Force, all persons who are guilty of them; and”

  • 1.4.1.4. “To take all necessary and proper measures, under the laws, regulations, and customs of the

Air Force, to promote and safeguard the morale, the physical well being, and the general welfare of the

officers and enlisted persons under their command or charge.”

  • 1.4.2. Discipline. Discipline is not just the act of punishing or penalizing. Discipline is also defined as

having self-control; the training that corrects, molds, or perfects the mental faculties or moral character;

and to train or develop by instruction or exercise.

  • 1.4.2.1. Whether in or out of uniform, military members must refrain from exhibiting behavior and

expressing attitudes that would bring discredit upon themselves, the Air Force, or the United States.

Cadets are expected to exercise control over anger, sexual conduct, use of alcohol, and other

discrediting or criminal behavior.

  • 1.4.2.2. Cadet supervisors and commanders must handle misconduct or deviations from standards by

utilizing the best tool that will both effectively rehabilitate the individual and uphold the needs of the

unit, USAFA, and Air Force. A leader and commander evaluates each case on its own merits and

circumstances which is the basis of the Leader-Follower-Situation Model. Reference ODS, August

2008.

  • 1.4.2.3. The Air Force has a three step discipline process: prevention, correction, and punishment.

While the latter two are the more commonly thought of processes, most of the Air Force revolves

around preventative discipline. The Air Force institutionalizes preventative discipline by creating an

environment where we develop the mental and moral character of assigned personnel through

processes.

  • 1.4.3. Cadet Disciplinary System. The discipline system for the Cadet Wing is detailed within CoCI

51-201, Cadet Counseling, Discipline, Rehabilitation and Monitoring. It includes the use of AFCW

Forms 10, demerits, confinements, tours and restrictions. This system is intended to enhance and add to

the options already existing within the UCMJ. Furthermore, these enhancements are intended to adhere

to the principles and desired outcomes of the ODS. It allows for appropriate counseling, leadership, and

discretion required by cadet and permanent party leadership to correct behavior and enforce standards. It

is imperative our cadets and permanent party continue to make decisions based on individual

circumstances, with the overarching philosophy of rehabilitation in mind. This system is not a substitute

for good leadership and guidance, which should correct substandard performance and/or behavior before

it becomes a problem.

1.5. GENERAL SITUATIONS.

This section outlines only a small number of common situations or circumstances most cadets may

encounter daily at USAFA. Although these activities may not be illegal or prohibited in all cases, cadets

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

13

must exercise good judgment when faced with these situations. These situations are to familiarize cadets

with certain circumstances and to provide guidance when dealing with the situation.

1.5.1. Consumption of Alcohol. Air Force policy and our way of life require responsible behavior.

Cadets must not put themselves in a position where they lose control of their actions, emotions, or

environment. The consequences, both personally and professionally, for misconduct influenced by

alcohol are severe.

  • 1.5.1.1. Conduct. Cadets 21 or older must demonstrate good judgment and appropriate conduct when

deciding to drink. Being of legal age is not an excuse to drink in excess or demonstrate disorderly

conduct, on or off the USAFA reservation. Cadets are expected to demonstrate leadership among those

individuals present who are not of legal drinking age. This includes refusing to tolerate underage

drinking or belligerent or inappropriate conduct.

  • 1.5.1.2. Designated Driver. Cadets who are designated drivers shall not consume any alcoholic

beverage while fulfilling their duties. Drivers and passengers share responsibility and accountability to

ensure drivers have not been drinking.

  • 1.5.1.3. Rules of Engagement for events where alcohol will be served to Cadets. During a planned

function, where alcohol has been approved to be served, cadet leadership must ensure the following

guidelines are met:

  • 1.5.1.3.1. A plan has been developed and implemented to prevent underage drinking.

  • 1.5.1.3.2. Photo identification checks are performed.

  • 1.5.1.3.3. Hand Stamps/Bracelets are issued to identify qualified drinkers.

  • 1.5.1.3.4. An appropriate Safety Plan has been developed to include:

1.5.1.3.4.1. Designated driver plan using upper-class drivers

1.5.1.3.4.2. Emphasis being placed on the 0-0-1-3 rule (0 underage, 0 driving after consumption,

1 drink per hour, 3 drinks total per outing).

1.5.1.3.4.3. Cadets briefed on good order and discipline and their responsibilities as good

“wingmen,” ensuring classmates drink responsibly.

1.5.1.3.4.4. Participants reviewing paragraph 1.5. of this publication.

1.5.1.3.4.5. Alcohol servers must be aware of “dram shop liability theory.” Reference AFI 34-219,

para 1.5., Alcoholic Beverage Program, and USAFA Supplement 1 to this AFI for further

guidance. Servers must acknowledge their understanding of the policy and the potential liability

under the UCMJ for serving alcohol to cadets who appear intoxicated or have consumed excessive

quantities of alcohol (reference 0-0-1-3 rule above).

1.5.1.3.4.6. Permanent party presence is required throughout the entire event.

  • 1.5.1.4. Drinking on the USAFA Reservation. A cadet of legal drinking age may not drink

alcohol on the USAFA reservation except in the situations list below (all exceptions require that a

cadet be of legal drinking age):

  • 1.5.1.4.1. At the Eisenhower Golf Course and Bowling Lanes.

  • 1.5.1.4.2. A guest in the private quarters of an active duty or civilian faculty member (such as civilian

professors or coaches) and the faculty member is present. This does not include the enlisted dorms.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

  • 1.5.1.4.3. A dinner guest of a USAFA Falcon Club member in the club dining room.

  • 1.5.1.4.4. All cadets at 10th SVS functions operated within the cadet duty area, but outside the

confines of “Hap’s Place.”

  • 1.5.1.4.5. A first or second-class cadet in good standing at "Hap's Place" in Arnold Hall.

  • 1.5.1.4.6. When cadets have approval from the Commandant, or designated representative, on an AF

Form 1768, Staff Summary Sheet, or CW Alcohol Request ESSS (preferred) submitted through the

squadron chain of command. To be considered, all requests must be received in the CW front office

no later than (NLT) 10 days prior to the scheduled event.

  • 1.5.1.4.7. If a USAFA event location isn’t pre-approved within AFI 34-219, USAFA Sup 1, then the

request must also be staffed through 10 MSG/CC for approval (of location). In this event, please

allow sufficient lead time for staffing.

  • 1.5.1.5. Scheduling Committee Action, Temporary Duty (TDY) Orders, or Sanctioned Events.

Alcohol shall not be consumed by cadets of legal drinking age on SCA, orders, or at sanctioned events

without prior Commandant approval. Exception: A cadet who is 21 years of age, or older, serving on

any Operation Air Force (OAF) orders may consume alcohol without Commandant approval but must

follow the directives of the host installation commander. Program commanders must ensure all OAF

cadets receive a briefing prior to their departure regarding alcohol consumption, abuse, and possible

adverse actions resulting from alcohol related incidents.

NOTE: Only cadets who are 21 years of age or older may consume alcohol, when authorized.

This age requirement applies world-wide, regardless of host nation laws allowing consumption at

a younger age.

  • 1.5.1.5.1. Exception Requests. All exception requests must have approval of the Commandant on an

AF Form 1768, Staff Summary Sheet (SSS), or Electronic SSS submitted through your squadron

chain of command. All requests must be submitted to CW for review NLT 10 days prior to scheduled

event. If approved, the permanent party commander of troops for the operation must brief their

Operational Risk Management (ORM) plan regarding alcohol use as part of the SCA pre-departure

briefing to the Commandant of Cadets. While in uniform, a cadet of legal drinking age may only

drink when attending a USAFA sanctioned event.

  • 1.5.1.6. Drinking in Off-Base Public Establishments (In Uniform). Cadets who are 21 years of age,

or older, may drink alcohol in public places while in uniform if attending a USAFA-sanctioned

function such as a formal squadron dining-in/dining-out or an awards dinner.

  • 1.5.1.7. Consuming alcohol with meals off base. Cadets who are 21 years of age, or older, may

consume alcohol in uniform or civilian clothes, whichever is most appropriate, when participating in a

sit-down meal in the dining area (not bar) of a restaurant.

  • 1.5.1.8. Consuming alcohol prior to duty. Cadets will NOT consume alcohol for a period of at least

8 hours prior to any duty; including mandatory athletic events, both home and away, and on an

approved SCA.

1.5.2. Public Display of Affection. Affectionate physical contact with a guest or another cadet in public,

such as holding hands or sitting with an arm around waist or shoulder, is not permitted, while in

uniform. A male cadet, as a gentleman, may offer his arm to a lady when walking conditions warrant.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

15

This does not preclude the requirement for rendering proper military courtesies. When out of uniform,

cadets must refrain from conduct exceeding holding hands in public USAFA areas.

1.5.3. Squadron Rooms and Other Areas. No cadet shall enter the room of another cadet of the

opposite sex without knocking on the door, announcing themselves, and waiting for the door to be

opened or a response by the cadet occupying the room. For official reasons such as inspections or safety,

personnel may enter the room after three attempts to make contact with occupants.

  • 1.5.3.1. The doors of fourth class cadet rooms must remain open when other fourth class cadets

of opposite sex are studying in the room together and anytime upper-class cadets are inside the

room. Upper-class cadets are permitted in fourth class cadet rooms only for official business.

Fourth-class cadets may study with upper-class cadets for common classes if appropriate in

dormitory common rooms, or other common areas in the library and Fairchild Hall. Civilians or

any other non-members of the Cadet Wing are not permitted in cadet rooms with doors closed.

  • 1.5.3.2. Cadets of the opposite sex are only permitted together in rooms where the door is fully open,

unobstructed, AND at least one room light illuminated (desk/room lamp, valet, or overhead). This

includes, but is not limited to, individual dormitory rooms, TV rooms, etc. Cadets shall not share any

item which would obstruct visibility of their persons (i.e., blanket, coats, etc.). Exception: Squadron

Activity Room (SAR) doors are required to remain closed. Therefore, members of the opposite sex are

allowed to use the SAR for its intended purposes with the door closed. However, lights will be kept on.

Additionally, cadets may sit next to each other on couches or sofas in SARs and TV rooms so long that

the above provisions are met.

1.5.3.3. Three

or

more

upper-class

cadets

of

mixed

sex

studying together for a common

subject/project/class may study with the door closed until Taps.

  • 1.5.3.4. Cadets are not authorized to engage in any form of “intimate behavior” in any room

(common or otherwise) within the cadet area dormitories or facilities. “Intimate behavior”

includes, but is not limited to sexual intercourse, fondling, kissing, cuddling, and spooning.

  • 1.5.3.5. In alternate room arrangements where cadet sleeping areas are separated from desk/study areas

by shelving units, cadets of the opposite sex are prohibited from entering the sleeping area of the room.

1.5.4. Off-Duty Employment and Personal Commercial Affairs. A cadet seeking to take part in

charity events when all proceeds go to that charity or to conduct personal commercial transactions on

USAFA with agents, salespeople and vendors of any commercial enterprise must coordinate with

USAFA/ADWC to ensure compliance with NCAA restrictions and his/her chain of command. Cadets

must receive written authorization from 10 MSG/CC IAW AFI 34-223, Private Organization (PO)

Program, after proper coordination. Cadets must then contact USAFA/JA (333-3940) for a copy of the

latest Cadet Fundraising Guide.

  • 1.5.4.1. Cadets shall not solicit orders, act as agents or act in other capacities for commercial

enterprises with the intent of realizing a personal profit. Cadets are not permitted to engage in off-duty

employment except during summer leave periods (participation in academic research pools at USAFA

is not considered off-duty employment). Cadets must submit an AF Form 3902, Application and

Approval for Off-Duty Employment, to their AOCs for summer employment approval. Cadets in good

standing may participate in off-duty activities such as rock bands, disc jockeys or vocal groups without

pay for events primarily attended by cadets; however, they must still obtain squadron AOC/AMT

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

approval. During the academic year, the Commandant is the approving authority for off-duty

employment for cadets with extenuating circumstances.

1.5.5. Use of Tobacco Products. The Air Force prohibits indoor tobacco use in all Air Force facilities.

USAFA discourages the use of any and all tobacco products by all personnel. However, for those cadets

who do smoke, chew or dip tobacco products, the following rules apply:

1.5.5.1.

Cadets SHALL NOT use tobacco products during duty hours (release from Night Call to

Quarters to LMD) or while in uniform.

1.5.5.2.

Cadets SHALL NOT use any tobacco products in any Cadet Duty Area, including the terrazzo,

with the exception of the following designated areas by cigarette urns and/or cigarette butt cans.

1.5.5.2.1. Sijan Hall. Designated tobacco use area located next to the urns located by stairwells 1, 4,

 

8, and 10 only.

1.5.5.2.2.Vandenberg Hall. Designated tobacco use area located next to the urns located by stairwells

 

3, 5, and 6 only.

1.5.5.2.3. Fairchild Hall. Designated tobacco use area located on the Terrazzo level on the extreme

southern, southeastern, and southwestern areas; ground level next to the parking garage southern

posts and near the bridge.

1.5.5.3.

Personnel may not use tobacco in government owned vehicles or on Air Force or contract

aircraft.

1.5.5.4.

Cadets must not smoke, chew or dip tobacco products when considerations of courtesy,

decorum and safety indicate that using these items is inappropriate.

Note: Reference AFI 40-102, Tobacco Use in the Air Force, for more information.

1.5.6. Public Appearances. Cadets are encouraged to make public appearances, grant interviews,

appear on radio and television, and prepare articles for publication. Prior approval is required (with the

exception of the C’azette and KAFA) from the AOC/AMT, the Office of Public Affairs, or, if related to

intercollegiate athletics, the Sports Information Office.

Note: Cadets must not solicit or accept any gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainment, loans or other

consideration of monetary value for their efforts.

1.5.7. Cadet Finance Limitations. Properly managing personal finances is a fundamental aspect of

being a self sufficient adult and professional officer. Failure to appropriately account for funds or

mismanagement of personal accounts could result in disciplinary action and affect your security clearance

(foreign intelligence operators often prey on military members with gross debt and financial

mismanagement). All Air Force members must appropriately manage their finances to ensure they can

meet all financial obligations. Excessive indebtedness or recurring financial difficulties may lead to

administrative or judicial action and/or impact security clearance eligibility and status. Reference

AFI 36-2906, Personal Financial Responsibility for more information.

1.5.8. Religious Accommodation. As military professionals (cadets, active duty, and civilian

employees), we are granted the great privilege of religious expression. Diverse religious expression is a

hallmark of American liberty, and when we take the oath to protect and defend the Constitution, that vow

includes the constitutional right to the free exercise of religion. Therefore, USAFA will support the free

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

17

exercise of religion through religious programs coordinated by our chaplains and by a positive and

proactive application of DoD and USAF religious accommodation policies in ways that include the

following:

  • 1.5.8.1. Spiritual Strength. Spiritual strength is a vital component in the development of officers of

character. However, it is important to recognize that spiritual strength -- the inner strength that allows

us to face and often overcome impossible odds, and risk our lives for our freedoms and our dreams --

can come from deeply held personal conviction as well as with religious training, affiliation and

commitment. All AF personnel, as leaders of character, will need this inner strength. Some will use

their religious faith as a resource for this strength, but others will draw on non-religious resources,

including family, culture, or heritage. It is as important for us to support the religious needs of those

who belong to specific faiths as it is for us to protect those who claim no faith from feeling pressure to

change their beliefs or views.

  • 1.5.8.2. Worship. The Commandant has developed standing SCAs to allow cadets to coordinate an

opportunity to attend worship or other like meetings once per week according to the tenets of their faith

or of a widely recognized personal belief system. Every attempt will be made to accommodate the

religious expression of all faith groups represented within the cadet wing. The Commandant is the

approval authority for exceptions to this policy. Cadets are free to explore religious traditions beyond

their self identified faith as listed in CAMIS; however, cadets must use the pass system referenced in

Chapter 5 of this publication.

  • 1.5.8.3. Holy Days. HQ USAFA/HC will identify major faith holy days observed by the diverse

population of the cadet wing. HQ USAFA/HC will provide recurring guidance regarding acceptable

accommodation practices for holy days. AOCs and AMTs will accommodate the observance of holy

days consistent with mission requirements.

  • 1.5.8.4. Immunizations. Cadets whose religious beliefs do not allow immunizations must go through

the chain of command for waiver of immunizations request. Reference AFJI 48-110, Immunizations

and Chemoprophylaxis, for additional guidance.

  • 1.5.8.5. Dietary Issues. Mitchell Hall provides vegetarian meals for cadets who, for personal or

religious reasons cannot or do not consume certain meat products. For example, during Passover for

Jewish cadets and Ramadan for Muslim cadets, special arrangements can be made with the Mitchell

Hall Nutritionist to accommodate dietary needs/restrictions. These arrangements are to be initiated by

the supported cadet through the Mitchell Hall Nutritionist (10 MSG/SVCF). 10 MSG/SVCF will

validate these special meal requirements with a USAFA Chaplain (USAFA/HC). Cadets can discuss

other special meal requirements with the 10 MSG/SVCF for evaluation/consideration on a case by case

basis. For religious dress/apparel issues see AFI 36-2903, Dress and Appearance of Air Force

Personnel, and Chapter 2 of this publication.

  • 1.5.8.6. Religious or Spiritual Ceremonies.

Any religious or spiritual ceremonies, along with any

associated items, materials, etc; used during the ceremony, must be coordinated thru USAFA/HC and

approved by the AOC prior to conducting them in dormitory rooms or squadron areas.

1.5.9. Behavioral Health Counseling. The Commandant has ensured voluntary behavioral health

counseling services to support cadets with personal concerns and academic, physical, and military

performance. The Peak Performance Center provides services designed to assist with adjustment to

military life and to cope with life stressors, for example: relationships, grief, depression, anxiety, sexual

assault treatment, healthy eating attitudes and behaviors, anger management, substance abuse, suicide,

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

violence, biofeedback for performance enhancement, sexual risk management, social skills development,

career guidance, military training events, and support for cadets facing UCMJ or disciplinary actions.

Services are provided on a voluntary basis only. The exception is commander referrals of cadets to

Substance Abuse Prevention Services for assessments and substance abuse awareness seminars.

1.6. ILLEGAL OR PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES.

All cadets must conduct themselves in accordance with the previously mentioned standards. When

cadets arrive at USAFA and during their first year, they receive indoctrination into followership, loyalty

and following the orders of those of higher rank and position. This is fundamental to the military

profession. Violating or failing to obey any lawful order or regulation is a violation of Article 92 of

the UCMJ. Collusion by cadets for the purpose of evasion of any lawful order or regulation may be

punishable under the UCMJ. The following section is a list of several illegal or prohibited actions or

activities that are unacceptable not only for cadets but active duty personnel as well. Cadets must be

familiar with listed offenses to avoid placing themselves in any of the situations. Disciplinary action may

be initiated for these and other offenses not listed here. Reference the UCMJ for an all inclusive list of

punishable offenses.

1.6.1. Alcohol Offenses.

1.6.1.1. Underage Drinking. A cadet under the age of 21, shall abstain from drinking anywhere,

regardless of local or host nation laws.

1.6.1.2. Cadet Alcohol-Related Disciplinary System (CARDS). CARDS addresses alcohol-related

offenses in a consistent manner that essentially combines UCMJ actions with CDS punishments (to

include marching tours). It applies a “two-strike” system for most alcohol-related offenses and

presumptive disenrollment for more serious offenses. As a standard, CARDS encompasses specific

severe punishments as well as rehabilitative measures for the following offenses:

  • 1.6.1.2.1. Providing alcohol to anyone not of legal drinking age, including USAFA cadets under

the age of 21, in any situation.

  • 1.6.1.2.2. Abusing alcohol and committing misconduct that is punishable under the UCMJ by

dismissal from the Air Force (examples include destruction of property or aggravated assault).

  • 1.6.1.2.3. Consuming alcohol while prohibited by SCA.

  • 1.6.1.2.4. Drinking or possessing alcohol in the cadet dormitories.

  • 1.6.1.2.5. Drinking or possessing alcohol while under the legal age.

  • 1.6.1.2.6. Driving under the influence of alcohol.

  • 1.6.1.2.7. Excessive use or consumption of alcohol to the discredit of the armed forces (examples

include incapacitating oneself for duty, drunk and disorderly conduct, drunk on station, destruction of

property or aggravated assault while under the influence).

  • 1.6.1.2.8. Failing to exercise leadership responsibilities in the presence of underage drinkers or

improper conduct of any type (this includes allowing someone to drive who is know to have

consumed alcohol) that is exacerbated by alcohol consumption.

  • 1.6.1.2.9. The transgression of any state or local law or code pertaining to the possession or

consumption of alcohol (to include “open-container” laws related to the maintenance of alcohol

within motor vehicles).

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

19

  • 1.6.1.2.10. Failing to properly control alcohol legally purchased for personal consumption.

  • 1.6.1.2.11. The above offenses each represent a “first-strike” transgression in a “two-strike” system.

Subsequent alcohol-related offenses of any nature by a cadet already found guilty of an alcohol-

related offense will be met with further UCMJ action and consistent, swift recommendation for

disenrollment.

1.6.1.3. Presumptive Disenrollment Offenses. These transgressions are not given a “second strike” –

the first offense will result in disenrollment except in the case of extreme mitigating circumstances:

  • 1.6.1.3.1. Providing alcohol to someone not of legal drinking age will result in UCMJ action and

presumptive disenrollment.

  • 1.6.1.3.2. Driving with a blood alcohol content above the legal limit will result in UCMJ action and

presumptive disenrollment.

  • 1.6.1.3.3. Any alcohol-related offense of an especially aggravated or egregious nature or one that is

committed by a cadet with an already poor record of military performance will result in UCMJ action

and presumptive disenrollment.

  • 1.6.2. Illicit Drugs.

    • 1.6.2.1. Illegal Use of Drugs. Our USAF members do not use illicit/illegal drugs. The USAFA Cadet

Wing has zero tolerance for the use of illegal drugs. Any cadet who manufactures, possesses,

distributes, or uses any illicit drug, including Ecstasy or similar substances may be subject to

court-martial or other UCMJ actions and disenrollment from USAFA.

  • 1.6.2.2. Drug Related Paraphernalia. Cadets are prohibited from possessing or using drug related

paraphernalia unless the articles are specifically authorized by a physician. Paraphernalia associated

with religious or spiritual ceremonies must be coordinated thru USAFA/HC and approved by the AOC.

  • 1.6.2.3. Supplements or Synthetic Drugs. Cadets shall not use, possess, distribute, or attempt to use,

possess, or distribute any commercially available or illicit substance whose intent, purpose, or effect is

to deliver, either directly or as a result of the body's metabolism, gamma Butyrolactone (GBL) or

gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) to the body. This ban includes, but is not limited to the following

products: all products containing GBL, GHB, Renewtrient, Remforce, Zen, Blue Nitro Vitality,

Reviviarant, Reviviarant G, GH Revitalizer, Hydroxycut, Gamma G, or any variation thereof. All

intercollegiate cadets must check with USAFA/ADM or USAFA/ADWC prior to using any type of

supplement or synthetic drug to ensure compliance with NCAA restrictions.

  • 1.6.3. Prescribed Medicines or Drugs. Federal law prohibits the sharing of controlled substances and/or

the transfer of these drugs to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed. Only the

individual for whom the controlled medication is prescribed can legally take the medication. Using a

prescription previously prescribed to you for a similar but different condition outside of the period

of time the original prescription was for also violates federal law.

  • 1.6.3.1. Prescription Security. It is critically important that these medications are properly secured and

then appropriately disposed of upon completion of their prescribed use. Cadets are responsible for

properly securing controlled medications prescribed for individual use. These medications will

be kept in a locked cabinet or on your person. Cadets shall not maintain medicine beyond its

expiration date. If no expiration date is listed, narcotic medications must be destroyed NLT 3 months

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

after the issue date. All other prescriptions must be destroyed one year after the issued date. Over-the-

counter medication, dietary supplements, etc, will be destroyed at the expiration date.

1.6.3.2. Prescription Disposition. Once medication is no longer required for their prescribed use, or has

expired, they must be properly disposed of. Per the 10th MDG Pharmacy, an acceptable method for

cadets to dispose of all medications is to simply flush them down the toilet. However, the desired

method is as follows: Place unused medications in a sealable plastic bag with water. Once the

medication has completely dissolved, pour the liquid into a container, along with a sufficient amount of

materiel such as pencil shavings, kitty litter, or coffee grounds, then place in the trash. Do not return

medication to the pharmacy.

  • 1.6.4. Hemp Products. Cadets must not use hemp products to include hemp seed, hemp seed oil, or hemp

extracts. These products will cause the urinalysis test to indicate positive THC use.

  • 1.6.5. Internet Abuse/Internet Service. It is a violation of Air Force instructions to use government

provided hardware, network access, or software to access illegal, offensive or pornographic

Internet sites or to defeat security or auditing systems. Further information on the appropriate use of

computer and network resources can be found in AFI 33-129, Web Management and Internet Use, and

Chapter 4, of this publication. Failure to comply with appropriate use of USAFAnet or USAFAEDU will result in any offenders’ accounts being closed immediately. Additionally, AOCs will pursue appropriate adverse actions using the full range of disciplinary tools, including the UCMJ.

  • 1.6.6. Gambling. As a general rule, wagers and games of chance including football and basketball pools

are prohibited. It is also prohibited to use any government provided form of communication, such as the

internet, a telephone, or the mail, to facilitate any form of gambling, even if the wager is to be placed in a

jurisdiction where gambling is legal. The use of internet gambling websites is specifically included in this

prohibition. Any questions pertaining to gambling and its propriety should be directed to the AOC/AMT

and USAFA/JA.

  • 1.6.7. Unlawful Discrimination. Any action that unlawfully or unjustly results in unequal treatment of

persons or groups based on race, color, sex, national origin and religion, and if civilian, age and disability

(formerly handicap) conditions, for which distinctions are not supported by legal or rational

considerations is considered unlawful discrimination. This includes discrimination on the basis of color,

national origin, race, religion, or sex that is not otherwise authorized by law or regulation. It is Air Force

policy that no person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to

discrimination on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, disability (formerly handicap), religion, or

sex (except as prescribed by statute or policy) under any program or activity either conducted by the Air

Force or receiving federal financial assistance disbursed by the Air Force. Any cadet who engages in

unlawful discrimination may be subject to court-martial or other UCMJ actions and disenrollment

from USAFA.

  • 1.6.8. Disparaging Terms. Terms used to degrade or connote negative statements pertaining to race,

color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability. These terms include insults, printed material,

visual material, signs, symbols, posters, or insignia. The use of these terms constitutes unlawful

discrimination. Spirit Missions and Banners must not violate this paragraph. Offenders may be punished

under the UCMJ.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

21

1.6.9. Sexual Harassment. According to AFPAM 36-2705, Discrimination and Sexual Harassment, sex

discrimination involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or

physical conduct of a sexual nature and when:

  • 1.6.9.1. Submission of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a

person’s job, pay, or career (quid pro quo harassment).

  • 1.6.9.2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by a person

is

used as a basis for career or

employment decisions affecting that person (quid pro quo harassment).

  • 1.6.9.3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work

performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment.

  • 1.6.9.4. This definition emphasizes that workplace conduct, to be actionable as “abusive work

environment” harassment, need not result in concrete psychological harm to the victim, but rather need

only be so severe or pervasive that a reasonable person would perceive, and the victim does perceive,

the work environment as hostile or offensive. “Workplace” is an expansive term for military members

and may include conduct on or off duty, 24 hours a day. Any person in a supervisory or command

position who uses or condones any form of sexual behavior to control, influence, or affect the

career, pay, or job of a military member or civilian employee is engaging in sexual harassment.

Similarly, any military member or civilian employee who makes deliberate or repeated

unwelcome verbal comments, (such as slurs or jokes), written communications (such as emails or

cartoons), gestures, or physical contact of a sexual nature in the workplace is also engaging in

sexual harassment.

  • 1.6.10. Physical Maltreatment. Physical maltreatment includes, but is not limited to, poking, hitting,

thumping, pushing, grabbing, threats of violence, physical violence, physical intimidation, hazing, or any

unnecessary physical contact.

  • 1.6.11. Hazing. Hazing is defined at USAFA as "unauthorized assumption of authority" whereby a

person is exposed to any cruelty, indignity, humiliation, hardship or oppression, or the deprivation or

abridgement of any right. Hazing is prohibited and may lead to disenrollment from USAFA.

Fundamental to an understanding of hazing is the recognition that all cadets will retain their basic human

dignity. The Air Force has a zero tolerance policy for hazing. Prohibitions include but are not limited to:

  • 1.6.11.1. Cruelty. The essence of cruelty is the intent to inflict pain, whether it is physical,

psychological or otherwise. Upper-class cadets may touch subordinates only if they receive permission

from the subordinate first.

  • 1.6.11.2. Indignity. Every cadet is to be treated in all circumstances as a human

significant value. Dignity is not to be degraded.

being who has

  • 1.6.11.3. Humiliation. Some individuals may feel some sense of humiliation in every failure. While

the prohibition does not extend that far, it does extend to acts intended to fundamentally debase a cadet

in the opinion of self and others.

  • 1.6.12. Insubordination. Insubordination is behavior which detracts from respect due a superior

authority. It may consist of acts or language, however expressed (to include electronic format). Acts

include neglecting the customary salute, or showing a marked disdain, indifference, insolence,

impertinence, undue familiarity, or other rudeness to a commissioned officer, enlisted member or civilian.

Being under the influence of alcohol is not a valid defense for insubordination.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

  • 1.6.13. “Nuking.” "Nuking" is defined as a cadet or group of cadets apprehending or subduing an

individual(s) for the express purpose of public humiliation. The “nuking” of any individual by any

USAFA assigned cadets (including exchange cadets) is expressly forbidden, regardless of the

willingness of the subject to the “nuking.” At a minimum, “nukings” will result in severe disciplinary

action.

  • 1.6.14. Professional and Unprofessional Relationships. All military members share the responsibility

for maintaining professional relationships IAW AFI 36-2909, Professional and Unprofessional

Relationships, and the USAFA Supplement. However, the senior member (officer, enlisted or cadet)

in a personal relationship bears primary responsibility for maintaining the professionalism of that

relationship. The senior member in a relationship is in the best position to appreciate the effect of that

particular relationship on an organization and must terminate or limit the extent of the relationship.

Members will be held accountable for the impact of their conduct on the Air Force or USAFA as

institutions.

  • 1.6.14.1. Professional Relationships. Professional relationships are those that contribute to the

effective operation of the Air Force and the cadet wing. The Air Force encourages personnel to

communicate freely with their superiors regarding their careers, performance, duties and missions. This

type of communication enhances morale and discipline and improves the operational environment

while preserving proper respect for authority and appropriate mission focus.

  • 1.6.14.2. Unprofessional Relationships. Relationships are unprofessional, whether pursued on or off

duty, when they detract from the authority of superiors or result in, or reasonably create the appearance

of, favoritism, misuse of office or position, or the abandonment of organizational goals for personal

interests. Unprofessional relationships can exist between officers, between enlisted members, between

officers and enlisted members, between active duty personnel and cadets, between cadets of different

classes, and between military personnel and members of the civilian employee work force or contractor

personnel. First, second, and third-class cadets shall only maintain a professional relationship

with fourth class cadets. Furthermore, all cadets, regardless of class, shall only maintain

professional relationships with active duty military, preparatory school cadets, and USAFA

civilian faculty and staff members (except for family members).

  • 1.6.14.3. Dating.

Policy for dating between graduated, commissioned officers, and cadets can be

found in AFI 36-2909, USAFA Supplement 1.

  • 1.6.14.3.1. Dating among the upper three classes is permitted. However, cadets must avoid

personal relationships that interfere with proper exercise of their duties within the chain of

command or good order and discipline. Specifically, a cadet shall not date a member of his/her

direct chain of command. Should a personal relationship evolve within a chain of command, cadets

involved must seek resolution through the cadet chain of command and AOC, who will take action

to resolve the issue. Cadets in the upper two classes may continue to date recently commissioned

officers under the restrictions outlined in AFI 36-2909, USAFA Supp 1, and with the permission of

his/her AOC, who will document the relationship in the cadet’s personnel record.

  • 1.6.14.3.2. Under no circumstances will cadets in the upper three classes date or maintain an

unprofessional relationship with a fourth-class cadet, regardless of any pre-existing relationships

prior to admission to USAFA.

  • 1.6.15. Possession of Illegal or Unauthorized Weapons.

Cadets shall not possess in their dormitory

rooms, gym lockers, dormitory storage rooms, privately owned vehicles (POV), or on their person, any

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

23

object or substance (includes paintball and air-soft guns) having, as one of its designed purposes, the

capacity to inflict death, injury or incapacitation of a person while on the USAFA reservation. Cadets

may transport authorized/approved weapons directly to and from authorized storage locations IAW para

  • 4.10.1.2.5. Reference CoCI 32-6005, Air Force Cadet Wing Morale, Health, and Welfare Inspections,

and CoCI 31-104, Armory Operations for more information.

  • 1.6.15.1. All cadets who are in possession of authorized firearms will comply with guidance provided

in para 4.9.1.2.

  • 1.6.15.2. The maximum length of any knife blade kept in a cadet’s room is 3½ inches (excluding

handle). Ceremonial knives with longer blades may be kept and displayed in the room with written

permission of the squadron AOC. Exception: Combat Survival Training (CST) Cadre and students

are authorized to temporarily store an issued survival knife in their assigned dormitory room. This

authorization only applies to the summer period in which they are assigned to CST. Personally owned

knives with blades longer than 3½ inches are not authorized as part of this exception.

1.6.16. Owning and Maintaining Off-Base Residences. Cadets will not own, lease, or maintain any

off-base living quarters. Parents, friends, or relatives who pay for the upkeep of an apartment for

cadets during weekends or off-duty time is considered not following the "spirit and intent" of the

regulations and is not authorized. First-class cadets may enter into an agreement and/or place a deposit

in order to “hold” an off-base residence for the purpose of residing there following graduation. They may

not, however, enter into the agreement until after the 1st of March before their graduation. The cadet may

not reside in or store personal property in the residence until the date of their graduation. Maintaining off-

base living quarters includes, but is not limited to, the following circumstances:

  • 1.6.16.1. Paying for the upkeep of a room/apartment to include all or any portion of the telephone

or utility bills, rent, or periodic obligations.

  • 1.6.16.2. Paying parents, friends, relatives or other agents for the upkeep of the room/apartment.

  • 1.6.16.3. Staying in the same off-base quarters when the documented owner/leasee has been

absent from the quarters for more than 72 hours. This does not apply when the cadet is on

Thanksgiving, winter or spring break or summer leave orders.

1.6.17. Identification Cards. A cadet must not possess more than one of the same type of official

identification in their name. Any falsified or altered ID card, to include a drivers’ license, or the

possession of another person's ID card or driver's license is incompatible with the Honor Code,

regardless of intent to use.

  • 1.6.17.1. Using an official document that falsifies your age is a violation of the Honor Code and is

incompatible with the Air Force culture of integrity.

1.7. SPIRIT MISSIONS.

The following are guidelines for Academy specific events. Cadets must foster a sense of “school spirit”

and camaraderie but must also remain professional.

1.7.1. Spirit Mission Guidelines.

All spirit missions must be approved by the cadet wing commander

prior to their initiation. Cadets must use their cadet chain of command to process approval. Cadets are

required to plan spirit missions using these guidelines, common sense, and the precepts of Occupational

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Risk Management (ORM) noted in Chapter 4. Exchange cadets must comply with spirit mission

guidance. Spirit missions should foster a sense of pride and camaraderie within the cadet wing and not

interfere with any organized training or activity, to include any formation. Furthermore, they must not

violate good taste.

  • 1.7.1.1. Human Dignity and Respect. Spirit missions, by their nature, are public displays that reflect

inner desires to beat a certain team or show strength in a time of struggle. However, disrespect in the

name of spirit hurts everyone involved—the individual, the unit, and the mission. To protect our

people and our mission we can never let our actions be ones that hurt and offend others in the name of

“spirit.” The policy for human dignity and respect is clear—racial, religious, sexist (to include sexual

innuendo), or any other discriminatory actions will not be tolerated—this includes spirit missions. The

challenge is to display spirit in a constructive fashion that does not demean anyone (individually or as a

unit) (or damage equipment and property).

  • 1.7.1.2. Safety. Safety is a paramount consideration to prevent injuries to participants or observers.

  • 1.7.1.3. Unauthorized Areas. The following areas are unauthorized for spirit missions:

    • 1.7.1.3.1. Academic Areas. All areas and computer labs in McDermott Library, Fairchild Hall, and

Fairchild Annex.

  • 1.7.1.3.2. Mitchell Hall. All areas in Mitchell Hall, except for spirit banners hung from the staff

tower in Mitchell Hall.

1.7.1.3.2.1. Spirit banners must be in good taste and be hung without interfering with Mitchell Hall

operations. Before hanging spirit banners in Mitchell Hall, cadets must check with the special

services flight office located on the west side of the staff tower.

  • 1.7.1.3.3. All fire hydrants, due to the possibility that painted or tampered fire hydrants would not

operate correctly at a time of emergency.

  • 1.7.1.3.4. All Static Displays. Airplanes are unauthorized areas due to the possibility of damage

which could occur when trying to remove paint or any type of adhesive (includes all static airplane

displays on the terrazzo).

  • 1.7.1.3.5. Golf carts are off limits due to the possibility of damage.

  • 1.7.1.3.6. All statues in the Air Garden are off limits.

  • 1.7.1.3.7. Flatiron, Eagle Peak and National Forest Service lands.

  • 1.7.1.3.8. Class Crests on the Class Wall beneath Cadet Chapel.

Note: Cadets must not use toilet paper from latrines for Spirit Missions.

  • 1.7.1.4. Clean Up. Spirit missions must be cleaned up within a 24-hour period of the spirit mission or

prior to the next noon meal formation, whichever occurs first, by the responsible cadets (this includes

removing all taping material and cleaning windows if used during the spirit mission).

  • 1.7.1.5. Consequences. If the spirit mission is unsatisfactorily cleaned up or government property is

lost or damaged as inspected by the building manager and group or squadron AOCs/AMTs, the cadets

involved will be held responsible for the cost of the clean up or to replace/fix any lost/damaged

government property. Cadets who conduct Spirit Missions that violate standards outlined in AFI 36-

2706, Military Equal Opportunity Program, may be punished under the UCMJ.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

25

  • 1.7.2. Team Spirit. It is appropriate for cadets to cheer on their teammates when they are on the field of

friendly strife as long as the behavior is professional and does not bring discredit on or embarrassment to

the cadet, USAFA, or the Air Force. While cadets should be proud and display school spirit, they should

not be arrogant or boastful.

1.8. ACADEMIC AND ATHLETIC CLASS STANDARDS. All cadets will adhere to the written and

verbal guidance given by faculty and staff of the Dean of Faculty and Athletic Department while in their

facilities (i.e. Classroom Standards).

1.9. AUDITORIUM PRESENTATION/ LECTURES/ CLASSROOM GUEST SPEAKERS.

  • 1.9.1. Be On Time. For auditorium lectures, cadets shall arrive at least five minutes prior to scheduled

start times. Cadets must immediately take seats and sit by squadron to facilitate accountability. If not

sitting by squadron cadets must fill rows from the front to the rear as a courtesy to the speaker.

  • 1.9.2. Customs and Courtesies. If the speaker opens up the briefing to questions from the audience,

cadets must rise and introduce themselves before asking questions. For example, "Sir/Ma'am, Cadet

Second Class Smith from Cadet Squadron 1, (question)." While the speaker answers the question, it is

appropriate for cadets to sit down.

  • 1.9.3. Food and Beverages. Cadets shall not bring food or beverages inside the auditorium at Arnold

Hall.

1.10. MITCHELL HALL CONDUCT AND DECORUM.

Cadet squadron commanders must make every effort to equally distribute members of each class at each

of the squadron’s tables. During mandatory meals, cadet squadrons shall sit by elements to the

maximum extent possible. Cadets are expected to maintain proper decorum while in Mitchell Hall. The

cadet chain of command and the senior cadet present at each table must maintain accountability and

enforce Mitchell Hall policies.

1.10.1. Seating and Excusal. At the beginning of the meal, the AFCW Support NCO will call the cadet

wing to attention. Only beverages and ice may be served before the cadet wing is called to attention.

However, food and beverages will not be consumed at any time before “Wing take Seats” is announced.

Cadets shall stand quietly during general announcements and bulletins and must refrain from talking,

eating, drinking, or touching anything on the table as a courtesy to those addressing the cadet wing.

When the speaker gives the command of “at ease,” cadets will have the opportunity for prayer,

reflection, or silent time. Next, the speaker will announce “Wing Take Seats.” No training other than

brief decorum spot corrections will occur between the initial command of attention and dismissal of

cadets. Cadets shall not leave Mitchell Hall during breakfast and the noon meal until excused by the

cadet wing staff.

1.10.2. UOD. The uniform for breakfast and lunch in Mitchell Hall is the UOD unless authorized by

Cadet Injury/Illness Report. See para 2.13. for alternate uniform wear for evening and weekend optional

meals.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

  • 1.10.3. Book Bags. Shall not be left unattended outside. Cadets may carry them to their tables and shall

neatly place them adjacent to, or over the back of their seats. Cadets may also use the shelves located

near each entrance.

  • 1.10.4. Removing Food from Mitchell Hall. Milk, juice, and other individually packaged food items

(loaves of bread and bagels, yogurt) partially consumed during the meal may be taken from Mitchell

Hall. Cadets may not remove food from tables prior to the meal or as they walk to their assigned tables.

Likewise, cadets must not remove food from storage areas such as refrigerators and condiment rooms.

  • 1.10.4.1. Cadets are not permitted to take silverware, table linen, any equipment or table condiments

(e.g., chocolate syrup, ketchup, peanut butter, etc.) from Mitchell Hall.

  • 1.10.5. Table Commandant (TC). First-class cadets will serve as the TC. If extenuating circumstances

arise, the highest ranking second-class cadet at the table will be designated TC. If the TC must leave

early, he/she will designate an appropriate replacement. If, during a buffet meal, there are no first or

second-class cadets at the table, third and fourth class cadets shall not sit in the TC position. The cadets

at the table will leave the seat vacant until a first or second-class cadet arrives. The TC is ultimately

responsible and will be held accountable for all actions of their respective table members. The TC will:

  • 1.10.5.1. Ensure cadets refrain from eating, serving food, distributing utensils or sitting prior to “Wing,

take seats.”

  • 1.10.5.2. Enforce all Mitchell Hall decorum at all meals.

  • 1.10.5.3. Ensure proper table etiquette of all members.

  • 1.10.5.4. Greet, introduce and entertain table guests when present. Also, ensure guests are served their

respective drinks and food before cadets and treated with respect at all times.

  • 1.10.5.5. Ensure cadets only make spot corrections after “Wing, take seats."

  • 1.10.5.6. Ensure cadets have been given enough food and time to eat during meals.

  • 1.10.5.7. Ensure cadets maintain mutual respect for one another.

  • 1.10.6. General Decorum Proper table etiquette must be displayed at all times. Rapping on dinnerware

is unacceptable.

  • 1.10.6.1. Mitchell Hall decorum applies to ALL cadets.

specialty tables (i.e., RAMPS, etc.).

There will be no “special” provisions for

  • 1.10.6.2. Cadets shall promptly find appropriate seats, place their caps on the holders under the chairs,

remove outer garments (neatly placing them over the back of their chairs), and remain standing until

"Wing, take seats." Cadets shall not touch or serve food prior to "Wing, take seats" and must not

depart until dismissed.

  • 1.10.6.3. Sit with an upright posture without slouching over the table or in the chair and never place

elbows on the table at any time while consuming your meal. Elbows on the table are considered

acceptable only once you have completed consuming your meal and wish to continue social

conversation.

  • 1.10.6.4. Use appropriate courtesies when addressing Mitchell Hall staff.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

27

  • 1.10.6.6. Know the proper place setting: plate will be upright with the plate insignia at the 12 o’clock

position, beverage glasses at the 12 o’clock position with juice glass to the right and salad bowl

adjacent to the upper left of the plate at the 10 o’clock position.

  • 1.10.6.7. Right handed cadets shall ground their utensils from the 12 o’clock position on their plates to

the 3 o’clock position; left handed cadets from the 12 o’clock to 9 o’clock position. Knife blades will

face inward toward the center of the plate.

  • 1.10.6.8. While eating, place a napkin in the lap.

  • 1.10.6.9. Serve guests first and then proceed by position and rank as a courtesy.

1.10.6.10.

All glasses will be filled to within 1/2 inch from the top of the glass. No one will touch the

upper 1/3 of each glass for health reasons.

1.10.6.11.

Pass food using the hand and arm opposite of the direction of movement

1.10.6.12.

Request assistance when the item is out of reach, and announce when dish is hot.

1.10.6.13.

Cadets shall not begin eating until the last cadet at the table has been served.

1.10.6.14.

Cadets must eat at a normal pace, concentrating on proper etiquette.

1.10.6.15.

Cadets shall not talk with their mouths full. They must finish chewing and swallow before

responding.

1.10.6.16.

When taking second helpings of food, ask if others would like additional portions.

1.10.6.17.

When spoken to, stop eating, put down any utensils or glasses, and look at the person

speaking.

1.10.6.18.

Rise and come to the position of attention when addressed by a superior who is standing or

seated at another table and when an officer joins or leaves the table.

1.10.6.19.

When the command, "All cadets are dismissed at this time" is announced, cadets must

excuse themselves by announcing to the senior ranking member of the table, "Excuse me, please" with

an appropriate departure statement.

  • 1.10.7. USAFA IMT O-96, Cadet Food Acceptability Report. Cadets shall use the USAFA IMT O-96,

to rate meals and service in Mitchell Hall. The TC will sign the Form O-96 and is responsible for its

comments. Comments should be serious in nature and address the quality/quantity of food served,

suggestions on how to improve food quality if needed, and suggested additions to the menu. Comments

shall not be offensive in nature, or violate AF or USAFA MEO policies.

  • 1.10.8. "Touch-and-Go" Meals. Evening meal buffet is from 1700 to 1900, Monday through Friday.

Cadets will be served either a "touch-and-go" or buffet meal until 1900. No meals will be served after

1900. Cadets may eat at Mitchell Hall tables until 1920, whether they had the buffet or a "touch-and-go"

meal. It’s the cadet’s responsibility to ensure no military duties are being missed if they remain in

Mitchell Hall past 1900. Cadets must properly dispose of any trash generated from "touch-and-go"

meals.

  • 1.10.8.1. Cadets shall not consume food or beverages while on the terrazzo.

  • 1.10.8.2. Cadets are not authorized to have family/friends dine in Mitchell Hall during mandatory

meal formations. However, paying guests may accompany cadets during optional buffet meals.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Special and official USAFA guests (e.g., potential academy candidates) who receive prior permission

through admissions or the athletic department may attend any meal.

1.10.8.3.

Cadets may not bring food from Mitchell Hall into Fairchild Hall, to include the McDermott

Library and Fairchild Annex. Exception: Food may be taken to the dining area outside the AAFES

snack bar after normal operating hours. All trash must be disposed of, or removed, and any spilled

food or beverages must be cleaned up.

 

1.10.9.

Missed Meals. The following specifies the procedures for cadets missing meals for medical

reasons:

1.10.9.1.

Cadets must follow Mitchell Hall procedures to obtain a box meal 24 hours a day, if

required for emergency or unusual situations. Cadets in Charge of Quarters (CCQ) will call the kitchen

at x4074/4075 for meal orders. The CCQs are also authorized boxed meals when duties require

missing standard meal times.

 

1.10.9.2.

From 0330 to 1930 cadets should go to the kitchen for the meal.

Normally, group level

CCQs will pick up required meals from Mitchell Hall based on squadron CCQ inputs.

1.10.9.3.

Physicians must state on the Cadet Injury/Illness report whether a cadet is on bedrest or

otherwise requires a special diet. Not all cadets on a Cadet Injury/Illness report are authorized boxed

meals.

1.11. CONCLUSION.

A cadet's behavior and social skill is of critical importance regardless of location. USAFA demands the

highest standards of professional behavior because the nation and the operational Air Force expect

nothing less from their junior officers. The policies and procedures relating to professional conduct are

based upon the rules and regulations of the Air Force, all of which stem from the service’s Core Values

of integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do. Cadets are obligated to take corrective

action whenever they witness an action or behavior which tarnishes the reputation of all cadets and

members of the Air Force. Like the Air Force Core Values and the Cadet Honor Code, the standards

listed within this chapter are the price of admission for entering the world's greatest air, space and

cyberspace force. If all your actions are honorable, you will have gone a long way toward fulfilling your

obligation for admission in the Air Force, fulfilling your Oath of Office as a cadet, and earning the right

to remain on the team. This is an incredible responsibility, but fundamental to the nature of the military

profession.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

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Chapter 2

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE

  • 2.1. INTRODUCTION.

This chapter outlines basic expectations of appearance during a cadet’s transformation from “officer

candidate” to “officer of character.” All Air Force personnel are expected to conform to excellent

standards of appearance. Changes to dress and personal appearance that are published as a change to

AFI 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance for Air Force Personnel, USAFA Supplement to AFI 36-

2903, approved by the Air Force Uniform Board, or Air Force Virtual Uniform Board do not apply to

USAFA Cadets until recommended by the USAFA Uniform Board and approved by the Superintendent.

  • 2.2. UNIFORM OF THE DAY (UOD). The Superintendent determines the UOD for USAFA personnel. Variations to UOD must be approved by the Vice Superintendent. The Commandant may authorize a variation to UOD for special events on a non-reoccurring basis. The UOD is mandatory when performing official military duties or when conducting official military business at anytime of the day or night including class, extra instruction, laboratories, and evening lectures. Exception: Cadets will wear any uniform directed under the provisions of paragraph 2.2.1. for a specific activity. 2.2.1. The UOD is mandatory from release from night call to quarters (NCQ) until retreat Monday- Friday and until last military duty (LMD) on weekends and holidays.

  • 2.2.1.1. Tuesday through Sunday the UOD is the Battle Dress Uniform (BDU)/Airman Battle Uniform

(ABU) unless otherwise directed.

  • 2.2.1.2. Monday UOD is any combination of the service uniform unless otherwise directed.

    • 2.2.1.2.1. UOD must be worn if a cadet has duty in the cadet area prior to a directed activity

requiring an authorized variation. If a cadet is scheduled for an activity requiring flight

suits/BDUs/ABUs, they may only change into flight suits/BDUs/ABUs during the first free

period prior to departing for the airfield or attending the class/appointment requiring the

variation in uniform. Exception: If a cadet does not have a free period prior to an activity

requiring a uniform variation, flight suits/BDUs/ABUs may be worn prior to the directed

activity.

  • 2.2.1.2.2. Cadets must return to UOD during their first free period upon return to the cadet area

or completion of the class/appointment.

  • 2.2.1.2.3. (ADDED) Cadets will take every opportunity to change back to UOD for mandatory

formations. If a cadet’s schedule does not permit the change to UOD they will notify their

squadron chain of command.

  • 2.2.1.3. Uniform for academic classes will be UOD unless directed to wear alternate uniforms

prescribed for a specific activity by an instructor. The uniform for physical education classes will be

the Physical Fitness Uniform unless otherwise specified by your instructor.

  • 2.2.1.4. Fourth-class cadets shall wear UOD or appropriate USAFA uniform required for duty or

activity from reveille until Academic Call to Quarters (ACQ) every day. After ACQ, fourth class

cadets may wear USAFA PC gear in their assigned dormitory squadron area.

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AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

2.2.1.5. Cadets authorized to sign out before retreat Monday-Friday or LMD on weekends and

holidays shall not transit the terrazzo unless in UOD.

  • 2.2.2. Summer Programs. The UOD will be determined by the specific program AOC/OIC, in

coordination with the summer cadet wing commander, but cannot deviate from the uniform restrictions

and guidance within this instruction.

  • 2.3. GENERAL APPEARANCE STANDARDS. When wearing the uniform, all Air Force members must adhere to standards of neatness, cleanliness, safety, and military image to provide the appearance of a disciplined service member. Long sleeves on any uniform or outergarment will not be “pushed” up on the forearm at any time.

    • 2.3.1. Expectations. Cadets shall keep all uniforms neat, clean, pressed, properly fitted, in good

condition, zipped, snapped or buttoned. Whether on or off duty, cadets must abide by the personal

grooming standards outlined in AFI 36-2903; excerpts are provided below.

2.3.1.1. Hands are not permitted in pockets at any time while in uniform including athletic

uniforms. Exception: Outdoor team sport members not actively engaged in the competition,

(e.g., on the bench or a substitute player) may place hands in pockets as needed during cold

weather events.

2.3.1.2. Hands shall not be pulled inside sleeves of any garment at any time. Gloves are authorized

with outer garments and athletic uniform/running suit.

  • 2.3.2. Grooming Standards. IAW Table 2.1 below. If authorized a shaving waiver, cadets must keep

facial hair trimmed to ¼-inch. AOCs and cadet chain of command will monitor progress in treatment to

control these waivers. Cadet Illness/Injury Report must be carried at all times while authorized this

waiver.

Table 2.1. Personal Grooming Standards.

 

A

B

C

Item of Grooming

Will be/have

Will not

(M-Men, W-

Women)

1

Hair, Overall Standard (M & W)

clean, well-groomed and neat.

contain excessive amount of grooming aids, touch eyebrows. Hair color/ highlights/frosting (must not be faddish). Examples of natural looking for human beings, Blonde/Brunette/ Red/Black/Grey) EXCEPTION: May be visible in front of women's flight cap.

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

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Table 2.1. Personal Grooming Standards (Continued).

 

A

B

C

 

Item of Grooming (M-Men, W-Women)

Will be/have

Will not

2

Hair Style (M)

a tapered appearance on both sides and back, both with and without headgear. A tapered appearance is one that when viewed from any angle outlines the individual's hair so that it conforms to the shape of the head, curving inward to the natural termination point. Block cut permitted with tapered appearance. Cleanly shaven heads, military high-and- tight, or flat top haircuts are authorized.

be worn in an extreme or fad style or in such a way that exceeds length or bulk standards or violates safety requirements. Protrude below the front band of properly worn headgear. Touch the ears and only closely cut or shaved hair on the back of the neck may touch the collar. Exceed 1 1/4 inches in bulk, regardless of length and exceed 1/4 inch at the natural termination point. Contain or have any visible foreign items attached to it.

3

Hair Style (W)

styled to present a professional appearance. Allow the wear of conservative hairpins, combs, headbands, elastic bands and barrettes. Hair pins and bands must match hair color. Long hair will be secured with no loose end. (see note 1.)

be worn in an extreme or fad style or violate safety requirements. Extend below any side of an invisible line drawn parallel to the ground at the bottom edge of the shirt collar regardless of length. Length will not be excessive. Include hair ornaments such as ribbons, beads, jeweled pins, or hair scrunchy. May not

Bangs, if worn, will not touch the eyebrows. Braids, micro-braids and cornrows are authorized. However, must be solid color similar to the individual's hair color; conservative and not present a faddish appearance.

have shaved heads, military high-and- tight or flat top haircuts. (Ban on faddish styles and cuts.) Will not prevent proper wear of headgear, including helmet or chemical mask. Synthetic hair not authorized when not permitted by safety/mission requirements. Dreadlocks are not authorized. NOTE: Minimum length/ bulk required is 1 inch not to exceed 3 inches in bulk and will not prevent proper wear of headgear,

4

Sideburns (M)

neatly trimmed and tapered in the same manner as the haircut. Will be straight and of even width (not flared) and end in a clean-shaven horizontal line.

including helmet or chemical mask. extend below the lowest part of the exterior ear opening.

5

Cosmetics (W)

conservative and in good taste.

be worn in field conditions.

6

Nail Polish /Lipstick

single color (compliment skin tone)

have decorations; will not exceed 1/4

(W)

and French manicure. (See note 2).

inch; will not wear shades of lipstick and nail polish that distinctly contrast with their complexion, that detract from the uniform, or that are extreme. Some examples of extreme colors include but are not limited to, purple, gold, blue, black, bright (fire-engine) red, and fluorescent colors.

32

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

Table 2.1. Personal Grooming Standards (Cont.).

 

A

B

C

 
 

Item of Grooming (M-Men, W-Women)

Will be/have

Will not

7

Fingernails (M & W)

clean and well-groomed.

exceed 1/4 inch in length past tip of finger. Males are not authorized to wear nail polish. Interfere with duty performance or hinder proper fit of prescribed safety equipment or uniform items.

8

Mustaches

 

be worn by USAFA cadets

NOTES.

 

1.

The intent of this item is that long hair should be styled in a manner that prevents loose ends

 

from extending upward on the head. (For example: when using the claw clip or hairpins, hair will

not present the appearance of a “rooster tail”; when hair is in a bun, all loose ends must be tucked

in and secured; when hair is in a pony tail, it must be pulled all the way through the elastic band

 

and may hang naturally downward, not extending below the bottom of the collar). As with all

hairstyles, a neat and professional image is essential.

 

2.

Will not apply designs to nails or apply two-tone or multi-tone colors on duty excluding

 

French manicure.

  • 2.3.3. Honor Guard Uniforms. The Honor Guard Commander will establish and direct personal

appearance and uniform standards for Honor Guard members until the Cadet Honor Guard Program

Operating Instruction has been published.

  • 2.3.4. Exchange Cadet Uniforms. Exchange cadets shall wear their equivalent of the UOD as

described in Table 2.10. Because USAFA hosts exchange and other service academy cadets, duties may

require uniforms other than UOD, and dressing privileges vary by class and time.

  • 2.3.5. Chapel Uniform. Upper three-classes attending chapel services shall be in UOD or better, or in

civilian “business casual” dress (See Table 2.3.) as a minimum. The Chapel may establish additional

dress requirements for choirs, music groups, ushers, readers, or other cadets assisting with services.

Fourth-class cadets shall wear UOD or better for chapel services on-base and service dress for off-base.

  • 2.3.6. Body/Physical Appearance Modification Standards.

outlined in Table 2.2.

Cadets must comply with standards as

Table 2.2. Body/Physical Appearance Modification Standards.

 

A

B

L

To present the

 

I

proper military

will be

N

image

E

1

Body Alteration

Prohibited, if it is intentional and results in a visible, physical effect

or Modification

that detracts from a professional military image. Failure to observe

these mandatory provisions and prohibitions by active duty Air

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

33

   

Force members, USAFR members on active duty or inactive

duty for training and ANG members in Federal service is a

violation of Article 92, Uniform Code of Military Justice

(UCMJ). See note 1.

 
  • 2 Tattoos/Brands

Tattoos/brands anywhere on the body that are obscene or advocate

(Unauthorized

sexual, racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination are prohibited in

content)

and out of uniform. Tattoos/brands that are prejudicial to good order

and discipline or that are of a nature that tends to bring discredit

upon the Air Force are prohibited in and out of uniform. Tattoos that

are commonly associated with gang affiliations are prohibited both

in and out of uniform. Unauthorized (content): Members who

receive tattoos/brands not meeting the standards after the

implementation of this policy are required to initiate tattoos/brands

removal at their own expense upon notification by their

Commander. Initial Accessions must disclose any tattoos and must

complete removal of inappropriate tattoos prior to being accepted in

the Air Force. Members failing to remove or alter unauthorized

tattoos in a timely manner may be subject to disciplinary action or

involuntary separation.

Failure to observe these mandatory provisions and prohibitions

by active duty Air Force members, USAFR members on active

duty or inactive duty for training and ANG members in Federal

service is a violation of Article 92, Uniform Code of Military

Justice (UCMJ). (See notes 2, 3, 4 and 5).

 
  • 3 Tattoos/Brands

Excessive tattoos/brands will not be exposed or visible (includes

(Inappropriate-

visible through the uniform) while in uniform. Excessive is defined

military image)

as any tattoo/brands that exceed 1/4 of the exposed body part and

those above the collarbone and readily visible when wearing an

open collar uniform. Members should not be allowed to display

excessive tattoos that would detract from an appropriate professional

image while in uniform. Commanders should use these guidelines in

determining appropriate military image and acceptability of tattoos

displayed by members in uniform. Air Force members with tattoos

not meeting an acceptable military image should be required to (a)

maintain complete coverage of the tattoos using current uniform

items (e.g. long-sleeved shirt/blouse, pants/slacks, dark hosiery, PT

running suit, etc.) or (b) remove tattoo(s). Depending on the

circumstances, commanders may seek Air Force medical support for

voluntary tattoo removal. PTDY is not authorized in this situation

and is at member’s expense. Members failing to remove, cover, or

alter excessive tattoos or who choose not to comply with acceptable

military standards may be subject to disciplinary action or

involuntary separation. Failure to observe these mandatory

provisions and prohibitions by active duty Air Force members,

USAFR members on active duty or inactive duty for training

and ANG members in Federal service is a violation of Article 92,

34

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

   

Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). (See notes 2, 4, 5 and

6).

4

Body Piercing

In Uniform: Members are prohibited from attaching, affixing or

displaying objects, articles, jewelry or ornamentation to or through

the ear, nose, tongue, eye brows, lips or any exposed body part

(includes visible through the uniform). EXCEPTION : Women are

authorized to wear earrings. Civilian Attire: (1) Official Duty:

Members are prohibited from attaching, affixing or displaying

objects, articles, jewelry or ornamentation to or through the nose,

tongue eye brows, lips or any exposed body part (includes visible

through clothing). (2) Off Duty on a military installation: Members

are prohibited from attaching, affixing or displaying objects,

articles, jewelry or ornamentation to or through the nose, tongue eye

brows, lips or any exposed body part (includes visible through

clothing). Piercing of earlobes by women is allowed, but should not

be extreme or excessive.

NOTES:

  • 1. Members who intentionally alter or modify any part of their bodies in order to achieve a visible, physical effect

that disfigures, deforms or otherwise detracts from a professional military image may be subject to disciplinary

action or involuntary separation, as determined appropriate by the member’s commander. Examples of prohibited conduct include (but are not limited to) tongue splitting or forking, tooth filing and acquiring visible, disfiguring skin implants.

  • 2. Installation or higher commanders may impose more restrictive standards for tattoos and body ornaments, on or

off duty, in those locations where Air Force-wide standards may not be adequate to address cultural sensitivities (e.g., overseas) or mission requirements (e.g.; basic training environments).

  • 3. Members who receive tattoos/brands not meeting the standards are required to initiate tattoos/brands removal at

their own expense (may not use Air Force Medical Centers for removal) upon notification by their Commander. Members not complying with these requirements will be subject to disciplinary action for failure to comply with Air Force Standards and may be involuntarily separated.

  • 4. There may be situations where the commander can restrict the wear of non-visible body ornaments. Those

situations would include any body ornamentation that interferes with the performance of the member’s military

duties. The factors to be evaluated in making this determination include, but are not limited to: impairs the safe and effective operation of weapons, military equipment or machinery; poses a health or safety hazard to the wearer or others; or interferes with the proper wear of special or protective clothing or equipment (EXAMPLE: helmets, flack jackets, flight suits, camouflaged uniforms, gas masks, wet suits and crash rescue equipment.)

  • 5. Tattoo/branding policy went into effect 15 March 1998.

  • 6. Members who receive tattoos/brands not meeting the standards after the implementation of this policy are

required to initiate tattoos/brands removal at their own expense upon notification by their Commander. Members not complying with these requirements will be subject to disciplinary action for failure to comply with Air Force Standards and may be involuntarily separated.

2.3.7. USAFA and USAF Awards and Decorations. Cadets must wear earned USAFA and USAF

awards and decorations on all uniforms as applicable. These are all indicators of your performance and

enhance a cadet's credibility in personal and professional settings. Merit Badges are also a symbol of

sterling accomplishments and experiences, and cadets shall wear them on service and service dress

uniforms. They reflect participation and completion of challenging programs or the attainment of

academic, military, or physical fitness goals.

Note: Reference USAFAI 36-3510, USAF Academy Cadet Program Recognizing Cadet Achievement,

for Merit List awarding criteria. Aviation, Instructor, Space, Jump, and Bulldog awarding criteria may

AFCWMAN 36-3501 1 AUGUST 2008

35

be found in the respective syllabi for those programs. For those cadets who have served in other

services, refer to AFI 36-2903 for appropriate order of precedence.

  • 2.3.8. Cadet Rank. Cadet rank is assigned based on leadership position and the wear of any other rank

is prohibited. Exception: cadets may “swap” rank at home football games with other cadets (i.e., a 4°

swaps shoulder boards with the Cadet Wing Commander or other Firstie); rank will not be exchanged

between cadets and officers. Cadets must not borrow higher rank for pictures and summer TDYs.

Cadets shall not wear the rank of their previous class and shall be considered “promoted” (i.e., a fourth

class cadet becomes a third-class cadet and so on) following completion of the Graduation Ceremony.

Cadet rank must be worn at all times. Team captain insignia shall be worn by intercollegiate team

captains ONLY. Club team captains are not authorized to wear the team captain insignia.

  • 2.4. PROHIBITED UNIFORM WEAR.

    • 2.4.1. Cadets shall not wear the uniform or any part of the uniform at a meeting or demonstration

sponsored by an organization, association, movement or group that:

  • 2.4.1.1. The Attorney General has named as totalitarian, fascist, communist, or subversive.

  • 2.4.1.2. Advocates the use of force or violence to deny others their rights under the Constitution.

  • 2.4.1.3. Seeks to change the US government by unconstitutional means.

2.4.1.4. When

participating

in

activities

such

as

public

marches/rallies not approved by the Air Force.

  • 2.4.1.5. When it would discredit the Armed Forces.

speeches,

interviews, picket lines,

  • 2.4.1.6. When deemed inappropriate by the Commandant.

  • 2.4.2. Cadets shall not mix any part of the uniform with civilian attire. This includes athletic uniforms,

grade insignia, cap devices, badges, distinctive buttons, issued clothing items, etc.

  • 2.4.3. Cadets shall not eat or drink in uniform while walking indoors or outdoors. Talking, texting, or

any use (any use includes checking time) of a cellular phone, to include wear of a hands-free device,

while walking in uniform is prohibited. Any use of a cellular phone is prohibited during duty

hours in Fairchild Hall, to include McDermott Library, and the Fairchild Annex before retreat on

academic days or anytime during finals week. Exceptions are for emergencies or official business on

government issued devices.

  • 2.4.4. Cadets shall not roller blade/skate, skateboard, or ride a scooter (to include any derivative of

previously mentioned items) anywhere while in uniform to include PT Gear. Note: Bicycling in PT

Gear is permitted with appropriate safety gear (i.e., helmet, reflective belt, etc.).

  • 2.5. MISCELLANEOUS POLICIES.

  • 2.5.1. Alternate Uniform. Cadets shall be in UOD at all times during the duty day unless alternate

uniform is authorized. Alternate uniform must be