You are on page 1of 7

Skillsworksheet – Unit 1

Reading

Necessity Is the Mother of Invention
We take many modern conveniences for granted. We can switch on a light, turn on the 
central heating and the television, and in the wink of an eye, we have light, heat and 
company. But we have only had the use of these inventions for a relatively short time. 
Generations of people lived without electricity for thousands of years, and yet they 
managed to obtain light, warmth and the means to enjoy company. How? Fire.
With the discovery of fire people could cook meat and vegetables, and they could sit 
round a warm protective fire and tell stories. Being warmer and better fed, they had the 
energy to investigate other means of improving their lives. We know that as early as 
8,000 years ago cloth was being spun and woven in western Asia.
The first metal to be discovered was copper. People found that if they heated it over a 
fire it could be worked into different shapes. By mixing copper with tin they obtained a 
harder metal called bronze. This was in common use 4,000 years ago. About a thousand 
years later, the Iron Age began. Being able to make iron meant that man was now able 
to create objects not only for domestic use but also for decoration. He also had the 
technology necessary to make iron weapons for attack and armour for defence. Battles 
began to occur between tribes jealous of each other’s material possessions. 
Iron was also important in agriculture. The invention of the plough enabled man to 
settle in one place, plant seeds and grow cereals. One summer, long, long ago in the 
Middle East, farmers discovered that by digging ditches and making artificial earth 
banks, they could make canals. By having control over the course of a river, they had 
control over water distribution: man had discovered irrigation. There was no longer any 
need for tribes to be nomadic; they could find an area of land, which suited their needs, 
and improve it.

1.­  Based on information in the text, answer the following questions.

1 How did the development of iron and the discovery of irrigation change human 
lifestyle?
2 In your opinion, do you think the discovery of iron influenced man’s tendency to be 
aggressive? Give your reasons.

2.­  Explain the meaning of the following words and phrases in your own words.

1 to take something for granted

2 woven

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 1 PHOTOCOPIABLE
3 armour 

4 in the wink of an eye

3.­  Name three metals mentioned in the text.

4.­  Are these statements true or false? Give evidence from the text.

1 Human beings developed intellectually because they had the use of fire.

2 The invention of iron meant that tribes no longer had to be nomadic.

Writing

5.­  Write 60­100 words on one of the following topics.
1 Modern conveniences such as the telephone, computers and microwave ovens have 
become very important in our lives. To what extent are they essential? 
2 Describe an important invention and how it has changed our lives for the better.

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 2 PHOTOCOPIABLE
Skillsworksheet – Unit 2

Reading

The End of Your First Love
I saw him today for the first time since we finished, and I have to admit that I had mixed
feelings about it, although on the surface I was calm and friendly. Our break­up was 
mutual, well, almost, but first let me give you the background. 
We’d been together for about three years, having met after school one day. I was 
walking home and he just came up to me and started talking. He was quite cute, so I 
gave him my sweetest smile and it started from there. Looking back on it, there were a 
lot of good times, although we didn’t really have a lot in common. That doesn’t matter 
too much when you’re sixteen, especially if he’s your first boyfriend. 
It was even better because at the time all my best friends were single and they’d gather 
round, desperate to hear what we’d been up to. It was almost like we were all going out 
with him!
What I said about having little in common was probably the main reason why we 
finished. I said before that it was a joint decision, but that’s not quite true. I’d been 
thinking for a while that the spark had gone from the relationship, but I just needed a bit
more time to work up the courage to tell him it was over. Then, out of the blue, one 
Saturday afternoon in the park, with no warning, he dumped me!
I was so surprised that I really didn’t know how to react, so I just said ‘OK’ and he left 
quickly to avoid further embarrassment. At first all I felt was indignant. It was my job to
finish with him and now everyone would think he had made the decision on his own. 
Why is it so important what other people think when you’re a teenager?
Then I went into a weepy phase, crying into my pillow at night. I wasn’t happy, so I 
decided to take some positive action: forget the good times and think about the bad. 
With the help of my friends, I made a list of all the things that annoyed me about him. It
was surprisingly easy and made me realise that the break­up was definitely for the best.
However, seeing him today brought back some of the happy memories, and that’s why I
had mixed feelings, but life goes on and now I’m a stronger person for it.

1.­  Based on information in the text, answer the following questions in your own 
words.

1 Why does the girl say that the break­up of the relationship was almost mutual?

2 How did she get over the loss of her boyfriend?

2.­  Are the following statements true or false? Give evidence from the text.

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 3 PHOTOCOPIABLE
1 Her friends were going out with her boyfriend at the same time.

2 She cared what other people thought about her relationship.

3 She felt good about seeing her boyfriend again.

3.­ Find synonyms for these words and phrases in the text.

1 the history

2 attractive / sweet

3 without a partner

4 unexpectedly

4.­ Explain in your own words what these expressions mean.

1 “… on the surface I was calm and friendly.”
2 “Looking back on it …”

3 “… the spark had gone from the relationship, …”

4 “… the break­up was definitely for the best.”

Writing

5.­  Write 60­100 words on one of these topics.

1 Write the boyfriend’s version of the end of the relationship.

2 In the text, the girl says “Why is it so important what other people think when you’re
a teenager?” Give your opinion.

Listening and speaking

The Valentine

1.­  Listen to the dialogue.

2.­  Who is the valentine card for? Who is it from?

3.­  What is the difference between sensitive and sensible in English?

4.­  Can you finish the poem Roses are Red, Violets Are Blue in a more original (and 
more meaningful) way?

5.­ Design a Valentine’s Day card – you don’t have to say who it’s for!

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 4 PHOTOCOPIABLE
© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 5 PHOTOCOPIABLE
Skillsworksheet – Unit 3

Reading 

The Biology of Sport ­ a Modern Hunting Ritual
According to British anthropologist Desmond Morris, sporting activities are essentially 
modified forms of hunting behaviour. Looking at football, for example, biologically, the
modern footballer is revealed as a member of a disguised hunting pack. His killing 
weapon has turned into a harmless football and his prey has turned into a goal­mouth. If
his aim is accurate and he scores a goal, he enjoys the hunter’s triumph of killing his 
prey. He does so with the strategic co­operation of his team who was once his family, 
his tribe. 
constancia
Desmond Morris says that to understand how this transformation has taken place, we 
must look back at our ancient ancestors. They spent over a million years evolving as co­
operative hunters. Their survival depended on success in the hunting field. In order to 
obtain food, their whole way of life, even their bodies, changed. They became chasers, 
runners, jumpers, aimers, throwers and prey­killers. 
Then, about ten thousand years ago, they became farmers. Their improved intelligence, 
so vital to their old hunting life, was put to a new use ­ that of controlling and 
domesticating their prey. The hunt became obsolete: the food was there on the farms. 
The risks and uncertainties of the hunt were no longer essential for survival.
However, the need for the thrill of the hunt remained. So hunting for sport replaced 
hunting for necessity. This new activity involved all the original hunting sequences, but 
the object of the exercise was to have fun and not just to avoid starvation. Instead, the 
“sportsmen” set off to test their skill against prey that were no longer essential to their 
well­being. They may have eaten what they killed, as we still do today, but there were 
other, much simpler ways of obtaining meat. The chase became exposed as an end in 
itself. 
The Greek solution to this change was athletics: field sports involving chasing (track 
running), jumping, and throwing (discus and javelin). The athletes experienced the 
vigorous physical activities of the hunting scene, all elements of the ancient hunt, but 
their triumph was now transformed from the actual kill to a symbolic one of winning. In
other parts of the world, ancient ball games were making a small beginning: a form of 
polo in ancient Persia, bowls and hockey in ancient Egypt, football in ancient China. 
Whatever the rules of the game, the physical act of aiming (to kill) was the essence of 
the operation. This element, more than any other, has come to dominate the world of 
modern sport. There are more aiming sports today than all other forms of sport put 
together. One could almost define field sports now as competitive aiming behaviour. 

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 6 PHOTOCOPIABLE
(Adapted from “Manwatching” by Desmond Morris)

1.­  Based on information in the text, answer the following questions.

1 How did the practice of hunting change over the years?

2 Why did ancient civilisations develop hunting into sporting activities?

2.­   Are the following statements from the text true or false? Give evidence from the 
text. 

1 Our ancient ancestors adapted their bodies for different hunting activities.

2 Hunting wasn’t vital for survival as soon as our ancestors started farming.

3 The Greeks developed ball games and the Chinese and Egyptians started track and 
field sports.

3.­  Find words in the text with these meanings.

1 an instrument for killing or hurting someone

2 excitement

3 extreme hunger 

4 victory

5 pointing at something with intent

Writing

6.­  Write a summary of the text in approximately 80­100 words.

© Pearson Educación, S.A., 2002 7 PHOTOCOPIABLE