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School Grade Level Grade 7

Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 the different levels of biological organization
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Describe the different levels of biological organization from
cell to biosphere; S7LT-IIc-3/
Learning Competencies /  Identify the parts that make up a human body.
Objectives  Describe how the functioning of each part work
Write the LC code for each together in an organism.
 Describe how these parts work together in an
organism.
 Parts of Human Body
II. CONTENT

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 64-69
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 77-81
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning EASE Biology. Module 6.
Resource (LR) portal
writing materials, posters and pictures of organisms, organ
B. Other Learning Resource
systems, organs, tissues and cells

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based approach - cyclic

A. Reviewing previous lesson  How do we calculate the magnification of a


or presenting the new specimen?
lesson
 Below are parts of 4 different ballpens.

Establishing a purpose for


B.
the Lesson
Identify which part belongs to which ballpen.
 A ballpen has parts like those in the pictures.

1
Identify the function of each part.
1. What will happen if any part of the ballpen is
missing?
2. How will you compare the work of a ballpen with
complete parts to the one with incomplete parts?
C.  Do the activity in LM pp 78-81 “What Makes up
an Organism? Part I. Parts of a Human Body”
Procedure
Read the selection and answer the questions that
follow.
You are an organism just like the plants and
Presenting examples / animals.
instances of the
new lesson

D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.


 Analysis:
1. What do you see in figure 2?
2. Can you identify the organ systems in figure 3?
3. How do these organ systems work together?
4. What are the parts that make up a human heart?
5. What will happen to the heart if any of these parts
Discussing new concepts is/are injured?
and practicing 6. What will happen to the organism?
new skills #1 7. What parts make up the kidneys?
8. What will happen to the kidneys if any of these
parts is/are injured?
9. What will happen to the organism?
10. What will happen to the organs if tissues are
injured?
11. What will happen to the organ systems?
12. What will happen to the organism?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Directions: Read this short story to the students then let
them realize the importance of each part. (You can ask
questions written below).
Ouch! Ouch! Ouch! That was the sound heard
from the bedroom on the second floor. Victoria hurriedly
Finding practical runs as fast as she can. She used the stairs going to the
applications of concepts next floor. She was shocked when she found out where it
and skills in daily living came from. It is Marteena’s bedroom, what is happening?
Victoria said to herself. Then she…tok tok tok…the sound
became louder…Ouchhhh…..Ouch……
Marteena…Marteena…my daughter open the door.
Nobody responded to her, except the sounds that she
heard. Victoria pushed the door so hard then it opened.

2
She saw her daughter lying on the floor crying and was
holding her waist. Victoria asked her daughter, what’s
happening? Why are you in pain? Where is the pain?
Marteena answered her mother in her moaning voice. I’m
in pain, here at my lower back and during my urination it
was so painful. Victoria ran her daughter to the hospital
and it was found out that she is suffering from
____________.
(Acute Urinary Tract Infection).
Questions:
1. What do you think is the doctor’s diagnosis to
Marteena?
2. What organ is affected in that diagnosis?
3. Do you think it can function as it is?
4. How will you maintain good functioning of your
kidney?
H. Making generalizations and
What makes up human body?
abstractions
How does each part work together?
about the lesson
Directions: Read each item carefully. Choose the
letter of the correct answer.
1. The heart pumps blood that carries oxygen and
nutrients to the different parts of the body. To which organ
system does the heart belong?
A. Circulatory B. Digestive C. Excretory D.
Reproductive
2. Cancer starts from cells that start to grow uncontrollably
fast. They destroy tissues and organs. What does this say
about the effects of diseased cells on the higher levels of
organization in an organism?
A. Diseased cells do not affect the other parts of an
organism.
B. Cancer involves only certain kinds of cells and does not
affect any other kind of cell.
C. Diseased cells affect only the next higher levels of
organization that they make up – the tissues.
D. Diseased cells damage the higher levels of
I. Evaluating Learning organization they make up: tissues, organs, organ
systems, and eventually, the whole organism.
3. Each part of an organ system plays a specific function.
Which of the following structures does not match its
function?
A. Eyes : Sight B. Kidneys : Respiration
C. Heart : Circulation D. Stomach : Digestion
4. Which of the following organs is NOT part of the
circulatory system?
A. blood B. blood vessels
C. heart D. kidney
5. Which of the following activities does NOT describe a
normal function of the kidneys?
A. filter blood B. excrete water
C. reabsorb water D. produce urea and
water

J. Additional activities for


application or What are the different parts of a plant?
remediation

3
V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

4
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 the different levels of biological organization
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Describe the different levels of biological organization from
cell to biosphere;S7LT-IIc-3/
Learning Competencies /  Identify the parts that make up a plant.
Objectives  Describe how the functioning of each part work
Write the LC code for each together in an organism.
 Describe how these parts work together in an
organism.
 Parts of a Plant
II. CONTENT

III. LEARNING RESOURCES Collaborative- thinking skills

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 69-71
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 81-83
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning EASE Biology. Module 6.
Resource (LR) portal
writing materials, posters and pictures of organisms, organ
B. Other Learning Resource
systems, organs, tissues and cells

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson


 What are the parts of s human body?
or presenting the new
lesson
 Ask the students to give a plant that has many
benefits.
Establishing a purpose for
B. 1. How do they give those benefits?
the Lesson
2. Can these plants still give those benefits in the
absence of one part? What made you say so?
C.  Do the activity in LM pp 78-81 “What Makes up
Presenting examples /
an Organism? Part II. Parts of a Plant”
instances of the
Procedure:
new lesson
Read the selection and study the figures below.

5
Plants are also made up of organ systems: the
root and shoot systems. The root system absorbs
water and nutrients; the shoot system moves
them to the different parts of the plant.

D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.


 Analysis:
13. What makes up the organ systems of plant?
14. In what ways are the functions of the organ
systems of plants similar to those of animals?
15. 3. In what ways are they different?
16. 4. How are flowers similar to the reproductive
organs of animals?
17. 5. What do you think makes up the root tip in
Discussing new concepts figure 9?
and practicing 18. 6. What is the function of the roots?
19. 7. What will happen to the roots if the tissues
new skills #1
were damaged?
20. 8. What will happen to the plant if the tissues are
damaged?
21. 9. What happens to the tissues, organs, and
organ systems if the cells are damaged or
diseased?
22. 10. What happens to the organism if the cells,
tissues, organs, and organ systems are damaged
or diseased?
23.
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. While walking in your backyard, you observe that the
leaves of the tomato plant planted by your father are
Finding practical
turning yellow and some are dried toward the bottom of
applications of concepts
the plant. What is the possible reason for this? What will
and skills in daily living
happen to the plant if you just ignore it? What can you do
to save the plant?
H. Making generalizations and
What are the parts of the plant?
abstractions
How do these parts work together?
about the lesson
Multiple Choice. Read each statement carefully and write
only the letter of the correct answer.
1. Some plants bear flowers during the summer season.
How are flowers different from the reproductive organs of
I. Evaluating Learning animals?
A. Flowers need pollinators like bees to reproduce;
animals do not.
B. Flowers are shed from time to time; nothing is shed
from animals.

6
C. Flowers have male and female parts; animals have
either male or female parts.
D. There is no difference between flowers and the
reproductive organs of animals.
2. The organ systems of plants consist of the root and
shoot systems. Why is it important for these organ
systems to work together?
A. To grow and survive
B. To avoid pests and other animals
C. To survive floods and strong winds
D. To survive droughts and earthquakes
3. Which is the reproductive organ of a plant?
A. flower B. leaf C. root D. stem
4. The part that provides anchorage to the plant is the
________.
A. flower B. leaf C. root D. stem
5. Which of the following is the function of a leaf?
A. To reproduce
B. To transport water
C. To absorb nutrients
D. To manufacture food

J. Additional activities for Make an interview or research for articles about certain
application or diseases that affect the heart, kidneys and other parts of
remediation the body. Bring also pictures that come to the articles.

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with otherteachers?

7
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 the different levels of biological organization
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Describe the different levels of biological organization from
cell to biosphere;S7LT-IIc-3/
Learning Competencies /  Identify the different levels of organization in an
Objectives organism
Write the LC code for each  Describe the parts that make up each level of
organization and give their functions

II. CONTENT Levels of Biological Organization

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 71-72
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 83-85
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning EASE Biology. Module 6.
Resource (LR) portal
Writing materials, posters and pictures of organisms,
B. Other Learning Resource
organ system, organs, tissues and cells.

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative - interactive

A. Reviewing previous lesson  What are the parts of the plant?


or presenting the new  How do these parts work together?
lesson
 Make a review on how the body parts work
together. Ask them to explain on how the body
work if one part is injured?
B.
Establishing a purpose for  You may ask someone (student) to make a sole
the Lesson role playing in front of the classroom and one
student who will narrate the story.
It was a sunny morning and Lucas was playing
basketball with his friends. He played the ball well and

8
made many three points. However, when one of his
friends passed the ball to him forcefully there was
something happened to his finger that made him to
quit. After a few minutes he noticed that it became
swollen and even more in pain. As a result, he can’t
play basketball for 1 week.
Questions:
1. What happened to Lucas?
2. Do you think if he plays basketball with his hand
condition, he can play well? Why?

C.  Do the activity in LM pp____ “Levels of


organization in an Organism”

 Procedure:
1. From the interviews you have made in Activity
1 and the articles you have read about certain
diseases that affect the heart, kidneys, and
the other parts of the body, complete the
table on page 8. You may use Manila paper
if the spaces provided in the table are not
Presenting examples / enough.
instances of the 2. On the topmost row write a disease, which
new lesson you have read about or learned from your
interview, that affects parts of the human
body.
3. In each of the boxes that correspond to the
levels of organization, describe how the disease
affects the parts that make up each level.
4. Opposite each level of organization, cut
and paste pictures (you may use the pictures
that come with the articles) that show how the
disease affects the parts that make up the
different levels. Another option is to show it
through drawing.
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
1. What are the different levels of organization?
2. What is the smallest unit that composed an
organism?
3. Which makes up the tissue?
Discussing new concepts 4. What is formed when tissues of the same
and practicing functions are grouped together?
new skills #1 5. What makes up an organ?
6. What is formed when organs of the same
functions are grouped together?
7. How does an organism formed?
8. How do the parts that make up the cells affect
the tissue? The organ? The organ system? And
the organism?
E. Arrange the following pictures from simplest to most
complex level. Write only the letter.

Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2

9
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
applications of concepts
and skills in daily living
H. Making generalizations and
abstractions What are the levels of organization in an organism?
about the lesson
Choose the letter of the correct answer.
1. Which of the following differentiates organs from
tissues?
A. Organs and tissues are made up of cells.
B. Organs and tissues make up an organ system.
C. Tissues make up organs; cells make up tissues.
D. Organs make up tissues; tissues make up organs.
2. At which smallest level of organization in an organism
can the characteristics of life be carried out?
A. Cell B. Organ C. Organ system D. Tissue

I. Evaluating Learning 3. Which is the correct sequence of the levels of


organization in an organism from biggest to smallest?
A. Cell – Organ – Organ System – Tissue
B. Organ – Organ System – Tissue – Cell
C. Tissue – Cell – Organ – Organ system
D. Organ System – Organ – Tissue – Cell
4. Human heart is an example of ________
A. Cell B. Organ C. Organ System D. Tissue
5. It is composed of different tissues grouped together into
a structural and functional unit.
A. Cell B. Organ C. Organ System D. Tissue

Answer:
1. C 2. A 3. D 4.D 5.
B
J. Additional activities for
Make a research on levels of organization that are bigger
application or
than the organism.
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D.

10
No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with otherteachers?

11
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 the different levels of biological organization
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Describe the different levels of biological organization from
Learning Competencies / cell to biosphere;S7LT-IIc-3/
Objectives  Identify the higher levels of biological
Write the LC code for each organization.
 Describe each level of biological organization.
 Levels of Biological Organization (From Organism
II. CONTENT
to Biosphere)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 83-85
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning EASE Biology. Module 6.
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource writing materials, posters and pictures

IV. PROCEDURES Integrative- content based

A. Reviewing previous lesson  What are the levels of organization in an


or presenting the new organism?
lesson
Establishing a purpose for  Are there other levels of organization that are
B.
the Lesson bigger than organisms?
C.  Do the activity“Level Up!”
 Procedure:
1. Study the figure and answer the questions
Presenting examples /
below.
instances of the
new lesson

12
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
1. What are the higher levels of biological
organization?
Discussing new concepts 2. Based on the figure, which is the smallest unit
and practicing in biological organization?
new skills #1 3. How is population differfrom organism?
4. How will you describe community?
5. What makes up an ecosystem?
6. Which is the highest level of biological
organization?
7. Describe the biosphere.
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. The following diagram is usually used to describe the
basic units of ecology.

Finding practical
applications of concepts
and skills in daily living

What do the concentric circles in the diagram indicate?


How do these reflect the interactions between the different
units of ecology?
H. Making generalizations and
What are the higher levels of biological organization?
abstractions
How will you describe each level?
about the lesson

I. Evaluating Learning

13
Answer: B, D, A, C, E
J. Additional activities for
Make your own Illustration of higher levels of biological
application or
organization. Use pictures or drawings for the illustration.
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with otherteachers?

14
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 the difference between animal and plant cells
The learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Employ appropriate techniques using the compound
microscope to gather data about very small objects
C.
Differentiate plant and animal cells according to presence
Learning Competencies / or absence of certain organelles; S7LT-IId-4
Objectives Objectives:
Write the LC code for each 1. Describe a cell
2. Name the different parts of the plant and animal cell.
3. Compare plant cell with the animal cell.

Animal and Plant Cells


II. CONTENT 1. Introduction of a cell
1. Comparison plant and animal cell parts

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 76-77
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 87-91
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials https://www.google.com.ph.
from Learning
www.make me genius.com
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource picture, powerpoint

IV. PROCEDURES Constructivism – direct instruction

A.  What instrument helps us investigate or observed very


Reviewing previous lesson
small objects or specimens?
or presenting the new
lesson  How many parts of the microscope can you remember?

Look at the following pictures.


Establishing a purpose for 1. Identify the show pictures.
B. 2. Give the function or the use of each.
the Lesson

15
C. Do the activity
“Comparing plant and animal cells”

What is a Cell?

The cell is the basic structural and functional unit of all


known living organisms. It is the smallest unit of life that is
classified as a living thing, and is often called the building
block of life.[1] Organisms can be classified
as unicellular (consisting of a single cell; including
most bacteria)
or multicellular (including plants and animals). Humans
contain about 10 trillion (1013) cells. Most plant and animal
cells are between 1 and 100 µm and therefore are visible
only under the microscope.[2]
Presenting examples /
instances of the The cell was discovered by Robert Hooke in 1665. The cell
new lesson
theory, first developed in 1839 by Matthias Jakob
Schleiden andTheodor Schwann, states that all organisms
are composed of one or more cells, that all cells come from
preexisting cells, that vital functions of an organism occur
within cells, and that all cells contain the hereditary
information necessary for regulating cell functions and for
transmitting information to the next generation of cells.[3]

The word cell comes from the Latin cella, meaning "small
room". The descriptive term for the smallest living biological
structure was coined by Robert Hooke in a book he
published in 1665 when he compared the cork cells he saw
through his microscope to the small rooms monks lived
in.[4]

16
A cell can be defined as the "structural and functional unit
of life". Let us understand the cell through the following
analogy. Think of your school building. Each building is
made up of a number of classrooms. Each classroom has
four walls. Each wall is made up of bricks. Structurally,
each brick is the smallest unit of your school building. So is
the cell with respect to the body, that is, the structural unit.
To understand the functional significance of a cell, let us
consider the order of a class. Each class has a number of
students. Out of these students some are monitors. These
monitors report to the class teacher who looks after the
overall functioning of his/her class. The smallest functional
unit of a class is a student. So is the cell for the body. The
bodies of both plants and animals are made of cells.
However, they are not a carbon copy of each other.

 A video clip about cell will be shown


(www.make me genius.com)
 Show a picture of the plant cell

A. PLANT CELL

B. ANIMAL CELL

D. Discussing new concepts


and practicing  Group presentation
new skills #1  Analysis

17
1. Compare the shape of a plant cell with that of an
animal cell
2. Which cell parts are found in both cells?
3. Which are present only in animal cells?
4. Which are present only in plant cells?
5. Based on your observations and study of plant
and animal cells, cite differences and similarities
between them.

Class processing/discussion
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Compare plant and animal cell by creating a Venn
diagram

Developing mastery present in Present in


both Plant present
(Leads to Formative plant cell
and plant cell
Assessment 3) only
Animal only
cell

G.  What must be present in a mobile phone to


Finding practical sustain its life?
applications of concepts  Cell is so minute and yet very powerful. If one
and skills in daily living of the million cells in our body is injured, what
will happen to you/us? explain
H.  What is/are the simplest word/words that you can
use to describe the cell?
 What makes plant and animal cell different? The
same?

Answer:

Structure Cell A Cell B


Cell wall x √
Making generalizations and Plasma membrane √ √
abstractions Chloroplast x √
about the lesson Nucleus √ √
Centrioles √ x

Differences between plant and animal cells:

 Plant and animal cells differ in shape and in some


parts. Plant cells are rectangular or angular or rigid in
shape, while animal cells are rounded and somewhat
irregular.

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 Plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts which animal
cells do not have. Animal cells have centrioles which
plant cells do not have.
Similarity between plant and animal cells:

 Both plant and animal cells have common parts


namely: the nucleus, plasma membrane, cytoplasm,
the mitochondrion, rough and smooth endoplasmic
reticulum, Golgi body, vacuole/vesicle and lysosome.

1. Which of the following structures can only be found in a


plant cell?
A. Centrioles C. Chloroplast
B. Mitochondrion D. Nucleus
2. The following parts are all present in an animal cell,
EXCEPT
A. Cell membrane B. Cell wall
B. C. Centrioles D. Ribosomes
3. Which of the following cell structures are present in both
plants and animal?
A. Cell wall B. chloroplast
C. centrioles D. nucleus
4. The following structures are all present in a plant cell,
EXCEPT
A. Cell wall B. Centrioles
I. Evaluating Learning C. Mitochondrion D. Ribosomes
Use the following options to answer the next question.
I. absence of centrioles
II. irregular shape
III. presence of cell wall
IV. angular and rigid shape
V. absence of chloroplast
5. You are asked to identify an unknown slide. Which could
help you identify it to be an animal cell?
A. I and III
B. II and V
C. I and IV
D. III and IV
Answer:
1. C 2. B 3. D 4. B 5. D

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learner who have caught
up with the lesson
D.

19
No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

20
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
the difference between animal and plant cells
The learners should be able to:
Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects
C.
Explain why the cell is considered the basic structural
and functional unit of all organisms;
S7LT-IIe-5
Learning Competencies /
Objectives
Write the LC code for each Objectives:

1. Identify the basic parts of the cell.


2. Discuss the functions of the basic parts of the cells.

Animal and Plant Cells


II. CONTENT

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 79-81
Learner's Materials
2. pp.90-91
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://www.google.com.ph
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource picture, worksheet

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – interactive instruction

A.  What organelles are found in both cells (animal


Reviewing previous lesson
and plant cell)?
or presenting the new
 What organelles are found only in both cells?
lesson
 Describe cell.
Do the activity “ My Parts, My Functions”
View a video clip about cell parts and its function.
Establishing a purpose for www.makeme.genius.com
B.
the Lesson

Procedure:

21
1. Study the figures below.
C. 2. Read the selection below and answer the
questions that follow.
Study closely Figures 1 and 2. These are
diagrammatic presentations of plant and animal cells
and their parts.

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

A cell has three basic parts: the nucleus,


plasma membrane and cytoplasm. The nucleus
is the part of cells easily seen under the light
microscope. It is very important because it
controls all the activities of the other parts that
occur within the cell. The nucleus contains
materials that play a role in heredity.
The plasma membrane surrounds the whole
of the cell. It separates what is inside the cell from
outside it. It also controls substances that go into
and out of the cell.
The cytoplasm consists of a jelly-like
substance where all the other parts of the cell are
located. It does not however, include the area
where the nucleus is. Many different activities of
the cell occur in the cytoplasm. You have seen
that plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts

22
that are not found in animal cells. The cell wall is
made of stiff material that forms the outermost
part of plant cells. This gives shape and
protection to them.
Plants make their own food. Chloroplasts are
important in plant cells because it is where food
is made. It contains chlorophyll which absorbs
energy from the sun to make food for plants.
Vacuoles are present in both plant and animal
cells. In plant cells, they are large and usually
occupy more than half of the cell space. They
play a role in storing nutrients and increasing cell
size during growth. Some plant vacuoles contain
poisonous substances. Vacuoles also store
water, thereby maintaining rigidity to cells and
provide support for plants to stand upright. Plant
cell vacuoles are responsible for the crisp
appearance of fresh vegetables. Vacuoles in
animal cells are small and are called vesicles.
They serve as storage of water and food and
function in the excretion of waste materials.

D.  Group presentation
 Analysis
1. What are the three basic parts of a
cell?
2. What do you think will happen to the
cell if plasma membrane does not
Discussing new concepts function properly?
and practicing 3. What is the purpose of the cell wall in
new skills #1 plants?
4. Why are there several chloroplasts in
the plant cell?
5. How would vacuoles in plants serve as
defense against animals that eat them?
 Class processing/discussion

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. In the school teachers, administrators, utilities
have their own role or function. Even in the
Finding practical
classroom some of you have their duties and
applications of concepts
and skills in daily living responsibilities to perform. What organelle of the
plant and animal cells do you think resembles
you as a student and why?
H. Making generalizations and
abstractions
about the lesson  What are the basic parts of a cell?

23
 What are the functions of each part
Directions: Choose the letter of the correct
answer.
1. Which of the following parts allow different
activities of the cell to happen?
A. vacuoles B. lysosome
C. cytoplasm D. vesicle
2. Which part allows or prevents substances to
go into and out of this cell?
A. cell membrane B. cytoplasm
C. mitochondria D. nucleus
3. Which is the control center of this cell?
A. cell membrane B. cytoplasm
C. mitochondria D. nucleus
4. The part of the cell that carries proteins to
I. Evaluating Learning different parts of the cell is the ______.
A. cell wall B. endoplasmic
reticulum
C. ribosome D. vacuole
5. The part of the cell that converts energy in
food to a form usable to the cell is the
_______.
A. endoplasmic reticulum B.
mitochondrion
C. nucleus D. vacuole

Answer:

1. C 2. A 3. D 4. B 5. B

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E.

24
Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

25
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
the difference between animal and plant cells
The learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards employ appropriate techniques using the compound
microscope to gather data about very small objects
C. Explain why the cell is considered the basic structural and
functional unit of all organisms; 7LT-IIe-5
Learning Competencies / Objectives:
Objectives 1. Describe a plant cell observed under the light
Write the LC code for each microscope.
2. Identify observable parts of a plant cell.
3. Draw onion cells as seen through the light microscope.
4. Explain the role of microscopes in cell study.

II. CONTENT

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 79-81
Learner's Materials
2. pp.91-94
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://ww.google.com.ph
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource microscope, slide, pencil and worksheet

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based - experiment

nn Reviewing previous lesson


Pick any two from the different organelles of the cell( plant
or presenting the new
or animal) and give the function or role of each.
lesson
I N V E S T I GA T E
 Define Investigate
 How do you investigate?
Establishing a purpose for
B.
the Lesson  What are the techniques that you always use when
you are investigating something?

C. Presenting examples /
Do the activity “ Investigating Plant Cells”
instances of the
new lesson

26
Note: the onion skin cell must have been prepared by the
teacher beforehand.

Procedure:
1. Examine the onion skin slide under the low power
objective (LPO).
2. Shift to the high power objective (HPO).
Remember: Raise the objectives a little and look to
the side while changing objectives!
3. Remove the slide from the stage. You can now stain the
onion cells with iodine solution.
Iodine Stains! Be careful not to spill it on your skin
and clothing!
4. Using a dropper, place one or two drops of iodine solution
along one edge of the cover slip. Place a piece of tissue
paper on the other edge of the cover slip. The tissue paper
will absorb the water, and iodine solution spreads out under
the cover slip until the whole specimen is covered with stain

(Figure 4).
5. Examine the stained onion cells under the LPO and
HPO.
6. Draw three to four onion cells as seen under the HPO.
Label the parts you have identified. Indicate how much the
cells are magnified.

D.  Individual Performance
 Analysis:
1. Describe the onion cells.
2. Did you observe any change in the image of onion cells
before and after staining?
Discussing new concepts 3. How did the iodine solution affect the image of the onion
and practicing cells?
new skills #1 4. What parts of the onion cell can you identify?
5. Did you see the chloroplast? Why?
6. Of what importance is the contribution of the microscope
in the study of cells?
 Class processing/discussion

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
Draw the onion skin cell and label its parts based from
(Leads to Formative
your investigation.
Assessment 3)
G. Old men and women and even of any age sometimes
Finding practical have the difficulty of reading and observing things due to
applications of concepts eye defects. If that is the case, what instrument is used by
and skills in daily living them to help them do their work? Is the eyeglasses and
microscope performing the same thing? How?

27
H. Making generalizations and 1. What are the observable parts of an onion cell?
abstractions 2. How does the microscope help in the study of cell?
about the lesson
Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer.

1. Adding iodine solution to the onion cell preparation


makes the cells______
A. big B. small.
C. less visible. D. more visible.
2. Which of the following plant cell parts is not found in
onion cells?
A. chloroplast B. cell wall
C. vacuole D. mitochondrion
3. All of the following parts of an onion cell can be seen
I. Evaluating Learning easily using a light microscope and iodine stain,
EXCEPT
A. cell wall C. nucleus
B. cytoplasm D. ribosomes
4. Why onion cells lack of chloroplast?
A. It is a bulb that grows below the ground
B. It doesn’t have cytoplasm
C. It is a storage of food
D. It is not a plant

Answer:
1. D 2. A 3. D 4. A
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did Use or discover
which I wish to share with other
teachers?

28
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  The parts and functions of the compound
microscope.
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Identify parts of the microscope and their functions
Learning Competencies /
S7LT-IIa-1/
Objectives
 Identify the parts and functions of the microscope.
Write the LC code for each

II. CONTENT Parts and Functions of the Light Microscope

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 85-87
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 95-98
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=zoom+in+picture
Resource (LR) portal
Manila paper, pentel pen, picture of a light microscope
B. Other Learning Resource
with parts and functions, real light microscope
Inquiry based – building knowledge community
IV. PROCEDURES
model
A. Reviewing previous lesson
or presenting the new  How do you use the microscope?
lesson
 Ask the students to bring out their cellphones and
Establishing a purpose for take some pictures. Then, ask them to zoom in
B.
the Lesson the picture. Facilitate the activity through the
questions on LG p 36.
C. Presenting examples /  Do the activity Part I in LM pp 85-87 “The
instances of the Microscope, Its Parts and their Functions”
new lesson  Procedure

29
1. Get the microscope from its box or the
cabinet. Do this by grasping the curved arm
with one hand and supporting the base with
the other hand.
2. Carry it to your table or working place.
Remember to always use both hands when
carrying the microscope.
3. Put the microscope down gently on the
laboratory table with its arm facing you. Place it
about 7 centimeters away from the edge of the
table.
4. Wipe with tissue paper or old t-shirt the metal
parts of the microscope.
5. Figure 1 shows a light microscope that most
schools have. Study and use this to locate
different parts of the microscope.
6. Look for the revolving nosepiece. Note that
objectives are attached it.
You should know that there are lenses inside the
objectives.
7. Find the coarse adjustment. Slowly turn it
upwards, then downwards.
8. Looking from the side of the microscope, raise
the body tube. Then, turn the revolving nosepiece
in any direction until the LPO is back in position.
You will know an objective is in position
when it clicks. Note that the revolving
nosepiece makes possible the changing from
one objective to another.
9. Locate the eyepiece. Notice also that it is
marked with a number and an
x. Know that the eyepiece further magnifies
the image of the object that has been
magnified by the objective. If the eyepiece is
cloudy or dusty, wipe it gently with a piece of
lens paper.
10. Look through the eyepiece. Do you see
anything?
11. Now, locate the mirror. Then, position the
microscope towards diffused light from the
windows or ceiling light. Look through the
eyepiece and
with the concave mirror (with depression)
facing up, move it until you see a bright circle
of light.
Only use lens paper in cleaning the lenses of the
eyepiece and the objectives.
The bright circle of light is called the field of
view of the microscope. Adjust the position of
the mirror so that it is not glaring to the
eyes. Practice viewing through the microscope
using both eyes open. This willreduce eyestrain.
12. Locate the diaphragm. While looking into
the eyepiece, rotate the diaphragm to the next
opening. Continue to do so until the original
opening you used is back under the hole in the
stage.
13. Find the inclination joint.
14. Grasp the arm and slowly pull it towards you.
Sit down and try looking through the eyepiece.

30
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
24. What are the functions of the base and the arm of
the microscope?
25. What have you observed about the objectives?
26. What is accomplished by turning the coarse
adjustment upwards? downwards?
27. What is the other function of the revolving
Discussing new concepts nosepiece?
and practicing 28. Which part connects the eyepiece to the
new skills #1 revolving nosepiece with the objectives?
29. What are the two functions of the eyepiece?
30. Describe the function of the mirror
31. What do you notice as you change the
diaphragm openings?
32. What can you infer as to the function of the
diaphragm?
33. What parts of the microscope are being
connected by the inclination joint?
34. What does this movement do?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing Video clip: How to Use the Light Microscope
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
Select some students to demonstrate the proper ways of
applications of concepts
using the microscope.
and skills in daily living
H. Making generalizations and
What are the different parts of the microscope?
abstractions
What are the functions of each part?
about the lesson
Name the parts of the microscope by choosing it from the
box.

I. Evaluating Learning

J. Additional activities for


application or Bring newspaper and pair of scissors tomorrow.
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C.

31
Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with otherteachers?

32
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  The parts and functions of the compound
microscope.
The learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Employ appropriate techniques using the compound
microscope to gather data about very small objects.
C. Focus specimens using the compound microscope
S7LT-IIb-2/
Learning Competencies /
 Focus the specimen using the compound
Objectives
microscope
Write the LC code for each
 Compare the image of the object seen by the
unaided eye and seen under the microscope
 How to Use the Light Microscope: Making a Wet
II. CONTENT
Mount and Observing Specimens

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 87-88
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 99-100
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
http://bioserv.fiu.edu/~walterm/human_online/microscope_index/micro_text/microscopy
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
microscope, newspaper, scissors, forceps/tweezers, glass
B. Other Learning Resource
slide, medicine dropper, tap water, cover slip

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson


 What are the parts of the microscope and how does
or presenting the new
each part function?
lesson
 The students will be asked to describe the picture.
They will be informed that it is not easy to view
Establishing a purpose for specimens in a microscope and there are proper
B.
the Lesson steps to be followed in focusing the specimens.

33
C.  Do the activity Part 2 in LM pp 87-88 “Making a Wet
Mount and Observing Specimens”
 Procedure
Making a Wet mount
1. Cut out a small letter “e” from a newspaper page.
2. Using forceps or tweezers place it in the center of
a glass slide in an upright position
3. Add a drop of tap water over the cut letter
4. Position the cover slip at 45˚ with one side
touching one edge of the water on the slide.
5. Slowly lower the other edge of the cover slip until
it rests on the water and the printed letter.
6. If bubbles become present (the perfect circles you
see on your preparation), remove or minimize it by
gently tapping the cover slip with the eraser-end of a
pencil. Make the bubble move towards the edge of
the cover slip.
Observing Specimens
1. Put the slide on the stage. Make sure that the
Presenting examples / letter is in the center of the hole in the stage and
instances of the under the LPO.
2. Watching from the side, carefully lower the body
new lesson
tube until the end of the LPO almost touches the
cover slip.
3. Look through the eyepiece. Slowly turn the coarse
adjustment upwards to raise the objective until the
letter “e” appears. Continue until you see the letter
clearly. This would indicate that you have focused it
already.
4. Hold it firmly with the stage clips.
5. Look through the microscope again. Slowly move
the slide to the right, then to the left.
6. Move the slide to the center. To shift to the HPO,
raise the body tube first. Looking from the side, turn
the revolving nosepiece to put the HPO in place.
Then, using the fine adjustment slowly lower the
objective till it almost touches the cover slip. Looking
through the eyepiece, turn the fine adjustment until
you see the clearest image.
7. Look through the eyepiece again. Then, shift to
the LPO, and scanner carefully observing the image
of the letter.
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
35. What makes the letter “e” suitable for observation
under the microscope?
36. How will you describe the position of letter “e” as
Discussing new concepts seen in the microscope?
and practicing 37. Compare the image of the letter “e” that you see
new skills #1 using your unaided eye with that you see through
the microscope.
38. To which direction does the image move after you
moved the slide to the right? To the left?
39. Why do you have to watch from the side when
changing objectives?

34
40. Why should the fine adjustment knob be used only
with the HPO?
41. In which objective/s can you see the whole letter
“e”?
42. What are the advantages and disadvantages of
using the HPO?
43. In which of the objective is the light darker?
Brighter?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical The students will be given some prepared slides for them to
applications of concepts observe. They will be asked to operate the microscope
and skills in daily living properly to view the image clearly.
H. Making generalizations and
How will you describe the image of specimen observed
abstractions
under the microscope?
about the lesson
Directions: Choose the letter of the best answer.
1. Which of the following can be observed using the light
microscope?
A. acacia bark C. piece of stone
B. five peso coin D. tip of a plant leaf
2. An animal cell being observed is seen at the topmost part
of the field of view under the LPO. If you want to center the
specimen, which direction should you move the slide?
A. left side C. right side
B. towards the user D. away from the
user
3. Refer to the pictures below:
I. Evaluating Learning A. B.

Which of the two above shows letter “e” seen under the
microscope?
4. All of the following will be observed in the image of an
object studied under the microscope, EXCEPT
A. inverted C. magnified
B. moves in opposite direction D. moves in the same
direction
5. When using the high power objective, you should not
adjust the:
A. Diaphragm C. Coarse adjustment
B. Fine adjustment D. Stage clips
J. Additional activities for
Suggest ways on how microscope contributes to the study of
application or
different objects and organisms.
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%

35
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

36
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  The parts and functions of the compound
microscope.
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Focus specimens using the compound microscope
Learning Competencies /
7LT-IIb-2/
Objectives
 Calculate the magnification of a specimen studied
Write the LC code for each
under the microscope.
How to Use the Light Microscope: Magnifying
II. CONTENT
Power of the Light Microscope

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 88
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 100
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource microscope, prepared slide, pen and paper

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson  How will you describe the position of letter “e” as
or presenting the new seen in the microscope?
lesson
Establishing a purpose for
B.  What are the functions of the objectives and the
the Lesson
eyepiece of a microscope?
C. Presenting examples /  Do the activity Part 3 in LM p 88 “Magnifying
instances of the Power of the Light Microscope
new lesson Procedure

37
The students will be grouped based on the
number of available microscope. Each group will
be given a microscope and a prepared slide.
1. Manipulate the microscope to focus the
specimen clearly.
2. If you see the specimen clearly, examine the
numbers indicated on the eyepiece and objective
that you used.
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
44. Describe the image of a specimen under the
microscope?
45. Does it magnified?
46. Which part/s of the microscope made the
specimen looks bigger?
Discussing new concepts 47. The magnification of a specimen can be
and practicing calculated by multiplying the number found in the
new skills #1 eyepiece with the number found on the objective
being used.
48. What is the number found in the eyepiece that
you used?
49. What is the number found in the objective that
you used?
50. How much is the specimen you are now viewing
magnified?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical If a cell being observed has been magnified 200x under
applications of concepts the HPO, what is the magnifying power of the eyepiece
and skills in daily living used?
H. The magnification of a specimen can be calculated by
Making generalizations and multiplying the number found in the eyepiece with the
abstractions number found on the objective being used. For example, if
about the lesson a specimen is viewed using a 10x objective and a 10x
eyepiece it will be magnified 100 times.

Directions: Choose the letter of the best answer.

1. Which two parts of the light microscope magnify the


image of an object?
A. eyepiece and mirror
B. eyepiece and objectives
C. objectives and mirror
D. objectives and diaphragm
2. A plant cell is viewed using a 10X eyepiece and a 43x
I. Evaluating Learning
HPO. How much will the cell be magnified?
A. 4.3X B. 33X C. 53X D. 430X
3. A student examined an object under the microscope.
The eyepiece is 5x while the LPO is 10x. How many times
was the object magnified?
A. 5x B. 10x C. 50x D. 500x
4. A drawing of a cell indicates that it has been magnified
450x under the HPO. If the HPO is 45x, what is the
magnifying power of the eyepiece?
A. 5x B. 10x C. 50x D. 100x

38
5. You were given a slide which contained a
microorganism. You were asked to examine the
microorganism under the HPO. Your eyepiece is 10x and
the HPO is 45x. How many times was the microorganism
magnified?
A. 10x B. 45x C. 100x D. 450x

J. Additional activities for


application or Suggest ways on how to take care the microscope.
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

39
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  The parts and functions of the compound
microscope.
The learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects.
C. Focus specimens using the compound microscope
Learning Competencies / 7LT-IIb-2/
Objectives  Handle the microscope properly.
Write the LC code for each  Follow the proper steps in handling the
microscope before and after used.
 How to Use the Light Microscope: How to Take
II. CONTENT
Care the Microscope

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages p. 89
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 100-102
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials NSTIC Science Manual. Biology Science Manual 413M. 4
from Learning
The Compound Microscope.
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource microscope, science books, Internet

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson  How do we calculate the magnification of a


or presenting the new specimen?
lesson

 After every using the microscope, how will you


Establishing a purpose for
B. store it? Ask students to suggest on how to store
the Lesson
microscope properly.

C.  Do the activity in LM p 89 “Handle with Care”

40
Procedure
1. Turn the revolving nosepiece until the LPO is in
place.
2. Lower down the body tube so that the end of
the objective is approximately 1cm above the
stage.
3. Position the clips so that they do not extend
Presenting examples / beyond the sides of the stage.
instances of the 4. Rotate the diaphragm until the smallest opening
new lesson is in position.
5. Let the mirror stand on its edge with the
concave side facing the user.
6.Remove the eyepiece from the body tube and
place it in the socket.
7. Put back the microscope’s plastic cover.
8. Carry the microscope properly and put it back
in its case or storage cabinet.
D.  Discuss the answers in the activity given.
 Analysis:
51. Why do you have to put the LPO in place and not
the HPO?
52. Why is it needed to have at least 1cm distance
between the objective and stage?
Discussing new concepts 53. Why do the stage clips should not extend beyond
the sides of the stage before storing the
and practicing
new skills #1 microscope?
54. What could be avoided if you let the mirror stand
on its edge with the concave side facing the
user?
55. What is the proper way of handling the
microscope?
56. Why is it important for us to know how to take
care the microscope?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing Video clip: Proper Handling of Microscope
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Microscope is an important investigative tool in studying
objects and organisms around us. It is important for us to
Finding practical
know how to take care of this tool for an efficient and
applications of concepts
longer use.
and skills in daily living
Suggest ways and other practices that can help to take
care of the microscope.
H. Making generalizations and What are the proper ways in handling and storing the
abstractions microscope?
about the lesson Why do we need to take care of the microscope?

Directions: Draw a smiley face ( ) if the statement


shows a proper way of taking care the microscope, and
sad face ( ) if if it is not.
_____1. Check the microscope before and after use.
I. Evaluating Learning
_____2. Store the microscope in a clean and dry place.
_____3. Before storing the microscope, lower down the
body tube until the objective touches the stage.
_____4. To carry the microscope, grasp the arm with one
hand and support the base with the other hand.

41
_____5. While observing wet mounts, you may use the
inclination joint to tilt the microscope.

J. Additional activities for


What other objects or organisms are usually studied under
application or
the microscope?
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with otherteachers?

42
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms that can only be seen through the
microscope, many of which consist of only one cell
The Learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects

C. Identify beneficial and harmful microorganisms. S7LT-IIe-6


 Observe life forms other than plants and animals
Learning Competencies / using magnifying lens.
Objectives  Share what you know about these life forms with
Write the LC code for each classmates and group mates.
 Compare them with known living things

II. CONTENT Living Things other than Plants and Animals

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 94-98
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 103-107
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource Live specimens, magnifying lens

IV. PROCEDURES

A.

Reviewing previous lesson


or presenting the new lesson

43
 Have you eaten any of the following food?
 Can you identify some of these?
 Where do you think they come from?
 Have you seen mushroom? molds? and algae?
Establishing a purpose for
B.
the Lesson  How will you classify those organisms? Plants or
Animals
C. Activity: Are these also plants?

1. Look at the live specimen shown by your teacher which


is like the photo below:

Figure 1

2. Look at the second live specimen your teacher


will show you. It is similar to the photo below:

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

Figure 2

3. Compare the two specimens shown by your teacher.


4.Observe the third specimen to be shown by your teacher.
She will show you something like this photo grabbed from
an internet source.

Figure 3

Observe these four other things your teacher prepared for


you to observe:

44
a. b. c. d.

Figure 4

D. For Figure1.
1. Is it a plant?
2. What is its name?
3. What is the reason for your answer in Q1?

For Figure 2
4. Is it a plant?
5. What is its name?
6. What is your reason for your answer in Q4?
7. Compare the two specimens/ pictures, how are they
different?
Discussing new concepts
8. How are they alike?
and practicing
9. Do you know of other living things like the two above?
new skills #1
10. How did you know about them?
11. Write their names if you know them.

For Figure 3
12. What do you think it is?
13. Is it a plant?
14. Give a reason for your answer in Q 13.

For Figure 4
15. Describe what you see in each (a), (b) or (c) and (d).
16. What do you think are the growths on a and b or c?
17. How about the growths?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
What other living things can be found inyour community?
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. On your way to school, you observed an organism which is
Finding practical
doubtfully plant. What are you going to do to make sure
applications of concepts
what
and skills in daily living
really it is?
H.  What other life forms other than plants and animals
Making generalizations and have you observed?.
abstractions  How will you compare them with known living
about the lesson things?

Directions: Enumerate the plant-like parts and


I. Evaluating Learning characteristics that are present to other organisms that are
really not plants.
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

45
V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching strategies
worked well? Why did these
worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

46
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms that can only be seen through the
microscope, many of which consist of only one cell
The Learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects

C. Identify beneficial and harmful microorganisms.


S7LT-IIe-6
Learning Competencies /  Hunt for life forms that are doubtfully plants;
Objectives  Collect specimens of these life forms;
Write the LC code for each  Observe these life forms using a magnifying lens;
 Describe/draw them; and
 Describe their habitats.
 Topic:
Living Things other than Plants and Animals
II. CONTENT
 Sub-topic:
Other Living Things in the Community

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 98-100
Learner's Materials pp. 107-109
2.
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
Clear plastic bag, Plastic gloves, Forceps, tweezers or
B. Other Learning Resource
tongs, Magnifying lens

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Complete the key concept below.


There are living things or organisms that cannot be readily
Reviewing previous lesson identified by the usual parts of plants we recognize like
or presenting the new lesson __________, (roots) ____________, (stems) __________,
(leaves) ____________, (flowers) or _________ (fruits)
though they may have the green color and some plant-like

47
parts. There are also living things that we can see only
when we use ___________ (magnifying) lenses.
If you are going to ask by someone to classify organisms
Establishing a purpose for
B. whether it is plant or animal, how will you classify them?
the Lesson
What will be your bases in classifying them?
C. Activity: What other living things are found in the school
grounds?
1. Bring the first three materials listed when you go
out into the school
Presenting examples / grounds. Look for other things that are plant-like in the
instances of the school
new lesson grounds.Your teacher will suggest where to go and what
to collect.
2. Go back to the classroom and observe what you
collected with a magnifying lens.
3. Draw it.
D. 1. Describe what you see.
2. Describe the place where you found it.
3. What do you think it needs to live and grow?
4. Does it look like any of the organisms you saw
Discussing new concepts yesterday?
and practicing If so, which one?
new skills #1 5. How are they different from the living things you already
know, like plants?
Note: The teacher will give the names of all the organisms
they observed in Activities 1 and 2: mushrooms, molds,
algae and lichens)
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
Mushrooms and molds are different from plants. In
applications of concepts
what ways they are the same?
and skills in daily living
H. 1. What are the characteristics of organisms that you
observed?
Making generalizations and
2. Describe the place where you found the organisms.
abstractions
3. What do they need to live and grow?
about the lesson
4. How are they differ from plants?

Directions: Choose the letter of the BEST answer.


1. Fungi get their food by ________organic material.
A. decomposing C. drinking
B. eating D. growing
2. The green alga, Caulerpa, and mushrooms both
have some characteristics similar to plants. What
are these characteristics common to both that are
also found in plants?
I. Evaluating Learning
I .Green color for food-making
II .Stem-like parts
III .Spores
IV. Fruit-like parts
A. I and II B. II and III C. I and III D. II and
IV
3. Just like many living things, fungi have certain needs
to survive. What are these needs?

48
I Food II Air and water III Sunlight and soil IV
Water
A. I and II B. II and III C. I and III D. II and
IV
4. Fungi cannot make their own food. What is the effect
of their food getting activities?
A. Release of oxygen
B. Production of starch
C. Trapping of solar energy
D. Decomposition of living things
5. What characteristic differentiates fungi, algae and
bacteria from the plants aside from their small size?
A. Most do not make their own food unlike plants. .
B. They cause diseases while plants and animals have
many uses.
C. They are at the base of the food chain while animals
are at the top.
D. They do not have true roots, true leaves, true stems,
fruits and flowers.
Answer:1. A 2. D 3. A 4. A 5. D
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching strategies
worked well? Why did these
worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

49
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms that can only be seen through the
microscope, many of which consist of only one cell
The Learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects

C. Identify beneficial and harmful microorganisms. S7LT-IIe-6


 Classify observed organisms as fungi, algae and
Learning Competencies /
bacteria.
Objectives
 Differentiate fungi, algae and bacteria.
Write the LC code for each
 Identify the uses and harmful effects of fungi, algae
and bacteria.
 Topic:
Living Things other than Plants and Animals
II. CONTENT
 Sub-topic:
Fungi, Protist and Bacteria

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 100-101
2. Learner's Materials Pages p. 109
Textbook
3.
Pages
4. Additional Materials from
Learning
Resource (LR) portal
Books, Internet, pen and paper, gathered information as
B. Other Learning Resource
homework

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based – knowledge building community model

A. Directions: Complete the key concept below.

Mushrooms and molds are different from plants because


Reviewing previous lesson or they are not _________ (green). They only have stem-like,
presenting the new lesson fruit-like and leaf-like parts just as plants do. Their bodies
are very much ______ (softer) and ______(smaller) than
plants.

50
Study the pictures below.

Establishing a purpose for the


B.
Lesson

How are plants and mushroom the same? How do they


differ?
C.
Activity: Fungi, Protists, Bacteria
1. On a table like the one below, enter the information
you gathered as homework the previous day.
2. List down your references.
Presenting examples / Name of Big Characteristics Uses/Benefits Harmful
instances of the Organism Group / Effects
Other
new lesson Examples

D. 1. What are the other big groups of living things aside from
plants and animals?
Discussing new concepts and 2. What are the similarities among these groups?
practicing 3. How are these big groups different from the groups of
new skills #1 animals and plants?
4. How do we benefit from these groups?
5. How do these groups affect us?
E. Discussing new concepts and
practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G.  What are the benefits that we can derive from
mushroom and seaweeds?
Finding practical applications
of concepts  What are some of the materials at home that are
usually attacked by molds? Are molds useful or
and skills in daily living
harmful? Explain your answer.

What are the other big groups of living things aside from plants and animals?
H. Expected Information:
Name of Big group/ Characteristics Uses/ Harmful
living thing or Other Benefits Effects
organism Examples
Mushroom Fungi / Not green; Food; Some
yeast, mold cannot make its decomposes species can
own food living matter cause
disease, e.g.
Making generalizations and athlete’s
foot,
abstractions ringworm;
about the lesson some are
poisonous
when eaten
Green algae, Protist (Algae)/ Has green, and Food for Some
e.g. Red algae, e.g., other colors; can humans; food considered
Caulerpaor ar- Kappaphycusor make their own for fish in pests in
arusep, Eucheuma food; some are ponds aquariums
one-celled, some and
are multicellular recreation
beaches

51
Lichen Partly fungus Algal part can Algal part
and partly alga photosynthesize; provides food
fungal part for the fungal
cannot part; fungal
part provides
a home for the
alga ; acts as
indicator of air
pollution;
lichens act as
seed bed or
spore bed

Molds Fungi Has root- Break down Responsible for


like, stem- once living spoiled food
like, fruit- matter into its
like parts; simplest
has spores components
Bacteria Bacteria or Can be Making May cause
Monera seen only fermented disease like TB,
when in products: also diarrhea,
colonies or decomposes pneumonia,
big once-living some sexually
numbers matter transmitted
diseases,
urinary tract
infection or UTI,
leprosy, typhoid,
rheumatic fever.

Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer.

1. Which is NOT an example of a fungus?


A. ginger B. mold C. mushroom
D. yeast
2. Fungi have been incorrectly classified as plants because
of their
A. effects B. examples C. physical
characteristicsD. uses
3. What is the benefit of fungus in pizza dough?
A. It makes the dough soft
I. Evaluating Learning
B. It makes the dough rise
C. it makes the dough brown
D. It makes the dough tastier
4. Which is the main responsible for spoiled food?
A. ginger B. mold C. mushroom
D. yeast
5. Which is mainly used in making fermented products and
decomposes once-living matter?
A. protists B. mold C. mushroom
D. bacteria

Answer: 1. A 2. C 3. B 4. B 5. D
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned 80%


A.
in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson

52
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching strategies
worked well? Why did these
worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or supervisor
can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

53
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms that can only be seen through the
microscope, many of which consist of only one cell
The Learners should be able to:
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects

C. Identify beneficial and harmful microorganisms. S7LT-IIe-6


 Prepare slides of the growths of molds on bread
Learning Competencies /
mold,
Objectives
 Observe these living things using a microscope.
Write the LC code for each
 Draw, label the parts and describe the function of
these parts of molds.
What Do These Living Things Look Like Under
II. CONTENT
the Microscope?

III. LEARNING RESOURCES Inquiry based - experiment

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 104-106
Learner's Materials pp. 110 -111
2.
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
Slides and cover slips, Dissecting needles (may be
improvised),Growth on decomposing banana, Bread with
B. Other Learning Resource
molds, Rotten potato, Dropper, Cotton, gauze or clean
absorbent cloth, Clean water

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson


or presenting the new lesson
Observe an old banana peelings and a bread with mold.
Establishing a purpose for
B.
the Lesson

54
What are their colors?
What organisms are present in the peelings and bread?
What do these organisms look like under the microscope?
C. Activity:
What Do These Living Things Look Like Under the
Microscope?
Part 1.
1. Get a piece of bread mold
2. Spread it with a needle until only a thin layer is on the
middle of the glass slide.
3. With the dropper, wet the spot with a drop of water.
4. Cover with the cover slip by putting down one side first
and gently laying down the cover slip until it is flat over
the specimen.
5. Place it on the microscope stage just under the low power
objective (LPO).
6. Draw what you see.
7. Focus until clear, then shift to the high power objective
Presenting examples /
(HPO).
instances of the
8. Draw what you see.
new lesson
Part 2.
Look at the figure below.

Figure 4. Parts of Mold


Compare the figure on your drawings.
Label your drawings.
Describe the function of these parts based on the picture.
D.
Discussing new concepts
1. How will you describe the specimen under the LPO?
and practicing
2. Describe the specimen under the HPO
new skills #1

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical Molds and bacteria usually cause food spoilage.
applications of concepts Suggest ways on how to prevent food from spoilage due to
and skills in daily living molds and bacteria.
H.  What are the parts of a mold?
Making generalizations and  What are the functions of these parts?
abstractions
about the lesson

55
Under the LPO, threadlike structures and two roundish,
yellowish forms may be observed.
Under the HPO, this yellowish, roundish form has smaller
round things inside and a stalk or stem-like part

Figure 3. Fungal hyphae (plural of hypha) – fine


branching, colorless threads; together they form a tangled
web called a mycelium
Direction: Label the parts of the mold.

I. Evaluating Learning

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I

56
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
 Employ appropriate techniques using the
compound
B. Performance Standards
 microscope to gather data about very small
objects
C.
Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction in terms
of:

7. 1 number of individuals involved;


Learning Competencies /
7. 2 similarities of offspring to parents; S7LT-IIg-7
Objectives
Objectives:
Write the LC code for each
 Define and characterize asexual reproduction
 Explain how an organism is
reproduce through Fission
and Budding

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT  Asexual reproduction ( Fission and Budding)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 108-109
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 115-117
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. http://www.cisd.org/cms/lib6/TX01917765/
Additional Materials
Centricity/Domain/1249/Sexual%20or%20Asexual.pdf
from Learning https://www.google.com.ph/search?biw=1366&bih=613&tbm=isch&sa
Resource (LR) portal =1&q=protococcus
+undergoing+binary+fission
Power point presentation or a video clip of reproduction
B. Other Learning Resource through fission of a Protococcus bacteria and budding of
a yeast.

57
IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – think-pair-share

A. Reviewing previous lesson


How is the observed organisms look under the
or presenting the new
microscope?
lesson
Establishing a purpose for Collect ideas from the learners of what they know about
B.
the Lesson “Asexual Reproduction”
C. Power point presentation of a
“FISSION” and “BUDDING”
1. Binary fission
 A cell splitting and becoming two cells (overview) Some
organisms like bacteria reproduce using binary fission.
They split in two, so one bacterium becomes two bacteria.
This always leads to daughter cells, and the offspring will
be identical to the parent.

 Binary fission is a method of asexual reproduction. It is


common in prokaryotes. A living cell divides into two cells.
The two cells should be identical, but since mutation can
occur, there might be slight differences. This process is
basically when a prokaryotic organism divides into two
parts. The parent cell divides to give rise to two daughter
cells, the daughter cells then each develop into individual
parent cells and give rise to two more daughter cells EACH,
and so on and so forth.

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

 Budding is similar to binary fission, but it is used by


plants and some animals, which cannot simply split in
half as bacteria can. It is when a small part of a plant or
animal breaks off and then, while they are separated
from their "mother", they start to grow until both the
"parent" and the "offspring" are the same size and both
are capable of budding again. This may happen many
more times.

58
D.  Ask the learners how the presented organisms
reproduced or increased in number.
 Analysis
A. 1. What happen to the Protococcus?
2. How does Protococcus reproduce?
3. What are the characteristics of the offspring of
Discussing new concepts protococcus?
and practicing 4. If Protococcus reproduced through fission, how
new skills #1 will you describe fission?
B. 1.How does budding in yeast cells differ from binary
fission in amoebas.
2. How does yeast reproduce?
3. What are the characteristics of the offspring of
the yeast?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical If fission is true to humans, what will happen to the
applications of concepts number of individuals in every family? What aspect of the
and skills in daily living family situation would probably be affected? Why?
H. Making generalizations and
How do organisms reproduced asexually through Fission?
abstractions
Budding?
about the lesson

budding fission asexual reproduction

Use the terms in the vocabulary box above to fill in the


blanks. You can use each term more than once.
I. Evaluating Learning 1. Some bacteria can reproduce asexually when their
single cells split in two, forming new individuals in a
process called _________.
2. Some simple organisms, such as hydras, sponges and
yeast, are able to reproduce asexually by_______by
allowing the offspring to begin as a growth on the parent.

59
3.
____________________________

4.
___________________________________________________

5. Reproduction that requires only one parent


_________________.
Answer: 1. Fission 2. Budding 3.
Fission
4. Budding 5. Asexual Reproduction
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

60
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Employ appropriate techniques using the compound
microscope to gather data about very small objects
C.
Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction in terms of:
number of individuals involved;
Learning Competencies /
Objectives similarities of offspring to parents; S7LT-IIg-7
Write the LC code for each Objectives:
1. Describe how Protococcus reproduce
2. Infer the Characteristics of the offspring of Protococcus

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT 1. Asexual reproduction (Binary Fission)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
Teacher's Guide
1. pp. 108-109
Pages
Learner's
2. pp. 115-117
Materials Pages
Textbook
3.
Pages
4. Additional https://www.google.com.ph/search?biw=
Materials from
1366&bih=613&tbm=isch&sa=
Learning
Resource (LR) 1&q=protococcus
portal +undergoing+binary+fission
scalpel or bale, microscopic slide, cover slip, microscope,
B. Other Learning Resource
tap water in clean bottle, and dropper

IV. PROCEDURES Constructivism – thinking skills

61
A. Reviewing previous lesson
What is fission?
or presenting the new
Why fission is considered an asexual reproduction?
lesson

Establishing a purpose for


B.
the Lesson
 Have you noticed a greenish growth on barks of
treenor on slippery concrete walkways.
 What could this oorganism be?
C. Do the exercise “Can One Become Two?”
Procedure:

Activity Proper
1. Put a small amount of scraping on a slide.
2. Add a drop of water.
3. With 2 dissecting needles, carefully tease or separate
the scraping and mix it with the water.
4. Gently place a cover slip on the slide. Examine the
scraping under the low power objective.

Look for a cell similar to the figure below.

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

Figure 1. Protococcus is a round single-celled green


alga.

5. Show your teacher the Protococcus cell that you have


located.
6. Protococcus, which is a prokaryote, reproduces by
dividing. Look for Protococcus cells that are dividing.
7. Shift to high power objective.
8. Draw the dividing Protococcus cells that you have
identified.

D.  Group presentation
 Analysis
1. How does the Protococcus look like under the
Discussing new concepts
microscope?
and practicing
2. What characteristics can you infer based from
new skills #1
what you observed?
3. How does the protococcus reproduced?
 Processing of the answers
E. Discussing new concepts
Show or draw the Protococcus (from the parent cell to its
and practicing
daughter cells)
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical If Fission is true to humans, what will happen to our
applications of concepts population?

62
and skills in daily living Will it become double or decrease? Why?
H. Making generalizations
and abstractions Characterize fission in every aspect.
about the lesson
1. All of the following organisms reproduce asexually by a
process called binary fission, EXCEPT
A. amoeba B. plant C. protococcus D.
paramecium
2. During fission, a single bacteria cell can copy its DNA and
divide into how many identical cells?
A. one B. Two C. three D.
four

I. Evaluating Learning

3. These bacteria cells reproduce through a process called


___________.
A. bilayers B. budding C. Binary fission D. Fragmentation

Answer:
1. B 2. B 3. C

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?

63
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other
teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards reproduction being both asexual or sexual

Employ appropriate techniques using the


compound microscope to gather data about
B. Performance Standards
very small objects

Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction in


terms of:
7. 1 number of individuals involved;
7. 2 similarities of offspring to parents;
Learning Competencies / Objectives S7LT-IIg-7
Write the LC code for each  Discuss how molds and fungi reproduce
asexually
 Explain how starfish grow and reproduce
asexually

Asexual Reproduction ( Spore formation and


II. CONTENT budding)
Rehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iTJU6bvg2Mgeneration)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 108-109
2. Learner's Materials Pages pp. 115-117
3. Textbook Pages
4.

B. Other Learning Resource Starfish and molds from bread

64
IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – peer teaching

A. Differentiate fission from budding.


Compare the two images below:
A.

Reviewing previous lesson or


B.
presenting the new lesson

 How many arms does a starfish


usually have?
Establishing a purpose for the
B.
Lesson  What grows on a bread that was left
uneaten for a period of time? Does the
color of it also changes as time goes
by?
C. A. Learners will watch a power point
presentation about spore formation and
regeneration or
B. Watch a video clip on regeneration and
spore formation.

3.SPORE FORMATION

 Fungi (for example, mushrooms) produce


spores, which may be asexual or sexual.
The asexual spores have the genetic
material inside, which allows them to make
a whole new organism identical to its
parent.

Presenting examples / instances of


the
new lesson

A mode of reproduction resembling


multiple fission, common among Protozoa, in
which the organism breaks up into a number
of pieces, or spores, each of which eventually
develops into an organism like the parent
form. The formation of reproductive cells
or spores, as in the growth of bacilli.

65
 REGENERATION
It is also known as FRAGMENTATION. Each
piece can grow into another individual. An example
is a starfish , an arm that breaks off from the body
can develop into a new one

D.
 Answer guide questions:
A. 1. What part of the starfish regrow after
being cut?
2. Why only that part grow? Why not all parts
of it?
Discussing new concepts and
B.1. What happen to a bread that was left
practicing
uneaten?
new skills #1
2. Can these organism grow as rapidly as the
Protococcus or more?
3. How the said organisms in the bread
grow?
 Individual performance

E. Discussing new concepts and


practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
Draw the regular starfish you know.
(Leads to Formative Assessment 3)
G.  If regeneration is true to humans, what part
of your body would you like to reproduce
and why?
Finding practical applications of  Why bread with molds should not be
concepts eaten?
and skills in daily living  Molds and bacteria can cause spoilage of
food. Suggest ways on how to prevent
food from being spoiled.

H.

66
Making generalizations and
What is the difference between budding and spore
abstractions
formation?
about the lesson

Match column A with column B

A B.
1. Form of asexual reproduction in a.
spore formation
which eachfragment of an organism
develops into a clone of its parent
2. Part of the sea star that regenerates b.
spirogyra
fast and becomes like the parent.
I. Evaluating Learning 3. A group of rapidly dividing cells c.
arms
develops on an organism and breaks
away to become a new organism.
4. This organism develops on old bread d.
regeneration
5. Another example of organism that e.
mold
undergoes spore formation.

J.

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned 80% in the


A.
evaluation
B. No. of learners who require additional
activities forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work? No. of
learners
who have caught up with the lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching strategies
worked well? Why did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter which
my principal or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized materials
did I
Use or discover which I wish to share
with other teachers?

67
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards reproduction being both asexual or sexual

Employ appropriate techniques using the compound


B. Performance Standards microscope to gather data about very small objects

Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction in terms of:


7. 1 number of individuals involved;
Learning Competencies / 7. 2 similarities of offspring to parents; (S7LT-IIg-7)
Objectives 1. Describe how potatoes reproduce.
Write the LC code for each 2. Explain how an organism reproduce through vegetation
3. Name some plants that propagate through vegetative
reproduction.

Asexual Reproduction ( Vegetative


II. CONTENT
Reproduction)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
Teacher's Guide
1. pp. 107-110
Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 112-118
Pages
Textbook
3.
Pages

68
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource worksheet, pen

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based – cyclic model

A. Reviewing previous lesson


What is the difference between spore formation
or presenting the new
and regeneration?
lesson

A. Jumbled Letter
Rearrange the jumbled letters to identify the
following statements.
Peodtnorruci – The ability of an organism to
produce new individual.
Frnofsipg – New organism produced.

B. Observe the pictures below.


Establishing a purpose for
B.
the Lesson

Questions:
1. What common characteristics are being shown
by the picture?
2. Based from the pictures how do the organisms
produced their offspring?
C.
Do the exercise “Can you grow new plants from
“eyes”?”

A potato tuber is a specialized stem which functions as a


food storage organ. Let us investigate how tubers can be
used in growing new plants.
Procedure:
1. Examine the potato. Can you see depressions?
These are the “eyes” or buds.

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

Figure
2. Cut the potato into pieces with each piece having an
“eye”. Observe how the cut pieces look.
3. Set aside the cut pieces for 2-3 days. Draw and describe
how the cut pieces look after 3 days.
4. After 3 days, plant each piece in a can, about 10-cm
deep. Set the tuber so that the “eye” points upward.
5. Set aside the cans in a shady area. Water the soil
everyday to keep it moist.
6. Report the progress of your work to your teacher.
Discuss your work in class.

69
After this activity, you may transplant the potato plants in
your school garden. You may harvest the potatoes within
10 weeks. Check how many potatoes you can harvest from
one plant.

D.  Group presentation
 Analysis:

Q1. Can you give a reason why it is better to plant the cut
Discussing new concepts pieces with the “eye” pointing upward?
and practicing Q2. How many “eyes” from each potato were you able to
get?
new skills #1
Q3. How many new shoots grew from each potato “eye”
you planted?
Q4. What is the advantage of using this type of
propagation?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G.  If you are a farmer, which would you choose as a
Finding practical plant , ginger or sugarcane? Why?
applications of concepts  Give other examples of organism that reproduce
and skills in daily living through spore formation and regeneration.

H. Making generalizations and


abstractions How will you characterize vegetative reproduction?
about the lesson

Directions: Read each statement carefully. Choose the


letter of the correct answer.

1. Which of the following structures are NOT involved in


asexual reproduction?
A. Gametes B. Tuber C. Stem D. Root
2. A farmer grew only one type of onion. All of the onion
plants died from the same disease. What can be said of
this onion plant population?
A. Only a few plants were resistant to the disease.
B. The onion plants were genetically identical
C. All of the onion plants were resistant to the
I. Evaluating Learning
disease.
D. The onion plants were genetically different from
each
other.
3. A farmer wants to propagate a good variety of a crop in a
way which maintained all its desirable traits. Which of the
following methods should be used?
A. Self-pollination
B. Vegetative propagation
C. Growing seeds produced from this variety
D. Cross-pollinating this crop with another good
variety and growing the seeds resulting from
the cross

70
4. How many parents are required for asexual
reproduction?
A one B. Two C. three D. four
5. Which of the following is a disadvantage for asexual
reproduction?
A. It has a limited ability to adapt
B. It can produce offspring quickly
C. It does not require a lot of energy
D. The offspring are genetically identical

Answer:
1. A 2. B 3.B 4. A 5.A

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

71
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
The learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Employ appropriate techniques using the compound
microscope to gather data about very small object
C. Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction in terms of:
7.1 number of individuals involved;
7.2 similarities of offspring to parents; S7LT-IIg-7
Learning Competencies /
Objectives
1. Identify the kinds or types of asexual reproduction.
Write the LC code for each
2. Give the advantages and disadvantages of asexual
reproduction.

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT 1. Asexual reproduction

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp. 107-110
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 112-118
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. https:www.you tube.com/watch?v=2WNoErUFAvl

72
Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource worksheet, pen

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – think-pair-share

A. Reviewing previous lesson


or presenting the new Name the different types of asexual reproduction.
lesson
A short game will be administered.
“Name that thing”
1. Some bacteria can reproduce asexually when their single cells
split in two, forming new individuals in a process called________
2. Some simple organisms, such as hydras, sponges and yeast,
are able to reproduce asexually by________by allowing the
offspring to begin as a growth on the parent.
Establishing a purpose for 3. Form of asexual reproduction which each fragment of an
B.
the Lesson organism develops into a clone of its parent
4. A group of rapidly dividing cells develops on an organism and
breaks away to become a new organism.
5. Reproduction that requires only one parent

Answer:
1. Fission 2. Budding 3. Fragmentation/regeneration
4. spore formation 5. Asexual reproduction
C. Do the exercise “It’s My Type”
Types of No. of Similarities Parts of Examples
Asexual Parent of the Body of
Reproduction Involved Offspring where Organisms
to Parents the
Offspring
Arise
fission
Presenting examples /
instances of the budding
new lesson
spore
formation
regeneration

vegetative

D.  Group presentation
 Analysis
Analysis

1. What are the different types of asexual reproduction?


Discussing new concepts 2. How many parent/s is/are involved in asexual
and practicing reproduction?
new skills #1 3. How do the characteristics of offspring related to the
characteristics of the parents?
4. What are the characteristics of asexual reproduction?
5. Based from your analysis, what are the advantages of
asexual reproduction? How about its disadvantages?

73
 Class discussion
 Processing of the answers
E. Identify the type of asexual reproduction and describe how each
organisms reproduced.
A.

B.
Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2

C.

F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. There are at least five types of asexual reproduction. Fission,
Finding practical
budding, spore formation, regeneration, and vegetative
applications of concepts
reproduction. If you are an organism, what type will you choose to
and skills in daily living
propagate? Why?
H. Making generalizations and
abstractions What are the different characteristics of asexual reproduction?
about the lesson

74
I. Evaluating Learning

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities
forremediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with otherteachers?

75
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
The learners should be able to:
 employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects
C.
Learning Competencies / Describe the process of fertilization; 7LT-IIg-8
Objectives 1. Define Sexual Reproduction
Write the LC code for each 2. Describe the process of fertilization

76
II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation
II. CONTENT 1. Sexual reproduction

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 119-121
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4.  pp. https://www.google.com.ph
Additional Materials
 https://www.thoughtco.com/sexual-reproduction-
from Learning
373284
Resource (LR) portal
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vAhzyMuYl
B. Other Learning Resource powerpoint presentation or video presentation

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson


 What is Asexual reproduction
or presenting the new
lesson  Name the different types of asexual reproduction
Establishing a purpose for
B.  Viewing of a video clip about sexual reproduction
the Lesson
C. Learners’ will have reading activity

What is sexual reproduction?

Sexual reproduction is a way of reproduction of some


animals and plants. Some protists and fungi also reproduce
this way. Organisms that reproduce sexually have two
different sexes: male and female. Offspring is made by a
cell from the male and a cell of the female. Different steps
are involved in the process.

Sexual reproduction involves two parents. As you can see


from Figure below, in sexual reproduction, parents produce
reproductive cells—called gametes—that unite to form an
offspring. Gametes are haploid cells. This means they
Presenting examples / contain only half the number of chromosomes found in
instances of the other cells of the organism. Gametes are produced by a
new lesson type of cell division called meiosis, which is described in
detail in a subsequent concept. The process in which two
gametes unite is called fertilization. The fertilized cell that
results is referred to as a zygote. A zygote is diploid cell,
which means that it has twice the number of chromosomes
as a gamete.
Steps of sexual reproduction
 1. The cells of an animal or higher plant have two
sets of chromosomes: they are diploid. When
gametes (sex cells) are produced, they have
only one set of chromosomes: they are haploid.
They have undergone a process of cell division
called meiosis. During meiosis, crossing over
occurs. This makes it possible to get
recombination. This has various consequences. It
means, for example, that all the children of two

77
parents are not identical, except in the rare case
where they developed from the same fertilized egg.

 The second step is called fertilization. In it, the two


cells merge into one. This restores the diploid state.

 Fertilization is what happens when a female's ovum


(or "egg") joins together with a male's sperm and
they form a zygote.

 Fertilization is also called conception. In humans,


biologists call a fertilized egg a zygote.

 A zygote is the fertilized cell that will grow into a


baby animal. When a female's ovum and a male's
sperm cell become one, this cell is called the
zygote. The zygote then multiplies, and grows into
an embryo. A zygote is the cell that results from
fertilization. A zygote is synthesized from the union
of two gametes, and constitutes the first stage in a
organism's development. Zygotes are produced by
fertilization between two haploid cells, the ovum
and the sperm cells, which make a diploid cell.
Diploid cells have copies of parent chromosome or
DNA.

Sexual reproduction

Majority of animals such as humansreproduce by


sexual reproduction. In sexual reproduction, two parents
combine their genetic material to produce offspring that
are genetically different from both parents. Genetic
material from the parents is transferred in a special cell
called a sperm for the male and an egg for the female.

When the egg and the sperm join together it is called


fertilization. During fertilization, the egg and sperm combine
their single sets of chromosomes to form a zygote containing
two sets, or the diploid number, of chromosomes for a
species (half from each parent).

With sexual reproduction the offspring receives half


of its genetic material from its father and half of its genetic
material from its mother. However, the mitochondrion DNA
is received solely from the mother. An advantage of sexual
reproduction is genetic variation. With genetic variation an
organism has a higher chance of adapting and evolving with
a changing environment. A disadvantage of sexual
reproduction is that two organisms are involved.

Examples:

Growing plants from seeds

78
Most plants reproduce themselves by producing
seeds. Seeds develop from flowers. Flowers are the sexual
organs of plants. The reason that plants produce flowers is
to reproduce themselves. The diagram below shows a flower
which has been cut in half so that you can see the different
parts. The male organ is called the stamen. The stamen
consists of the anthers and the filaments. The anthers
produce pollen grains which are the male reproductive cells
of plants like the sperm of animals. The female organ is
called the pistil. The pistil consists of the stigma, the style
and the ovary. In the ovary are one or more eggs or ovules
which are the female reproductive cells of plants. Pollen is
carried from the anther to the stigma by wind or insects.
Insect-pollinated flowers attract insects by producing a sweet
substance called nectar, a strong smell and large colored
petals. Most fruit and vegetables are insect-pollinated.
Pollination is the carrying of pollen from the stamens
(male part of the flower) to the stigma (on the female part
of the flower)

Animals

Red Kangaroo

79
Red kangaroos are one of the largest marsupials, and
herbivorous mobs of them bounce about eating grasses
and other vegetation. They’re usually headed by the most
mature female and include lots of other females and young
kangaroos, called joeys. When it’s mating time, males will
sometimes box each other for females with their powerful
jumping legs. The winning male deposits his sperm in the
female, where an egg is fertilized.

Sand Scorpion

Sand scorpions dance during courtship. Males


grasp the females by their pinchers, or pedipalps, and move
them around in circles. After dancing for a while, the male
deposits a packet of sperm on a stick or other surface. Then,
he moves the female until she is on top of the sperm. She
takes in the sperm and fertilizes her eggs internally.

D.  Analysis
1. How many parent is involved in sexual
reproduction?
2. What materials are needed in sexual
reproduction?
3. List down as many characteristics as you can
Discussing new concepts about sexual reproduction.
and practicing 4. What is the product of fertilization?
new skills #1 5. How gametes are produced?
6. What is contain in a gamete?
7. What is it that we received from our parents?
8. What are the male and female parts of a flower?
9. Give examples of organisms (plants and
animals) that undergo sexual reproduction.
 Class discussion/processing
E. Compare the reproduction of plants with that of animals.

Answer:
Discussing new concepts SEXUAL REPRODUCTION SUMMARY
and practicing male female type result final
new skills #2 of of result
union union
plants pollen ovule polli- single multi-
(egg) nation cell

80
zygote cell
em-
bryo
(in
seed)
animals sperm egg fertili- single multi-
zation cell cell
zygote em-
bryo
F.  Define sexual reproduction in the simplest way you
Developing mastery can.
(Leads to Formative  Enumerate the steps of fertilization the shortest
Assessment 3) way possible.

G. Finding practical
Have you ever observed that even if you are family not all
applications of concepts
of you have the same features. Why?
and skills in daily living
H.  Define sexual reproduction in the simplest way you
Making generalizations and can.
abstractions  Enumerate the steps of fertilization the shortest
about the lesson way possible.

1. What type of cell division produces gametes?


a. mitosis b. meiosis c. both d. none of it
2. Why must gametes only contain half the amount of
genetic information of the parent?
a. because parents are separated
b. because parents are husband and wife
c. because both of them shares the genetic material of
the
offspring
d. all of the above
3. What are the female and male gametes of a flowering
plant?
a. pistil and ovary c. stamen and ovary
I. Evaluating Learning b. stamen and pistil d. style and ovary
Give an example of a plant:
4. That contains both male and female organs.
a. zygote b. gametes c. stamen d. pistil
5.Contains only one type (male or female) of reproductive
organ
a. zygote b. gametes c. stamen d. pistil

Answer:
1. Meiosis 2. Genetic material must come from both parent
so it must be half from both3. Pistil and stamen 4. Zygote
5. Gametes

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

81
No. of learners who earned
A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
B. Performance Standards The learners should be able to:

82
 employ appropriate techniques using the
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects
C.
Describe the process of fertilization; 7LT-IIg-8
( Fertilization in flowering plants)

Learning Competencies / Objectives:


Objectives 1. Describe fertilization in flowering plants.
Write the LC code for each 2. Distinguish the male and the female reproductive
organs of a gumamela flower.
3. Give the function of each of the organs.

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT 1. Sexual reproduction ( Fertilization in flowering plants)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp.
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 119-121
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://www.gogogle.com.ph
Resource (LR) portal
gumamela flower (withered and fresh), gumamela bud,
B. Other Learning Resource
blade, and handlens if available.

IV. PROCEDURES

A.  How many parents are involved in sexual


Reviewing previous lesson
reproduction?
or presenting the new
lesson  What is the difference between gametes and
zygote?
A.
 What is your favorite flower?. Describe it.
 Are flowers important?
 How important are they?
B.
 Study the picture of a gumamela flower
with its parts.

Establishing a purpose for


B.
the Lesson

83
Compare the picture with the actual flower that you have.
Questions:
1. Do they have the same parts?
2. What are the different parts of a flower?

C. TYPES OF FERTILIZATION

There are two mechanisms by which fertilization can take


place.

 The first is external (the eggs are fertilized outside of


the body); the second is internal (the eggs are
fertilized within the female reproductive tract
 Parts of Flower -Video for Kids-makemegenius_com
series of Education Videos and

 Do the activity: Structure of a Gumamela flower


Objectives
After you have performed this activity, you should be able
to:
a) distinguish the male and the female reproductive
structures of a gumamela flower
Presenting examples / b) describe the function of each structure in reproduction.
instances of the Procedure
new lesson  Examine the entire flower and the part of its stem.
 Examine the bud, an unopened flower. Identify the
sepals.
Remove the sepals and petals. The most important
reproductive parts remain.
 Touch the stigma in a relatively fresh opened flower,
in a bud and in a withered one. Cut through the ovary
and examine the parts with a hand lens.

 Touch the tip of a stamen or tap it lightly over a piece


of white paper.The powdery materials at the tips are
made up of pollen grains. Sperm cells (male gamete)
are produced inside these grains.
 Take a whole flower. Measure the distance between a
pollen grain on a
 stamen and the ovary where the ovule is.

D.  Class discussion/class processing


 Analysis
1. Describe how the flower is attached to the stem.
Discussing new concepts 2. What is the function of the sepals in the unopened
and practicing flower?
new skills #1 3. On which flower does the stigma feel sticky?
4. Why do you think the stigma is sticky?
5. How many compartments do you find?
6. How do you think pollen grains reach the pistil?

E.  What are the two types of fertilization?


Discussing new concepts
 How do they differ?
and practicing
new skills #2  Give examples of organism that undergoes on the two
types of fertilization.
F.
Developing mastery

84
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Fertilization in a flower happens without us
Finding practical
knowing it. We see the new buds popping out
applications of concepts
then eventually grows slowly. What does flowers
and skills in daily living
do to our life?
H.  What organs in a flower are responsible for
Making generalizations and
reproduction?
abstractions
about the lesson  How each organ of a flower works together for
reproduction?

Assessment:

Directions: Read each statement carefully.


Choose the letter of the correct
answer.

1. What parts of the flower are involved in sexual


reproduction?
A. Pistil and petals C. pistil and stamen
B. Stamen and sepals D. petals and pollen grains
2. All of the following are part of a pistil,
EXCEPT__________
A. Ovary B. sepal C. stigma D. style
3. Which part of the flower produces pollen grains?
I. Evaluating Learning
A. Anther B. filament C. stigma D. style
4. Parts of the flower that supports the petals.
A. Sepal B. stalk C. stigma D. style
5. The transfer of pollen grains from the anther to the
stigma of a flower.
A. combination B. fertilization
C. pollination D. germination

Answer:

1. B 2. B 3. A 4. A 5. C

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners

85
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual

86
The learners should be able to:
 employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects
C.
Describe the process of fertilization; 7LT-IIg-8
( Fertilization in humans and animals)
Learning Competencies /
Objectives Objectives:
Write the LC code for each 1. Identify the cells involved in sexual reproduction of
humans/ animals.
2. Describe how reproduction in humans/animal occur.

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT Sexual reproduction ( Fertilization in humans/animals)

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
Teacher's Guide
1.
Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 121
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning  https://www.gogogle.com.ph
Resource (LR)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDpTaUtgf0g
portal
B. Other Learning Resource powerpoint, video clips, article

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – think-pair-share

A. What are the male and female reproductive organs?

Reviewing previous lesson


or presenting the new
lesson
Male Reproductive Female
Organs Reproductive
Organs

Establishing a purpose for  Viewing of a video clip about human reproduction


B.
the Lesson  Read an article about human/animal reproduction
C.

87
Human Reproduction

Objectives:

1. Identify the cells involved in sexual reproduction of


humans/animals.
2. Illustrate the process of sexual reproduction.
3. Describe how fertilization occurs.
A. Read an article about human reproduction and
fertilization

Humans and all animals that reproduce sexually


have cells called gametes. Gametes are formed during
meiosis and come in the form of sperm (produced by
males) or eggs (produced by females). When conditions
are right, sperm and egg unite in a process known as
fertilization. The resulting fertilized egg, or zygote,
contains genes from both parents

Watch video clip


(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDpTaUtgf0)
1. Based from what you have watch or read,
illustrate the process of reproduction by filling in
Presenting examples / the boxes below.
instances of the 2. Look for the possible answers inside the box.
new lesson

88
Sperm cell
Zygote
Fertilization
Egg cell
Ovary of a female
Parent
Testes of a male

1. How many parents are involved in sexual


reproduction?
2. What gametes or sex cells are produced by
male parent?
3. What gametes or sex cells are produced by
female parent?
4. What happens when the sperm cells unite with
the egg cell?
5. What is formed after fertilization?
6. Does the offspring’s characteristics identically
the same with its both parents? Why?

D.  Group presentation
 Analysis
1. How many parents are involved in sexual
reproduction?
2. What gametes or sex cells are produced by male
parent?
Discussing new concepts 3. What gametes or sex cells are produced by female
and practicing parent?
new skills #1 4. What happens when the sperm cells unite with the
egg cell?
5. What is formed after fertilization?
6. Does the offspring’s characteristics identically the
same with its both parents? Why?

 Class processing/discussion
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
Draw the process of fertilization the simplest way you
(Leads to Formative
understand it.
Assessment 3)
G. One of the most controversial issues in our country is the
approval of responsible Parenthood and Reproductive
Health Act of 2012 (Republic Act No. 103540, informally
known as the Reproductive Health Law or RH Law. It is a
law in the Philippines, which guarantees universal access
Finding practical
to methods on contraception, fertility control, sexual
applications of concepts
education, and maternal care. The government believes
and skills in daily living
that passing the Law will be a great help in our economy
since overpopulation causes.
Another reason why the government introduced the
RH bill is that the use of contraceptives cannot only be of
assistance in birth control but can also serve as protection

89
against sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS and lower
the risk of unwanted pregnancy. RH bill is all about birth
control and the Catholic Church is very much against it. In
our churches family planning with the use of contraceptives
is completely immoral. It’s like disrupting the balance of
nature. They strongly insist that “natural” family planning
should be carry out by families, that there should be no
control over it.

Suppose you are members of a committee assigned to


study the RH Bill, will you approve it or not? Why?

H. Making generalizations  What type of cells are involved in sexual


and abstractions reproduction?
about the lesson  How does fertilization occur?
Assessment:
Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer.

1. A gamete unites with gamete to form a zygote.


Which process is taking place?
A. Pollination B. Fertilization
C. Asexual reproduction D. Vegetative
propagation
2. In sexual reproduction, what is the source of the
genetic
material in a zygote?
A. An egg cell only B. A sperm cell only
C. A pollen and a sperm cell D. An egg cell and a
sperm cell
3. Which species can produce offspring that are
genetically different from their parents?
A. A species that has few variations
B. A species that reproduces asexually
C. A species that reproduces sexually
D. A species that competes with a similar
species
I. Evaluating Learning
4. Which is NOT a characteristic of sexual
reproduction?
A. Gametes from two parents unite to form
a zygote.
B. Offspring are genetically identical with
the parent.
C. Offspring are different from their parents
and sibling.
D. Genetic variability of offspring help to
ensure survival in changing
environmental conditions.

5. How many parent/s is or are involved in sexual


reproduction?
A. one only B. two
C. three D. none

Answer:
1. B 2. D 3. C 4. B
5. B

90
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored
below 80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other
teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards
 Reproduction being both asexual or sexual
The learners should be able to:
 employ appropriate techniques using the
B. Performance Standards
compound microscope to gather data about very
small objects

91
C.
Describe the process of fertilization; 7LT-IIg-8
The difference between Asexual and Sexual
Learning Competencies /
Reproduction
Objectives
Write the LC code for each
Objective:
Differentiate sexual and asexual reproduction.

II. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation


II. CONTENT 1. Asexual reproduction
2. Sexual reproduction

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages pp.
Learner's Materials
2. pp. 119-121
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://www.gogogle.com.ph
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource worksheet, pen, article or video clip

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative - jigsaw

A. Identify whether the following organisms reproduce


sexually or asexually.

Reviewing previous lesson or


presenting the new lesson 1.________________ 2. ________________

3. ________________ 4. ________________

Look at the pictures below. Identify and describe


Establishing a purpose for
B. how each organism reproduce.
the Lesson

A.

92
B.

C.

C. Do the activity” Let’s Make a Difference!”

Objective:

Differentiate sexual and asexual reproduction.

Materials:

worksheet, pen, article


Presenting examples / Procedure:
instances of the
new lesson 1. Read the article about sexual and asexual reproduction
below.

2. Complete the table below to compare sexual and


asexual reproduction.

Asexual reproduction

Asexual reproduction is reproduction without sex. In this


form of reproduction, a single organism or cell makes a

93
copy of itself. The genes of the original and its copy will be
the same, except for rare mutations. They are clones. The
main process of asexual reproduction is mitosis. This type
of reproduction is common among some single-cell
organisms, for example, amoeba. Many plants also
reproduce asexually. Asexual reproduction is the
formation of new individuals from the cell(s) of a single
parent.

It is very common in plants; less so in animals.

Asexual reproduction is a type of reproduction by


which offspring arise from a single organism, and inherit
the genes of that parent only; it does not involve the
fusion of gametes, and almost never changes the number
of chromosomes. Asexual reproduction needs only one
parent, unlike sexual reproduction, which needs two
parents. Since there is only one parent, there is no fusion
of gametes and no mixing of genetic information. As a
result, the offspring are genetically identical to the parent
and to each other. They are clones.

Sexual reproduction

Majority of animals such as humans reproduce


by sexual reproduction. In sexual reproduction, two
parents combine their genetic material to produce
offspring that are genetically different from both parents.
Genetic material from the parents is transferred in a
special cell called a sperm for the male and an egg for the
female.

When the egg and the sperm join together it is


called fertilization. During fertilization, the egg and sperm
combine their single sets of chromosomes to form a zygote
containing two sets, or the diploid number, of
chromosomes for a species (half from each parent).

With sexual reproduction the offspring receives


half of its genetic material from its father and half of its
genetic material from its mother. However, the
mitochondrion DNA is received solely from the mother. An
advantage of sexual reproduction is genetic variation.
With genetic variation an organism has a higher chance of
adapting and evolving with a changing environment. A
disadvantage of sexual reproduction is that two organisms
are involved.

Modes of No. of Similarit Involvemen


Reproductio Parent y of t of Sex
n Involve Offsprin Cells
d

94
g to the
Parents
Asexual
Reproductio
n
Sexual
Reproductio
n
D. • Group presentation
• Analysis

1. What are the modes of reproduction?


2. How many parent/s is are involved in sexual
reproduction? In asexual reproduction?
3. How are offspring similar to the traits of their
parents in sexual and asexual reproduction?
4. In which mode of reproduction are sex cells
involved?
5. How is sexual reproduction different from
asexual
reproduction
• Class processing/discussion

More info for teachers:


• Asexual Reproduction
– involves only 1 parent
– offspring genetically identical to parent
– involves regular body cells
– its quick
• Sexual Reproduction
– involves 2 parents
Discussing new concepts – offspring genetic mix of both parents
and practicing – involves specialized sex cells
new skills #1 _ its slow

Asexual Reproduction
• advantages
– does not require special
cells or a lot of energy
– can produce offspring
quickly
– in a stable environment
creates large, thriving
population
• disadvantages
– limited ability to adapt
face massive die-off if environment changes

Sexual Reproduction
• advantages
– lots of variation within a
species
– able to live in a variety of
environmental settings
– able to adapt to changes in
the environment
• disadvantages
– needs time & energy
– produce small populations

95
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Based from the given data about sexual and
Finding practical applications
asexual reproduction are you happy that you were
of concepts
reproduced out of sexual reproduction or would
and skills in daily living
you prefer to be born asexually? Explain.
H. Making generalizations and
State the differences between asexual and sexual
abstractions
reproduction.
about the lesson

Directions: Indicate which of the statements below refer


to:
A. Sexual reproduction
B. Asexual reproduction
Write the letter of the correct answer.

1.Two different types of sex cells unite to form a


zygote.
2.The characteristics of the offspring are like
those of the parent.
3.The new individual may have been a part of the
I. Evaluating Learning body of a single parent.
4.The offspring is a combination of the traits of
both parents.
5.New individuals from a single parent are
reproduced very fast

1. Sexual 2. Sexual 3.Asexual

4. Sexual 5. Asexual

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D.

96
No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching strategies
worked well? Why did these
worked?
F. What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or supervisor
can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


GRADES 1 to 12 Teacher Learning Area Science

97
Daily Lesson Log

Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Differentiate biotic from abiotic components of an
ecosystem
S7LT-IIh-9
Learning Competencies /  Identify the components of the environment;
Objectives
 Compare living and nonliving things; and
Write the LC code for each
 Describe how organisms interact with each other
and with their environment.

II. CONTENT  Components of an Ecosystem

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.123-125
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource Hand lens, pen, paper

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based – cyclic model

A. Reviewing previous lesson


 What do living things need in order to survive?
or presenting the new
lesson  How do living things meet their basic needs?

The teacher will show a picture of an


aquarium. She will ask the students to identify what
are included in the environment of the fish.

Establishing a purpose for


B.
the Lesson

98
C. Activity: In the Garden
1. Visit your school garden.
2. Observe the living and nonliving things present in the
garden.
3. List down the living and nonliving things.

Presenting examples /
instances of the Living Things Nonliving Things
new lesson

D. 1. What are the things that you see in your school


garden?
2. Which of these things are living? Which of these
things are nonliving?
3. Observe the things that you identified as living. What
do they have in common?
Discussing new concepts 4. Observe the things that you identified as nonliving.
and practicing
What do they have in common?
new skills #1
5. What is the role of each living things in the
environment?
6. What is the role of each nonliving things in the
environment?
7. How do living things interact with each other and
with its physical environment?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
 Imagine life without trees. What kind of life would it
applications of concepts
be?
and skills in daily living
H.
What are the two components of an ecosystem?
The two components of an ecosystem are the biotic
and abiotic components. The biotic component is composed
of living factors while abiotic component is composed of
Making generalizations and nonliving factors or the physical environment.
abstractions
Living things have basic needs to meet in order to
about the lesson
survive. These basic needs: water, nutrients, sunlight (for
plants), and shelter, are provided to them by their physical
environment. Living things meet their basic needs through
their interaction with their physical environment.

99
Identify whether the following are biotic component or
abiotic component.
1. Plants
I. Evaluating Learning 2. Animals
3. Soil
4. Water
5. Sunlight

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

100
I. OBJECTIVES

A. Content Standards The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


 Organisms interacting with each other and with their
environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Learning Competencies / Differentiate biotic from abiotic components of an
Objectives ecosystem
Write the LC code for each S7LT-IIh-9
 Name the major types of ecosystem.
 Describe how each major type of ecosystem differs
from one another.
 Identify other abiotic factors other than the basic
abiotic factors in the ecosystem.

II. CONTENT Major Types of Ecosystem

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References

1. Teacher’s Guide Pages

2. Learner’s Materials
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=GZzVW_
Resource (LR) portal HSNIae8QWapbvQDw&q=types+of+ecosystem+and
+examples

https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/57df3a5e908d57b05b8ac29f
/types-of-ecosystems

B. Other learning Resources

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Reviewing previous lesson What are the basic abiotic factors that help biotic factors
or presenting the to survive in an ecosystem?
new lesson How does each abiotic factor functions in an ecosystem?

Identify the pictures whether it is


B. Establishing a purpose for I. Natural aquatic
the Lesson II. Natural Terrestrial
III. Artificial or Manmade.

101
Tundra Pond

Aquarium

C. Presenting examples / “Biotic and abiotic factors in An ecosystem”


Instances of the new
lesson 1. The class would be divided into six groups.

2. Each group would be receiving a diagram/picture of the


different types of ecosystem (Forest and Pond) with biotic and
abiotic factors.
3. They will be asked to choose which between the two
ecosystems they do prefer to work with.
4. The group will cut the pictures from the given diagram of their
chosen ecosystem and arrange or group the pictures according to
“Biotic and Abiotic” respectively.
5. They will also answer questions for the analysis.
6. Presentation of outputs will follow.

I. Processing of the lesson


D. Discussing new concepts II. Analysis:
and practicing new Forest Ecosystem
skills # 1 1. Which biotic factor in the forest ecosystem serves as a habitat
for the animals?
2. How do animals react when human cut down the trees?
3. How precipitation and the fertility of the soil affects the life span
of the organisms/biotic factors in a forest ecosystem?

Pond Ecosystem
1. Which biotic factors in the pond ecosystem provides food for
the fish and the frog and other organisms?
2. What abiotic factors in the ecosystem may affect the survival of
the biotic factors?
3. How Salinity and dissolved oxygen affects the existence of the
biotic factors in a pond ecosystem?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing new
skills # 2

F. Developing mastery -What abiotic factors are present in the forest and pond
(Leads to Formative ecosystem?
Assessment 3) -How would you compare these abiotic factors to the basic
abiotic factors in the ecosystem?

G. Finding practical If you want to relax and enjoy the tranquility of the
applications of concepts environment, which between Forest and Pond ecosystem
and skills in daily living would you like to do that? Why?

102
What are the major types of ecosystem?
H. Making generalizations and What type of ecosystem is the forest? The Pond?
abstractions What are the abiotic factors in the two ecosystem?
about the lesson

I. Evaluating Learning 1. Area of land with many trees containing deer, rabbits,
bears, ferns and bushes?
a. grassland b. lake/pond c. estuary d. forest

2. Freshwater surrounded by land with turtles, fish, frogs,


algae and tadpoles?
a. ocean b. grassland c. forest d. lake/pond
3. Which of the following are terrestrial ecosystems?
a. forest and pond c. forest and grassland
b. ocean and pond d. estuary and grassland
4. Which of the following are aquatic?
a. ocean, grassland, and lake/pond
b. ocean, estuary , and forest
c. ocean, forest, and grassland
d. ocean, lake/pond, and estuary
5. Area of land with many trees containing deer, rabbits,
bears, ferns and bushes?
a. terrestrial b. aquatic c. manmade d. all of the above

J. Additional activities for Search for the different ecological relationship in the
application or ecosystem.
remediation Describe each.

y land

VI. REFELCTION

A. No. of learners who earned


80% in the evaluation

B. No. of learners who require


additional activities
for remediation who scored
below 80%

C. Did the remedial lesson work?


No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson

D. No. of learners who continue to


require
remediation

103
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well?
Why did these worked?

F. What difficulties did I encounter


which my
principal or supervisor can help
me solve?

G. What innovation or localized


materials did I
use or discover which I wish to
share with other
teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

104
I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Differentiate biotic from abiotic components of an
ecosystem
S7LT-IIh-9
Learning Competencies /  Describe interdependence among the
Objectives components of the environment;
Write the LC code for each  Infer what happens to organisms if their
environment is not able to provide them with their
basic needs

II. CONTENT Interdependence in Ecosystem

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.125-127
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecosystem
Resource (LR) portal
Transparent jar, stick, water, garden soil, dead
B. Other Learning Resource twigs, stones, small plant, some insects,
medicine dropper

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – think-pair-share

A. Reviewing previous lesson


How do living things different from non-living
or presenting the new
things?
lesson

Identify whether the following pictures


are biotic component or abiotic component of an
ecosystem.
Establishing a purpose for
B.
the Lesson

C. Presenting examples / Presentation of the Terrarium


instances of the
new lesson
D. Discussing new concepts
Follow up questions
and practicing

105
new skills #1 1. Which are the biotic components in your terrarium?
How about the abiotic components?
2. How can plant survive in the covered jar? Where
can it get the needed nutrients for photosynthesis?
3. How can the insects survive? From where will they
get the oxygen?
4. What will happen to the insects when the plant dies?
Why?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
applications of concepts Explain the sayings: “No man is an Island”
and skills in daily living
H.
Why a terrarium is considered a mini
ecosystem?Describe the interdependence among the
components of the ecosystem.
A terrarium isan example of a mini ecosystem. An
ecosystem is a community of living organisms in
conjunction with the nonliving components of their
Making generalizations and environment (things like air, water and mineral soil),
abstractions interacting as a system. These biotic and abiotic
about the lesson components are regarded as linked together through
nutrient cycles and energy flows. As ecosystems are
defined by the network of interactions among organisms,
and between organisms and their environment, they can
be of any size but usually encompass specific, limited
spaces (although some scientists say that the entire
planet is an ecosystem).

Direction: Choose the letter of the correct answer.


1. A plant needs water, radiant energy, minerals,
oxygen, and carbon dioxide to live. This statement
shows that an organism depends on which of the
following?
A. abiotic components B. biotic
components
C. climate D. minerals
2. Which of the following represents an abiotic
component of the environment?
I. Evaluating Learning A. Sprouting mongo seeds B. Dugong nursing its
young
C. Grass on mountain slopesD. Flowing lava
3. Setting up an aquarium that represents a mini
ecosystem has to have which of the following
requirements?
A. Fish and water only
B. Water, sand, soil, and light only
C. Populations of fish, snails, and plants only
D. Communities of different species of organisms,
water, sand, soil, and sunlight

106
4. Temperature, light, air, water, soil, and climate are
all __________ parts of the environment.
A. biotic B. abiotic C. boreal
D. living
5. A glass container chiefly enclosed for growing and
displaying plants and small animals.
A. Aquarium B. Terrarium C. Shark Tank

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

107
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C.

108
Describe the different ecological relationships found in an
Learning Competencies / ecosystem.S7LT-IIh-10
Objectives  Identify the different relationships existing among
Write the LC code for each organisms in an ecosystem.
 Differentiate the kinds of symbiotic relationship.
Ecological Relationships
II. CONTENT
 Sub Topic: Symbiotic Relationship

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.127-132
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_relationship
Resource (LR) portal
sample ecosystem in the school ground,
B. Other Learning Resource magnifying lens

IV. PROCEDURES Integrative – scaffold -knowledge

A.  Recall the components of our terrarium; identify


Reviewing previous lesson
the biotic/ abiotic components present in it?
or presenting the new
lesson  How can the plant and insect survive in the
covered jar?

In the environment, there are plants, animal and


microscopic organisms such as bacteria and fungi. A
group of organisms of the same kind living in the same
place at the same time is called population.
In the figure below, what populations of organisms
do you see?

Establishing a purpose for


B.
the Lesson

C. Activity:
In a Relationship
1. Choose a study area in your school
Presenting examples / 2. Observe carefully the different organisms in your
instances of the study area.
new lesson Caution: Do not catch the organisms. Just observe
them.
3. Fill in the table below to show how organisms
interact with one another and the types of

109
relationship they are engaged in. Use the symbols
below to identify the types of relationship they have.

Interacting Organisms Symbiotic


A B Relationship

Symbols:
+ the organism is benefitting
- the organism is harmed
0 the organism is neither benefitting nor harmed by the
relationship

Symbiotic Relationships
+ + mutualism
+ - parasitism
+ 0 commensalism
D. 1. Which organisms are benefitting in the
relationship?
Discussing new concepts
2. Which organisms are harmed by other organism?
and practicing
new skills #1 3. How will you describe mutualism?
Commensalism? Parasitism?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical
How can environmental pollution affect the relationship
applications of concepts
among organisms in the ecosystem?
and skills in daily living
H.

Making generalizations and What are the different relationships existing among
abstractions
organisms in an ecosystem?
about the lesson

110
Direction: Match the organisms in Column A to the
symbiotic relationships that they might have in an
ecosystem in Column B.

Column A Column B

I. Evaluating Learning ___1. Bees and flower A. commensalism


___2. Orchids attached on a big tree B. competition
___3. Tapeworm in human intestine C. mutualism
___4. Grasses in the backyard D. parasitism
___5. Larva of an insect lives on the leaves
of a plant

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

111
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive

112
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Describe the different ecological relationships found in an
ecosystem.S7LT-IIh-10
Learning Competencies /  Identify the predators and prey animals in the
Objectives environment;
Write the LC code for each  Describe how predators and prey animals interact
with each other in the environment

Ecological Relationships
II. CONTENT
Sub Topic: Predation

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.130-132
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials http://idahoptv.org/sciencetrek/topics/predators/facts.cfm
from Learning
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsfJL-IIVz4)
Resource (LR) portal

B. Other Learning Resource Worksheet, pencil, pen, pictures, video clips

IV. PROCEDURES Constructivism – activity based

A.  What are the different kinds of symbiotic


Reviewing previous lesson relationships?
or presenting the new  How will you describe mutualism?
lesson Commensalism? Parasitism?

The students will watch a video clip about predation.


Establishing a purpose for (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsfJL-IIVz4)
B.
the Lesson
What did you observe in the video?
C.

Presenting examples /
instances of the Activity: How Do They Eat?
new lesson Direction: Observe each organism in the
picture carefully. Fill in the appropriate box to
each of the organism.

113
Parts
of
Organisms Organism Predato Prey the
s involved r body
(Eaten used
(Eater) ) by
the
eater
to
get
its
food
?

D.
1. Which organisms are involved in the pictures?
2. Which are the predators?
Discussing new concepts
and practicing 3. Which are the preys?
new skills #1 4. Which part of the body does the predator use to get its
prey?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. Finding practical In an ecosystem, lizards hunt insects for their food. What
applications of concepts will happen to the population of insects if lizard’s population
and skills in daily living increases? If lizard’s population decreases?

114
H. How do the predators capture the prey animals for food?
Making generalizations and
abstractions How predators and prey animals interact with each other
about the lesson in the environment?

Identify the predators and the preys from the following


organisms.
Organisms Predator Prey

1.kingfisher and
fish

2.mouse and deer


I. Evaluating Learning
3.chicken and
worm

4.pitcher plant and


insect

5.hawk and chicks

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue
to require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish
to share with other teachers?

School Grade Level Grade 7


GRADES 1 to 12 Teacher Learning Area Science

115
Daily Lesson Log

Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Predict the effect of changes in one population on other
populations in the ecosystem.
Learning Competencies / S7LT-IIi-11
Objectives  Define food chain;
Write the LC code for each  Identify the components of a food chain; and
 Differentiate producers and consumers.

II. CONTENT  Food Chain

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.132-137
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials Biology Science and Technology Textbook for
from Learning
Second Year 2009 Edition pp. 75-76
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource pen/pencil, worksheet, pictures

IV. PROCEDURES Constructivism – thinking skills

A.  How do the predators capture the prey animals for


Reviewing previous lesson food?
or presenting the new
lesson  How do predators and prey animals interact with
each other in the environment?
Action Song: (to the tune of “May Pulis sa Ilalim ng Tulay”)

May damo, may damo sa ilalim ng tulay(2x)


May damo (6x) sa ilalim ng tulay
Kinain ng daga ang damo sa ilalim ng tulay (2x)
Establishing a purpose for Kinain ng daga, kinain ng daga, kinain ng daga ang damo
B.
the Lesson sa ilalim ng tulay.
Kinain ng ahas ang daga na kumain ng damo sa ilalim ng
tulay (2x)
Kinain ng ahas, kinain ng ahas, kinain ng ahas ang
daga, na kumain ng damo sa ilalim ng tulay.

116
Kinain ng uwak ang ahas na kumain ng daga na kumain ng
damo sa ilalim ng tulay (2x)
Kinain ng uwak, kinain ng uwak, kinain ng uwak ang ahas
na kumain ng daga na kumain ng damo sa ilalim ng tulay.

1. What are the organisms involve in the song?


2. Which organisms in the song are predators?
3. Which are the preys?

C.
Activity : Watch What you Eat

1. Fill in the boxes with the pictures/names of given


organisms
2. Arrange them according to which organism is eaten
by another
3. Make sure that the arrowheads of the arrows (which
will be read as “eaten by”) between each boxes is
Presenting examples / pointing to the eater.
instances of the
new lesson

D. 1. Which is the first organism in your food chain?


2. Which is the producer in your food chain?
3. Based from the illustration, how will you define
producer?
Discussing new concepts 4. Which organisms are the consumers? Why are they
and practicing called consumers?
new skills #1 5. Which organism is the first order consumer? What did
the first order consumer feed on?
6. Which was eaten by the second order consumer?
7. Which was eaten by the third order consumer?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F. 1. List down the organisms found in your community.
Classify them according to the following categories.

Producer First-order Second- Third-


Developing mastery Consumer order order
(Leads to Formative Consumer Consumer
Assessment 3)

117
2. Construct a food chain using the organisms listed
on the table above.
G.

Plant needs nutrients in order to grow and produce


Finding practical well. Plants should also be protected from pests and
applications of concepts
diseases. To do these, farmers usually apply chemical
and skills in daily living
fertilizers to enrich and spray pesticides to kill harmful
insects that feed on plants.
What do you think will happen if human will eat food coming
from sources which have been heavily treated with
chemicals like this?
H.  What you have formed is called food chain. How
will you define food chain?
Making generalizations and
abstractions  What composed the food chain?
about the lesson  How do producers and consumers differ?

Given the following organisms: grasshopper, rice plant,


snake and frog,
1. form a food chain,
I. Evaluating Learning 2. identify the producer,
3. identify the secondary consumer.
4. In what trophic level is the grasshopper?
5. In what trophic level is the snake?

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E.

118
Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

119
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Predict the effect of changes in one population on other
Learning Competencies / populations in the ecosystem.S7LT-IIi-11
Objectives  Describe how energy is transferred from one
Write the LC code for each organism to another in the process of food chain.

II. CONTENT Energy Transfer

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.132-137
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
B. Other Learning Resource pictures of different organisms, picture of a sun

IV. PROCEDURES Collaborative – peer teaching

A.

Reviewing previous lesson


or presenting the new
lesson

 How will you interpret the picture?


 Why does an organism eat another organism?

120
Identify the statements below. Rearrange the jumbled
letters to get the correct answer.
1. Usn – The main source of energy
2. Srpdoceru – Organisms that can make their own
Establishing a purpose for food
B.
the Lesson 3. Nstlpa – The most common producers in the
ecosystem
4. mrcnsosue – Organisms that feed on other
oraganisms

C. Activity: Arrange Yourself!

1. Each group will be provided by pictures of different


organisms (snake, grass, mouse, hawk) and picture of
Presenting examples / sun.
instances of the 2. Each member will hold one picture.
new lesson 3. The students will arrange themselves so they can form
a food chain
4. The first group to form a food chain will perform a yell
about their formed food chain.

D. 1. Which is the producer in the food chain?


2. Which are the consumers?
3. Which organism provides energy to the
Discussing new concepts mouse?
and practicing 4. Which organism provides energy to the hawk?
new skills #1 5. Where does the plant obtain its energy?
6. How does the energy from the sun reach the
snake?

E. Discussing new concepts


and practicing
new skills #2
F.

Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)

The picture above shows that frog eats the worm and the
frog is eaten by the snake.
Will the snake acquire the total energy obtained by the
plant from the sun? Why?
G. What do you think will happen to the population of the
Finding practical worm if the number of frog in the community increases?
applications of concepts What will be its effect on the population of snake? Depend
and skills in daily living your answer.

H. Making generalizations and


abstractions How is energy transfer from one organism to another?
about the lesson

121
1. Given with the following organisms: rabbit, lion,
carrot, fox, construct a food chain.

I. Evaluating Learning

Producer 1st order 2nd order 3rd order

How does energy from the Sun reach the third-order


consumer?

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

122
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with
their environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C. Predict the effect of changes in one population on other
populations in the ecosystem.
S7LT-IIi-11
Learning Competencies /  Construct food chains starting with the food
Objectives
wastes.
Write the LC code for each
 Decide on the best way to deal with food wastes
in your home or school.

II. CONTENT  Energy Transfer

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2. pp.137-139
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials
from Learning
Resource (LR) portal
two small, clear jars with covers and with holes all over at
least three large clay flower pots,soil, rubber gloves, trowel,
B. Other Learning Resource microscope, slides and cover slips, magnifying lens, pole
for aerating composting materials and wire covers for the
clay pots

IV. PROCEDURES Inquiry based - simulation

A. Show pictures of different decomposers and scavengers.


Let the student identify the organisms showed.
Reviewing previous lesson
or presenting the new
lesson

123
 What are decomposers?
Establishing a purpose for  Name some of the common scavengers you know.
B.
the Lesson  Why are scavengers and decomposers important in an
ecosystem?
C. Activity: What to do with food waste?
1. Set up the composting pots and jars in advance. In
one covered jar, put some food wastes. In the other
covered jar, put a layer of soil at the bottom, followed by
a layer of food wastes covered with a layer of soil.
Repeat until the jar is full. Do the same for the clay pots,
filling one first before moving to the second pot, until the
third (or last pot) is full. Water the jar and pots with soil
if the soil dries up.
2. Do not water the jar of food wastes without soil.
Observe the food wastes and living organisms that you
find in the jar daily. Record your observations on a table
like the one below:

Day/Date Observations about food wastes


and living organisms

Presenting examples /
instances of the
new lesson

3. Do the same for the jar with soil and the clay pots as
soon as they are full. Include observations about the
soil.
4. After a week, and every week thereafter, mix the
contents of a clay pot to provide air to the organisms
underneath the surface the soil.
5. Continue your observations until the food wastes can
no longer be seen and everything looks like soil. This
means that decomposition of the food wastes is
complete or nearly so. You have made compost.
6. Use the magnifying lens and microscope to examine
very small and microscopic organisms. On Day 1, get
small samples of the soil and make wet mounts to
examine it under the microscope. Repeat this after a
week and every week thereafter until the observations
are concluded.
7. Draw the microscopic organisms you observe and try
to identify them with the help of reference books.
D.
 What organisms did you find in the compost jar or pot
Discussing new concepts
from Day 1? List them down in the order of appearance.
and practicing
new skills #1  Construct at least one food chain and one food web
based on your observations.

E.

124
Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative
Assessment 3)
G. In your own community, observe common and unique
population relationship. Determine how organisms in each
Finding practical
applications of concepts relationship are affected. Imagine how your community
and skills in daily living would be like without these relationships. Write your
observations and predictions on a journal.

H.  What is the benefit of composting food wastes?


 What other methods would you recommend to dispose
Making generalizations and
of food wastes?
abstractions
about the lesson  How does the over production of wastes affect the
recycling capacity of the ecosystem?

1. What are the best examples of decomposers?


A. Bacteria and fungi C. Bacteria and viruses
B. Protists and fungi D. Fungi and Viruses
2. In natural communities, what condition is likely to cause
a disruption or imbalance among species?
A. Removal of a predator
B. Introduction of a foreign species
C. Overgrazing
D. All of these.
3. How is energy replenished in ecosystems?
A. By the sun C. By recycling
B. By body functions D. By food chains
I. Evaluating Learning
4. Which of the following exist only as parasites?
A. Bacteria C. Insects
B. Fungi D. Viruses
5. Soil organisms, such as fungi, worms, and bacteria are
all biotic parts of the woodland ecosystem. What is the
role of these organisms in the woodland ecosystem?
A. To provide nitrogen for the animals
B. To obtain dissolved oxygen from moisture
C. To break down the remains of other lving things
D. To store chlorophyll for the photosynthesis process
Answer: 1. A 2. D 3. C 4. D 5. B

J. Additional activities for


application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for

125
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons
work? No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F. What difficulties did I
encounter which my principal
or supervisor can help me
solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

126
School Grade Level Grade 7
Teacher Learning Area Science

GRADES 1 to 12
Daily Lesson Log Teaching
Quarter Second
Date and Time

I. OBJECTIVES

The learners demonstrate an understanding of:


A. Content Standards  Organisms interacting with each other and with their
environment to survive
The Learners should be able to:
B. Performance Standards  Conduct a collaborative action to preserve the
ecosystem in the locality
C.
Predicts the effect of changes in abiotic factors on the
Learning Competencies / ecosystem S7LT-IIj-12
Objectives  Identify the changes happening in abiotic factors of
Write the LC code for each the ecosystem;
 Suggest solutions in some environmental problems

Effects of Changes in Abiotic Factors on the


II. CONTENT
Ecosystem

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

A. References
1. Teacher's Guide Pages
Learner's Materials
2.
Pages
3. Textbook Pages
4. Additional Materials Science and Technology II Biology Textbook 2009 Edition;
from Learning pp. 344-352
Resource (LR) portal biology.tutorvista.com/ecology/abiotic-factors.html
Chairs, tables, blackboard, posters, manila papers, articles
B. Other Learning Resource
on environmental issues

IV. PROCEDURES Constructivism – think-pair-share

A. Reviewing previous lesson


What other methods would you recommend to dispose of
or presenting the new lesson
food wastes in your community?
Let the students view a short video (provided by the teacher)
Establishing a purpose for about the destruction of natural resources. The teacher may
B.
the Lesson also use the music video of the song “Kalikasan” by Asin.Let
the students interpret the song or the video.
C. Activity: “Analyzing an Issue on Land Use”

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1. Study the situations below with your group.

The town of Masagana is a prosperous


place. Its shoe and bag industries export big volume of
shoes and bags to many countries of Asia and Europe.
The town’s population is increasing due to the
migration of workers-with their families-needed in the
shoe factories. Some families have built houses just
everywhere.
There are plans to build houses, roads,
schools, and other infrastructures on the nearby hills.
A meeting is to be held to discuss the issue: Should
the town allow the construction of houses on the hills?

Presenting examples / 2. Imagine your group to be the persons attending the


instances of the meeting. Each member chooses a role, assumes
new lesson the role and speaks from that position. The roles are
as follows:
 town mayor (presides over the meeting)
 a councilor
 an owner of a shoe factory
 an officer of the “bantay kalikasan” project
 a resident who has been living in the town for many
years
 a land developer
3. Discuss with your group the different roles
4. Conduct the meeting in front of the class. Act out the
roles. You may use props like chairs, tables,
blackboard, manila paper, posters, etc. The rest of
the class will listen to the arguments.
5. Summarize the argument of each person in one or
two sentences.
D.  How could be the problem affect the organisms in
the ecosystem?
Discussing new concepts
 Has the group come up with a way or ways to
and practicing
resolve the issue?
new skills #1
 In what ways do problem can be solved?
 Do you agree with the solution?
E. Discussing new concepts
and practicing
new skills #2
F. Listed below are some environmental problems and issues
in our country:
 Continuous logging
 Converting rice fields to subdivision
Developing mastery
(Leads to Formative  Overfishing
Assessment 3)
Guide Questions
1. What effects do these activities create on the
ecosystems?
2. Suggest solutions to solve the problems.
G.  Cite some changes in abiotic components in your
Finding practical
community.
applications of concepts
and skills in daily living  What effects do these changes create on the living
things in your community?
H.

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 What are the changes happening in the abiotic
factors of the ecosystem?
Making generalizations and
 What are the possible effects of changes in abiotic
abstractions
factors on the ecosystem?
about the lesson
 What possible solutions can you suggest in some
environmental problems?

How should an ecosystem below be used to protect its biotic


components? Choose the best answer from the given
options.

1. Coral reef
A. Promote it as an ecotourism destination
B. Collect corals as souvenir items for tourists
C. Collect coral fishes and sell them to pet shops
2. Rainforest
A. Cut the big trees into log
B. Advertise it as a camping site
C. Get only minor forest products
I. Evaluating Learning 3. River
A. Filter it for drinking
B. Use the water for irrigation
C. Construct a dam to generate electricity

4. Hilly land
A. Make it as jogging area
B. Convert it into an industrial area
C. Develop it into a housing subdivision
5. Mangrove swamp
A. Convert it into fishpond
B. Gather mollusks for food
C. Cut the mangroves to make charcoal
J. Additional activities for
application or
remediation

V. REMARKS

VI. REFLECTION

No. of learners who earned


A.
80% in the evaluation
B. No. of learners who require
additional activities for
remediation who scored below
80%
C. Did the remedial lessons work?
No. of learners
who have caught up with the
lesson
D. No. of learners who continue to
require
remediation
E. Which of my teaching
strategies worked well? Why
did these worked?
F.

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What difficulties did I encounter
which my principal or
supervisor can help me solve?
G. What innovation or localized
materials did I
Use or discover which I wish to
share with other teachers?

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