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I.

Objectives

At the end of the lesson, the students should be able to:


a. gain a deeper understanding on run-on sentences and misplaced modifiers;
b. familiarize the basic ways on how to correct errors;
c. engage in activities concerning errors in sentence construction; and
d. express appreciation of significant human experiences.

II. Subject Matter

A. Topic: Run-On Sentences and Misplaced Modifiers

B. References: Exploring Life through Afro-Asian Literature; pp. 146-148 & 153-
154

C. Materials: Powerpoint presentation, visual aids, worksheet, projector

D. Core Value: Accuracy

E. Value “A person who makes few mistakes makes little progress.”


Statement:

F. Strategy: Active Learning Strategy, Critical Thinking Strategy, Discussion


Strategy

G. Approaches: Individualistic, Student-Centered

III. Procedures
A. Daily Routine

- Prayer
- Kaibigan ng Kalikasan Program (KKP)
- Lesson Proper
- Checking of Attendance

B. Motivation

Teacher’s Activity Student’s Activity


Good Morning class!
Good Morning Sir!
So how are you today class?
We’re all good Sir.
Okay. Very Good. So you must also be good
in our classroom today for you to understand
our discussion. Before we proceed to our
discussion, let me first provide the learning
goals that you need to accomplish this day:
 Gain a deeper understanding on Run-
On Sentences and Misplaced
Modifiers;
 Familiarize the basic ways on how to
correct errors;
 Engage in activities concerning errors
in sentence construction; and
 express appreciation of significant
human experiences.

Good morning once again. Before we


formally start for our today’s discussion, let’s
first have an activity which is entitled, “Seen
Zone 2018”. In this activity, you are going to
identify, look, or see what’s the problem in the
pictures that I will be posting later on. If you
identified what’s the problem in the picture I
will give you chips. Is that clear class?
If that’s the case, let’s begin our activity.
Yes, Sir!

So class, what’s the problem with this photo?


Sir, there should be no apostrophe in that
signage and it should be No Vacant
Room/Rooms.
Very good!
How about this next picture, class?

Sir, the word ‘porn’ there should be prone,


meaning, having a natural inclination or
tendency to something.
Well said, Martin. How about this next
picture?

Sir, the signage is wrong because it is


already stated that the store is open 24
hours. So, why did the owner still included a
specific time to open and close his/her store?
Indeed, your answer is right!

So what have you noticed from our activity


class?
There are a lot of errors Sir.
This set of pictures show different errors.
Who among you didn’t experience yet
committing errors?
None, Sir.
Of course, we committed an error and made
a mistake. Commit does not collocate with a
mistake. Why?
Why Sir?
Because ‘commit’ is something intentional
and ‘mistake’ usually happens accidentally.
So class, is committing a mistake or error
always bad?
(students’ answers vary)
Very Good! Well said. Remember class that
what is bad is not learning from own and
others’ mistakes, making the same mistakes,
not being attentive when it is necessary. We
wouldn’t grow if we never made mistakes. It
is true that there is a price of a mistake or
error. We must better to accept the mistake
or error, handle it and move on.

C. Presentation of the Lesson

Now, try to think of a certain situation where


you encountered someone doing something
wrong. What are your ways of helping them
or correcting them?
(The students will start to share with the
group about their experiences and how they
get rid of it.)
Okay. Very good class. From what you’ve
shared, what do you think is the connection
of it to our lesson?
Sir, I think we will deal more with correcting
errors.
Well said.

In order for us to correct sentences or


paragraphs, we should be familiar with the
different rules in correcting such. So, are you
now ready with our discussion?
Yes, Sir.
With that, I welcome you all into the world of
errors in sentence construction specifically
the run-on sentences and misplaced
modifiers.

D. Lesson Proper

Today we will discuss errors in sentence


construction specifically the run-on sentences
and misplaced modifiers.
Okay let us proceed then to run-on
sentences. Class, what have you noticed
from this sentence, She writes the music he
plays the guitar. Based from the example,
what do you think is run-on sentences?
The students may answer:
 These sentences are written
sequence of two or more main
clauses that are not separated by a
period or semicolon or joined by a
conjunction, Sir.
 These contain too many ideas without
proper punctuation, Sir.
 These are two sentences that should
be separated by some kind of
punctuation mark but are not, Sir.
Okay. That’s good.
When we say run-on sentences, these occur
when two or more sentences expressing
different ideas are written as one statement.
No adequate signs, such as proper
punctuation or capitalization, are used to
separate the ideas. Many of these errors
arise from the failure to recognize that there
are two or more independent clauses in the
sentence. Based on our example, ‘She writes
the music’ and ‘he plays the guitar’ are each
independent clauses, containing a subject
and a verb and expressing complete
thoughts. Do you think the two clauses can
stand alone?
Yes, Sir.
Absolutely, the two are independent clauses
that can stand alone because it expresses a
complete thought and is grammatically
correct. However, in our example, the
independent clause, ‘She writes the music,’
incorrectly runs into a second independent
clause, ‘he plays the guitar.’
Another example, The child has severe cold
she sneezed relentlessly. Is this a run-on
sentence, class?
Yes, Sir.
Why do you say so? Yes, Keneth.
Sir because the sentence has two distinct
ideas.
Very good! It has two ideas right? First, the
child has severe cold. Second, the child
sneezed relentlessly. These two sentences
are each independent clauses, containing a
subject and a verb and expressing complete
thoughts. Is ‘the child has severe cold’
grammatically correct class?
Yes, Sir.
Why do you say so? Yes, Lyka.
Sir, that sentence is an independent clause
that can stand alone because it expresses a
complete thought and is grammatically
correct.
Very good Lyka! However class, on the
examples we have, the independent clause
‘the child has severe cold’, incorrectly runs
into a second independent clause, ‘she
sneezed relentlessly’. Am I understood,
class?
Yes, Sir
So class, what are the things needed in
correcting run-on sentences?
The students may answer:
 Sir, we can use a semicolon to
separate the two ideas.
 Sir, we can use a conjunction such as
and, not, so, yet, or, but, and for to
connect the two thoughts.
 We can also use period, Sir.

Very good class! In order to correct run-on


sentences, any one of the following can be
used. First, separate the two sentences be a
period (.) and make sure to capitalize the
beginning letter of the sentence. For
example, The child has severe cold. She
sneezed relentlessly. Are we clear with that
class?
Yes, Sir.
Second, we can use a comma (,) and a
coordinating conjunction like and, nor, yet, or,
but, and for to connect the two independent
sentences. For example, The child has
severe cold, so she sneezed relentlessly. So,
what have you noticed class?
There is a conjunction ‘so’ to connect the two
thoughts, Sir.
Very good! Who among you can give me
another example? Yes, Nika.
Sir, the sentence I moved to the Philippines
when I was young, and it was easy to learn
Tagalog. The coordinating conjunction that I
used is ‘and’, Sir.
Very good Nika! So let’s proceed with the
third one, we can also use a semicolon (;) to
separate the two ideas. For example, The
child has severe cold; she sneezed
relentlessly. Understood class?
Yes, Sir.
Lastly, we can also transform any of the two
sentences into a subordinate clause. So
class, what comes into your mind when you
hear subordinate clause? Yes, Jay.
Sir, I think it is also known as dependent
clause and it begins with a subordinate
conjunction or a relative pronoun and will
contain both a subject and a verb.
Very well said, Jay. Can you give some
subordinate conjunctions in your mind?
The students may answer:
 after
 although
 as
 because
 before
 even if
 even though
How about the example of relative pronoun
class?
The students may answer:
 that
 which
 whichever
 who
 whoever
 whom
 whose
 whosever
 whomever

Very good! For our example we have, While


the child has severe cold, she sneezed
relentlessly.
In here, we attached the subordinate clause
in front of the main clause and we used a
comma. So here’s the equation for that.

SUBORDINATE CLAUSE + , + MAIN


CLAUSE

Are we clear with that class?


Yes, Sir.
For this another example, we are going to
attach the subordinate clause at the end of
the main clause, you will generally use no
punctuation, like this: The child sneezed
relentlessly because she had severe cold.
What have you noticed class? Yes, Mariella.
Sir, the sentence was transformed using the
subordinate conjunction ‘because’ and there
is no comma in the sentence.
Very good! So the equation for this example
is:

MAIN CLAUSE + SUBORDINATE CLAUSE

Are we clear with those examples class? Are


there any questions or clarifications?
None, Sir.
If none so far, let’s have an exercise.

(The teacher will post the ten examples


wherein the students will identify where they
can separate the complete thoughts and use
any of the four ways to improve them.)

Samples:
1. The plants in the herbal garden had
not been watered in a long time the
leaves had dried up completely.
2. The supermarket closed shop early
Marissa failed to buy bread for her
breakfast.
3. Allan made his new notebooks dirty
he painted the cover with watercolor.
4. The tests were postponed the heavy
downpour cause power failure.
5. The players were suspended the mob
got uncontrollable.
6. The senators needed some break
from their stressful job they went
abroad.
7. The workers submitted their demands
to the government they went to the
Malacanan.
8. Many parent go to foreign lands to
work they leave behind their families.
9. Elections provide people the chance
to change the government some
candidates are not worthy to be
elected.
10. Violence in media affects the youth
primarily parents must guide their
children in viewing their favorite TV
program.

Are we clear with those examples class?


Yes, Sir.
If that’s so, let’s proceed now to Misplaced
Modifier. Misplaced Modifier is a structural
problem which results from the distance
between the modifier and the word it
modifies. So what comes into your mind
when you hear the word modifier? Yes,
Juliana.
Sir, a modifier is a describer. It is a word,
phrase, or clause that describes another
word, phrase, or clause.
Very well said, Juliana. So a modifier is a
word, phrase, or clause that functions as an
adjective or adverb to provide additional
information about another word. For example,
He is a cute baby. In this sentence, “cute” is
an adjective modifying the noun, “baby”. The
adjective “cute” is a modifier. “Cute” modifies
the type of baby. Am I making myself clear
class?
Yes, Sir.
Okay. Oftentimes, this type of structure gives
the sentence two or more different meanings.
For example, Unsuspecting, the barangay
tanod caught the robbers. In the second
sentence, who was the unsuspecting class?
Was it the barangay tanod or the robbers?
Sir, the sentence is wrong because the
adverb modifies the tanod and the robbers.
Very good Kyle. In here class, we should be
aware on what our adjective modifies
because it will make people confused. In
order for us not to be confused, we have
these two methods for correcting dangling
modifiers. First, introduce the subject within
the opening of the sentence. For example,
Unsuspecting, the barangay tanod caught the
robbers. In this example, it would be better if
we first introduce the subject. So what do you
think is our subject class? Yes, Jachin.
Sir, our subject can be the robbers.
Very good! How can you make it better then?
Would you mind revising it?
Since the robbers were unsuspecting, they
were caught easily by the barangay tanod.
Well said Jachin. Thank you for your answer.
So we can conclude that the adjective
“unsuspecting” modifies the noun, robbers.
Am I understood, class?
Yes, Sir.
The second method is to place the modifier
close to the word it modifies. For our previous
example, how can you make it better, class?
Yes, Adela.
The barangay tanod caught the unsuspecting
robbers, Sir.
Very good Adela! So the “unsuspecting” is an
adjective that modifies the noun “robbers”
which are closed to each other. Another
example is: Running through the forest
immediately exhausted the dog. Did the dog
run immediately or did running immediately
exhaust him? How can you correct this one
class? Yes, Beauty.
Sir, It should be ‘Running through the forest
exhausted the dog immediately’.
Okay very good! So it is clear that the
exhausted modifies the dog. Understood
class?
Yes, Sir.
Is there any question or clarification about
Misplaced Modifier?
None so far, Sir.
If none so far let’s have an exercise.

(The teacher will post eight examples wherein


the students will identify if there is a
misplaced modifier in the sentences. Say
THERE IS if there’s a misplaced modifier in
the sentence and they will correct the
statement. If the sentence is correct, say
CORRECT.

Samples:
1. Arriving late, we failed to read the
newspaper.
2. Looking down from the rooftop, I felt
so scared.
3. When Mang Leon became too old to
work, his children supported him.
4. Holding tightly with the hands, the
rope remained firm throughout the
show.
5. Holding tightly with his hands, the
acrobat gave a very challenging
performance.
6. Holding the rope tightly, the acrobat
finished his performance unscathed.
7. As they roared loudly, the lions scared
the children away.
8. As they roared loudly, the children
suddenly got scared of the lions.

Are we clear with Misplaced Modifier class?


Yes, Sir.
So with that, I want to check if you have
understood the two common errors in
sentence construction and try to assess your
work.
E. Generalization

I know you have learned a lot from today’s


discussion. Is there anyone from the class
who can summarize our lesson?
(Students raise their hands.)
Call a student to generalize the topic.
Run-On Sentences contain too many ideas
without proper punctuation and Misplaced
Modifier is a word, phrase, or clause that
describes another word, phrase, or clause.
Run-On Sentences occur when two or more
sentences expressing different ideas are
written as one statement. No adequate signs,
such as proper punctuation or capitalization,
are used to separate the ideas. On the other
hand, Misplaced Modifiers are structural
problem which results from the distance
between the modifier and the word it
modifies.

F. Evaluation

So with that, everything needs to be


corrected. Even just a single mistake needs
to be corrected too. So I want you all to
remember the things we have discussed this
day.

Activity: Ticket Out


Instruction: The teacher will distribute a ticket
wherein the students will write about the
things they have learned and identify whether
the given statement is true or false. If the
sentence is “TRUE” they will write their name.
If the sentence is “False” they will write the
name of their CRUSH. Part two is they will
read each sentence carefully and identify
what type of error is committed. After which,
they will rewrite the sentence in its correct
form on the space provided.

The activity is equivalent to 30 points. Ten


(10) points for the True or False, five (5)
points for the essay, and fifteen (15) points
for the last part.

CRITERIA:
Content 2
Grammar 2
Neatness 1 (The students will do the activity.)
TOTAL 5

Thank you for your active participation class!


God bless!

G. Assignment

Have an advance reading on fragments.