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VOLUME 39 / NUMBER 4

TECHLEARNING.COM

IDEAS AND TOOLS FOR ED TECH LEADERS I NOVEMBER 2018 I $6

HOW TO PROTECT STUDENTS IN BOTH


THE PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL SENSE.

To see more
Tech & Learning
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or visit us online PUT TO THE TEST— LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE:
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CONTENTS FEATURES
16 SCHOOL LEADERS ADVOCATE FOR STUDENTS
WITHOUT HOME INTERNET ACCESS
By Eileen Belastock
Here’s how these district leaders have addressed the issue
of digital inequity.

17 WHY STUDENT CREATION IS THE


HARDEST/BEST FORM OF ASSESSMENT

16
By Kerry Gallagher
By using a creative assessment process, we can better measure
mastery for students with a variety of skill levels.

18 COLLABORDEPENDENT WRITING WITH GOOGLE SLIDES


By Eric Curts
Learn how Google Slides can become a versatile tool for
collabordependence.

20 SAFETY FIRST
By Tara Smith
Whether virtual or physical, the safety of students is every
educator’s first priority. Here’s how schools can protect them.

27 HOUR OF CODE PRODUCTS


By Shannon Mersand
Here are some of the many options available for educators to bring
Hour of Code activities into their classrooms this December.
38
32 TOP 10 K–12 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRENDS
By Steven Lahullier

27 Here’s a countdown of today’s top edtech trends.

34 T&L LEADER: DIGITAL EQUITY ROUNDTABLE; PROFILE OF


ASBURY PARK (NJ) SUPERINTENDENT SANCHA GRAY

PRODUCTS Scan here to access


the digital edition,
19 T&L REVIEW: which includes
additional resources.
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38 WHAT’S NEW
DEPARTMENTS
4 EDITORS DESK: SAFE ALL AROUND
6 TRENDING

32
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EDITOR’S
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NOVEMBER 2018 | VOL. 39 NO. 4

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SAFE ALL
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CONTENT
Managing Content Director Kevin Hogan

AROUND
kevin.hogan@futurenet.com
Content Director Christine Weiser, christine.weiser@futurenet.com
Advisors Carl Hooker, Andrew Wallace,
Marianthe Williams, Steve Baule, Jean Tower,
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‘C
Mike Jamerson, Rico D’Amore, Todd Dugan, Grace Magley,
Andrew Marcinek, John Marcus, Laura Chesson,
ybersecurity” and “mass shooters” were probably Jon Castelhano, Karen Fuller
not on your syllabus as an education major in college Production Manager Fred Vega, fred.vega@futurenet.com
Managing Design Director Nicole Cobban
were they? Unfortunately, those subjects have become
Senior Design Director Lisa McIntosh
priority number one for educators, administrators, and
parents everywhere. This month, contributing writer ADVERTISING SALES
Brand Expert Allison Knapp, allison.knapp@futurenet.com
Tara Smith takes a deep dive into the insights and
Business Solutions Manager Katrina Frazer, katrina.frazer@futurenet.com
resources available for securing, or at least attempting to secure,
students both virtually and physically (Safety First, p 20). SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE
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| NOVE M B E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM
NEWS
TRENDING
ANDTRENDS
THE LATEST NEWS & STATS AFFECTING THE K-12 EDTECH COMMUNITY

top10
BLOG BITS
“You don’t have to stop using the
tools you love or toss out your
lesson or curricular plans to start
developing SEL.”
—Danny Wagner
WEB STORIES
“Because of the accountability
From techlearning.com movement and because of
high-pressure textbook reading
programs, we have for decades
ignored a simple fact of research:
the strongest indicator of reading
growth in students is access to

Are Curriculum Specialists Passwords and books in the home (not phonics
1 in Edtech Denial? 6 Positive Self-Talk programs).”
Curriculum is the what, edtech Try creating a password with —Paul Thomas
is the how—together they a positive message to build
make learning engaging, you up and help you grow. “We live in a world where we
effective, and relevant. can communicate whatever we
Our Notion of Being Literate
8 Ways Teachers Can 7 or Illiterate Calls for an Update want with a few clicks of the
2 Incorporate Technology Being able to read and write keyboard or the touch of a screen.
into the Classroom in text form and on analog Miscommunication is a common
This free webinar teaches platforms is no longer enough symptom of these communication
simple solutions—that you can to call yourself literate. advances.”
use tomorrow and that will —Allyson Apsey

7 Free Edtech Things. Cause
bring long-term, sustainable
change in your school.
8 Free Edtech Things Are
Always a Good Thing
10 Sites for Online Find out what you can
3 Tutoring/Teaching get for free—from digital
Online tutoring is a flexible, storytelling tools to online
economical solution for
learning and enables educators
storage, content curation
platforms, books, and more.
TOP
to earn extra money on

Digital and Hands-On
TWEETS
their own schedule. 9 Combine to Challenge Kids NASD Tech Services @NATechServices

Makerspaces A to Z: Exploring STEM Applications Agreed!: “It isn’t about the iPad,
4 Combinatory Whitebox Learning includes
it is about excellent teaching!
When planning and building a simple CAD design simulation
You wouldn’t blame the book
makerspace, you’re creating a tools, a digital competition, and
unique learning environment. options for hands-on building. for poor student performance.”
#CosnIntl2018
Top 15 Sites and Apps 
Pilot Program Offers Free
5 for Flipped Learning 10 Robotic Teaching Resources @techlearning: 3 keys to teaching
“Flipped classroom” models Find out about Sony’s pilot entrepreneurial learning from
are becoming more popular. program to provide educators @ShakeUpLearning: curiosity,
Discover top tools and a with free tools and training. take risks/become resilient, take
helpful infographic. ownership of learning. #goalet

F I N D L I N K S AT W W W.T EC H L E A R N I N G .CO M / N OV 1 8

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TRENDING

VERIZON
INNOVATIVE
LEARNING
LAUNCHES
5G EDTECH
CHALLENGE
NEW STUDY SHOWS The Verizon 5G Edtech Challenge
is calling for edtech nonprofits to create

STUDENTS NOT PREPARED


transformative solutions that leverage 5G
connectivity to solve challenges in under-
resourced middle schools. The goal is for

THINKSTOCK/YOURNIKONMAN
FOR THE TECH JOBS AR, VR, or AI to help address challenges like
lack of student engagement, lack of teacher’s

OF THE FUTURE
STEM expertise, and the need for more
immersive personalized support for students
with special needs.
Teams creating the ten most compelling
projects will receive $100,000 each, access to
A 2018 study conducted by PwC in conjunction with the Business-Higher Education 5G nodes, Verizon 5G training and mentors, and
Forum surveyed over 2,000 K–12 US teachers. The results show a concerning gap support teams to prepare their concepts to be
between the demand for high-level skills needed in the future workforce and what brought to life in select middle schools.
students are actually learning in school. By 2020, nearly 80% of all jobs will require Submission dates: October 15 to November
some degree of technological skills, yet it’s projected that there will be a surplus of one 30, 2018
million tech jobs without applicants able to fill them.

F O R F U L L D E TA I L S :
Key findings include: more emphasis should be placed on W W W. 5 G E DT EC H C H A L L E N G E .CO M

Although teachers see great value in teaching technology.


their students learning higher-level 60% of classroom technology use is
technology skills like data analytics, passive (e.g., watching videos, reading
computer programming languages, websites).
website design/creation, and robotics,
only 10% of K–12 teachers surveyed Only 32% of classroom technology use
feel confident incorporating higher- is active (e.g., coding, producing videos,
level technology into student learning. performing data analysis) and allows
students to practice skills required for
DIGITAL LEARNING DAY
79% of teachers say they’d like to
receive more professional development many jobs. 2019 ANNOUNCED
for technology-related subjects.
When students don’t have technology Last year, the Digital Learning Day
80% of high schools don’t offer courses access at home, it’s more challenging (DLDay) map featured over 2,000
in data analytics, and 64% don’t teach for teachers to integrate technology events in classrooms, libraries, schools,
app design/creation. in the classroom. More teachers at and districts across the country.
Over 40% of high schools don’t teach underserved schools report that DLDay 2019 on February 28 will be
computer programming languages students do not have home access to
the eighth annual celebration of great
(46%), robotics (42%), or web design/ devices (64%, compared to 27% in
creation (41%). teaching paired with technology. Add
affluent schools) or the Internet (69%,
your event at digitallearningday.org.
64% of K–12 teachers say they feel compared to 30% in affluent schools).

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TRENDING

TOP 10 TOOLS FOR


SELF-PACED LEARNING
By David Kapuler progress and lets them learn at their own pace.
6. PBS Learning Media—This wonderful site
Self-paced learning is an excellent features an educational portal where students
way for students with different learning can study a wide range of subjects at their own
styles to master material at their own pace with resources (e.g., videos, lessons) aligned
pace. David Kapuler has compiled this to state standards.
alphabetical list of resources: 7. Sentence Builder—Kids ages 4–7 can use
1. BrainPOP & BrainPOP Jr.—These this iOS app to learn about sentence structure and
popular sites offer self-paced learning grammar in a fun and engaging way.
in all subject areas. Students watch 8. Splash Math—This K–5 math curriculum
animated movies starring the robot and iPad app offer individual self-learning and
Moby then answer questions. game-based programs for students.
2. GrammarFlip—Students practice 9. UMU—This fantastic site and mobile app
their grammar by watching educational 4. Mathigon—This innovative interactive (iOS/Android) can be used for any subject—even
videos and then completing interactive exercises. textbook acts as a personal tutor for students and professional development.
3. Lynda—On this online training site, users provides instant real-time feedback. 10. VocApp—Flashcards on this free mobile
learn material at their own pace on a wide range 5. Outwhiz—This site or app for math and app help users learn at their own pace and help
of subjects. English for grades K–8 also tracks students’ teachers differentiate instruction.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 9
TRENDING

APPS OF THE
DAY FROM
TECHLEARNING.COM
App of the Day picks are selected from
the top edtech tools reviewed by Common
Sense Education.

THINKSTOCK/ONEINCHPUNCH
NEW COMMON SENSE RESEARCH

Simple Machines: Fun Way
to Learn Physics
FINDS 95% OF TEENS OWN A Kids have fun exploring important physics
concepts as they create and figure out
MOBILE DEVICE; TEENS PREFER simple machines in a solid standards-
aligned context.
TEXTING TO TALKING
A new research report from Common Sense—Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their
Experiences—tracks social media use among American teenagers. The report offers a revealing look at how
teens’ social media use has changed since the original report was published in 2012.
For example:
■■ 70% of teens use social media multiple times a day (up from 34% in 2012), with 16% saying they use
it “almost constantly” and 38% saying they use it multiple times an hour.
■■ 35% say texting is their favorite way to communicate with their friends, followed by in person at 32%.
In 2012, in-person communication (49%) topped texting (33%).
Superb App Introduces
■■ 57% agree that social media often distracts them when they should be doing homework, and 54% say Kids to Animation
that using social media “often distracts me when I should be paying attention to the people I’m with.”
Easy Studio Stop-Motion Studio, with a
■■ 44% say they get frustrated with their friends for being on their phones so much when they’re hanging simple tutorial and lessons, gives kids all
out together. And nearly one-third who own smartphones say they’ve been woken up by their phones they need to create their first animations.
during the night.
■■ 72% think some tech companies manipulate them to spend more time on their devices.
■■ 64% of teen social media users in 2018 say they “often” or “sometimes” come across racist, sexist,
homophobic, or religious-based hate content in social media.
■■ 13% of teens report “ever” being cyberbullied, and more than one in five teens (23%) has tried to help
someone who has been cyberbullied.
■■ 15% list Facebook as their main social networking site (down from 68% in 2012). Facebook today is
more likely to be used for communicating “with my grandparents.”
Solid News, Writing Inspiration
■■ 25% say social media makes them feel less lonely (compared to 3% who say more) and 16% say it
Provided by TIME for Kids
makes them feel less depressed (3% say more).
Well-written articles, including ones
F O R M O R E G O TO W W W.T E C H L E A R N I N G .CO M / N OV 1 8
written by kids, can help students learn
about dozens of topics.

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TRENDING

NCTM ANNOUNCES
NEW GRANT FOR HIGH-
SCHOOL MATHEMATICS
EDUCATORS
A new scholarship from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

THINKSTOCK/SEB_RA
(NCTM)—Advanced Mathematics Education Course Work Scholarship
for Grades 9–12 Teachers—aims to improve competence in the teaching of
mathematics by supporting teachers completing advanced course work in
mathematics education. Advanced course work may include graduate courses or
senior-level undergraduate courses. Creating effective classrooms and learning
environments requires that teachers continue to grow in their knowledge of
mathematics, of pedagogical content, and of students as learners of mathematics.  competence in teaching mathematics and in making an impact on their
The $3,000 scholarship will be awarded in February 2019. NCTM is students’ learning.
seeking applicants who are interested in enhancing their knowledge and Application deadline: November 2, 2018

F O R F U L L D E TA I L S G O TO W W W. N C T M .O R G /G R A N T S

NEW POLLS SHOW PARENTS AND TEACHERS CONTINUE TO


DEMAND ACCESS TO TIMELY AND RELIABLE EDUCATION DATA
A recent poll from the Data Quality classroom ■■ 89% are relying on data to help personalize
Campaign found that parents and teachers learning for each student’s unique needs.
agree that education data is necessary to make AMONG THE TEACHERS SURVEYED: ■■ 96% say they value data on students’
important decisions in support of students. ■■ 95% use a combination of academic data social emotional learning as an important
However, many parents lack awareness about and nonacademic data, such as attendance measure of their development and growth.
the data available and teachers face barriers and classroom behavior, to understand ■■ 57% say they don’t have enough time
in effectively using data. kids on pads in performance. during the school day to access and use
data.

AMONG PARENTS:
■■ 93% say they not only value data but also
need it to better understand their child’s
progress in school so they can best support
their learning.
■■ 95% support teachers using data to
ensure students are getting support and
THINKSTOCK/CIFOTART

enrichment.
■■ 42% did not look at a school or district
report card in the past 12 months. And of
those parents, 40% were unaware such
resources existed. 

F O R M O R E G O TO W W W.T EC H L E A R N I N G .CO M / N OV 1 8

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TRENDING

SCHOOL-ASSIGNED MOBILE DEVICES SUPPORT


EFFORTS TO IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL EQUITY
Project Tomorrow has released the first of a ■■ High-school students with assigned
series of briefing papers based on the data access to a laptop or Chromebook are
collected last fall from hundreds of thousands more likely to use those devices to
of principals, teachers, and students as personalize their learning process, to stay
part of their Speak Up Research Project for organized with their schoolwork, and to
Digital Learning. The brief, The Educational leverage technology for more enhanced
Equity Imperative: Leveraging Technology to learning experiences than their peers
Empower Learning for All, examines the role with no access or only sporadic access.
of technology use in school as an enabler of ■■ Teachers using digital content report
equitable learning environments. Highlights higher levels of student outcomes than
from the brief include: teachers who are not using these tools.
THINKSTOCK/RIDOFRANZ

■■ Principals of schools with 1:1 programs


are more likely to report that technology
use is effective in core academic
subjects.
SITE OF
F O R M O R E G O TO W W W.T E C H L E A R N I N G .CO M / N OV 1 8 THE WEEK
MICRO SCHOLARSHIP
NEW RESEARCH FINDS DIGITAL DIVIDE RESOURCE SUPPORTS
EXACERBATES EDUCATION INEQUITY ASPIRING COLLEGE
The digital divide is compounding equity problems within STUDENTS
US schools, according to new research from ACT’s Center
for Equity in Learning. The report, “The Digital Divide and
Educational Equity,” looks at the 14 percent of ACT-tested
students who said they had access to only one device at home.
Among students who have access to only one device at home:
■■ 85% were classified as underserved (low income, first
THINKSTOCK/RIDOFRANZ

generation in college or minority).


■■ American Indian/Alaskan, African American, and
Hispanic/Latino students had the least amount of access;
white and Asian students had the highest. For example,
20% of American Indian/Alaskan Native students have
access only to a smartphone, compared to only 4% of
This proactive tool,
white students.
■■ 24% of students whose self-reported annual family income was below $36,000 also reported having access to only which takes some of
one device—a gap of 19 percentage points compared to students from families with annual income above $100,000. the mystery out of the
■ ■ Of students whose parents have a college degree, the majority have access to more than one device at home. financial aid process,
Students with access to only one device may deal with challenges not faced by students with access to two or more helps high-school
devices. For example, these students may need to share that device with other family members.
Policy recommendations to address these issues include: expanding programs that help to rectify device and Internet
students earn micro-
access imbalances; encouraging teachers to ensure that students can easily find, view, and use required electronic materials scholarships and find
via their phones; and prioritizing and fast-tracking the installation of higher quality and more reliable Internet connections the best matches for
in schools. their talents and
budget.
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BIG IDEAS

came to us” when students began advocating


for themselves, expressing frustration about
their inability to access their education at
home. While Green Bay Area PS had more
classrooms using digital resources, they
had not addressed the ISTE Standard for
Education Leaders to ensure that “all students
have access to the technology and connectivity
necessary to participate in authentic and
engaging learning opportunities.” And
Omaha PS began to understand that, once
they were technology rich, they needed to

THINKSTOCK/MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES
develop the strategic plan frameworks that
would “increase access and digital equity to
transform learning.”

ON THE ROAD
All three districts wanted to improve
student learning by modernizing and
differentiating with technology, Doersch said.
Beaverton PS started by establishing a Digital
Equity Brown Bag, a team of passionate

SCHOOL LEADERS
stakeholders that would tackle the digital
inequity in the district. These Brown Baggers
established partnerships with the 1Million

ADVOCATE FOR
Project by Sprint and the Kajeet Homework
Gap Grant to provide low-cost Internet and
wifi hotspots for students in need. Green Bay

STUDENTS WITHOUT Area PSD decided to provide daily wifi check-


out options for students through Kajeet
SmartSpot. Omaha PS pushed digital literacy

HOME INTERNET ACCESS and digital citizenship with a five-year public


service grant from Cox, which they used to
renovate a bus. This flexible learning space
provides free Internet, digital literacy, and
digital citizenship across the community.

By Eileen Belastock this webinar, said. But three passionate school TO INFINITY AND BEYOND

A
leaders—Steve Langford, CIO, Beaverton (OR) All three districts are looking to the
recent CoSN Meeting the Needs of SD; Diane Doersch, CTIO, Green Bay Area (WI) future. Beaverton is asking difficult questions,
Students without Home Internet PSD; and Rob Dickerson, Executive Director including: “Does usage look different across
Access webinar reflected the of Information Management Systems, Omaha our schools?” Doersch underscored that,
growing concern and call to action (NE) PS—shared their digital equity action plans for true digital transformation, district
for districts, businesses, and state that became their silver bullets. equity policy changes are needed. Omaha PS
and federal government to address continues to focus on partnering with local
the homework gap. The Student Access to Digital THE PERFECT STORM businesses to provide students with safe and
Learning Resources Outside the Classroom Through a combination of initiatives welcoming learning environments. They’re
Report, by the Department of Education, has including bonds and E-Rate, each of these three also continuing to educate parents, Dickerson
identified the main causes of digital inequity as districts has been able to put devices in students’ says, on “where their student is coming from
access, the cost of high-speed broadband, and hands, build a strong, reliable infrastructure, and and how they can engage with them around
families’ lack of understanding of the importance implement curriculums rich with digital content. the idea of digital citizenship and digital
of the Internet to support their students’ Dickerson called this influx of technology “a literacy.”  
education. setting for a perfect storm.”
There is no silver bullet for addressing digital Eileen Belastock (@EileenBelastock) is
equity in schools, as Susan M. Bearden, CoSN’s THE BRICK WALL the director of academic technology for Mount
new Chief Innovation Officer and moderator of Langford described how “digital equity Greylock RSD in Williamstown, MA.

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BIG IDEAS

they’re regulated, standardized, and necessary.


They have their place. But every learner deserves
to experience an iterative creative process filled
with plans, mistakes, feedback, and micro-
successes along the way. In the course of their
day-to-day work, most professionals:
■■ Pose a question or are challenged with a task.
■■ Research (usually involving networking,
crunching numbers and data, consulting

THINKSTOCK/SEVENTYFOUR
academic/scholarly sources).
■■ Come up with a solution.
■■ Ask for informal feedback from colleagues.
■■ Edit and revamp their work.
■■ Propose a rough draft.
■■ Get more feedback.
■■ Edit and revamp some more.
■■ Rinse. Repeat. It’s a process.

WHY STUDENT CREATION


If the purpose of school is to prepare
students for the challenges ahead and help
them build the skills they need for success, it’s

IS THE HARDEST/BEST worth noting that creativity is the “premier


skill” innovative companies are looking for. And
if creativity is the “premier skill,” then schools

FORM OF ASSESSMENT should focus on building creativity into lessons.


Encouraging student creation is hard, but it’s
also what is best for our students.

By Kerry Gallagher or classmates. These creative projects tend to Kerry Gallagher (@KerryHawk02) is the

T
be the ones students choose to share via digital Assistant Principal for Teaching and Learning
he goal of assessment has traditionally portfolios or as part of applications to internships at St. John’s Prep in Danvers (MA). Read more
been to measure student mastery—so or even college. Younger students display these at www.KerryHawk02.com.
some students measure high while projects at parent nights or open houses.
others do not measure up. The
students who measure high tend to WHY CREATIVE ASSESSMENTS
always measure high. And the students ARE A CHALLENGE FOR
who don’t measure up tend to experience EDUCATORS
disappointment over and over. Students who With traditional tests, grading is measurable,
experience continued success believe in their simple, and usually efficient. Putting a number
abilities and continue to challenge themselves to or value on creative work is more challenging.
WITH TRADITIONAL TESTS,
achieve more. But students who don’t measure Sometimes teachers create instructions and
GRADING IS MEASURABLE,
up learn not to trust their own work, fall into a rubrics that resemble step-by-step recipes. Each SIMPLE, AND USUALLY
cycle of self-doubt, and avoid challenging tasks. student follows the recipe and creates a product EFFICIENT. PUTTING
that looks just like their classmates’ products. A NUMBER OR VALUE
WHY STUDENTS PREFER This, of course, is not creative work. ON CREATIVE WORK IS
CREATIVE ASSESSMENTS In order to come up with creative MORE CHALLENGING.
When students go through a creative assessments, educators need both training in SOMETIMES TEACHERS
assessment process (rather than taking a project-based learning (Ross Cooper and Erin CREATE INSTRUCTIONS
traditional test) to demonstrate their learning, Murphy’s Hacking PBL is a great place to start) AND RUBRICS THAT
they receive feedback from their peers and their and opportunities to observe teacher-leader
RESEMBLE STEP-BY-STEP
teacher. For many students, feedback feels less like colleagues who are successfully implementing
a rating and more like an opportunity to improve. that model in a tech-rich, purpose-filled way.
RECIPES. EACH STUDENT
Because the final product that results from
FOLLOWS THE RECIPE AND
a creative assessment is a unique expression of WAIT ... NO MORE TESTS CREATES A PRODUCT THAT
each student’s thinking and learning, students AND QUIZZES? EVER? LOOKS JUST LIKE THEIR
are often proud and empowered to share that Short quizzes and summative tests have their CLASSMATES’ PRODUCTS.
work with an audience beyond their teacher place in every learner’s academic experience—

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 17
BIG IDEAS

collaborative feedback for their peers by:


■■ Reading another student’s slide.
■■ Deciding what feedback they’d like to give.
■■ Selecting the text or item on the slide they
wish to comment on.
■■ Clicking “insert” in the top menu bar and
then choosing “comment” from the drop-
down menu and typing their feedback in
the comment box.

THINKSTOCK/ANNASUNNY
Students can then check to see what
feedback their classmates have provided them
and make any necessary revisions to their work.
Because you as the teacher created the
slideshow, you have access to everything the
students have written and all the comments
they provided for their peers. You can easily
click down through each slide to see all of your
students’ work in one convenient location.

COLLABORDEPENDENT
One of the biggest challenges with a
collaborative project is that students are able
to edit each other’s slides. This will likely

WRITING WITH GOOGLE


happen at some point—either intentionally
or by accident. Version history keeps track of
every change made to the slideshow and who

SLIDES made the change. This will allow you to see if a


student changes another student’s work.
Because students can write independently
and provide feedback collaboratively all in one
By Eric Curts master slideshow with all of the students’ names place, Google Slides is the perfect solution for

T
so you can simply make a copy next time.) working collabordependently!
echnology can have its pain points. Older students who are comfortable
Take peer feedback, for example. It using Google Slides can create a new slide for Eric Curts is an education trainer and
can be a challenge to share and open themselves when they open up the slideshow (a consultant with over 20 years’ experience and
25 different Google Docs—or to keep good option for writing could be the “Title and an authorized Google Education Trainer and
each student’s work separate and Body” slide.) a Google Certified Innovator. Read his blog at
navigate from one student to the next Share the slideshow with all of your www.controlaltachieve.com.
if all 25 students write in the same Google Doc. students and give them editing rights. You can
What we need is an easy way for students to work use the share button or, if you’re using Google
independently when writing but collaboratively Classroom, you can push the slideshow out to
when giving feedback. We need a tool that lets your students and give them all access to the
them work “collabordependently.” Google Slides same slideshow and editing rights by:
can break out of being just a presentation tool to ■■ Creating an assignment in Classroom.
become a versatile tool for collabordependence. ■■ Attaching the slideshow using the drive icon.
WHAT WE NEED IS AN EASY
Decide what you want your students to write, ■■ Choosing the option for “Students can
WAY FOR STUDENTS TO
explain, or create. Then create a Google Slideshow, edit file.”
WORK INDEPENDENTLY
including details at the start such as directions, a Students go to their slide and begin to work.
WHEN WRITING BUT
writing prompt, or resources to explore. This may involve writing a paragraph based on a
COLLABORATIVELY
The idea is that each student will have his or prompt, giving a definition of a scientific term in
WHEN GIVING FEEDBACK.
her own slide in the slide deck. Make a sample their own words, or explaining how to solve a math
WE NEED A TOOL THAT
student slide and use “Ctrl D” to duplicate as problem. Students can type, but they can also take
LETS THEM WORK
many as you need for the entire class. When advantage of other features in Google Slides such
COLLABORDEPENDENTLY.”
students open the slideshow, they can pick a blank as inserting images, shapes, videos, and more.
GOOGLE SLIDES CAN BREAK
slide to work on. Numbers can also be assigned to When students are done with their
OUT OF BEING JUST A
each student so they know which slide is theirs—or independent work on their own slide, they visit
PRESENTATION TOOL TO
student names could be added to each slide ahead other slides in the slide deck to see what their
BECOME A VERSATILE TOOL
of time. (If you do this, you may want to make a classmates have written. They then provide
FOR COLLABORDEPENDENCE.

18 | MO N TH 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM
PRODUCT REVIEWS

MICROSOFT SURFACE GO
microsoft.com n Retail Price: Starting at $399. Accessories: Surface Mobile Mouse $34.99; Surface Go Signature Type Cover $129.99; Surface Pen $99. (Education discounts available.)

OVERALL RATING:
By Frank Pileiro The Surface Go has a single
Microsoft has done

T
microphone as well as 5.0MP an excellent job with the
he Microsoft Surface Go is a 10-inch, ultra-portable two- front-facing and 8.0MP rear- design and functionality of
in-one device that combines the portability of a tablet with facing autofocus cameras the Surface Go, which will
optional accessories, including a keyboard, for a flexible that are capable of 1080p HD meet a variety of classroom and
laptop experience. The Surface Go is suitable for everyday video. Videoconferencing,
curricular needs. Schools can
build their fleets of Windows
tasks like email and Web surfing and includes office video, and still picture capture devices without breaking
productivity software. are of high quality. The two- the bank or sacrificing
The device tested included an Intel Pentium Gold Processor 4415Y, watt Dolby Audio™ Premium features.
4GB of RAM, and a 64GB solid-state hard drive. Another model, with stereo speakers make consuming
8GB of RAM and a 128GB solid-state hard drive, is also available. The multimedia enjoyable, and Bluetooth
device is lightweight, coming in at a very portable 1.15 pounds (without Wireless 4.1 technology as well as a 3.5mm
the keyboard attachment) and boasts up to nine hours of battery life. headphone jack allow for private listening.
The vibrant 10-inch, 1800x1200 resolution, Corning Gorilla Glass 3
display supports up to 10 multi-touch points. Ease of Use: The Surface Go is very easy to use. It starts up quickly and
login options include traditional passwords and facial recognition. For
Quality and Effectiveness: The Surface Go top performance, the device runs on Windows 10.
bridges the gap between tablets and laptops with a The Surface Go is an excellent solution for districts
price point that’s affordable enough for classroom TOP FEATURES that have adopted Microsoft Office 365 or any other
use. Teachers and students can use the device on its • The Surface Go’s size and weight make it Web-based programs. For optimum portability and
own, without any accessories, for necessities such an excellent Windows two-in-one device. effectiveness, the Surface Go’s speedy a/b/g/n/ac-
as online research, productivity, and collaboration. • The screen resolution is outstanding, with compatible wireless card will connect to any school’s
very good sound and responsive touch wireless network. The device also comes with the
features. Microsoft Store so a school can add and manage apps
• The Surface Pen and Type Cover Keyboard for its entire fleet of devices.
accessories turn the Surface Go into a true
multi-use productivity device. Creative Use of Technology: This small portable
device has configurable options to meet the needs of
districts that require networkable devices to run the
Windows operating system. The Surface Go’s multipoint screen allows for
up to 10 touch points and gestures. With the Surface Pen and Microsoft’s
OneNote software (or your preferred software for research and note
taking), the Surface Go becomes a portable productivity powerhouse.
The optional detachable Type Cover Keyboard and Surface Pen
increase productivity and creativity options. The Type Cover has a Suitability for Use in a School Environment: The Surface Go
nice feel, with mechanical keys and a touch pad that rival those of a combines the flexibility and portability of a tablet and a laptop and is
full-sized keyboard. The programmable, pressure-sensitive Surface a great solution for districts looking for a portable device to support
Pen expands the tablet’s usefulness for a variety of classroom tasks, Microsoft Office 365 or other cloud-based productivity programs. The
including taking notes and drawing directly on the screen. The Surface optional accessories further expand options for a variety of classroom
Pen and Type Cover both secure to the side of the device magnetically, uses. The Surface Go also has ports and connectivity options for docking,
so everything is portable. connecting USB devices, and increasing storage with a memory card.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 19
SAFETY FIRST
Whether virtual or physical, the safety of students is every educator’s first priority.
Here’s how schools can protect them.
By Tara Smith

VIRTUAL
“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound A recent public service announcement
of cure.” Benjamin Franklin was addressing fire from the FBI encourages public awareness of
safety when he coined this familiar axiom, but cyber threat concerns related to K–12 students.

SAFETY the analogy to Internet safety isn’t a bad one. Just


as we wouldn’t let a live spark go untended, so
we need to take sensible steps to guard sensitive
“Malicious use of sensitive data could result in
social engineering, bullying, tracking, identity
theft, or other means for targeting children,”
information—our own and our students’—online. the FBI release states. “Therefore, the FBI is

20 | N OVE M B E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


are free online materials districts can use to Invaluable free resources on ferpasherpa.
help equip everyone to avoid common—and org include:
sometimes disastrous—mistakes. ■■ “The Educator’s Guide to Student Data
The FPF’s education privacy resource site, Privacy”—a concise and comprehensive
FERPA|Sherpa (ferpasherpa.org), is a goldmine introduction that explains: why it’s important
of resources and information. Parents, educators, that teachers understand and care about
and students can find links to over 450 resources, student data privacy; what constitutes
including models from districts, training materials, student data; the relevant state and federal
and information on student privacy from experts at laws; and more
the Department of Education’s Privacy Technical ■■ Tips on best privacy practices for using apps
Assistance Center (PTAC), CoSN, the Council in the classroom, including a link to a short
of School Attorneys (COSA), the Student Data YouTube video called “Ask Before You App”
Privacy Consortium (SDPC), and the Software produced by the California Educational
and Information Industry Association (SIIA). Technology Professionals Association
(CETPA) and Common Sense Education

“With enough ■■ Links to webinars and other training


materials from the model Student Data
resources, training, Privacy program run by the Utah State

and support,” the FPF Board of Education


■■ A model student data policy (from Howard
says, “schools can have County Public Schools in Maryland)

the tools they need to


■■ Model contracts, such as the California
Student Data Privacy Agreement, that the
safely use cutting-edge SDPC urges companies to sign

technology to do what
■■ Lists of the steps recommended by the
Department of Homeland Security and of
they do best—teach resources available from the FTC
■■ Guides for parents and educators, created
students.” with ConnectSafely and the National PTA,

Seven Basic Security Checks for


providing awareness to schools and parents of
Evaluating Educational Platforms
the important role cybersecurity plays in the
securing of student information and devices.” ✔
While there’s no “one size fits all”
solution, FPF has produced this
Ensure that passwords are
protected
Heightened awareness, paired with a wealth of
publicly available resources to help schools and
districts address these concerns, is good news for

checklist to help schools do some
simple tests to assess the basics of
Ensure that the login and
password recovery mechanisms
security standards on new edtech do not reveal unnecessary
educators, parents, and students. products and services. information (e.g., the existence
Unlike other industries, which have the means The seven steps include: of an account)
to invest in sophisticated programs to protect
against cyber threats, the budget constraints most
districts face mean that there are fewer resources
✔ Look for an encrypted
connection ✔ Be watchful for “information
leakage.”
for IT security. While this lack of funding is a
significant concern, there’s a lot that schools ✔ Ensure that applications use TLS
between email servers For each of these steps, FPF provides
working with limited resources can be doing to a step-by-step process to evaluate the
help prevent threats from becoming a reality.
The Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) notes,
✔ Ensure that URLs do not contain
sensitive information
area in question as well as additional
security resources for those looking for
for example, that most student data disclosures
are caused by human error—like clicking a false ✔ Ensure sensitive information is
not stored in the cache or
more detailed guidance.
For more information go to: https://fpf.
attachment in an email or using a weak password. browser history org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Seven-
Few districts have the funding or resources to Basic-Security-Steps-Final.pdf
train staff to protect student data, but there

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 21
SAFETY FIRST
on student data privacy issues prevent violence against school children.
■■ Resources to help parents talk with their In Virginia, Governor Ralph Northam
children about being safe online has awarded $6 million in school security
■■ Up-to-date and user-friendly information equipment grants. The grants will pay for
on federal and new state laws, compliance, video monitoring systems, metal detectors,
and helpful initiatives from edtech classroom locks, electronic-access controls,
companies. visitor identification systems, direct
communications links between schools
As “The Educator’s Guide and law enforcement agencies, and
to Student Data Privacy” other security upgrades in
reminds us, “as 443 schools and other
we adopt new instructional facilities.
technologies, we Likewise, the
must think about how Minnesota Department
they affect the safety, of Education has
security, and privacy
of all stakeholders—
announced that 123
schools will benefit
PRIVACY
especially our
students. … But it’s
from $25 million in
state grants to improve
AGREEMENTS:
also our responsibility
as educators to embrace
school security systems.
The department classified
WHERE DO
innovation and encourage
our students and our colleagues
entrance and communication
system upgrades as priorities
YOU BEGIN?
to try new approaches and embrace and limited requests to $500,000. The focus of the Privacy Contract
new tools. It’s a challenge, but it’s not The state received nearly 1,200 Framework, a project of the
beyond our reach.” grant applications seeking nearly California Student Privacy Alliance
$256 million—over 10 times the available (CSPA), is helping schools, districts,
For more information go to https:// funding. Minnesota Department of Education states, and vendors to find resources
ferpasherpa.org/fbipsa/ Commissioner Brenda Cassellius said the that they can adapt to their unique
high demand for grants indicates that the state contexts to implement needed
urgently needs to fund a more comprehensive
protections. The project provides
school safety initiative. “Students and teachers

PHYSICAL
resources, expertise, and tools
clearly need more support to ensure our kids
to help districts streamline the
are safe,” she said. “The school safety grants …
application contract process with

SAFETY
only scratch the surface.”
While districts are facing increased threats, vendors.
the technology to help counteract these threats The Contract Builder, for example,
is also advancing rapidly. As with all new is a build-your-own-contract
GRANTS GALORE: SCHOOLS technology, it’s important to ask questions and
tool. Users can review numerous
RECEIVE STATE AND FEDERAL to continually assess and measure the impact
other contract clauses, including
FUNDING TO UPGRADE (including any unintended consequences) of
SECURITY SYSTEMS implementation.
those from the US Department
The good news for districts feeling of Education, to “mix and match”
overwhelmed by the costs of implementing FACIAL RECOGNITION clauses that best fit their contract
measures to protect the physical safety of SOFTWARE CAUSES OUTCRY needs.
students and staff is that lots of government A new school security system based on
The SDPC Application Registry,
grants are being made available for this purpose. facial and object recognition, called Aegis,
originally built by Cambridge Public
The Stop School Violence Act of 2018, for has fueled an outcry from the New York Civil
Schools, is a tool that enables users
example, provided funding for grants to help Liberties Union. The NYCLU warned that
with threat assessment and the creation of the system was being implemented without to streamline, standardize, and
technology solutions to increase anonymous sufficient clarity concerning how students’ and manage contracts and applications.
reporting options. The $70 million in STOP teachers’ privacy and related rights would be For more information go to: https://
grants will provide funding that can be used protected. The software, by Canadian firm SN privacy.a4l.org/privacy-contract-
to develop, design, staff, and operate a variety Technologies, was designed to monitor schools
framework/
of programs, applications, hotlines, websites, for individuals on watch lists, and to scan for
intervention teams, and training methods to dangerous objects such as guns. The NYCLU

24 | N OVE MB E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


SAFETY FIRST
pointed specifically to a danger that the facial contain personal locator devices that
recognition technology could be used to report communicate with Enseo’s Internet of
the non-citizen children to ICE and other law Things devices.
enforcement authorities, and that the data The beacons use a trilateration
of very young children would be stored in a algorithm to find the teacher’s exact
database. The New York State Department of location and continue to track the
Education reports that it is working with the teacher’s location if they move around
district to determine the best practices and the campus. Next year, Enseo could
protocols that should be implemented to ensure expand its services so that whenever a
that it complies with the law and protects MadeSafe button is pushed, the school
students’ personal information. resource officer can immediately tap
This outcry echoes a larger debate about into the video surveillance cameras in
the growing prevalence of facial recognition that vicinity.
technology in everyday life, with national Vanessa Ogle, founder and CEO
rights groups like the ACLU having vigorously of Enseo as well as an LISD parent,
contested border authorities’ use of this hopes other districts will utilize the
technology at airports and other checkpoints. technology. The IoT beacons, cloud
computing, and networking are high-
PANIC BUTTONS tech, but Enseo keeps the cost down
CONNECT WITH IOT by using the existing coaxil cables that
DEVICES TO COMMUNICATE educators to use MadeSafe technology most school districts already have.
EMERGENCIES from Enseo. Staff members are wearing the That means schools don’t have to pay to install
The first day of school at Lovejoy (TX) buttons, that can immediately notify school more expensive fiber optic lines. A side benefit,
ISD this year also marked another first as resource officers of an emergency or threat on she says, is a better wireless network at the
more than 600 employees became the first campus, around their necks. The wearables school.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 25
SAFETY FIRST
SAFETY DEPENDS become more complicated as technology org, “We are now dealing with ‘Generation
ON THE THOUGHTFUL has advanced. While students can use their Text’ instead of ‘Generation X.’ The rumors
IMPLEMENTATION OF phones for important communication during typically become greater than the issue,
PROPER POLICIES emergency situations, in the chaos of a crisis problem, or incident itself.”
As districts wrestle with all of these complex students can inadvertently be spreading
questions and navigate a wise and sensible path rumors or false information. And in non-
through the unknown, the discussions need to emergency situations, incorrect information
begin with establishing proper policy.
Take cell phones, for example. In general,
can create unwarranted fear or anxiety. As Ken
Trump, President of National School Safety
While students can
cell phone policies in K–12 schools have and Security Services, told SchoolSecurity. use their phones
for important
communication
during emergency
situations, in the chaos
of a crisis students
can inadvertently be
spreading rumors or false
information. And in non-
emergency situations,
incorrect information can
create unwarranted fear
or anxiety.

THE SEVEN MOST IMPORTANT If a school’s cell phone policy allows student
QUESTIONS PARENTS SHOULD ASK use during emergency situations, school
administrators can avoid difficulties by making
(AND SCHOOLS SHOULD BE READY TO sure rules on their usage are clear from the
beginning. During drills, phone use should be
ANSWER) ABOUT STUDENT PRIVACY part of the conversation around best safety
practices.
1. Which websites, services, and apps will my child’s classroom use this year? There are a few additional practices schools
2. How does my school handle directory information? can include in the crisis management plans to
optimize cell phones as a safety tool. A mass
3. What is my school’s approach to school safety, and what does it mean for notification system linked to cell phones can
my child’s privacy? keep students, faculty, and staff members reliably
informed so they can act appropriately during
4. Does my child’s school administer surveys?
an emergency, and a panic button app can also
5. What are the rules for recording devices in my child’s school? relay necessary information instantly and inform
everyone on the network of the alert.
6. How is my child’s information secured?
The safety of everyone in our schools, both
7. How does the school train teachers and staff to protect student information? virtual and physical, depends on thoughtful
discussions among all stakeholders, gathering
It’s not necessarily a cause for concern if a school doesn’t have all the answers to these
expert resources, proper training, and the clear
questions, but FPF underlines the vital importance of communication between parents
communication of policies. The hope is that we’ll
and schools as they work together to protect children’s information.
never need to put them to the test. But as with
For more go to: https://ferpasherpa.org/parentqa2018/ Benjamin Franklin’s ounce of prevention, it’s
better to be on the safe side.

26 | N OVE MB E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


PARTICIPATE IN THE
HOUR OF CODE WITH
THESE GREAT PRODUCTS
By Shannon Mersand

S
ince its launch in 2013, the Hour series: //CODE: On variety of programming
of Code has introduced more than the Brink ($14.99, concepts like loops and
625,750,509 people ages four to ages 8+) continues conditionals as players
104, in more than 180 countries, to building sequencing attempt to collect 7
basic coding and computer science skills; //CODE: Potato King cards while
concepts. This year’s Hour of Code Rover Control mashing, roasting, and
will take place from December 3 through ($14.99, ages 8+) and frying the other potato
December 9 and will offer an opportunity //CODE: Robot pirates. In addition to
to engage students all over the world in Repair ($14.99, ages 8+) build logical reasoning computer science concepts, Potato Pirates helps
computational thinking and coding. skills. All three games are played offline (Robot promote social interaction (www.thinkfun.com).
The Hour of Code website (hourofcode.com) Repair offers an online version for Hour of Code,
offers tutorials and activities from more than thinkfun.com/hourofcode) and help build logic, CoderBunnyz
400 partners in 45 different languages. There problem solving, and critical thinking skills. ($34.85, ages 4+) is a
are also numerous apps, websites, and unplugged card game invented by
activities and lesson plans available. In addition an eight-year-old girl
to the vast array of options on the website, there who wanted to make
are also a number of products on the market coding fun for everyone.
that make learning logic, problem solving, This four-player
computational thinking, and coding more like a board game teaches
game. an array of computer programming concepts
like control structures, sequencing, cuing, and
UNPLUGGED CODING debugging (among others) as players navigate
(NO DEVICE REQUIRED) ThinkFun has their way around fences and over puddles to
If you want to engage students but don’t have also released two reach their special carrot. Offering four skill
computers or tablets, consider ThinkFun games, brand-new games just levels, CoderBunnyz offers a fun, low-stakes way
CoderBunnyz, and Turing Tumble. in time for this year’s to engage computational thinking skills (www.
ThinkFun’s extensive line of offline games Hour of Code, Hacker coderbunnyz.com).
is appropriate for teaching computer science and Potato Pirates.
skills to students of Hacker ($24.99, ages Turing Tumble
many ages. Younger 10+) asks students to ($69.95, ages 8+)
students can engage outsmart cybercriminals with its 40 challenges goes beyond coding
with Robot Turtles and 120 coding puzzles. With three levels of to introduce students
($24.99, ages 4+) and play, students take on the role of coder, hacker, to how computers
move their way up or security engineer as they collect data, work. While reading
to the Clue Master avoid viruses, and try not to set off alarms. about Alia the space engineer in a graphic novel,
Logical Deduction Hacker teaches students are asked to help debug problems
Game ($9.99, ages the concepts of to create working Turing computers using
8+) or Code Master concurrency and marbles and switches. This hands-on table top
Programming security mindset. game introduces engineering, problem solving,
Logic Game ($19.99, Potato Pirates binary concepts, algorithms, logic gates, and
ages 8+). Step it up ($14.99, ages 7+) more (turingtumble.com/). TLC SmartTech
a notch with the // is a strategic card (tlcsmarttech.shop/product/turing-tumble)
CODE programming game which covers a offers educator and volume discounts.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 27
HOUR OF CODE
CODING PLUGGED by Thames and for detailed lessons
(REQUIRES A DEVICE) Kosmos, which fully aligned with
Are you ready to take coding off the screen asks students Code.org’s CS
and bring it to life? Try Code Car, Love to Code, to build their Fundamentals course.
CodeGamer, or Robotics Smart Machines, all own video game For older students, try
of which allow students to program objects and controller then Cue ($199.00, ages
bring them to life. use it to program their way through various levels 11+), with customizable personalities. Similar to
of a video game, solving problems and challenges Dash and Dot, Cue is controlled by an app that
Code Car along the way. Once they’ve completed the game, uses block-based coding, but it also introduces
($45, ages 8+) from they’ll have the coding know-how to create their JavaScript. Add
Let’s Start Coding own projects (thamesandkosmos.com). the Sketch Pack
introduces students ($129.99, ages 6+)
to text-based coding Robotics to Dash or Cue and
by using C++ to Smart Machines challenge students
manipulate features ($134.95, ages 8+) to blend robots,
on a car-shaped is another great math, and art
microcomputer. way to combine (makewonder.com).
Students will learn about variables, loops, engineering
functions, and more as they beep the horn, sound with computer Edison ($49.00, ages 4+) is a flexible
the siren, and flash the lights. Complete with programming, and it also adds a bit pf physics. robot that can be programmed in four ways,
video walkthroughs, guides, and explanations, After students build robotic models, they can including using barcodes, EdBlocks (block
Code Car has over 15 hours of challenges to bring them to life with the included block-based coding), EdScratch
engage students as they see their programs come coding app. In addition to the building directions, (a Scratch-like
to life. Once they cool facts and concepts—about physics, robotics, interface), and EdPy
have mastered the and computer programming—are found (Python), so as
challenges, introduce throughout the manual (thamesandkosmos.com). students gain skills
them to the Let’s and confidence they
Start Coding Base ROBOTS can transfer their
Kit ($40, ages 13+) Ready to do more than make lights and knowledge to the
or Ultimate Kit sounds? Add some motion and other animation next level. Add the
($94, ages 13+), to the coding experience with robots like Edison, EdCreate Edison
which offer more Dash, Dot, and Cue from Wonder Workshop, or Robot Creator’s
complex opportunities. Let’s Start Coding also Bee-Bot, Blu-Bot, and Pro-Bot from Terrapin, Kit ($29.00, ages 5+) so students can combine
offers free online professional development meeperBOT, Phiro Robot, or KIBO. engineering and coding to create the EdTank,
so teachers can learn how to use the Base Kit EdDigger, EdRoboClaw, EdCrane, EdPrinter,
(letsstartcoding.com). PLUGGED ROBOTS and more. Edison fits in the palm of your hand,
(REQUIRE DEVICE) allows users to build their own creations using
Love to Code Dash ($149.99) and Dot ($79.99) are a popular building bricks, and has a website that’s
Creative Coding widely adopted full of free resources for implementation—
Kit by Chibitronics duo of robots from including lesson plans, student activity sheets,
($85, ages 14+) Wonder Workshop and more (meetedison.com).
combines art, designed for ages
circuitry, computer five and up that meeperBOT
programming, make learning 2.0 ($54.99, ages
debugging, and programming, using 5+) is a Bluetooth-
reading. Fern the Frog walks students through a suite of five free enabled robot
projects as they explore how to control the Chibi apps, fun. The apps that also allows
Chip microcontroller, seamlessly blending utilize block-based children to create their own robot using popular
art and technology. For younger students programming at a building bricks. They can program the robot
more comfortable with block-based coding, a variety of skill levels using BOTCode, a block-based language that
Microsoft MakeCode version is also available to teach sequences, also shows the text-based coding behind the
(chibitronics.com). loops, conditionals, and more as students blocks. The apps also include a comic-book-
become more confident in their skills following style story that immerses students in reading
For a mix of computer engineering and step-by-step challenges. Add the Learn to while programming (meeperbot.com/pages/
coding, try CodeGamer ($169.95, ages 10+) Code Curriculum Pack ($129.99, ages 5–12) meeperbots).

28 | N OVE M B E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


HOUR OF CODE
UNPLUGGED ROBOTS programming, compatible
(NO DEVICE REQUIRED) including sub with popular
KIBO Robot procedures, building bricks.
Kit ($229 – $499, and it features Both allow for
ages 4–7) allows touch and sound programming
students to explore sensors that can using built-in
programming be incorporated into the sequence (terrapinlogo. buttons, as well as swipe card coding without
in an unplugged com/robots.html). the use of a device. Pro adds the capability of
environment, with the added excitement Bluetooth mode so users can program via a
of sounds, lights, and movement. A multi- You may also consider Phiro. There are device using Scratch 2.0, Snap!, or Phiro Code
functional robot, KIBO is programmed using two models of Phiro robots—Unplugged ($149, mobile app programming languages. There are
wooden function blocks (barcode programmed) ages 4+) and Pro ($199 ages 9+). Both come several lessons available for free on the website
to create simple and more complex sequences with DC motors, lights, and sounds and are (robotixedu.com).
of actions. Curriculum guides and lessons
are available for purchase on the website
(kinderlabrobotics.com).
BOOKS FOR
Kids First
Coding & Robotics
THE HOUR
kit ($129.95, ages
4+) brings coding
OF CODE
within reach for Rosen Publishing offers a
young children. number of books that tie into the
Learn concepts like Hour of Code perfectly. From
sequencing, loops, functions, and algorithms the interactive ebook series
by programming a peanut butter and jelly Spotlight on Kids Can Code to
sandwich, a mouse, a fire truck, a penguin, and the graphic novel series Power
more—all without a device. The robot reads the Coders, students will find computer
code cards using an optical scanner and then programming intertwined with
runs the program on the provided map cards. activities and adventures. Spotlight
The kit includes 30 lessons aligned with CSTA on Kids Can Code is a set of 26
standards, ISTE standards, and and a course from interactive ebooks intended for students in grades three through eight. They focus on a variety of
Code.org, and it follows a storybook-like format computer science topics, including Boolean logic, digital security, geolocation, and more. Each
(thamesandkosmos.com). of the interactive ebooks includes videos, maps and photos, questions and answers, timelines,
vocabulary, concepts, and unplugged activities (rosendigital.com/resources/spotlight_kids-can-code.
COMBO ROBOTS php). Computer-Free Coding by Kevin Wood is another Rosen series, appropriate for students in
Want the option grades four through six, that features unplugged activities where students explore data, debugging,
of a plugged or logic, and repeating. The Power Coders series by C. R. McKay and Joel Gennari is a set of graphic
unplugged coding novels appropriate for grades four through six. The books follow
experience with a a group of friends on their adventures involving computer science
robot? Try Bee-Bot concepts like bugs, loops,
($89.95, ages 3+), sequences, and more. They’re
Blue-Bot ($119.95, packed with problem solving
ages 3+), or Pro- and cleverly disguised lessons,
Bot ($149.95, ages and students who enjoy
3+)—a series of robots graphics novels will engage
from Terrapin that immediately with these books
introduce students (rosenpublishing.com).
ages three and up The wide array of activities
to basic logic and programming. Bee-Bot is and products available means
controlled using the buttons on its back, and that students of all ages and
Blue-Bot adds Bluetooth capability and a drag- skill levels can learn basic
and-drop language as well as Logo and a TacTile computer science principles during the Hour of Code and
Reader, which uses sequential tiles. Pro-Bot beyond. Join this international movement and help build
offers a greater variety of onboard buttons, your students’ 21st-century skill sets.
allowing for more complex and user-driven

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 29
TOP 10 K–12
EDUCATIONAL
TECHNOLOGY
TRENDS
By Steven Lahullier

While “trendy” ideas and products come and go, many of these influential be acknowledged in front of the entire class. The biggest barrier to this trend
concepts seem likely to continue to shape edtech for many years to come. Some of will likely be the cost of equipping an entire school or class with their own
them are still emerging, and some of them are controversial, but they all have great wearable technology.
potential for teaching and learning. Here’s a roundup of today’s top edtech trends:

4
Cloud Computing—Cloud computing is a trend that reduces many

1
1:1 Devices—This trend seems to continue to expand. It depends frustrations with computing. The ability to save something in the
largely on a school or district’s ability to fund the initiative. The idea cloud, that can be shared and modified from anywhere at any time,
of having a device for every student is a highly desirable goal for most, has proven to be extremely useful. Gone are the days of creating multiple
and this trend will likely continue for years to come versions of a document every time it’s saved, or saving
as schools gradually build their programs until they important work to a flash drive that must be taken
reach 1:1 status. everywhere and is at risk of being left, stolen, or lost.

2 5
Mobile Devices—Mobile devices in education Collaborative Computing—This trend is closely
can be controversial. Proper implementation and linked to cloud computing. The ability to collaborate
monitoring are essential to ensure a beneficial on writing assignments, presentations, spreadsheets,
learning experience. Some benefits of mobile devices etc. has proven to be an invaluable asset in K–12
include the ability to view textbooks, research, education. Students can work both synchronously and
participate in Internet-based class assignments, asynchronously on the same item, and this is an advantage
and create media-rich projects. Schools often have in many curricular areas and encourages group work. It is
to address issues of equality and funding to ensure also beneficial that, with many collaborative computing
that all students, regardless of economic status, have environments, the teacher can review student work as it
access to a mobile device in the classroom so no one is progresses to monitor when the work is getting done and
disadvantaged. who is contributing what to an overall project.

3 6
Wearable Technology—Wearable technology is an up-and-coming Robotics—Robots will likely continue trending in the K–12
trend in edtech. Wearable technology covers a wide range of items— environment. From Nao robots down to Cubetto and Ozobots, there
from assistive technology for students with disabilities to devices are many ways to integrate robotics at varying price points. Pre-
to encourage motivation and participation. One way this trend is being made robots can serve a specific purpose, but a more in-depth learning
implemented in K–12 education is with wearable devices such as watches, experience can arguably be had when students create robots to serve
which a teacher can use to discretely notify or message students in class who a specific purpose. Robots can be expensive, but they can also be built
may be off task, or to provide encouragement or praise for great work. This with spare parts and recovered or donated items. This provides diverse
is particularly beneficial for students who may be shy or who may not like to possibilities for robotics in K–12 education.

32 | N OVE MB E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


7
IoT—Internet of Things (IoT) encompasses a wide bought prepackaged items, all offer benefits to education.
variety of technologies, from auto-starting a car with an Some examples include Bloxels, which utilizes an app on a
app to adjusting a thermostat over a wifi connection. It’s tablet or phone to capture a physical game board that students
anticipated that this trend will continue to grow in edtech. can manipulate to create characters and layouts that are
The possibilities for IoT in K–12 education are endless. playable virtually on the tablet app. Another example, which
IoT can be integrated, for example, in the way content and incorporates many trends, is the game-based environment
textbooks are utilized, in how writing and notetaking are of many of the Hour of Code and Code.org activities to teach
done, and in security features that a school or classroom can computational thinking concepts to K–12 students.
implement for student safety. The security aspect may raise

10
controversy because there are privacy concerns connected to STEAM/STEM—The STEM or STEAM trend
the ability to track students’ locations in school. is not likely to be going anywhere anytime
soon. A push to help students prepare to fill

8
Augmented Reality—AR seems to be an often anticipated jobs in STEM fields is driving this trend.
overlooked, or underrated, trend. While there are many Most of the skills required for success in STEM learning
instances where AR can be used simply as a gimmick, are skills that can be used to solve problems in many
applications such as HP Reveal have near-limitless uses other areas. Many other trends, such as makerspaces,
and could be used in any curricular subject to integrate could be combined with, and fall into, the STEM
technology and make for a richer educational experience. category. Anything associated with STEM education,
from 3D printing and graphic design to engineering and

9
Game-Based Learning—Game-based learning will coding, seems likely to continue to be a trend in K–12
continue to be a significant trend in K–12 education. education for the foreseeable future.
From the days of playing PowerPoint Jeopardy for test
reviews to app-based game creation applications, integrating Steven Lahullier is an elementary school technology
games, technology, and education will continue to be a popular teacher at the Robert Gordon School in Roselle Park (NJ)
approach. There are limitless possibilities for game-based and doctoral candidate in the Educational Technology
learning in education. From home-brewed games to store- Leadership program at New Jersey City University.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 33
THINKSTOCK/VIEWAPART
LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE:
DIGITAL EQUITY
By Annie Galvin Teich

A
t the monthly T&L Leader “Students in rural communities deserve the same “Even trying to provide our kids with similar
Hangout, district leaders gathered opportunities as students in larger districts,” said tech to the district next door, they still aren’t
for an online roundtable. The focus Dugan. “We wanted our kids to use the same equitable. So, we looked for best-of-breed
of the roundtable was to share technology and have the same opportunities as available, and we mixed and matched technology
strategies for addressing digital middle-class kids in the district next door.” to provide them with us as much as we could.
equity in their districts, specifically Understanding that professional Last year, our district was probably the most
what has worked best for districts as they seek to development was one of the critical keys to successful in this desert of underfunded districts
close the equity gap for gender, economics, and success for their 1:1 initiative, Dugan arranged in rural Illinois,” said Dugan.
diverse student communities. Here are some of for some “extreme” PD. “We made site visits Access was also a challenge. In town, a local
the highlights of that conversation. to schools in the Chicago suburbs, focusing on Internet provider worked with the district to
Todd Dugan, the new superintendent in Leyden School District, which is large, famous, set up $10-per-month high-speed Internet
Bunker Hill, Illinois, led off the conversation with and well-funded,” he said. Dugan’s educators for families who were recipients of federal
a presentation on the ways they used innovation were there to learn and tried to copy much of programs. Devices were going home with 75%
to close the equity gap in his previous district in what Leyden was already doing. “The most of the students. However, it was impossible to
rural Middleton, Illinois. The district is remote, important outcome of our visits was that our provide for the other 25% as there was no access
with only a local Internet company to service teachers became friends with teachers at Leyden in the most remote areas of the district.
families in town. Kids outside the city limits and left there with Twitter handles and contacts.
only had access to the Internet through their They now had people they could connect to for OTHER APPROACHES TO
cell phones. When going 1:1, getting coverage advice as needed.” Dugan said that this was even CREATING EQUITY
and connectivity in a district with no fiber more important to their success than seeing Randy Rogers, director of learning services
and 86% poverty presents unique challenges. Leyden’s technology in operation. at Seguin ISD in New Braunfels, Texas shared

34 | N OVE MB E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Strategies for K-12 Technology Leaders

that his is a Hispanic-majority district with a using in order to support homework practice
significant ESL population and many working- and feel part of their students’ daily learning
class families without a lot of technology at experiences.
home. The district implemented programs Tracy Daniel-Hardy, director of technology
through a state grant that allowed them to at Gulfport (MS) School District, explained
send computers home with students. “We used
“EVEN TRYING TO that part of what they have to do to make
mobile hotspots at first,” said Rogers. “Now it’s PROVIDE OUR KIDS WITH certain they receive appropriate funds is ensure
a computer with a built-in SIM card. To get one SIMILAR TECH TO THE there is equity across the board, whether or
of these computers sent home, we required the DISTRICT NEXT DOOR, not a school qualifies for Title I. “We also have
parents to apply and go through training with THEY STILL AREN’T a district-wide plan that reflects our culture,”
their students.” Putting hotspots on buses in EQUITABLE. SO, WE she said. “We try to make our programs
their rural district is also in the plans. “We offer LOOKED FOR BEST- equitable. For instance, we want to ensure that
tech summer camps at no charge for students, OF-BREED AVAILABLE, opportunities are gender-balanced, so we offer
such as robotics and coding, starting at pre-K. AND WE MIXED AND a ‘girls who code’ program.”
We’re always looking for ways to expose kids to Chris Jenks, director of technology for
MATCHED TECHNOLOGY
opportunities in technology they wouldn’t have Tuscaloosa (AL) City Schools, shared that their
access to at home,” said Rogers.
TO PROVIDE THEM WITH district now has 1:1 Chromebooks for grades 1–9.
Neva Moga, instructional technology
US AS MUCH AS WE But they believe the iPad would be the better
supervisor in Milwaukee Public Schools, says COULD. LAST YEAR, OUR device for self-contained special education
they’ve distributed thousands of Kajeet hotspots DISTRICT WAS PROBABLY classes. “We won’t let a device go home until
in Milwaukee. Most of the students who receive THE MOST SUCCESSFUL there is a parent who comes in for orientation,”
them qualify for free or reduced lunch. “We IN THIS DESERT OF he said. “There are rubrics to use with each
ended up not making it mandatory for parents UNDERFUNDED DISTRICTS student to assess their specific needs in Special
to come to a meeting in order for their student IN RURAL ILLINOIS,” Ed. We want these students to have similar
to take a device home,” she said. “We treat it just experiences to what the other students are
like a textbook. If it’s lost, then the Chromebook having as much as possible.”
has to be replaced before the student can
graduate.” the technology department to develop evening Hearing what leaders are doing in other
Matthew X. Joseph, director of digital family workshops to support families with districts can provide insight into your own
learning, informational technology, and little or no English. In their 1:1 environment, district’s challenges and goals. You can share
innovation at Milford (MA) Public Schools, all students in grades 3–12 have Chromebooks. your stories at the next T&L Leader Hangout
shared his district’s experience in supporting Approximately 31% of their population have by joining our private community of school
families with limited English. Milford is working limited English proficiency. Noorjanian worked district leaders here: https://tinyurl.com/
to close the equity gap with collaboration among with families to sign up for emails, as that is the G-TLLeaders.
the superintendent’s office, the English Learners primary communication channel for the district. Also, we still have a few spots left for our
(EL) department, and the technology team to The family classes also included translators and December Leadership Summit in Phoenix on
ensure all students have opportunities and all a multi-lingual integration specialist. Another December 6-7. If you are interested, please
families have support. group of classes included the G Suite so families contact Christine Weiser (christine.weiser@
Jen Noorjanian, director of EL, worked with could learn about the tools their children are futurenet.com).

UPCOMING EVENT
December 6-7:
Phoenix, AZ
LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

Attendance at a summit is complimentary for those invited by Tech & Learning. To be considered, please
complete this short survey: www.surveymonkey.com/r/2018_Summit_Signup

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 35
BUILDING A BRIGHTER FUTURE—
MORE THAN A MOTTO
By Sascha Zuger

F
or Sancha Gray, Asbury Park (NJ) completing,” says Gray.
School Superintendent, building a Members of the highly
brighter future is a way of life. This competitive APSD Dream
is no small feat, considering that Academy (and Dream Scholars,
she and now-NJ Commissioner of their middle-school counterparts)
Education Lamont Repollet stepped are given laptops for 24/7 use.
into a struggling district with 75% of students Dream Academy students—chosen
reading below grade level (half of those being through a mix of GPA, interview,
three-to-six grades below). Just four years later, teacher recommendations, and
graduation rates have spiked 21.8% and students academic portfolio review—can
are thriving under innovative initiatives that graduate from high school with
include blended learning, tech-rich classrooms, an associate degree in social
and exposure to hope and opportunities for science. They use the Blackboard
lifelong success. platform to communicate with
“We service 2,000 students—the majority professors and engage fellow
qualify for free or reduced lunch. Considered a students in their courses. This fall,
high poverty district, we provide our students the first cohort of Dream Academy
with everything—uniforms, books, book bags, students will begin their junior
free breakfast, free lunch, and an after-school year taking several courses at
program with snack and dinner, served family Brookdale Community College,
style, with constructive conversation about before becoming full-time college
their day in the classroom. We share these students and completing their
tools with parents so that they can reinforce senior year on campus.
the strategies at home. We just want to provide Literacy improvement does
that comprehensive and wraparound support not take the summer off. Realizing
for our students and their families. We even Sancha Gray, Asbury Park (NJ) School Superintendent that competing for students’ time
have a backpack meal program, where we are and attention during summer-fun
able to discretely send home meals for over the months required an extra burst of
weekend.” on the same programs their children are using creativity, Gray created a program
Gray shared their uphill path to success at at their own pace—it’s private and respectful, so bundling literacy with sports and the kind of
the 2018 T&L Phoenix Leadership Summit. there’s no stigma. We offer bilingual instruction day-camp opportunities enjoyed in more affluent
Considering the student as a whole, she says, is and GED classes. When we support parents’ communities.
key. learning, they create a culture of learning at “Our Summer STEAAM (extra A for
“With close to 85% reading below grade home.” athletics) is completely free for all APSD
level, there are implications for what may or may Edtech programs that mirror video games students. Fun days are rotated with academic
not be happening in the home. We renovated were also brought in, building student confidence instruction days. This can include formal swim
a decade-long dormant building to create as learners won badges and advanced through instruction at a Y day camp for our pre-K–first-
The Parents Center. When we rolled out our the levels of the adaptive programs. A second grade students (we’re a shore community and are
classroom tech demos, parents were pulling prong of individualized direct instruction, sharply aware that incidences of drowning are
me aside, saying how much these programs informed by the data provided from those higher for Black and Hispanic children) followed
(Read180, System 44, iRead, Math180) would “games,” was rounded out by a third rotation— up with free swim or opportunities to enjoy the
have helped, how they wished they had this tech reading books of their choosing at their level. camp experience. Upper elementary students
as kids. Now they do. We have staff, we have a “They have a lot of pride in selecting a book receive formal golf instruction by a PGA-
computer-based monolingual English program on their own, one that they know they can certified golf pro at the country club, creating a
that parents can log in and access. They can work have success in reading, understanding, and great opportunity to learn etiquette and social

36 | N OVE M B E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


graces in addition to a lifelong sport they might debaters landing in the top
not otherwise have access to. Lacrosse—another 5%), and even Gray’s goal
sport that is usually cost-prohibitive—is also of creating a Performing TECH USED
being introduced and will become a regular Arts Academy by 2020.
offering.” “We believe if ■ READ 180, System 44, iRead, MATH 180
Gray credits the coming together of we provide for our
■ Google Classroom—Digital learning management
community, praising her partnerships and “Hard students—give them the
system using Google apps
Hat Nation” (#hardhatnation) in getting the tools that are necessary,
job done. Achievements are touted on social give them access and ■ MobyMax—Digital personalized
media, changing the tone of the district’s story opportunity—they will learning software
to engage the public positively. Building a better be successful and rise
■ Seesaw—Student-driven digital portfolio
future, which she defines simply as “hope and to the occasion. We
opportunity,” comes in many forms—programs offer experiences and a ■ Flipgrid—Digital tool that amplifies students’ voices
like National Digital Learning Day, “The Pen Is supportive environment
Mightier Than the Sword” student documentary to build their confidence. ■ Autodesk Inventor CAD Software
that took top honors at the Pocono Mountains It’s not about the win; it’s
Film Festival, students performing with Wyclef about making sure they
Jean during the Asbury Park Music and Film have a place at the table.” young adult novelist. She has been covering
Festival, emotional learning programs in inspirational educators and technology in the
partnership with KYDS, competing at the Urban Sascha Zuger is a lifestyle journalist for K–12 arena for Tech & Learning for the past
Debate Club at Harvard (with three first-time national magazines, a travel writer, and a eight years.

BACK OFFICE BUSINESS


EDWEB AND COSN PARTNER TO SUPPORT PILOT PROGRAM
SUPERINTENDENTS AND DISTRICT LEADERS OFFERS FREE
edWeb is hosting an online community and engaging webinars to help ROBOTICS
superintendents connect and collaborate and get the maximum value from TEACHING
the CoSN Empowered Superintendents initiative. The initial webinar, “The RESOURCES
Empowered Superintendent: Leading Digital Transformation,” is available Sony is offering a pilot program
on demand and features Dr. David Schuler, superintendent of Township High through which educators will be
School District 214 (IL), and Dr. Chris Gaines, superintendent of Mehlville provided multiple KOOV kits,
(MO) School District, discussing sharing strategies and building confidence as free of cost, along with one hour
technology leaders. Monthly webinars will tackle topics such as Student Data of training with the KOOV team
Privacy: A Priority and Essential Commitment (October 8th) and Cyber Security: A Critical School District Priority
(November 12th). Superintendents and district leaders are invited to join the edWeb Community, SuperConnected, for
invitations to upcoming programs and to collaborate with peers on these topics.

and four weeks to experience


AMERICORPS VOLUNTEERS IMPROVE READING KOOV firsthand. KOOV is an
OUTCOMES IN DES MOINES (IA) PUBLIC SCHOOLS educational robotics and coding
To support the district’s mission to improve student literacy proficiency, the district kit for ages eight and up, made up
trained AmeriCorps members to deliver the offline instruction provided by Lexia of blocks, sensors, actuators, and a
Reading Core5. Leveraging the power of the volunteers to improve student reading companion app. The app teaches
outcomes requires an understanding of the instruction, the students’ needs, the data, and core concepts about design, coding,
the resources themselves. School leaders used specific strategies to ensure that these and robotics, and it features a
volunteers could support instruction and help improve reading outcomes effectively. 50+ hour educational course,
They trained volunteers to access Lexia’s reports and use the data to adjust direct instruction. The district standardized an guidance on building and coding
implementation plan, so that everyone worked with a common set of tools, and helped volunteers understand the data by for pre-designed robots, and a free
teaching them how to access the data of the populations they were working with and how to follow up with students who production area to build and code
were flagged for offline instruction. new robots from scratch.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM | N OV E M B E R 2 01 8 | 37
WHAT’SNEW
TECH & LEARNING ROUNDS UP A SUMMARY OF NEW TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS

Acer (edu.pa@acer.com) made available its Acer Repair


Certification eLearning Program to education accounts in
the United States and Canada, giving high school students the opportunity
software
to build transferable skills in a hands-on setting. Students interact with
eLearning modules including videos, resource materials and assessments, & online
then must demonstrate
their technical skills for a GOOGLE FOR
local school staff member EDUCATION UPDATES
by replacing either the (edu.google.com)
mainboard or the LCD Google for Education announced updates
screen of an Acer C738T and new tools to help teachers keep
Chromebook, a product innovation alive in
qualified for the program. their classrooms.
Google Slides
now features
machine learning
closed captions to aid in instruction,
Chromebooks now features Labster
Chromebook labs to help students with
their assignments, Jamboard has a new
View Only mode that lets teachers share
jam sessions from their lessons that day
while restricting edit access, updates
to Docs made adding MLA citations a
smoother process, and more.
Seville Classics (www.sevilleclassics.
com) announced the expansion of its EDSBY UPDATES
AIRLIFT line of sit-to-stand desks. (edsby.com/edsby-k12-data-
The AIRLIFT S3 Electric aggregation-analytics/)
Standing Desks feature a Edsby announced that it has built
three-section frame that rises from sophisticated data aggregation and analysis
24.8 inches to a maximum height of capabilities that
51.4 inches. Additionally, the desks allow states,
include dual motors that lift up to provinces and
264 lbs. at a brisk 1.49 inches per countries to optimize their education
second. The desks also feature a investments and policies. This K-12 ‘data
curved desk top (54” x 30”) available switch’ uses proprietary and open standards
in a black, white, or walnut finish. to talk to a wide variety of data sources, and
merges data into a single store to provide a
unified view of educational data - such as
achievement, attendance and students at risk
- in real time.

FOR MORE OF THE LATEST PRODUCT RELEASES, VISIT US ONLINE AT TECHLEARNING.COM.

38 | N OVE MB E R 2 018 | WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


WHAT’S NEW
software & online
Destiny Resource Manager, and Destiny
FARIA EDUCATION Analytics. Highlights include new reader
MIDAS
GROUP AND RUBICON functionality in Destiny Library Manager,
(www.midaseducation.com)
( fariaedu.com) & (Rubicon.com) MIDAS (Massively Integrated Data
offline access on Chromebooks and support
Faria Education Group Limited has Analytics System) is a single data model
for exporting eBook notes to Google Drive
acquired Rubicon. Combined, Faria and application that encompasses all of the
or Microsoft One Drive documents, web
Rubicon will serve over 10,000 schools common
accessibility guidelines update to Destiny
in 130 countries with curriculum support functions for
Discover, QoL updates to the Lexile
for over 600 academic standards. Faria instruction
Reading Program Service and Resource
will deliver a new and improved version of in one system with one User Interface.
Manager, and more.
Atlas, combining its curriculum planning MIDAS announced its new website has
functions with ManageBac’s learning added the Education Data Visualization
management functions including assessment
ISTATION AND BOULDER and Educator Growth and Mentoring
and reporting, service learning, and project-
LEARNING SPEECH tools. The revamped website also better
based learning. Faria will continue to
RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY illustrates and explains the functionality of
support schools on the Atlas platform with
UPDATE the product, including a new products tab
(www.istation.com) & (boulderlearning.com)
no changes to the service, its pricing, or that more clearly shows the scope of the
Istation recently announced a partnership
customer support, or the planned feature MIDAS Education Enterprise System.
with Boulder Learning, Inc., to develop
improvements.
its Oral Reading Fluency and Listening
Comprehension Program using Boulder
SECOND NATURE
FRESHGRADE PROFESSIONAL Learning’s speech recognition technology.
QWERTYTOWN 2.0
LEARNING CENTER The new Istation program utilizes Boulder
(qwertytown.com)
(www.freshgrade.com) QwertyTown 2.0 is a web-based
Learning’s FLORA (fluent oral reaching
FreshGrade announced its Professional keyboarding app that teaches typing,
assessment) speech-recognition and
Learning Center. Designed digital literacy, and online communication
assessment product to analyze what
to give teachers flexibility skills. Students are driven to succeed
students say and how fluently they speak.
with their professional by QwertyTown’s
The program’s goal is providing teachers
development (PD), the gamification features,
with a time-saving tool that allows them
Center offers online webinars, modular social motivation and
to focus on teaching instead of student
courses, and customizable PD options engaging lessons and
assessments.
to streamline educators’ FreshGrade’s challenges. Teachers
and administrators are empowered with
practice. The resources in the Professional ISTE AND NEARPOD tools that meet the needs of everyone for
Learning Center can be accessed at any (www.iste.org) & (nearpod.com)
time on any device and feature a mass- any sized school. QwertyTown is One
Nearpod announced an initiative to provide
enrollment option for easy implementation Roster compatible and has partnered with
premium access to content to members of
for principals and teachers. The webinars Clever to offer Auto Sync, Google SSO,
the International Society for Technology
are led by teachers and come pre-recorded sign-in with badges, Chromebook auto log-
in Education (ISTE). The partnership will
and live on the Center. in and more.
expand access
to webinars,
FOLLETT DESTINY 16.0 articles, and other
LEARN AND
(www.follettcommunity.com/
resources designed to support teachers on
PROJECT UNICORN
webinar/destiny16-0) (projectunicorn.learnplatform.com)
how to best use technology for learning and
Follett has released Destiny 16.0, a new Lea(R)n and Project
teaching. The initiative will also connect
version of the Unicorn announced
ISTE and Nearpod members with edtech
market-leading the launch of the
experts through learning networks that offer
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software & online WHAT’S NEW

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Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation


Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation

13. Publication Title 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below
Tech & Learning October-18
(Requester Publications Only)
1. Publication Title 2. Publication Number 3. Filing Date 15.
Extent and Nature of Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue No. Copies of Single Issue
Tech & Learning 695590 9/28/2018 During Preceding 12 Months Published Nearest to Filing Date
a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)
44278 43708
Outside-County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions Stated on
4. Issue Frequency 5. Number of Issues Published Annua 6. Annual Subscription Price PS Form 3541. Include direct written recipient, telemarketing,
(1) and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including 25318 23146
Monthly (Except July and December) 10 $29.95 nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser's proof
copies and exchange copies.)
7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4) Contact Person In-County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions Stated on
Future US Inc. Kwentin Keenan b. Legitimate PS Form 3541. Include direct written recipient, telemarketing,
28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor Telephone Paid and/or (2) and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including
Requested nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser's proof
New York, NY 10016-7959 703-852-4604 Distribution copies and exchange copies.)
8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer) (By Mail and Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors,
Future US Inc. Outside the Mail) (3) Counter Sales, and Other Paid or Requested
28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor Distribution Outside USPS.
New York, NY 10016-7959
9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) (4) Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through
the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail)
Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)
Allison Knapp
28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor
C. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation  25318 23146
(Sum of 15b. (1), (2),(3),and (4)]
New York, NY 10016-7959
Outside County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541
Editor (Name and complete mailing address) (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests
Kevin Hogan (1) induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including 18160 20296
28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor Association Requests, Names obtained from Business
New York, NY 10016-7959 Directories, Lists, and other sources).
Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address) In-County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541
Christine Weiser d. NonRequested (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests
Distribution (2) induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including
28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor
(By Mail and Association Requests, Names obtained from Business
New York, NY 10016-7959 Outside the Mail) Directories, Lists, and other sources).
10. (Do not leave blank If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the Nonrequested copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other
names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies
names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of (3) mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail or
each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Package Services Rates).
Full Name Complete Mailing Address
(4) Nonrequested copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include 282 201
Pickup Stands, Trade show, Showrooms and Other Sources).
Future US Inc. (Future PLC) 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor New York, NY 10016-7959
e. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) 18442 20497

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c. and 15e.)  43760 43643

g. Copies not Distributed  518 65

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) 44278 43708

i. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation  57.9% 53.0%


(15c divided by 15f x 100)

* If you are claiming electronic opies, go to line 16. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17.

11 Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or


Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or 16. Electronic Copy Circulation
Other Securities. If none, check box -----------------------------------------------------------------------------  None
Full Name Complete Mailing Address
a. Requested and Paid Electronic Copies 
b. Total Requested and Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies 
(Line 16a)

c. Total Requested Copy Distribution (Line 15f) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies 


(Line 16a)

d. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Both Print & Electronic Copies) 
(16b divided by 16c x 100)

 I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are legitimate requests or paid copies.

17 Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the November 2018 issue of this publication.

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner Date
September 28, 2018
Publisher
12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to maiI at nonprofit rates) (Check one)
I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form
The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions
 Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months (including civil penalties).
 Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

PS Form 3526-R, July 2014


PS Form 3526-R, July 2014 PSN: 7530-09-000-8855

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software & online
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How to launch an instructional Apple device or solution system sets teachers free to
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Benchmark Education Company (BEC) Expansion Grant

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