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Digitally signed by

Maria Morrison

Maria DN: cn=Maria


Morrison, c=CA,
o=Ningwakwe
Learning Press,
Morri email=maria@ning
wakwe.on.ca
Reason: I am the

son author of this


document
Date: 2008.05.22
16:09:49 -04'00'

Ningwakwe Learning Press

Submission Guide

February 2008
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................ 3
CATEGORIES OF SUBMISSIONS........................................... 3
SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL OR RESPONDING TO A
CALL FOR PROPOSALS........................................................... 4
FIRST REVIEW PROCESS ....................................................... 4
PUBLICATION PROCESS......................................................... 5
CONTRACT ................................................................................... 5
MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION ........................................................ 5
POST PUBLICATION ...................................................................... 6
ELECTRONIC MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION
GUIDELINES ............................................................................... 7
NINGWAKWE LEARNING PRESS STYLE SHEET ............. 9
PUNCTUATION .............................................................................. 9
QUOTATIONS ................................................................................ 9
NOTES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY ......................................................... 9
COMPOUND WORDS ................................................................... 10
SPELLING ................................................................................... 10
ALSO NOTE:................................................................................ 10
NUMBERS ................................................................................... 11
BULLETED AND NUMBERED LISTS ............................................. 11
PROOFREADERS MARKS ..................................................... 12

©NINGWAKWE LEARNING PRESS 2008


WWW.NINGWAKWE.ON.CA

1-888-551-9757

NLP Submission Guideline


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Introduction
The Ningwakwe Learning Press is an Aboriginal operated publishing press. Our mandate is
to publish books by Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis & Inuit) authors. The Press prides
itself on providing Aboriginal Authenticity in all aspects of our publishing process - from
staff to authors, editors and artists, whenever possible.

The genres the Press publish are:


• Literacy and educational materials within an Aboriginal cultural context
• Aboriginal languages
• Fiction, which includes novels, poetry and anthologies
• Non-fiction in social history and policy as it relates to Aboriginal issues
• Non-fiction, creative and humour
• Children and young adult titles

Categories of Submissions

1. Project Funded: The Ningwakwe Learning Press is a non-profit organization.


As such, the majority of our publications have been pre-arranged by special
project funding. It is the Press’s duty to abide by these funders guidelines. The
Press has set topics, ideas and processes that must be followed.
• Project funded individuals are hired by the Ningwakwe Learning Press to complete a set of
tasks monitored by the Press staff. As such, we refer to them as ‘contractors’.

2. Self-Published: If authors or organizations wish to publish their material with


the Press, the same publishing services as above are offered. The main difference
is that the author or client organization retains greater control over the
development. The self-published author may opt out of some or all of the
publishing services. Even if the Press publishes a material in this category, it does
not mean the Press will distribute it. A separate distribution contract outlining
rights and rates will need to be reviewed and assessed.
• Self-published authors and organizations will be referred to as ‘authors’

3. NLP Sponsored: The Press may decide to publish a material without


guaranteed project funding. In this case, all of the Press’ policies, procedures and
publishing processes must be followed.

In the remainder of this guide, we will refer to both consultants and authors as ‘authors’.

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Submitting a Proposal or Responding to a Call for
Proposals
Either an electronic proposal or full manuscript as a paper copy may be submitted for
consideration. Enquiries should be sent to the Publishing Manager of the Press. We ask that
the submission include the following:
• an abstract;
• some estimation of length and inclusion of such things as maps, charts,
illustrations;
• tentative table of contents;
• brief biography of the author;
• Curriculum vitae (if applicable)
• Cover letter

First Review Process


Each submission is initially reviewed by the Press’s publishing staff. This internal review
assesses the submission’s relationship to the Press’s areas of focus and mandate, and also
considers production and marketing aspects. Once a submission passes this internal review,
the manuscript will be sent to the Curriculum Development Task Team (CDTT) which
consists of at least two outside readers.

We ask the CDTT reviewers to answer the following questions about the manuscript:
• Does the work make an original contribution to the subject area?
• Is the manuscript as it stands acceptable for publication? If not, would a revised
manuscript be publishable? What revisions would be required?
• What suggestions do you have for improving the manuscript, relating to style,
inaccuracies, omissions, etc.?

If the reviewers recommend revisions, their report will be passed on to the author to assist
with revisions. Each manuscript reviewed will also be assessed financially. Press staff will
assess the manuscript’s estimated production costs including any special features (e.g. colour
reproductions) and potential market. All scholarly books require some form of financial
assistance to be economically viable, and Press staff will discuss with the author if an
application to funders will be required to make publication financially feasible.

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Publication Process
Once the manuscript has been accepted for publication, it will be assigned a place in the
Press’s publication schedule. The contract writer will be issued a contract and a deadline for
receipt of the final manuscript and all accompanying material.

Contract

The author is given a contract for the book. Ningwakwe Learning Press’s contract is
written in plain language, and author are encouraged to discuss the terms of the
contract with the Publishing Manager, or seek their own legal advice. The contract
details the responsibilities of both the Press and the author; for example, it is the
responsibility of the Press to edit it, to design the cover and insides, to bear financial
responsibility for publication, and to pay the author on a regular basis. It is the
responsibility of the author, for example, to obtain permissions to reprint all material
that is copyright elsewhere and to follow the Press’s style guide and meet deadlines.

Manuscript Preparation

The Publishing Manager will provide information regarding acceptable formats for
electronic submission of the manuscript, including computer programs, operating
systems, how to set up files for and submit endnotes, graphs, maps, etc., basic
formatting instructions, etc. For example, we prefer electronic submissions to be in
Microsoft Word, or as an RTF file, and that footnotes and endnotes not be
embedded. We require a paper copy of the manuscript that matches the electronic
copy exactly.

The Ningwakwe Learning Press uses the Chicago Manual of Style and the Oxford
Canadian Dictionary as guides for house style.

Submitted manuscripts should consist of the following parts (items in square


brackets are optional):

1. Title page
2. [Dedication page]
3. Table of Contents
4. [Foreword]
5. [Preface]
6. [Acknowledgements]
7. Complete text (chapters, articles, etc.)
8. [Tables]
9. [Figures, maps, and other illustrations]
10. [Appendices]
11. Bibliography
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Editing and Production

The press will edit the manuscript, electronically or on hard copy, and return it to the
author. At this stage, the manuscript will be edited to conform to house style, and for
grammar, punctuation, spelling, logical development, consistency, etc. The Press uses
a Publishing Review Task Team (PRTT) that reviews all materials. One of their main
duties is to edit for cultural accuracy. The author may approve or reject suggested
changes; this is a process of consultation. At this time the author may also make final
changes. The Press will do final proofreading.

The design, cover, and typography of the book are the responsibility of the Press and
the designer. The input of the author is welcome.

Post Publication

After the book is released, the Press will market the book through a combination of
publicity, advertising, and direct mail campaigns, which may include, for example, a
book launch, author readings and book signings, author interviews, submission of
copies for reviews to appropriate journals and newspapers, advertising, displays, and
inclusion in catalogues. The author may be asked to be available for media
promotion.

The Press attends conferences and trade shows, where its books are displayed. As
well, the title is featured in the biannual catalogue, and listed on the Press’s web site.
Copies of the book may be sent to selected instructors to review for text adoptions.

As is specified in the author’s contract, the author will be given a number of


complementary copies of the book. The author may also purchase from the Press
additional copies of the book at a discount.

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Electronic Manuscript Preparation Guidelines

The Ningwakwe Learning Press prefers manuscripts submitted in electronic form. The
advantage of electronic manuscripts is that they can be edited and made into a book without
having to retype anything. Please keep in mind, however, that whatever software you use to
prepare your manuscript, the Press will then convert your manuscript to a software of the
editor’s choosing. This version is eventually submitted to a compositor who will make pages
in yet another software program. So please keep it simple—if you spend a lot of time
using your software to format your manuscript and customize the way it looks, we, in turn,
must spend time paring your manuscript back down to its basic elements to ensure that the
whole process goes smoothly.

Use the following guidelines to ensure that the electronic manuscript and printout you
submit to us will be ready to edit:

• All the elements in your manuscript should be easy to identify. Clearly identify each
chapter and each additional part of your manuscript—front matter, introduction,
references, appendixes, figures, endnotes etc.
• Your manuscript should be double-spaced throughout.
• Make sure that there are no comments, annotations, or hidden text whatsoever in the
final version of the manuscript that you submit to the press. In addition, make sure
that all “tracked changes” or other revision marks have been accepted as final (i.e.,
there should be no revision marks in the final manuscript).
• Do not use the space bar to achieve tabs or indents or to align text.
• Do not use the automatic hyphenation feature. There should be no “optional”
hyphens in your manuscript.
• Use the same typeface, or font, throughout the entire manuscript. If a second font
containing special characters not available in standard typefaces is used, please alert
your editor.
• If a chapter has more than one level of subheads, differentiate them visually (with
centering, bolding, underlining, etc.) or, preferably, by typing (using angle brackets)
<A>, <B>, or <C> at the beginning of each subhead, as appropriate.
• To insert notes, use your software’s built-in endnotes feature. Use the feature “as is”;
please don’t reset any of the options. The benefit of the built-in notes feature is that
it connects the text of a specific note with a specific place in the text. These
“embedded” notes can be moved, combined, or deleted with ease; the number in the
text will always carry its text with it, and the notes will automatically renumber as
needed. All formatting (of number size and style, placement of the notes relative to
the book as a whole, and even conversion of endnotes to footnotes and vice versa)
will be performed by the Press. If you do not use your word processor’s note-making
feature, use superscript to indicate note numbers in text.
• Do not assign “styles” to achieve different formats for subheads, block quotes,
paragraph indents, etc. The default, or “normal,” style should be the only style in
your manuscript. If your program assigns a special style to automatic endnotes or
footnotes, however, that’s okay.

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• In a list of references, for successive works by the same author, use six hyphens (i.e.,
------) in place of the author’s name after the first appearance.
• Do not insert an additional hard return to create extra space between paragraphs.
Where you wish a space break in the book to indicate a change of subject, type
“<space>” on a line by itself.
• Format prose extracts (block quotations) and verse extracts with your word
processor’s feature for indenting paragraphs. Insert a hard return only at the end of a
paragraph or a line of verse. Do not “line up” text using the space bar—adjust the
indent level instead.
• Do not “manually” create hanging indents for your bibliography by using hard
returns and tabs in the middle of an entry. Instead, use the hanging indent feature in
your word processing program. If you are unsure how to do this, simply indent the
first line of each entry (i.e., format them like the paragraphs in the rest of the book).
• For each table, illustration, photograph, or figure of any kind, please place a
bracketed, sequentially numbered “callout” in the manuscript that indicates
placement. Also include a separate, sequentially numbered list that matches the
callouts in the manuscript and contains a caption and credit line (or source), if any,
for each figure. Regardless of whether you submit the figures in electronic form, you
must include a printout or photocopy of each figure with the printout of your
manuscript.
• No two pages of your manuscript should have the same number, and no page should
be submitted unnumbered. Either number the pages according to section (i.e., “chap.
1, p. 57”) or consecutively throughout the manuscript.
• Copy your final, completed manuscript onto disk, Do not make any changes to the
disk after you have submitted the final manuscript either by email or delivered on
disk.
• Identify your file type and label your disks, and include the name of the software you
used to produce your manuscript (i.e., “Corel WordPerfect version 10” or “Word
2002 for Windows XP”).

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Ningwakwe Learning Press Style Sheet
The Press uses The Chicago Manual of Style, and the Oxford Canadian Dictionary as its
major guides.

Punctuation
• do not use serial commas
• use double quotes; if there is a quote within a quote, use single within double
• punctuation following italic copy is to be italic, same for bold
• use , ’ ” not ‘, ”
• commas and periods go inside quotation marks; exclamation points, question
marks, colons and semicolons go outside unless part of a quotation
• for ellipses, use three spaced dots. . . . If the ellipsis follows a complete sentence,
the period falls normally at the end of the sentence and the ellipsis afterward. Don’t
begin or conclude quotations with ellipses, even if the quotation is a fragment.
• don’t put parentheses within parentheses; use square brackets instead. E.g. (see Jim
Smith [1966]).
• possessive, word ending in s: James’s
• possessive, plural word: the Mortons’

Quotations
• quotations of fewer than 100 words should be run into text with quotation marks;
for quotations of 100 or more words, remove quotation marks and set the material
as a block quotation, which will be set down in size and spaced from text by the
formatter.
• make sure that a source is cited for all quotations
• authorial interpolations should be placed within square brackets
• don’t put brackets around letters at beginnings of quotes to signify changes in
upper or lower case (i.e., according to CMS, we may take the liberty of changing the
case of the first word at the beginning of a quote to allow for smooth syntax)
• [sic] use roman type
• syntax: all quotations must be incorporated into the text with appropriate
punctuation (i.e., no quotation should stand alone without being part of a preceding
or following sentence)

Notes and Bibliography


• endnote/footnote numbers are always positioned outside parentheses and
semicolons. E.g., “ . . . state)”24 not “ . . . state24)” and “ . . . state:”24 not “ . . .
state24:”
• for names of publishing houses, delete suffices “Incorporated,” “Limited,” etc. (or
short forms of)
delete articles before names of publishing houses or journals (e.g., Free Press, not
The Free Press; Vancouver Sun, not The Vancouver Sun). Should read the Free
Press, the Vancouver Sun.

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• use “and” instead of “&,” even for publishers such as Douglas and McIntyre, who
normally use an ampersand
• abbreviate US states using two-letter abbreviations (NY, MA, etc.); same for
Canadian provinces (BC, AB etc.)
• “et al.” and “ibid.” should be roman, not italic
• close up initials of people’s names (e.g., E.D. Smith) in text, notes, and bibliography
• if there is a complete bibliography, all notes may be short style (surname and short
title, page number). Avoid the use of “idem,” “op. cit.,” “loc. cit.” in notes. Use
“ibid.” if the title immediately preceding it is the same, otherwise use surname and
short title
• multiple entries for authors in bibliographies should be listed according to date of
publication (earliest to most recent) if author-date citation system is used, and
alphabetically (according to first major word in title) otherwise
• in chapter headings in notes section, chapter subtitle should be omitted
• in dissertations (Ph.D.) and theses (M.A.), the university department is not included
• when citing volume and issue numbers for periodicals, use the following format:
Modern Languages Association 34, 2 (1985): 3–45. Classics 25 (1992): 1–22. Don’t
put “vol.” or “no.” before the numerals. To avoid needless information, do not
include the season, month, or date unless the volume and/or issue number are
missing.

Compound Words
In general, follow the rules and principles set forth in Chicago Manual of Style or the
Oxford Canadian Dictionary.

Spelling
Use “Canadian” spelling: Oxford Canadian Dictionary

Some NLP preferences:


• Aboriginal, even as an adjective (e.g., Aboriginal art)
• Arctic (noun), arctic (adj.) Canada
• centre
• cheque
• cooperation, coefficient, coordination, co-found, co-worker, co-edit, co-author
• data (always plural)
• decision making/maker (noun)
• focussed, focussing
• fulfill
• governor general, lieutenant governor
• grey
• indigenous
• Native (when referring to First Nations), even as an adjective (Native belief)

Also note:
• “de facto,” “ibid.,” “et al.” “a priori,” and similar foreign terms now commonly

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used in English and appearing in English-language dictionaries should be in roman
type (follow Oxford Canadian Dictionary)
• first, second, third (not firstly, secondly, thirdly)
• legal cases: Calder v. Attorney General of British Columbia (don’t use “vs.”)
• close up acronyms and abbreviations (FEAC, CPR, UN, UK, BC, USA)
• c. for “circa” (e.g., c. 1870) in captions; but in text use “about”
• capitalize “chapter,” “figure,” “table,” in textual references and use numerals. E.g.
(see Chapter 4).
• one-third, one-half, etc.
• alphabetization is word by word, not letter by letter. “Mc” (e.g., McDonald) is
alphabetized as if it were “Mac” and “St.” as if it were “Saint.”

Numbers
• numbers under 100 are spelled out, 100 and over are numerals (unless numbers are
particularly dense in one section and refer to unit quantities, or if manuscript is more
scientific)
• 2 x 4 mm, not 2 mm x 4 mm
• dates, page numbers, and percentage numbers, chapter numbers, part numbers are
in numerals
• 1990s (no apostrophe)
• 2nd, not 2d when referring to editions in bibliography and notes (in text, however,
write these out)
• dates: June 1992, 12 June 1992, 12 June
• equals sign has a space on either side (x = y)
• when specifying ranges of dates or numbers use “between/and” or “from/to”
don’t use dashes except in parenthetical material
• between 1950 and 1962 (not between 1950–62) (but, the 1980–81 academic year)
• from 12 to 15 percent (not from 12–15 percent)
• currency: spell out or use numerals in accordance with above rule (write out
numbers under 100); fractional amounts over one dollar are expressed in numerals
($l.25); whole-dollar amounts are set with zeros after the decimal points when they
appear in the same context with fractional amounts, and only then ($6.95 and $7.00;
$325 and $400); a price of $3 million, or $7.3 billion)

Bulleted and Numbered Lists


If the points in a list are complete sentences, they have initial caps and closing
periods; if they are fragments, they have no initial caps and no closing punctuation,
except for the last point, which concludes with a period. If you come across a
situation where some points are fragments and some consist of a fragment and then
an additional sentence, try to revise the material so that all points are either
fragments or sentences. If this is not possible, put periods after all the points, even
the fragments, but don’t start the points with initial caps.

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Proofreaders Marks

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