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ARTEP 34.24.

5-
1 O. DRI LL
ARMY TRAINING AND HEADOUARTERS
EVALUATION PROGRAM DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
NO. 34-245- 1 0-DRtLL Washrngton, DC,31 December 19g7

DRI LLS/PROCEDURES
FOR THE INTEI-LIGENCE SECTION

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Paragraph page
PREFACE .. lt
CHAPTER 1 Drill Training . .. .. 1-1
General .....1-1 1-1
Training 1_9 1-1
Format .....1-ó 1Ô t-2
CHAPTER 2 Drills 2-r

Drill 1 Recordi ling Intelligence Info


formation..... 2-r
Drill2 Intelliggence Preparation of the Battlefield
Id.... 2-14
Drill 3 Intelliggence Annex to the O Operation Ordeler...
RECONNAISSSANCE AND SUR\ RVEILLANCEI ,PLAN.2-29
Driìl4a Battali<ion Reconnaissancee ¿and Surveillanrnce
Planniring . .
2-39
Drill 4b Battalirion Reconnaissance. ¿r.rd Sr'lrrreitlan
rnce
ring ..
Planni. 2.49
DISSE¡]MINATiON OF INT {TELLIGENICEDl')
Drill Sa Briefinng,/Transmitting byy ìRadio
Drill
Dri '...'.' 2-60
Driìl5b Writterrn Reports
Driìl
Dri 2-67
Appendix A
Ap
App Individual Task to Di
Ir Drill Matrix . .. AO
llossary
Glc
Glos AAcronyms and Abbre rreviations . . CGlossa. ry-1
;: PREFACE CHAPTER 1

DR¡LL TRAIN!NG
1. The purpose of this drill book is to provide the intelligence 1-1. General.
sectionieaäer with the standard U.S. Army drills that apply
to his section. continuous mastery of these drills is an essen- a. A unit's abílity to accomplish its mission frequently
tial baseline requirement for all intelligence sections' depends on the ability of its soldiers to execute keyactions
instiirctively in immediate reaction to a situation -or order.
2. Tables of organization and equipment (TOE) 07245J410,. The ability to do this is fundamental to survival on the bat-
Mechanized InTantry Ba.ttalion, was used as a basis for writ- tlefield. Drills are designed to focus on a iimited number of
i"g tfrlr drill book. Oth". type units should adapt these drills key actions that every like unit in the Army must master.
to their respective TOE. United States Army drills are U.S. Army standards, and your
3. The proponent of this publication is Headquar!91s' section must be able to execute them without deviatio., arrd
TRADöC. Submit changès for irnproving this publication o-n precisely as described. A drill is a collective task at section
ÐÁ Form 2028 (Recomrnended Chãnges to Publications and level which has been identified as one of the most vitar tasks
Blank Forms) and forward it to Commander, 9.p._49+f performed by that unit for success in combat. It is largely
Int.ìligutt". Óenter and School, ATTN: ATSI-TD-UTC, Fort mission, enemy, terrain, troops and time availatrle (METT T)
Huachuca, AZ 85613-7000. independent; requires minimal leader actions to execute; is
executed on a cue such as a specified enemy action or simply
4. unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine gender is a ieader order; and is executed in the same way every time.
used, both men and women are included.
b. Ðrills do several important things:
(1) They allow your section to perform critical tasks
instantly because they have been practiced repetitively.
(2) They reduce communications requirements because
the soldiers know what they have to do.
(3) Thev build teamwork.
(4) They save time, energy, and lives.
X-2. Training. Drills may be trained using a talk-through.
walk-through, and run-through method. you,'of course, must
be a master of the drill to train your soldiers to execute it. you
may wish to periodically talk your soldiers through the
driil-explaining each soldier's role-then have tirem go
through it slowly, correcting any mistakes as they go. !Vhu.r-
ever possible, train in an environment in which you would be
expected to execute the drill in wartime. Do it frequently in
mission-oriented protection posture (MOpp). Be tòugh ãn
you_rself and your soldiers. A good section executes instantly
--'
and with precision. Your section will pay a high pricà for
faiiure to do so.
1-3. F-ormat. This drill book contains two chapters' orìe CHAPTER 2
appendix, and a glossarY. [¡RtLt_s
a. Chapter 1 is entitled DriII Training' It contains general
i.rfãrr"utiã" about the drill book, training guidelines for
leáclri"g drills, and the format for this drill book'
b. Chapter 2 contains five drills for use by the intelligence DM¡LL 1
section leader to train his section' Recordimg ! mteBllgemce ImforrnatËøar
c. Appendix A contains an individual task to drill matrix
tfrãt iaä"tifies the leader and individual tasks extracted from T.dSK: Record intelligence information.
innärt"tv Qualification Standards Manual ffQSM)
ã¿-li s5a i and Soldier Training Publications (STPs) CtlE: The intelligence officer directs his section to record
incoming intelligence information to support the unit,s
34-9681-SM and 34-96824-SM-TG. mrsslon.
d. The glossary contains a list of acronyms and abbrevia- STANÐARDS: No prior drills are required. The intelligence
tions used in this drill book' section will enter intelligence information into the data base
which will make evaluation and analysis easier and more
accurate, and will facilitate preparation of intelligence
reports by drawing together all available informãtion on a
specific subject.
SUPPORTING INDIVIÐUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,
Individual Task to Ðrill Matrix.
XLLUSTR-A.TIONS: See Figures 2-1 (Organization of a TOC
Area), 2-2 (Intelligence Journ al), 2-B (Order of Battle Situa-
tion Map), 2-4 (Coordinate Register with Written Entries),
and 2'5 (Coordinate Register with Schematic Entry)
PERFORMANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-
through instructions.
SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J410. Other type units
should use equipment organic or available to their-respective
unit.
(1) Carrier command post, Iight tracked.
(2) Radio set, AN/VRC-90.
(3) Radio set, AN/VRC-92.
(4) Telephone set, TA-312 /PT (2 each).
(5) Power supply, vehicle, HYP-57/TSEC.
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
markers, paper, pens, penciìs, masking tape, blank forms,
and so forth.
(7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale).

t-2 2-r
(B) Applicable reference materiais, unit operatfgngrdg¡
TALK-THROUGH INST'R,UCTtrONS :

(OPORD), intelligence L"li*ut", DA Forrn i594 (llailv Staff a. Orientation. Devices for recording intelligence informa,
);;r""il; ö"1v öiri"""'s Log), and current order of battle tion used by the intelligence section include: intelligence
(OB) holdings. journal, intelligence journal file, situation rnap (SITMAP),
(9) Other TOÐ equipment, as necessary' and the coordinate register. Each member of the intelligence
wjth section is personally responsible for ensuring that each bit of
b. Training site. The intelligence section is collocated (BTF) incoming combat information is properly recorded, evalu-
th; Sg iop"r"Iio". "ã"tio"l in-tþe b.attalion 'r'ask force
of the ToC ated, interpreted, made available to the battalion cornmander
;;;i;i "p"rations ""tti"t irocl' The location and be near routes to and his staff, and disseminated to using units.
*""ïpt""ide for good comntunications
subordinate
i;i;h"; h"tdquartãrs, companv teams, other iocalon^s
(1) The intelligence journal is the official, permanent,
i""iir,^""1iËu ÈrF trains. Buitt-up aïeas are good used' the TOC and chronological record of reports and messages that have
f"r ifrtÈfF. TOC. If built-up areas cannot be
provide cover and con- been received and transmitted, important events that have
;h";iã be tocated o., u r",r"i.e slope to
occurred, and actions taken in response. The journal is of
cealment frorn e"te-v gto""a obsãrvation and fire' This drill
garrison environment' great significance, so accuracy and cornpleteness are
t"ãt tf." be performôd in a essential.
c. Section instructions. (2) The intelligence journal file is maintained by the
(1) Arrange the intelligence section in a realistic config- intelligence section to retrieve journal entries and supporting
uration for fietã operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1)' material when writing reports or answering questions about
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough enemy activity taking place during a specified reporting
understaitding of recording devices and procedures' period.
(3) Break the section d'own into teams to simutrate 24- (3) The SITMAP is a temporary graphic display of cur-
and a
horr, ài"r^tion. Each team will consist of a team chief rent enemy dispositions and major enemy activities. It is
team member. used to portray the enemy situation and provide a basis for
comparison to determine the significance of newly received
(4) Ensure that the required Ïesources are on hand prior
data about enemy forces. The SITMAP will show possible
to comrnencement of training' intelligence gaps which may require redirection of the collec-
(5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE' tion effort. Maintenance of the SITMAP at battalion level is
usually a joint S2lS3 effort. The friendly situation is nor-
mally the responsibility of the S3, and the enemy situation
TWO WAVS OF ORGANIUüNG T@C the responsibility of the 52. Maintenance of the SITMAP
wË[0Ee 8-Eg takes precedence over all other recording means during com-
roP view bat operations. In a fast-moving situation, particularly af. the
ffiE BTF level, the SITMAP is the basis for briefing the com-
mander and his staff daily, or more often, and may be the
ffi1 fr only recording device used.
(4) The coordinate register provides the intelligence sec-
tion with a workable counterpart to the extensive intelligence
files maintained at higher echelons. This device permits
ready access to available intelligence information by 52
personnel.

Figure 2-1. Organization of a TOC Area'

oo ot
a'.)
b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety precau- (4) Action actually taken as a result, to include
dissemi-
tions should be observed. nation assigned to reports or information received, and other
c. Demonstration. None. internaÌ recording actions.
d. Explanation. ¡flTELIIGETCE IOUR¡{AN- SAHPTE PAGE
(1) Explain the process of recording incoming informa-
tion, illustrating each recording procedure. Use a simulated
message that would be received by the intelligence section to 29 Bd
begin the recording process. IJse a mapboard with a map of
the area of operations (AO) to illustrate posting a SITMAP.
Explain the purpose and use of the intelligence journal, intel-
ligence journal file, and the coordinate register. Talk through
the process of completing each recording device using an
enlarged example of each device. Explain how messages are
received by the intelligence section during normal operations.
(2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position
in the intelligence section and explain the duties of that posi-
tion to each individual. Performance measures outline the
responsibilities of each individual.
(3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain
his role in the battle drill, to include performance steps for
which he is responsible.
IVALK-THROUGÍI: Initiating Cue. This drill begins when
the TOC has been established and the intelligence section
begins receiving messages from higher, adjacent, and lower
echelons. These messages arrive by radio, telephone, and
courier.
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
1. Team member 1 maintains the intelligence journal (Figure
2-2) accurately and completely.
a. AII journaì entries wilì contain the following:
(1) An accurate and concise statement of the message,
report, or event.
(2) A notation about the sender or individual making
LEGEND:
the report, to include unit, duty position, and section.
M-map ru-units I

(3) The time of receipt or dispatch and the method of C-commander


I
-trooos
If ¡
transmission. S - staff

Figure 2-2. lntelligence Journal.

2-4 ')tr
b. Record the following: ORDER OF BATTLE SITIJAT!ON MAP

COACI{ING POINT: The following list is onlv the


minimum standard. Other items may be recorded in the
#- , E-1" \
---¡¡- t¿r ,lËl ,,
\
journal. Remind section members to record all important
./ lÀf' f
(F' t ffi ,
ur'Ûo¡o
information in the journal. / fr#,'{ fE-1,,
(1) Purpose, subject, and conclusions ofbriefings' '""h/\
(2) Command decisions and summaries of plans' "--"
,, o1ro1o 'lHl,. ) f;;"'
,, f çs.., /
(3) Movement of enemy units, platoon to division level'
i .__-_- ffi / r,.__r ,181,,.,;'..
iffi'; ^\
\l l" ^ìu [H]"
(4) Significant messages received and transmitted'
(5) Incidents of enemy activity, other than movement'
'['fu,.,lÉl; ,Ë,. ,H,l
(6) Friendly patrol activitY. oarzoo 032120
\
(7) Liaison activity. vvvvvvvvvvvvvv\7 //
/-\/._\/__\1r.p^r-_\/--,
section.
(8) Changes in personnel within the intelligence _nn
,'i
nlza
SfRENGTH
x" z¿ x ss

(9) Summaries of written messages or orders' UNLOCATÊD UNIÌS

(10) Summaries of action based on enemy or friendly -g-NLr-N-Q eE_8S wPN


Recon 8n.22d MRO
122ñm HOW Regr.22d MRD
MRB 6 2580 TK Regl,22d MRD
activity. TK SN 2 330 80 MED TK
FIRE SUPPORT

]¿!Lr N_Q wPN llg


2. Tearn chief maintains intelligence files. SSMBN 1
AFTY
FROG
8N 5 152mm HOW
4
tg
122mñ Sp HOW 36
a. Maintain journal file containing previously recorded 122mm HOW (O_30) 72
122mm RL
journal sheets and supporting materials. 122ñh MORT
18
54
REGI 5A.6
(1) File all supporting material in chronological SAM
AAMSL SA-9
20
16
BTRY ZSU-23-4 16
sequence. FEINFORCEMENTS
(2) Include copies of orders, periodic reports, m-essages, !al-T
MFH
No
1
Ee¡r
40 MEO tX
memorandn*s, cottf"rence notes, map overlays, and other TX REGT r OO MED TK

items required to support journal entries.


(3) Annotate the journal number on the supporting Figure 2-3. Order of Battle Situation Map.
document. a. Limit information about friendly forces to-
3. Team member 1 posts the SITMAP. Figure 2-3 shown on (1) Boundaries.
the next page illustrates an OB SITMAP-
(2) Locations of command posts (CPs) of higher, lower,
and adjacent units.
(3) Reconnaissance units.
(4) Forward edge of the battle area (FÐBA).

2-6 2-7
g. If time and personnel are available, prepare separate
(5) Forward line of own troops (FLOT)'
overlays depicting-
b. Dispiay graphically all current enemy dispositions and (1) Enemy fortifications.
major enemy activities.
(2) Potential enemy nuclear targets.
(1) Unit identification.
(3) Enemy obstacles.
(2) Unit boundaries.
(4) Destroyed bridges in enemy areas.
(3) Major roads or trails that could support movement
of personnel, weapons, and equipment. (5) Enemy OB data.
(4) Locations of automatic weapons. (6) Friendly reconnaissance patrols.
(5) Locations of supporting mortars. (7) Surveillance activities that include ground coverage
(6) I-ocations of antitank guns. of each system.
(7) Locations of artillery, to include air defense h. Remove information from the SITMAP that is outdated
or no longer needed for current operations.
artillery.
(8) Locations of minefields. COACIIING trOINT: There is no definitive means to
determine what information is outdated and should be
(9) Locations of roadblocks. removed from the SITMAP. This is a value judgment
(10) I-ocations of entrenchments. based on the mission of the unit and how often the
enemy relocates his assets. Information posted to the
(11) Locations of obstacles. SITMAP should be checked against the priority intelli-
(12) Locations of defensive positions. gence requirements (PIRs) and information require-
ments for validity. Experienced personnel should guide
(13) Locations of logistic and command facilities. Iess-experienced personnel in determining the length of
(14) Locations of aircraft staging areas. time that information should remain on the SITMAP.
(15) Locations of nuclear, biological, and chemical i. Make a record of past activity on a 24-hour basis for his-
(NBC) contaminated areas. torical purposes. Examples are map overlay tracings or pho-
tographs of the SITMAP.
(16) Locations of intelligence and electronic warfare
(IEW) systems. COACI{ING POtrNT: This historical file wilt be used to
determine patterns of enemy movernent and disposi-
c. Post all enemy units platoon level and above. tions, and to identify trends.
d. Indicate the latest time when the activity was observed j. Post the following information in the margin of the
or the disposition was confirmed. SITMAP or on briefing charts nearby.
e. Use conventional signs, symbols, and abbreviations
depicted in FM 21-31 (Topographic Symbols) and FM 101-5-1 (1) Computations of enemy personnel, weapon
(Oþerational Terms and Symbols). Explain any deviation in strengths, and weaknesses.
the marginal data on the map or overlay.
(2) Organizatton charts of specified enemy units.
f. Ensure that maps and overlays are properly classified. (3) Summaries of weather and terrain data.
(4) List of FIRs and information requirements.
COACHING POINT: Take care not to overcrowd the (5) Notations about the current patrol plan.
map. One method to avoid overcrowding is to group
entries by categories on a series of acetate overlays. (6) Movement computations.
Another method is to prepare an enlarged sketch map (7) List of friendly attachments.
that covers the overcrowded area.

2-9
2-B
(8) List of unlocated enemy units believed to be in the transparent bond paper whenever possible. Ensure that you
AO. cover the following;
(9) Probable enemy courses of action. (1) AO.
(10) Battle damage assessment (BDA). (2) Areaofinterest.
4. Team chief maintains the coordinate registers. Figure 2'4 (3) Enemy area.
below shows a coordinate register with written entries. Fig- (4) Areas on both flanks.
ure 2-5 shown on page 2-12 shows a coordinate register with
schematic entry. b. Maintain a written entry page (Figure 2'4) for each grid
COACI{ING FOINT: Timely maintenance of the square. This entry page should describe:
coordinate registers might not be practical in fast- (1) Enemy activity.
moving, high-intensity situations such as pursuit, delay, (2) Locations of enemy weapon systems.
or exploitation. This recording device would be valuable
in a relatively static situation or in a trow-intensity con- (3) Other significant data that impacts on battalion
flict (LiC). operations.
a. Use a iooseleaf notebook with each page representing a c. Precede each entry by the date-time group (DTG) and
single grid square of the SITMAP. Use st'rong, semi- map coordinates.
d. Add comments or notations to any entry as directed by
COORÐ83*ATE REG¡STER W!Tû{ WRBTTEN EruTR¡ES
the 52.
GRIO SQUARE 2E15
e. Maintain a schematic entry page (Figure 2-5) for each
IÎEM TII/IE cooRo STATEMENT F¡OTES
grid square. Use a grid scaie underneath the schematic page
Hov€ no!l Pll check lhlt
092235 2S381 539 MG Êlrcr on nacon Rl trom  Co
to allow a more accurate and rapid plotting of, or reference to,
2 09231 I ?
V.h ñoløê - Tl? - Hclrd dlrccl H of
A Co OP 2 283215o7
All Alr OP lo look the entries. A standarized scale will assist in dissemination
Sp.cl6l OB ropod on WPnt OIYwohlr morc lnto oñ of intelligence data from higher to lower echelons. Plot the
3 r00600
å Follllcatlon¿ Epnr Btrcngth
entry on the grid square in the same manner used to plot the
28021 523
2A141527
lo Trcnche! & Bunkere SITMAP.
28141527 lo
f. Review the coordinate register when your unit moves to
28221429 a new area, whenever new data is added, or when obsolete
29611545 lo
data is deleted.
Plûloon on llnc - h6c 2 MGr Sûme MG å3 Yc¡lerdoy?
28781 551 Chcck !hlrl

28311551 to Ê¡lcnllYc lrênche! añd flrlng por


29001599

4 102335 28391 530 lo I Co Plt rêplr wlrê âñd AP M¡nê. Nêw ¡lncc 081800
28691541

5 110600 28431 588 R.r Unll (Co?) ln gcncr¡l ore¡ (From DIY PIR)

6 1 10630 2838f 557 Med T!ñk rpollcd by L Plrnc Hor mlny morc?

28731 584 !nd


r r1320
281 51 564

I Fl!.h lrom.m¡ll Crl Ady nol ovêr AT? ôîllâlrcrôlt? Guñ? RR


1 2001 0 2861 1 564
7S or B¡zook!? Arl hlghêr HO

Figure 2-4. Coordinate Register with Written Entries.

2-10 2-1r
COORD¡NATE REGISTER WITH SCHEMATIC ENTRV e. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com-
plete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly.
GRID SQUARE 2815 PERFORMANCE: When intelligence section personnel can
perform all tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate
manner, inform the commander or evaluator that the section
I

E<
I+
is ready for evaluation or reevaluation.
I ..î
ri..,
82 mm

il
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(1/.'t.Jil1"

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NOTATIONS: LEGEND
Elms Ot 1sl & 3d Bn X -lncoming Àdy
66 Rille Regl
- -En Pelro¡ Contâcl

B -Bunker

Figure 2-5. Coordinate Register with Schematic Entry.

PR,ACTICE:
a. Whe¡r personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to
create new inputs and practice under realistic volume and
time constraints.
b. As section members develop proficiency, rotate person-
nel to ensure cross training.
c. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of each soldier
and to maintain soldier interest in the training. Realistic
situations include personnel who are absent due to work or
sleep shifts (24-hour operation), and completion of short-
notice, command-directed reports and details.
d. The intelligence section must be prepared to operate on
the integrated battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to
moving to the performance stage.

2-12 o 11)
L- L.)
ElRtñ-L 2 (9) Other TOE equipment, as necessary.
b. Training site. The intelligence section is coliocated with
ãmtelligeE¡ee Freparatiom of the Battle'fie8d the S3 (operations section) in the BTI" TOC. The location of
the TOC must provide for good communications and be near
routes to higher headquarters, company teams, other subor-
TASK: Perform intelligence preparation of the battlefield dinate units, and the BTI- trains. Buil'u-up areas are good
(IPB). locations for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used,
CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to perform the TOC should be located on a reverse slope to provide cover
IPB to support the unit's assigned contingency mission. and concealment from enemy ground observation and fire.
This dritl may also be perfbrmed in a garrison environment.
STANÐ.A.RÐS: No prior drills are required. The intelligence
section will perform IPB in conjunction with other staff ele- c. Section instructions.
ments to project significant battlefield events and enemy (1) Arrange the intelligence section in a realistic config-
actions, and to predict the enemy's probable courses of action uration for field operations within a TOC (!'igure 2-1).
prior to initiation of hostilities.
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough
SUPPORTING INDIVIÐUAL TASKS: See Appendix A, understanding of recording devices and procedures.
Individual Task to Drili Matrix.
(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24-
ILLUSTRATIONS: See Figures 2-6 (IPB Process), 2-7 ("ter- hour operation. Each team will consist of a team chief and a
rain Factor Matrix), 2-B (Terrain Factor Overlay), 2-9 team member.
(Weather Factor Analysis Matrix), 2-10 (Weather Factor
Overlays), 2-11 (Doctrinal Templ ate),2-72 (Situation Tem- (4) Ensure that the required resources are on hand prior
plate), 2-13 (Available Collection Resources), 2-74 (Event to cornmencement of training.
Template), and 2-I5 (Decision Support Template). (5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE.
PÐRFORMANCE MEASURÐS: Found in the walk- TAT-K-TFIR,OIJGH INSTRUCT'IONS :
through instructions.
SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:
a. Orientation. IPB is a process which the intelligence sec-
tion must perform in conjunction with other staff elements on
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J470. Other type units a continuous basis. IPB is used as the basis for briefing the
should use equipment organic or available to their respective cornrnander ancl his staff daily, or more frequently when
unit. directed. The information developed during IPB isffiGince
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked. Ferves as the basis for command decisions at battalion and
(2) Radio set, AN/VRC-90. higher headquarters. Each mernber of the intelligence section
is personally responsible for ensuring that all useful pro-
(3) Radio set, AN/VRC-92. cessed intelligence and combat information have beëñ'iñêor-
(4) Telephone set, TA-312/PT (2 each). póratãd into the IPB process, madè available to the battalion
(5) Power supply, vehicle, HYP-57/TSEC. comrrrander and his staff, and clisseminated to using units
(Figure2-6)on the next page.
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms, b. Safety. rmal traini ñd equipment safety precau-
and so forth. tions should be
(7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale).
c. Demonstra
(8) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-
d Explanation.
gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, ciimatology
studies, and current OB holdings.

2-r4 2-15
(3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain
IPB FROCESS
his role in the battle drilt, to include performance steps for
which he is responsible.
WAI-K-THRO{JGII: Initiating Cue. This drill begins when
the TOC has been established and the initial situation has
been posted to the SITMAP. The intelligence section begins
receiving messages from higher, adjacent, and lower eche-
lons. These messages arrive by radio, telephone, and courier.
BATTLEFIELD
THREAT AREA PERFORMAI{CE MEAS{JRES
evaLùÁÍíöñ EVALUATION
1. Team chief performs battlefield area evaluation.
a. Identify commander's AO from OPORD.
b. Portray AO on overlay.
THREAT (1) Ensure that overlay is properly marked.
INTEGRATION
(2) Ensure that overlay is properly oriented to map"
c. Identify commander's area of interest.
(1) Identify territory beyond and adjacent to the AO
TERRAIN
WEATHER
ANALYSIS ANALYSIS
containing enemy forces capable of affecting future
operations.
(2) Identify range limitations of available monitoring
and coilection assets.
(3) Identify lead time beyond the FLOT or attack objec-
EVALIIATION
tives required by the commander to act or react to the
situation. .ii
d. Portray area of interest on overlay based on command-
er's guidance.
Figure 2-6. IPB Frocess.
2. Team member 1 performs terrain analysis.
a. Develop terrain data base.
(1) Use a mapboard with a map of the battlefield area'
Explain each step of the IPB process to all section members' (1) Review existing data base.
Explaln the purpose and use of each overlay and matrix' (2) Accurately identify the five military aspects of ter-
Taik through the process of completing each overlay and rain (observation and fields of fire, concealment and cover,
matrix using an actual copy of those products to illustrate obstacles, key terrain, and avenues of approach and mobility
each step. Explain the information used as input in each step corridors).
of the IPB process. Tell all section members where the infor- (3) Identify gaps in data base.
mation can be obtained when it is needed. (4) FiIl gaps identified in data base.
(2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position
COACHING FOINT: The engineer terrain analysis
in the intelligence section, and explain the duties of that posi- team operating at division level will collect, process, and
tion to each individual. Performance measures outline the disseminate terrain intelligence to supported units. Stud-
responsibilities of each individual. ies and overlays depicting obstacles, cross-country

q 1n
2L6 L'L I
movernent, percent of slope, and other aspects of terrain
will be made avaiiable by the terrain analysis team.
b. Develop terrain factor matrix (Figure 2'7).- tû[: ?
c. Ðevelop terrain factor overlays. Figure 2-B shown on-the
next page is a terrain factor overlay of built-up areas, LOC,
and hydrology areas.
(1) Compare terrain features to the terrain factor
matrix.
(2) Determine type of overlays required'

TERRAIil F'ACT@R TIATRIX

FACTONS

Scd.cr Srd!c¡ Wcatlat S!il¡cc


0ù¡rrcl. 8uil!üp 0r¡'i¡er-
FUNCTIONS [ff.cts
(Sle¡¡ 0n T¡tto¡
(Htdrolo¡lì
lSoil'l

x T T x I
f'.1é! ol td.

x I x

X
x I x

x x X x X Figure 2-8. Terrain Factor Overlay.

x I I x
COACHING POINT: Examples of overlays: soils,
x x
built-up areas, roads and bridges, alternate landing
x
sites, drop zones, percent of slope, hydrology, vegetation
x X x x ! density, fields of fire, canopy closure, lines of communi-
cation, fording sites, and obstacles to nap of earth.
x x x x x x
0¿ ¡nd X
LZ
d. Develop combined obstacles overlays.
I x x
x
e. Identify avenues of approach that support friendly and
t0C ¡rd MS8 x x x enemy capabilities to move, shoot, and communicate.

x x x x
f. Perform line-of-sight analysis.
x
g. Analyze avenues of approach.
I'n. ol S,9hr x f
h. Develop avenues of approach overlay for friêndly and
x I X x enemy capabilities and courses of action.
,"*' I '| ' |'I ' |'|'
S,'cr

3. Team chief performs weather analysis.


I I

a. Develop a weather data base.


NOTE: The terrain factor matrix ¡dentif ies the terrain factors that are mili-
tarily s¡gnif¡cant. lt provides a guide for terrain and weather overlays' (1) Review historical and current weather data to
.Where an "X" is indicated denotes a relationsh¡p between the factor and include light data charts; 12-, 24-,36-, and 72-hour forecasts,
f unction.
long-range forecasts; climatology studies; and special studies.

Figure 2-T.Terrain Factor Matrix"

2-19
2-L8
(temperature
(2) Assess the.tactical aspects of .weatherclouds' severe IVEATHEN FACTOR AI|ALYSIS NATRIX
sib.ilitv'
and humiditv, precipiätì;; ; wi"d'
vi
to vision)'
weather, and illumiriätìåi-^"a "båtructions
and enemy
(3) Identify weather effects on friendly
equipment and oPerations'
lnlolllg.nca ur.t/ ¡t Ë È
¡
(4) IdentifY gaPs in data base' Appllc.llonr ã
ë
I ô c
o
¡
t !
à ¡ =
a Ë
(5) FilI gaps identified in data base' E
t
E t I
e
È !
3
É
a
o
t t Ê
¡

o
forecasts' studies' and
a 3
I À õ
COACHING POINT: Weather base can be
;;;;v" t"';i;-; historical d¿ta Obffi!$oñ ¡ ll.l(r. ol llr. I I ¡ I ¡ T r ¡
officer and Air Arllllrrt tmplæ.ñ.ñl¡ x x t
requested fr",t ;h;îilitt" Àl"n weather ¡ r
x
Coæ.dmñl I I x I x ¡
Force weather team' Cræcí.9. X I ¡ I ¡ I I I T
I ¡
matrix' Figure 2'9 on Oaqnó ol Apgroach x I x x
b. Develop a weather factor analysisanalysis matrix' Al. ^Éñú!r
ol A99.oacñ
^rmwr 6orañañl
I I ¡
I
I
¡
¡ x I r I I ¡
the next p.g" .ho*" a *eatÏ'"'
factor Cad+oñl?y x I ¡ T T
Fq(¡n¡ Al.r x T ¡ I I ! x I
Figure 2-10 shown on Al. Dþp ¿oÈr I r ¡ I I I I
c. Develop weather factor overlays'
I T x
}l.¡cotþr LZ T ; I I r r x ¡ I I x
and cloud coverage
page 2-22illustrates weather effects LOC! ..d ItAr
t{ac Op.r.ùoñ.
x
¡ ¡
I x
I
I
I I ¡
I I
T r
overlays. UÞol-3lglrl Rrdlo R.dlr ¡ I T

multiple terrain ¡lI¡ lnplæ.ñ.ñl x I I


d. Place multiple weather o-verlays over
x I

âevelopedt to determine if
lñllllnü$ Roclrr ¡ I I x ¡ I
overlays (-'f more t;;;;lt
of approach and
weather informatiäi'*ili ãlr""t the ãvenues I ¡¡ñdly .ltlr¡d. $¡{tt trlrct ñ.rcot¡or lttl c¡taùllltt.
mobilitY corridors'
4. Team member 1 performs threat evaluation'
NOTE: The weather factor analysis matrix helps to determine what
weather effects overlays will be required. lt ident¡fies th€ weather factors
that are militarily signif icant and correlates their efforts w¡th specif ic
¡ntell¡gence uses and tactical appl¡cations. Where an "X" is indicated
denotes a relationsh¡p between the factor and it uses/applications.

Figure 2-9. Weather Factor Analysis Matrix.

2-21
2-24
a. Assembie and veview- all available data.
(1) Mission.
(2) OB holdings.
COACFIII{G PûINT: OB holdings consist of the nine
OB factors (cornposition, disposition, strength, training
status, tactics, combat effectiveness, logistics, electronic
technical data, and miscelÌaneous data).
(3) Higher headquarters analyses, estimates, reports,
and IPB prod.ucts.
b. trdentify threat forces expected to be found in the AO
and area of interest.
c. Develop applicable doctrinal templates for threat forces
(Figure 2-11).

ffi@TOB¡ZED RrFLE {tsfr!P} DEFET{SE REG¡HEÈTÀ¡- g!-¡CE

CLOUD COVERAGE OVERLAY

çlæl
| Ë-r
'i- är
I
å
K-,' {'30ffi
-!l
#
c^xoPY clost

'l'HrIro
RE

Probrblllty ol balôg
obærvad trcm
s,qx, fr t +¡
zsu-zs-l I = ï

lt
a 00-25%

B 25-50.É

ffi1
'i aj-lflr
I
c 50'75tÉ I
I
al
D

@' \Ï,ry
75-100%
I z.srm

Þ I
,,l. I
,| ,.,1,
+d
1.5&ñ
Figure 2-10. Weather Factor Overlays'
,-.
of a
COACIIING POINT: Threat evaluation consistsand Figure 2-1'1. Doctrinal Ternplate.
ã"táilãa study of enemy forces, their composjtion.
;;;;;i; tti;n] tactical doctrine, weapons and equipment'
#J;;p;ttin g b attlefield function al svstems' The
tfrt".iãf tnis ô'valuation is to determine enemy capab-ili-
ii"t ã"¿ how they operate based on their doctrine and
training.

o .)D
o .)o L-L¿
d. Identify gaps in data base. (1) Affix combined. obstacles, terrain, and weathe. orr".-
lays to map.
e. Fill gaps identified in data base.
(2) Affix doctrinal template over appïopriate avenue of
5. Team chief performs threat integration. approach or mobility corridor.
a. Deveiop situation templates (Figure 2-12). (3) Prepare template showing unit and. equipment dis-
positions, frontages, depths, and echelo., spaci.rg adjusied for
2 SITUAT!TN TEMF¡.ATE terrain and weather factors.
(4) Label this overlay "situation template."
UNIÏ DISTANCES ANO FRONTAGES
ADJUSTEO TO TERRAIN CONSTRAINTS b. Identify named areas of interest (NAIs).
(1) Identify enemy locations.
.(2) Choose_a potential enemy course of action along a
particular mobiliiy corridor.
(3) Identify capabilities of available collection resources
(Figure 2-13).

EOUßC!T AGEHCIES

¿. æuGa la I Fmñ. ¡yatoñ. or ¡cilytty lrom wÀlch An ¡gañcy rr ôñy lñdtvtdu¡t or o.g¡ñruiloñ rh¡cñ
lñto@t¡gô tt oit€¡ñ.¡ty gõt tôad. Sourcoe noy Or axplorl¡ ¡ þuaco to collæt !¡dlor præ08!
hay not Þa uñdg l¡1cñdly cqñtrol. Inlo.ô!ttoñ.

coMrroN S0URCES COIIHON AGEHCIES

C¡grurad añ.my Cty¡il¡e Lowor ¡ñO adt¡Canl Mtt¡tlry ootrca


dOCUñanl¡ À ¡g¡nCl.¡ coññ¡ñoa
ñ¡lartal
Racoyr.ad US ñril¡ry P¡Yog un,t¡
Eôañy clactao- N¡tron!t ¡ôtal
.lgnát,c ol¡9l¡c'd 9'rtont agañc'at Atl'ad
'ntal
añraonl
eñOmy aCUyrtro! aoa vñ¡lt
c¡Y'¡.tt¡¡rr
Sò.tl ¡nd-
Loqr r.¡rdcnr! uñrl! CSS un,r¡
i,-i,.
lr¡gñañtr
Nuctaa, Duðt¡ Ch.ñrcrr snrrr TNSCOM

Atlugac¡
coñt¡ñrnat.d Eñgrnoar uñrtt Cl trrñ,
ara¡¡
Ðu^Ot
Tcrrarñ ¡aañt Tt taamt
RaótoactrYa lñ'g.ry
malaar¡l
Cr¡t.rr Wa¡tha. ta!ñt Mt unrrt
Figure 2-'l 2. Situation Tennplate.
waathar forac¡rl odod
r'9gdl
Othar srv¡cot Artrfi..y
ouot
Maor frogg! pat¡q¡¡
Sluór.o /
lñtornañb EpW C¡valry

Flgure 2-13. Available Collection Flesources.

2-24 2-25
COACHING POINT: All coliection resources are con- (1) Review ail NAIs in selected avenue of approach to
sidered at this point, to include resources at higher
echelons, since non-organic collection resources can be :d, destroyed, or manrpulated.
-)
requested via a request for intelligence information (2) Designate as tÀitrrãp#t, *h"r" the enemy can
(RII).- ßÉf be disrupted, delayed, destroyed, or manipulated.
(4) Ðxamine the map to identify points and areas along (3) Identify other areas that may be used to target the
tne molinty corridor where activity, or lack of activity' will enemy.
i'.Ìpffiæ p allgllgJjìnglLsgIåepfudltqg. and
(4) Identify capabilities of available ground and air
can be monitored and collected agarnst' interdiction systems.
/ iS; Mark the NAI on the overlaY. COACEIING POtrNT: All systems, including those of,
(6) Repeat this process for each mobility corridor and higher echelons, should be considered at this point, since
enemy course of action' non-organic systems can be requested to provide assis-
(7) Labe1 this overlav "gg-l*HHÍ (Fieure 2-14)' tance in targeting.
c. Identify target areas of interest (TAI)' (5) Repeat this process for each mobility corridor and
enemy course of action.
(6) Recommend the TAI to 53 for targeting.
(7) Coordinate with S3 to identify options available at
the TAI and lead time required to exercise options.
(8) Determine enemy rate of movement restricted by ter-
,"in rrr ues used ín the
battlefield area.
(9) Determine decision points by comparing lead time
required to implement a decision against distance and enemy
rate of movernent.
(10) Post decision points to the overlay and label it the
'Secision
æ support template." Figure 2-75 on the next page
shows a decision support template.

PR^dCTICE:
a. When personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to
create new inputs and practice under realistic volume and
time constraints.
b. As proficiency is developed, rotate personnel to ensure
cross training.
c. Inject realisrn to fully test the capabilities and to provide
soldier interest in the training. Realistic situations can
include personnel who are absent due to work or sleep shifts
(24-hour operation), and completion of short-notice,
Figure 2-'!4. Event TennPlate. command-directed reports and details.

t.>n
2-26
d. The intelligence section must be prepared to operate on 8m¡E-H- 3
the integrated battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to
moving to the performance stage. ãmte!ããgearce ,qmmex *ei Ëhe &pes'atüo¡¡ Onder
e. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com-
plete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly' TASK: Prepare the intelligence annex to the OPORD.
PERFORMANCE: When intelligence section personnel can C{JE: The intelligence officer directs his section to prepare
perform all tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate an intelligence annex to the OPORD.
.nurr.r"r, inform the commander or evaluator that the section STANDARDS: This drill may be performed in conjunction
is ready for evaluation or reevaluation. with 34-80-5-Drill, Dissemination of Intelligence. The intelli-
gence section will extract information from all recording
devices and use that data to prepare an intelligence annex to
DECISION SUPPORT TEMPLATE
the OPORD. This intelligence annex will contain information
about enemy forces thai is essential to the conduct of a speci-
fied operation.
SUPPORTING INDIVIDUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,
Individual Task to Drill Matrix.
ILLUSTRATIONS: See Figure 2-16 (Format of an Intelli-
gence Annex).
PERFOR,MANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-
PROEABL
EN EMY
through instructions.
OBJ ECIIVE SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J4I0. Other type units
should use equipment organic or available to their respectivg
unit.
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked.
(2) Radio set, AN/VRC-90.
(3) Radio set, AN/VRC-92.
(4) Telephone set, TA-372/PT (2 each).
(5) Power supply, vehicle, HYP-57/TSEC.
LEGÊND
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
Mob¡lily corridors
markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms,
-Time Lire. Time l¡ñes are developed on doc- Ã
H+- lrinel rates ol movemenl as etlecled by lerra¡n Ñ 'Key lerra n bv pr¡orily ol use and so forth.
and weather. Time lines âre modified based
N
on acfual rales ol moveñenl. (7) SITMAP with appropriate overlays.
(B) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-
gence estimate, intelligence summaries (INTSUMs), daily
Figure 2-15. Decision Support Template. staff journal, and OB holdings.
b. Training site. The intelligence section is collocated with
the 53 (operations section) in the BTF TOC. The location of
the TOC rnust provide for good communications and be near

2.29
2-28
routes to higher headquarters' company teams, other subor- b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety precau-
ãin"t" unitl and the ÈTF trains- Built-up areas are good tions should be observed.
locations for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used, c. Demonstration. None.
It iOC should be located on a ïeveïse slope to provide-cover d. Explanation.
" concealment from enemy ground observation and fire'
and
This drill may also be performed in a garrison environment' (1) Use an example of an intelligence annex (Figure
2-L6a) to explain the purpose of the annex. Emphasize that
c. Section instructions. the intelligence annex is a formal intelligence tasking docu-
(1)Arrangetheintelligencesectioninarealisticconfig- ment that may accompany an OPLAN or OPORD. It is
uratiòí for fielá operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1)' standardized and has a more rigid format than other
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough annexes.
undersîanding of how to prepare an inteliigence annex to an (2) Assign each team member to prepare a portion of the
OPORD. intelligence annex. Explain each individual's duties involved
(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24- in completing this task. Performance measures outline the
ho.r'' àp"rution. Each team will consist of a tearn chief and a responsibilities of each individual.
team member. (3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain
his role in the preparation of the intelligence annex, to
(4) Ensure that the required ïesources are on hand prior include the performance steps for which he is responsible.
to commencement of training.
WALK-THROUGFI: Initiating Cue. This drill begins when
(5) Use only that equipment authorized bv TOE' the TOC has been established and the intelligence section is
TAI-K-T}IROUGT{ INSTRUCTIONS: screening materials and preparing to disseminate intelli-
gence information by means of an intelligence annex to the
a. Orientation. OPORD.
(1) The intelligence annex disseminates information
aboui enerny forceJwhich is essential to the conduct of an PERFORMANCE MEASUR,ES
operation ..td to give any other necessary intelligence orders :

oi guidance for a particular operation. It also serves as a 1. Team member 1 prepares the draft annex heading with the
*"äirr* for instructing subordinate commanders to acquire following data:
informatior, ,re""ssaty for the conduct of an operation but a. Copy number.
*fri"f, can only be obiained immediately before or when the
operation itself has begun. The intelligence annex is. not a b. Issuing headquarters.
..rb.tit,.t" for an intelligence collection plan; rather it is a c. Place ofissue.
way to communicate the taskings or requests of the collection
plan. d. DTG when signed.
(2) The intelligence annex is a formal intelligence task- e. Message reference number.
ing document that may accompany an operation plan
(OÞLAN) or OPORD. It should be as brief as possible con- f. OPORD number.
òistent with clarity. trts first paragraph is a summary of the g. References.
enemy situation required to understand the OFLAN or h. Time zone used throughout the order.
OPORD and may rèfer to annotated maps' enenly situation
overlays, or currãnt intelligence reports (INTREPs)' Subse- i. Classification.
quent paragraphs contain specific collection requirements
ánd initructions. Standing operating procedures (SOPs)
information should not be repeated in the intelligence annex.
The format for an intelligence annex is shown in figures
2-16a through 2-16h.

2-:lr
2-30
COACHING trOINT: An example intelligence annex 3. Team member 1 prepares a draft of paragraph 2, Intelli-
heading is shown below. gence Requirements (Figure 2-76c).

INTEI.LIGENCE ANNEX HEADI NG a. List each PIR in a separate subparagraph.


b. State the order of priority of each PIR.
c. I-ist information requirements.
rffidffiñI COACHING FOINT: An example of paragraph 2 of
(Change from oral orders, if any) the annex is shown below. Paragraph 2 lists the com-
Copy4of5Copies mander's PIR and information requirements in priority.
1/4 Mech Inl Bn
zELLE (467r), BUTTANO E ruT'E[.tIG ET-I C E R€Q [.I I REM EroTs
101900U Sep 45
8013.
2. INTELLIGENCE REQLJIREMENTS.
Anner A (lntelllgence) to Operatlone Order 24 a. PlRs.
Reference: Map, BUTTANO, Edltlon 2, f :50,000 sheets 204 (1) Will enemy reir¡force his forces along the Flood
(zELLE-PAGT). River before the time of attack? lf so, when, where, and witfi
Zulu Tlme what lorces? Special attention to the mechanized regirnent
and the mediurn tank neEirnent in vicinity of Burg.
Figure 2-16a. Format of an lnlelliEence Annex. (2) W¡ll enerny ernploy nuclear weapons against us? lf
so, when, where, how rnany, of what yields, and by what
2. Team chief prepares a draft of paragraph 1, Summary of delivery means?
Ðnemy Situation (Figure 2-16b).
b. ln{orrnation requiremenls.
a. Include information about enemy that is essential to (1) V/¡ll enemy continue to delend in his present posi-
implement the OPI-AN OR OPORD.
tion? lf so, how will he organize his forces on the ground,
b. Reference other intelligence documents, if applicable. and with what troops? Special attention to locations and
c. Ensure that referenced documents are made available to activities of reserves and vulnerability to nuclear att€ck.
all recipients of the annex. (2) Will enemy attack prior to 1105002 September? lf
so, when, where, and in what strength? Special attention to
COACIIING POINT: The first paragraph of the intel- the axis Hill536-Hill524-CR9841 and TAI 1,2. and 3.
ligence annex gives a summary of the enemy situation
required to understand the plan or order. It may refer to
annotated maps, enemy situation overlays, or current Fígure 2-16c. Forrnat of an lntelligence Annex-
intelligence reports. An example of paragraph 1 of the
annex is reflected below.
4. Team chiefprepares a draft ofparagraph 3, Intelligence
Acquisition Tasks (Figure 2-16d).
SUMMARY OF EIIEMY S¡TUATIOñI a. List, by unit, detailed instructions for reports required
by the issuing headquarters.
1. SUMMARY OF ENEMY SITUATION. See INTSUM, thls b. List RtrIs from units not organic or attached.
HQ, 1018002 September, and Appendlx 1, Sltuatlon COACI{ING FOINT: Paragraph 3 is used to issue
Overlay. instructions to subordinate commanders and requests to
higher headquarters to collect information before or dur-
ing the initial phase of an operation. An example of
Figure 2-16b. Format of an lntelligence Annex. paragraph 3 ofthe annex is on the next page.

r) 1) r)
z-,1,1
5. Team member 1 prepares a draft of paragraph 4, h{easures
¡NTE!-LtGENCE ACQUISET¡(}N TASKS for Handling Persoànel, Documents, and Materiel (Figure
2-I6e).
3. INTELLIGENCE ACQUISITION TASKS. a. Include instructions for handling and segregation of
a. Orders to Attached and Subo¡'dinate Units. enemy prisoners of war (EPWs), deserters, repatriates, inhab-
(1) Co A. itants, and other Persons.
(2) Co B. b. Include locations of EPW collection points'
(a) Report as obtained- c. Include instructions for handling and processing cap-
1 Status of conslruction ol defensive posi- tured documents.
tions and minef ields on and to the east of the Flood River. d. Include instructions for processing (disposition) of cap-
2 Location and size of ammunition storage tured enemy materiel.
sites and location, size, and content ol engineer equip- COACEIING POINT: Paragraph 4 of the annex con-
rnent parks. tains instructions for handling captured personnel, doc-
(b) Report as obtained-neEalive reports by uments, or equiprnent that differ from SOP' An exampì'e
1104002 September.
of paragraph 4 of the annex is shown below'
1 Activity in medium tank regiment (-) and
tank baltalion assembly area in vicinity of Burg.
2 Localion and activity of mechanized regi- DOCI *lEt{T AND MATERIE¡.
ment in vicinity of Burg. 4. MEASURES FOR I,IA}.¡DI.¡NG PERSONNEL, E}OCU-
b. Requesls to Higher, Adjacent, and Cooperating MENTS, AND MATERIE¡-.
l-.lnits. a. EPWs, deserter¡, repatr¡ateoo lnhabltants, and other
(1) 1st Brigade is requested to provide: peruons wlll be handled per lleld SOP.
(a) As obtained- b. Captured docu¡nenla wll! þe evacuated accordlng to
1 Location, size, and type of unit in vicinity of fhe dlvl¡lon SOP wlth one ercepllon: eny document¡ on
H¡ll 536 (north of Burg). radlo equlpment, C-E lrequencler of radloc, rsdart' or alr-
cralt mu¡t be evacualed lmmedlately through CEIUI
2 Number, types, direction of movement, and
channel¡.
time of movement of air or surface vehicular traflic within
the division zone, with special attention to Highway 2. c. Captured malerlel wlll be evscualed per dlvlrlon
SOP. Equlpment that l¡ ¡erulceable, ¡uch as tr¡¡ck¡ and
(b) As obtained-Negalive reports by 1104002
englneer egulpment, may be relalned and u¡ed at the
September.
commander'¡ dl¡crellon.
1 Location and activity of mechanized regi-
ment in vicinity ol Burg. Figure 2-16e. Format of an lntelligence Annex'
2 Localion and activity of mechanized regi-
ment southú-est of CR9944. 6. Team chief prepares a draft of paragraph 5, Documents
(2) Supporting GSR teams provide inlormation and Equipment Required (Figure 2-76Ð.
obtainable from radar surveillance of designated NAI/TAl. a. List all maps required.
b. List aerial photographs required (if applicable)'
Figure 2-16d. Format of an Intelligence Annex.
COACHING POtrNT: Paragraph 5 of the annex lists
the conditions under which certain maps' documents, or

2,:i.4
2-35
equipment required by, or allocated to, units can be
d. Distribution.
oËtalned or requestea. en example of paragraph 5 of the e. Appendixes.
annex is reflected below. COACHING POtrNT: An example of the closing part
of an annex is shown below.
E}@CUffi ENTS A8{E} EQU¡PMËNT REqEJIRED
I NTELL¡GENE E Å${ N EX C LCISã ?{G
5. ÐOCI.JMEh¡T'S ANÐ EQIJ¡PñIIENT REQU¡RED.
a. Mape. SOF dletrlbutlon of map, BUTTAI{O, 1:50,000'
ZE¡-LE-PAGT. Acknow!edge.
POWERS
b. Photographlc. Followlng aerlal photographs w!!! be
LTC
ft¡rnlehed: BUTTANO, Yertlcal coverage.
Appendlres:
Figure 2-'|-6î. Forrnat of an lntelligence Annex' 1-Sltuatlon Overlay
2-Reconnalssance and Survelllance
7. Team member I prepares drafts of paragraph 6, Counter- Dl¡trlbutlon: Same as OFORD
If
i"t"fiigu""", and paragraph 7, Reports and Distribution'(Fig-
;;;;;;;y, includã t pãtugttph for other Instructions OFF!CIAL:
ure 2-169).
COA.CHING FOINT: An example of paragraphs 6' 7' /e/AI.JSTIN
and 8 are depicted below.
AUST!N
c@&,NTER!ruTELL¡GENcE,REP(IRTsÅNDD¡sTRlB¡jTloN'
A¡{D OTI{ER ¡I{STRUCT'¡ONS s2

6. COUhIT'ERINTELLIGENCE. Soo Appendlr 2, Counter- (C¡"""1f1"rfl"")


lnteillgence of lst Brlgade !nlelllgence Ar¡nex'
?. REFORTS AND DISTR¡BIITIOF{. Effectlve'1108002
September unlte wl!l aubmlt ¿ltuatlon/status reports Flgure 2-'16h. Format of an lntelliEence Annex (Concluded).
(si¡rneps) lAw battsllon reconr¡alasance end surYell- 9. Team member 1 finalizes the intelligence annex to the
lance plan. OPORD.
8. OTHER ¡ñüSTRUCTIONS (as requlred)' a. Collect all paragraphs and appendixes ofthe annex.
a. Battallon TOC opens vlclnlty of MA 626592 D-day' b. Collate them in alphanumeric order.
H + 6 hours.
b. Reconr¡alg8ance and Survelllance, Appendlx 2'
c. Write or type (or have written or typed) the final draft of
the annex.
d. Proof the annex and make (or have made) any neces-
FiEure 2-169. Format of an lntelliEenee Annex' sary changes.
e. Provide to team chief for final review.
B. Team chief prepares a draft of the closing portion 9f -th".
;";;, ili.ãr-"ã" ã""elopment of appendixes (Figure 2-16h)' 10. Team chief attaches the intelligence annex to the
OPORD.
a. Acknowledge line.
b. Name and rank- of commander' a. Review annex for completeness.
c. Authentication block. b. Have annex acknowledged and authenticated.

t) ,)a

2-36
c. Have appropriate number of copies made.
d. Distribute annex in rnost secure and expedient manner.
DRILL 4a #
Battalion Rec@nna¡ssance and Surveillance
trRACT'ICE:
Plannlng
a. When personnel can walk through this battle driil, it is
time to create new inputs and practice under realistic volume
and time constraints.
TASK: Prepare a reconnaissance and surveillance (R&S)
b. As section members develop proficiency, rotate person- plan.
nel to ensure cross training.
CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to prepare
c. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of each soldier an R&S plan to support the unit's mission.
and to maintain soldier interest in the training- Realistic
situations include personnel who are absent due to work or STANDARDS: No prior drills are required. The inteìligence
sleep shifts (24-hour operation), and completion of short- section (S2) will develop an R&S plan thai describes all
notice, command-directed reports and details. assets used in information collection. A completed plan will
d. The intelligence section must be prepared to operate on strongly influence the accuracy and timeliness of intelligence
the integrated batttefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to products.
moving to the performance stage. SUPPORTING INDIVIDUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,
e. Incoming reports should not be considered totally corr,- Individual Task to Driil Matrix.
plete or accurate. Evaluators shouid vary input accordingly. ILLUSTRATIONS: See Figures 2-1 (Organization of a TOC
PERFORMANCE: When intelligence section personnel can Area) and 2-17 (Battalion Reconnaissance and Surveillance
perform all tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate Overlay).
-anner, inform the commander or evaluator that the section PERFORMANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-
is ready for evaluation or reevaluation. through instructions.
SETUP INSTR,UCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on table of TOE 07245J4I0- Other type
units should use equipment organic or available to their
respective units.
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked.
(2) Radio Set, AN/VRC-9O.
(3) Radio Set, AN/VRC-92.
(4) Telephone Set, "I^-3I2/P"f (2 each).
(5) Power Supply, vehicle, HYP-57ITSEC.
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms,
and so forth.
(7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale).
(B) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-
gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, climatology
studies, and current OB holdings.

2-38 2-39
(9) Unit R&S SOP. area and by repetition. It is normally used to gain informa-
tion from the aforementioned areas over a long period of time
(10) Other TOE equipment, as necessary. to note any changes that take place. Surveillance missions
b. Training site. The 52 is collocated with the 53 (opera- are normally preplanned and are particularly suited to cover
tion section) in the BTF TOC. The iocation of the TOC must large areas rapidly and repetitively; minimize risk to the col-
provide for good communications and be near routes to lector; observe or detect changes on the enemy side of the
higher headquarters, company teams, other subordinate I'LOT; and cue other collectors for more detailed coverage'
units, and the BTF trains. Built-up areas are good locations (3) The collection effort at brigade and battalion level is
for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used, the TOC managed using the same 5-function analytical collection
shouid be located on a reverse slope to provide cover and con- management process used at division and higher echelons'
cealment from enemy ground observation and fire. This drill However, at brigade and battalion, the products of the collec-
may also be performed in a garrison environment. tion management cycle are a gtaphlgR&S oveJlay with writ-
c. Section instructions: ten or oral instructions. To t63Gñlif,Tñffirmal written-out
(1) Arrange the 52 in a realistic configuration for field requirements analysis on the collection plan and the asset
operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1). evaluation sheets are not prepared; rather this process is
cognitive. Additionally, you should understand that long-
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough range planning is conducted at division and higher echelons,
understanding of the R&S Plan. while brigade and battalion planning normally involves
(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24- events that wilt occur within a few hours.
hour operation. Each team will consist of a team chief and a
team member. (4) Normally R&S planning at brigade and battalion -
levels consists of an overlay depicting assets, areas covered
(4) Ensure that the required resources are on hand prior
and accompanying instructions. The brigade supplies its bat-
to commencement of training. talions with an overlay depicting battalion zones for recon-
(5) Use only that equipment authorized bv TOE. naissance and mission tu"ki.tg. Í
T'A I-K-TT{RO{JGF{ INSTRUCTIONS :
ePicting asset dePloYment and
asset tasking. (Figure 2-I7 on the next page shows a battal-
a. Orientation. R&S pians provide a systematic watch over ion R&S overlay.) BTF R&S overlays are then compiled at
the battlefield and early warning of enemy activity, targets
brigade, with brigade asset plans to create the overall bri-
for fire and maneuver and, most importantly, information to gade R&S plan. Once this plan is created, gaps in coverage
satisfy the commander's PIR and information requirements. áre identified and resolved by further taskings or, possibly,
(1) Reconnaissance is undertaken to collect information RII are sent to brigade. When time does not permit the crea-
by visual or other detection means. It is characterized by its tion of overlays, battalions use fragmentary orders (FRA-
direction toward coverage of one or more specific target GOs) for tasking and control.
areas. The reconnaissance mission may be developed from
cues indicating that an area contains information of intelli-
gence value, or because current or planned operations require
detailed coverage of a specified area.
(2) Surveillance is the systematic observation of aero-
space, surface, or subsurface areas, places, persons, or things
by visual, aural, electronic, photographic, or other means.
Surveillance is characterized by wide coverage of a target

2-4r
2-40
BATTAN.ION R&S PLAN b. Safety. Normal typø.*g#í"quipment safety precau-
ã _/olsefied.
tions should be
Bn R&S Plan c. D-eærrõãstration. None.
d. Explanation.
Legend
(1) Use an iliustration of the R&S overlay (Figure 2-17)
Map sheet name(s): to talk through the procedure for completing the R&S plan'
Map eheet number(s): Explain the purpose of each step and ensure that all person-
Map serles: nel understand the relationship between each step-
Map Scale: (2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position
E
Prepared by: within'the 52 and explain the duties of that position to each
ù
O - polnt NAI individual. Performance measures outline the responsibilities
of each individual.
^ ^,{'^? area NAI (3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain
I
l
his role in the battle drill, to include the performance steps
I
vJ
Q\ mobltry
corrldor
for which he is responsible.
i
A.B
\ryALK-T[IR.O[JGH: Initiaiing Cue. This drill begins when
the TOC has been established and the 52 has received bri-
I I
gade collection requirements, the commander's PIR and
Jr" ', information requirements, and the S3's essential elernents of
INSTRUCTIONS: 12

lwo lhree-m8n oPs and eltabllsh contlnuous sur- friendlyinformation(EEFI).Ananalysisofthebattlefield>


-@iåtovlde
velllanc€ ol NAls 2 and 3 from Op¡ 1 and 2 NLT 2306002. Coordlnate area (AO / area of intelest) has been performed and a current ! ,(
roules to/lrom OP¡ wlth FSO. falggl. Fnglneers cleerlng obstacle (NA! .it.ruäõñEñ-pÏil-ITMAP is posted. )
3), recon (BRDMT) at NAt 2. -_
PER,FORMANCE MEASUR,ES
Team B: Proylde ona seyen-man patrol to conducl a roule rocon of
Gr-ãõÑtrãt 23O5OOZ. Conduct surveiltance of NAt 20 trom 2306002
rre 1. Receive and anaÌyze requirements. Team chief receives,
TO 2307002. Target: Artlltery battery porlilons. analyzes, and prioritizes the PIRs, information requirements,
screen ilne trom NBO2O2O5 ro NBO23f 56 NLT and EEFL
-lggþilstabllsh
23O7O0z. Coordlnate screen llne wlth Team A.
COACHING POINT: This is a mental process.
GSR: Erlabllsh postttons 1 rnd 2 NLT 23O2OOZ. O/o estsbilsh postilon
3. Coordlnate all movemenl and poslllons wlth Teams B and C. Target:
Initially it may be helpful for the team to record all of its
BMPs ardT62s movlng soulh on MC 1, enrure your coverage ertends oul analyses. As the team members practice and become
to NB 080350. more proficient, they should be able to perform all
Acllons on conlacl/obslacles: Ae per Bn TAC SOp. actions mentally.
Reporlr: All assets r€porl on the Bn command nel unill 0g00 then a. Check to see if the information required is readily avail-
change lo the ecout net. Repo!'t lnlllsl contact a¡ ..FLASH," olher reports able in the current data base.
per SOP.
DISTRIBUTION:
b. Determine indicators by identifying those enemy activi-
Teams A, B, C, Company D, Scout pLT, S3/FSO, Brtgade 52. ties or characteristics of the AO that answer the PIRs and
information requirements. The determination of indicators is
Figure 2-17. Baltalion Reconnaissance and Surveillance based on those characteristics that reflect-
Overlay. (l) Normal doctrinal activity and disposition.
(2) Aciivity required for a particular course of action.

2-42
2-43
(3) Activity within enemy capabilities and limitations. (2) Timeliness. f)oes the asset have the capabiìity to col-
lect and report in time to meet the commander's
(4) Possible or practicable operations.
requirements?
(5) Collection characteristics. (3) Technical characteristics. Does the resource have the
(6) Identification of target characteristics. equipment to collect what you want? (A ground surveillance
COACI{ING POINT: Encourage section members to ráa"r (GSR) cannot distinguish self-propelled artillerv from t
use event templates to help decide where and when to tanks except when they are within visual range')

look, and for what indicators. (4) Environment (weather and terrain)' How will
c. Determine specific information requirements (SIRs) by weather and terrain afiect the resource's collection capa- R
translating the indicators into specific missions. SIRs are the bility? (GSR capabilities are reduced in heavy precipitation)' t\
basic questions that need to be answered to confirm or deny (5) Enemy. How will enemy forces affect the resource's : ¡r
the existence of an indicator. collection (Mounted patrols required to recon- ,I {
d. Evaluate the SIRs and PIRs based on the time sensitiv-
"upãbihty?
noiter through enemy positions
^,
will be easily identified and . s \
ity. Consider: engaged') $-R
,' to factors
b. Compare assets " r --^ ¿L^+:*^^^+ ^^l^^+.i^ñ
^* selection'
that impact on
(1) Time necessary to assign the indicator to an R&S
asset. B. Team chief coordinates with the SB to ensure compatibilitÑ, $
(2) Time necessary to collect and report the information.
with the BTF gqmmandçfS -q.chç{ne*o*fuga+euYgr and the \-^
tasked unit's primary mission.
(3) Time necessary to disseminate the resulting inteili (for
a. R&S ïesouïces assigned to support the BTF include t
gence to meet the needs of the commander.
refer6'ãffi4-80, pages 2-1 through 2-15):
(4) Time needed by the commander to react to the (1) Maneuver comPanies.
information.
(2) Scout platoons (perform screens and zone, area and
(5) Mobility of the target.
route reconnaissance).
e. Determine reporting requirements of each SIR. (3) GSR and remotelv emploved sensors (REMS)'
(1) Specify when, where, and in what detail the informa- (4) Artillery latget acquisition resources'
tion is to be reported.
(5) Observation posts (OPs) and patrols - */ (¿'
(2) Determine if the commander needs the information
by a specified time, or upon the occurrence of a specific event. (6) Engineer platoon assets.-r¿ Lf ,* -tq ¿"7 fui*$dt.,
(3) Determine if the information should be reported pe- b. Determine time criticality of ,eqoi,emet'tJ 'Obiu)ct
riodically or if periodic negative reports are required. (1) If a formal plan cannot be created, individual collec-
(4) Report combat information as soon as it is collected, tion resources are tasked using FRAGOs.
using the most direct means available. (2) If time is available, create a graphic plan with
2. Team member 1 determines R&S resource capability and instructions and tasks.
availability to collect against each SIR. COACHING POINT: Once the team has demon-
a. Consider the following factors when determining strated its proficiency in creating a graphic-R&S^plan,
the team should be tiained to disseminate the R&S
resource capability to collect information.
teqrrirem"nts in a time critical scenario where the use of
(1) Range. How far from the target can the resource be FI{AGO's replaces the issuance of graphic plans'
and still collect effectively against it?

2-45
2-44
4. Team member 1 constructs the R&S overlay. As a min- 6. Team member 1 coordinates with and provides the E&9-
imum, the R&S overlay will include three sections (see Figure overlav to:
áf,+æ
2-77). a. Company teams.
a. Administrative data for the overlav that includes: b. Scout platoon leader.
(1) Registration marks (at least 2). c. GSR and REMS team leaders.
(2) Classification at the top and bottom of ihe overlay. d. s3.
(3) Overlay title. e. Fire support officer (FSO).
(4) Map sheet name(s). f. Engineer platoon leader.
(5) Map sheet number(s). g. Brigade 52.
(6) Map series.
(7) Map scale. 7. Team chief evaluates reports received from collection
assets. Reviews reports for:
(8) Prepared By:
a. Timeliness.-..lQompare the time the event occurred to the
(9) Legend. time iñ-e event was rePorted.
b. A graphic display of deployed R&S assets that depicts: b. Content. Check to see that reporting follows the guide-
(1) Number, location, and parent unit of listening post Iinesffiiffied in the plan.- 1o. 5"Q
(LF)or OP. c. Responsiveness. Ensure that the information is being
(2) Patrol routes, start point (SP), release point (RF), and reported in time to effect the commander's operations'
checkpoints. B. Team chief uses reports to answer SIRs, information
(3) Scout screen lines; boundaries ofreconnaissance requirements, and PIRs and when requirements are estab-
zo n e s,/ ar ffi ìilãcãüf Tõ&-ti on s. Iished and process started again.
(4) GSR primarv, alternate ocations, FRACTICE:
left andffil'-mission, an target area be established or ref,ined to
(monitor or general search). a. Battalion R&s soPs should
minimize the time necessary for a full R&S plan to be devel-
(5) REMS locations (strings or fields). oped. For example: A brigade defensive R&S SOP could state
(6) Engineer reconnaissç.nce missions (where required). that battalions were responsible for creating their plans out
-fõ ôvæ<¿trc o8:;l.kt Cs-. - sevb'-¿-rl€*¿ z. vtÍ-! - to the first major terrain feature or out to the 15 kilometer
c. Instructions to collection assets to include:
mark, whichever is farther.
(1) Task and SIR (mission statement).
b. When personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to
(2) Target. create new inputs and practice under realistic volume and
(3) Actions or contact. time constraints.
(4) Reporting instructions. c. As proficiency is developed, rotate personnel to ensure
d. A distribution list (provided by the team chief). cross training.

5. Team chief evaluates R&S overlay and identifies gaps in d. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of the section
collection. Gaps are referred to brigade for coverage. and to maintain soldier interest in the training' Realistic
situations can include personnel who are absent due to work
and sleep shifts (24-hour operations), and completion of short-
notice, command-directed reports and details'

2-47
2-46
e. The 52 must be prepared to operate on the integrated
battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to moving to the
tlRl[-E- 4b
performance stage. tsrlgade Recomnaissa¡rce a¡rd Surveillance
f. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com- Plannimg
pÌete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly.
PERFORMANCE: When 52 personnel can perform all
tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate manner, inform TASK: Prepare an R&S PIan.
the commander or evaluator that the section is ready for eval- CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to prepare
uation or reevaluation. an R&S plan to support the unit's mission'
STANDARÐS: No prior drilis are required' The intelligence
section (S2) will develop an R&S plan that describes all
assets used in information collection. A completed plan will
strongly influence the accuracy and timeliness of intelligence
products.
SUPPORTING INDMDIJAL TASKS: See Appendix A,
Individual Task to Drili Matrix'
IX-LUSTRATIONS: See Figures 2-1 (Organizatíon of a TOC
Area), 2-18 (Brigade Initial Reconnaissance and surveillance
Overlay), and' 2-79 (Brigade Consolidated Reconnaissance
and Surveillance OverlaY).
PERFORMAI'JCE MEASUR,ÐS: Found in the walk-
through instructions.
SETUP INSTR,UCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J470' Other type units
should use equipment organic or available to their respective
units.
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked'
(2) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-9O.
(3) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-92.
(4) Telephone Set, TA-312/PT (2 each).
(5) Power Supply, vehicle, HYP-57lTSEC'
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms,
and so forth.
(7) Map board wiih maps (appropriate scale)'
(B) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-
gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, climatology
studies, and current OB holdings.

2-48
249
(9) Unit R&S SOP.
BR¡GAÐE !N¡T8AL R&S @\dERtAV
(10) Other TOE equipment, as necessary. 01
gñ R&S Pl.n
b. Training site. The 52 is collocated with the 53 (opera-
Logand
tion section) in the BTF TOC. The location of the TOC must
provide for good communications and be near routes to Mrp.he.l n.mc(t):
map rh..l nuñbo,(r):
higher headquarters, company teams, other subordinate Mrp r.lg.:
Mtp !cal.:
units, and the BTF trains. Built-up areas are good locations Prap¡rod by:

for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used, the TOC
( t , -polnlNAl
should be located on a reverse slope to provide cover and con-
cealment from enemy ground observation and fire. This drill f--a--tl - lro¡ NAI

may also be performed in a garrison environment. - Mgitt-"\ - moblllly


corrldort
c. Section instructions: -----J
(1) Arrange the 52 in a realistic configuration for field -ltrmobtttty
^K:
çf- " cot.ldor¡
operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1).

v
P'
t-J
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough
understanding of the brigade R&S overlays. Figure 2-18 on r,t' 1

the next page shows a brigade initial R&S overlay. Figure


2-1-9 on page 2-52 shows a brigade consolidated R&S overlay. NSTRUCTIOI"IS: i-i'-''
| 18

TF 3-29: Ettabllsh contlnuous Burvelllance ol NAI 3 and MC 1 Nl-T


(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24-
2306002. Targel: Enemy MRCa (BMFs w/T52e) movlng so¡rth on MC 1
hour operation. Each team will consist of a team chief and a and englneere clearlng obslacles at NAI 3. Esllmate screen from
team member. N8020205 to N8023156 NLT 23070û2.
(4) Ensure that the required resources are on hand prior 2-51 INF: Establlrh contlnuou¡ survelllance of NAI 5 and MC 2 NLT
2306002 and esllmate contacl wllh elements of 521D al conlact polnts I
to commencement of training.
and 7 NLT 2305002. Targel: Enemy MRCo (BMPa w/T62s) on MC 2 and
(5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE. recon (BRDMa) al NAI 5.
TF 3-51: Establlsh conllnuous suryelllance of poselble LZ at NAI 8
NLT 2302002. Targel: Alrmoblle låndlng (mlle-8 and mlle-24).
Reports: As per Bde TAC SOP.
Other assets aYallable:
- Tm A/205 Ml: Prlorlty of ESM/ECM lo Bn-Regl nels lor enemy
on MC 2.
- 2-17 FA (MPO-36): Submlt requesls lor consolldatlon NLT
- AeroScoul Pll: Submlt requesls for consolldat¡on NLT
- D/2-59 ADA (FAAR): Prlorlly ol gearch to MC 2 and alr MC 6.
DISTRIBUTION: TF 3-29; 2-51 INF; TF 3-51; S2,2-17 FA; D/2-59
ADA; AeroScout Plt; 53/FSO; G2 2AD.

Figure 2-18. Brigade lnitial Reconnaissance and Surveillance


Overlay.

2-50 2-5r
by visual, aural, electronic, photographic, or other means'
BRIGAE}E CONSO¡.I DATEÍ} R&5 OI/ERLAV
Surveiilance is characterized by wide coverage of a target
area and by repetition. It is normally used to gain informa-
tion from the aforementioned aïeas over a long period of time
to note any changes that take place' Surveillance missions
are normally preplanned and are particularly suited to cover
Legend
large areas rapidly and repetitively; minimize risk to the col-
Map rheet name{o): Iector; observe or detect changes on the enemy side of the
Map eheel number(a): FI-OT; and cue other collectors for more detailed coverage'
Map oerlec:
Mop rcale: (3) The collection effort at brigade and battalion level is
Prepared by: managed using the sarne 5-function analytical coLlection
- polnt NAI management process used at division and higher echelons'
Ho*ever, at brigade and battalion, the products of the collec-
- ¡rea NAI tion rnanagement cycle are a graphic R&S overlay with writ-
-itcì-\- moblllty ten or oral instructions. To this end, the formal written-out
-----J corrtdors requirements analysis on the collection plan and the asset
evåluation sheets are not prepared; rather this process is
#l'-'"rrmobtttty cognitive. Additionally, you should understand that long-
corrldor
f;- ,^.rg" planning is conducted at division and higher echelons,
whiie brigade and battalion planning norrnally involves
events that will occur within a few hours.
(4) Normatty R&S planning at brigade and battalion
Ievels consists of an overlay depicting assets, areas covered
and accompanying instructions. The brigade supplies its bat-
Figure 2-19. Brigade Consol¡dated Reconna¡ssance and talions with an overlay depicting battalion zones for recon-
Surveillance Overlay. naissance and mission tasking. Battalions translate brigade
requirements into an overlay depicting asset deployment and
TALK-T}IROUGTI INSTRUCTtrONS : asset tasking (see Figure 2-17). BTF R&S overlays are then
a. Orientation. R&S plans provide a systematic watch over compiled at brigade, with brigade asset plans to create the
the battlefield and early warning of enemy activity, targets overall brigade R&S plan. Once this plan is created, gaps in
for fire anC maneuver and, most importantly, information to coverage are identified and resolved by further taskings or,
satisfy the commander's PIRs and information requirements. possibly, RII are sent to division. When time does not permit
the creation of overlays, brigades use FRAGOs for tasking
(1) Reconnaissance is undertaken to collect information and control.
by visual or other detection means. It is characterized by its precau-
direction toward coverage of one or more specific target b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety
areas. The reconnaissance mission may be developed from tions should be observed.
cues indicating that an area contains information of intelli- c. Demonstration. None.
gence value, or because current or planned operations d. Explanation.
required detailed coverage of a specified area.
(1) Use an illustration of the R&S overlav (Figure 2-19)
(2) Surveillance is the systematic observation of aero- to talk through the procedure for completing the R&S plan.
space, surface, or subsurface areas, places, persons, or things

o tro 2-53
L.¿L
person- COACHING POINT: Encourage section members to
Explain the purpose of each step and ensure that atrl use event templates to help decide where and when to
neiunderstut d th. relationship between each step' look, and for what indicators.
(2) Assign each team member to a specific duty position
c. Determine SIRs by translating the indicators into spe-
within the Sf and explain the duties of that position to 9?:l cific missions. SIRs are the basic questions that need to be
individual. Performance measures outline the responsibilities answered to confirm or deny the existence of an indicator'
of each individual.
(3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual explain
d. Evaluate the SIRs and PIRs based on the time sensitivi-
ty. Consider:
his role in the battle drili, to include the performance steps
for which he is resPonsible' (1) Time necessary to assign the indicator to an R&S
asset.
WAI.K-THROUGII:InitiatingCue.Thisdrillbeginswhen
the TOC has been established and the 52 has received
divi- (2) Time necessary to collect and report the information'
sion collection requirements, the commander's PtrRs and (3) Time necessary to disseminate the resulting intelli-
of
information requirements, and the S3's EEFI' An analysis gence to meet the needs of the commander.
performed
the battlefield área (AO/area of interest) has been
(4) Time needed by the commander to react to the
and a current situation template or SITMAP is posted'
information.
PERFORMANCE MEASURES (5) Mobility of the target.
1. Receive and analyze requirements' Team chief receives' e. Determine reporting requirements of each SIR.
analyzes, and prioritizes the PIRs, information requirements'
and EÐFI. (1) Specify when, where, and in what detail the informa-
tion is to be reported.
COACIIING POINT: This is a mental process'
Initiatly it may be helpful for the team to record all of its (2) Determine if the commander needs the information
analysås. As the team members practice and become by a specified time, or upon the occurrence of a specific event'
more proficient, they should be able to perform all (3) Determine if the information should be reported
actions mentallY. periodically or if periodic negative reports are required'
a. check to see if the information required is readily avail- (4) Report combat information as soon as it is collected,
able in the current data base. using the most direct means available.
b. Determine indicators by identifying those enemy activi 2. Team member 1 determines R&S resource capability and
and
ties or characteristics of the AO that answer the PIRs availability to coilect against eaci- SIR.
determination of indicators is
infor*ation requirements. The a. Consider the following factors when determining
based on those characteristics that reflect-
resource capabiiity to collect information.
(1) Normal doctrinal activity and disposition' (1) Range. How far from the target can the resource be
(2) Activity required for a particular course of action' and still collect effectively against it?
(3) Activity within enemy capabilities and limitations' (2) Timeliness. Does the asset have the capability to col-
(4) Possible or practicable operations' lect and report in time to meet the commander's
requirements?
(5) Collection characteristics'
(3) Technical characteristics. Does the resource have the
(6) Identification of target characteristics'
equipment to collect what you want? (Artillery radars cannot
distinguish type of artillery unit firing.)

2-55
2-54
the team should be trained to disseminate the R&S
(4) Environment (weather and terrain)' How will
requirements in a time critical scenario where the use of
weather and terrain affect the resource's collection capabil-
FRAGOs replaces the issuance of graphic plans.
ity? (Aerial scout capabilities are reduced in heavy
precipitation.) 4. Team member 2 constructs the initial brigade R&S over-
(5) Enemy. How wiil enemy forces affect the resource's lay. As a minimum, the R&S overlay will include four sec-
tions (see Figure 2-18).
collection capability? (A mounted patrol required to recon-
noiter through enemy positions will be easily identified and a. Administrative data for the overlay that includes:
engaged.) (1) Registration marks (at least 2).
b. Compare assets to factors that impact on selection' (2) Classification at the top and bottom of the overlay.
3. Team chief assigns collection requirernents (SIR) to bri- (3) Overlay title.
gade R&S ïesources. Assignments are coordinated with the
(4) Map sheet name(s).
S3 to ensure compatibility with the brigade scheme of
maneuver and other brigade requirements- (5) Map sheet number(s).
(6) Map series.
COACIIING POIITüT: Brigades do not identifv and
task battalion assets to cover individual brigade SIRs. (7) Map scale.
Instead, the maneuver battaiion as a whole is con- (8) Prepared By:
sidered a brigade "asset" and assigned an R&S zone of
(9) Legend.
action which may include severaL collection require-
ments. Brigades may, however, assign specific missions b. Graphic display of resource zones of responsibility to
to BTFs such as the establishment of a screen line' This include:
still leaves the BTF the flexibility to manage its own (1) BTF boundaries.
assets within the guidance (see Figure 2-19).
(2) Limits of zones of responsibilities.
a. Brigade R&S resources include (for reference' see (3) Collection requirements (NAIs, mobility corridors, or
FM 34-80, pages 2-15 through2-25):
other areas that the BTF must cover).
(1) Maneuver battalions.
c. Collection resource instruction which will include:
(2) Artillery target acquisition resources and artillery
radars. (1) Mission tasking or SIRs to be collected by BTF.
(3) Ensineer and military police (MP) assets. (2) Reporting instructions.
(4) Aerial scouts. COACHING POINT: Instructions to collection re-
(5) Mititary intelligence (MI) battalion/Ml cornpanv
sources may also appearin the intelligence annex to the
OPORD, or may be written separately in 5-paragraph
elements (based on support relationships). order and attached to the R&S overlay. R&S overlays
b. Determine time criticality of requirernents. are routinely included as an annex to the intelligence
(1) If a formal plan cannot be created, individual coliec- annex to the OPORD.
tion resources are tasked using FRAGOs- d. A distribution list (provided by the team chieÐ.
(2) Iftime is available, create a graphic plan with COACHING POINT: Brigade should maintain one
instructions and tasks. initial R&S plan which will be used to com-
copy of this
COACHIh{G FOII'{T: Once the team has dernon- pile BTF R&S plans in the next step.
strated its proficiency in creating a graphic R&S plan,

2-57
2-56
5. Team chief compiles and evaluates battalion R&S plans 7. Team chiefevaluates reports received from collection
and determines gaps in coverage. assets. Reviews reports for:
a. BTF R&S plans are compiled into one master brigade a. Timeliness. Compare the time the event occurred to the
R&S ptan. Brigade initial R&S plan is used to compile BTF time the event was reported.
R&S plans. The following items are compiled and added to b. Content. Check to see that reporting follows the guide-
the brigade initial overlay (see Figure 2-18). Iines established in the plan.
(1) BTF asset deployments to include:
c. Responsiveness. Ensure that the information is being
(a) Scout screen lines on location. reported in time to effect the cornmander's operations.
(b) Patrol routes, SPs, RPs, and checkpoints. 8. Team chief uses reports to answer SIRs, information
(c) Locations of LPs,/OPs. requirements, and PIRs and when requirements are estab-
lished and process started again.
(d) GSR primary, alternate, and subsequent loca-
tions, and left and right scan limits. FRACTICE:
(e) REMS locations (strings on fields). a. Brigade R&S SOPs shouid be established or refined to
minimize the time necessary for a full R&S plan to be devei-
(f¡ Engineer reconnaissance missions (where oped. For example: A brigade defensive R&S SOP couid state
required). that battalions were responsible for creating their pians out
(2) A graphic display ofbrigade controlled assets are to the first major terrain feature or out to the 15 kilometer
added to cover gaps in battalion R&S plans and/or to extend rnark, whichever is farther.
the depth of brigade coverage. At a minimum this will b. When personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to
include: creafe new inputs and practice under realistic volume and
(a) Asset location. time constraints.
(b) Routes, SPs, RPs, and checkpoints. c. As proficiency is developed, rotate personnel to ensure
(3) Instructions to brigade controlled assets. cross training.
b. Any gaps that are identified and that cannot be covered d. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of the section
by adjusting battalion assets and/or by brigade assets are and to maintain soldier interest in the training. Realistic
routed and referred to division as an RII. situations can include personnel who are absent due to work
and sleep shifts (24-hour operations), and completion of short-
c. Plan is coordinated with brigade staff to ensure that notice, command-directed reports and details.
support requirements are coordinated
e. The 52 must be prepared to operate on the integrated
6. Team member 1 coordinates with and provides the R&S battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to moving to the
overlay to- performance stage.
a. Brigade R&S assets attached from division (for exam- f. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com-
ple, aerial scouts). plete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly.
b. s3.
PERFORMANCE: When 52 personnel can perform aII
c. FSO. tasks in this dritl in a timely and accurate manner, inform
d. Engineer platoon leader. the commander or evaluator that the section is ready for eval-
e. Division G2. uation or reevaluation.

2-58 2-59
ÐRELL Sæ
b. Training site. The 52 is collocated with the 53 (opera-
tions section) in the BTF TOC. The location of the TOC must
BrEefimg/TræmsmËttËetg bY RadEæ provide for good communications and be near routes to
higher headquarters, company teams, other subordinate
TA,SK: Disseminate intelligence and combat information units, and the BTF trains. Built-up areas are good locations
through a briefing or transmitting over a radio. for the BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used, the TOC
CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to dissemi- should be located on a reverse slope to provide cover and con-
nate intelligence and combat information. cealment from enemy ground observation and fire. This drill
may also be performed in a garrison environment.
STANÐARDS: No prior drills are required. The 52 will
conduct a briefing, in conjunction with other staff members, .c. Section instructions:
ffi commander to adopt a specific course of (1) Arrange the 52 in a realistic configuration for field
action based on the unit's contingency mission. The briefing operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1).
will follow the intellieence estimate format and willbe based
reporffirlgence
on snot u,,,ffi (2) Ensure that all section personnel have a thorough
Tìionffiìe value to higher headquarters. An INTSUM understanding of recording devices and procedures.
will then be prepared. (3) Break the section down into teams to simulate 24-
SUPPORTING INÐMDUAL TASKS: See Appendix A, hour operation. Each team will consist of a team chief and a
Individual Task to Drill Matrix. team member.
(4) Ensure that the required resources are on hand prior
ILI-UST'RATIONS: None.
to commencement of training.
PERF ORMANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-
(5) Use only that equipment authorized by TOE.
through instructions.
SETUP INSTRUCTtrONS: TALK-THROUGH INSTRUCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J4I0' Other type units a. Orientation.
should use equipment organic or available to their respective (1) Intelligence must be reported in a manner which
units. permits its ready use. There are several ways to disseminate
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked. combat information and intelligence. The methods most
commonly used at the battalion level are described below.
(2) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-9O. Corirbat information is passed by the most direct means pos-
(3) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-92. sible from the collector to the user. These means vary accord-
(4) Telephone Set, TA-312/PT (2 each). ing to the nature, location, and echelon of the prospective
user and the urgency of the information. Intelligence may be
(5) Power Supply, vehicle, IIYP-57/TSEC. disseminated electronically, by written means, or oraliy.
(6) Administrative supplies including ace!'ate, china (2) Intettigence information is disseminated to higher,
markers, papeï, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms, lower, and adjacent units based on the time available for dis-
and so forth. semination and the units' need for it. Listed below are the
(7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale). basic reports,/documents prepared by brigades and battal-
(B) Appticable reference materials, unit OPORÐ, intelli- ions. These reports may be disseminated orally, in a briefing,
gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, climatology transmitted over the radio, or in written form.
studies, and current Ots holdings. (a) Spot report. One-time reports used to transmit
(9) Other TOE equipment, as necessary. information or intelligence of an immediate value.

2-61
2-60
(1) Use a formal briefing checklist to expìain how to
(b) Intelligence estimate' An examination of intelli- organize and develop the briefing. Explain the purpose of the
gence fu"tá.., *"ut=h.r, enemy' and terrain, that affect mis- briefing. Emphasize that the briefing must be accurate, thor-
ãior, .""o-plishment. IJsuaIIy written at division or
higher
ough, and detailed. Explain the information used as input to
and briefeòat brigade and battalion' the briefing. Tell all section members where the information
(c) Inteltigence annex' Intelligence document con- can be obtained when it is needed.
taining information on enemy forces and formal intelligence (2) Assign each team member to prepare a portion of the
taskinls. Usually accompanies the OPLAN or OPORD' intelligence estimate. Explain each individual's duties
(d) Situation report (SITREP)' Used to report infor- involved in completing the assignment. Performance mea-
sures outline the responsibilities of each individual.
mation about the currenl tactical situation, friendly and
enemy. (3) Conduct a brief back. Have each individual expiain
his role in the battle drill, to include the performance steps
(e) INTSUM. A brief summary of intelligence for which he is responsible.
gathered over a specified period of time'
\ryALK-TÍIROUGII: Initiating Cue. This drill begins when
(f) Patrol reports. Written by the 52 after the verbal the TOC has been established and the initial situation has
debrief of a patrol. been posted on the SITMAP. The commander directs that his
(e) FRAGO. A modification to orders, used to brieflv staff brief him on the current situation. The intelligence sec-
disseminate instructions. tion prepares its portion of the staff briefing following the
intelligence estimate format.
(3) The reports listed above are outlined in FM 34-3'
PERFOR,MANCE MEASURES
Chapìát 8. Thi; drill is designed for the preparation of an
oralìntelligence estimate; however, any of the other reports 1. Team chiefprepares a detailed presentation plan'
may be substituted. a. Determine the purpose of the briefing.
(4) The intelligence estimate is a logical and orderly b. Determine what graphic aids are required.
examination of the intelligence factors affecting mission
c. Determine ..vhat support aids are required.
accomplishment' It provides the commander with an analy-
sis of the AO, enemy strength, and capabilities that
can COACHING FOINT: Initially, the section mav have
influencehismission.Theintelligencestaffbriefingfollows to prepare a briefing checklist to provide an outline of
the format of the intelligence estimate' the tasks to be accomplished as the briefing takes shape.
The briefing checklist helps the briefer organize and
(5) The staff briefing is the most widelv uigd tvpe of. develop the briefing. As the section personnel become
militàlv briefing. In the staff briefing, the intelligence off^icer more familiar with the briefing format and require-
is calleä on to piesent information pertinent to his area of ments, they should be able to brief from note cards.
responsi¡itity. The presentation of the staff briefing is vital, 2| Teammember 1 prepares the briefing.
sinäe it culminates i., r decision to adopt a specific
"ottt*und
ãor,,r." of action. Each member of the intelligence section is a. Collect material.
personally responsible for ensuring tÞat all useful processed (1) Assemble all available intelligence and combat
írt"lfigé"ä" utrd combat information has been incorporated information.
into the briefing.
b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety precau-
tions should be observed.
c. Demonstration. None-
d. Explanation.

2-62
a. Rehearse the briefing.
COACHING POINT: The briefing is based on-infor-
mation or intelligence that has been transmitted to COACHING POINT: The briefer must be prepared to
higher headquarters in the form of spot reports or support any part of the briefing and to anticipate possi-
lÑfRnps. Spot reports are one-time reports used by ali ble questions so that they may be adequately answered.
echelons to transmit intelligence or information
of
ques-
b. Present the briefing.
immediate value. The report should answer the (1) Describe the mission in a short, clear, and concise
tions who, what, when, and how' Spot reports using a-
unit, time' equipment (SALI-ITE) restatement of the assigned or assumed mission of the
size, activity, loáation,
command.
forÁat strould be used.. The INTREP is prepared when
facts influencing enemy capabilities have been observed (2). Discuss what influence the AO has on probable
or when a chanfe in enemy capabilities has occurred' enemy courses of action.
(2) Prepare an overlay of the current enemy situation' COACHING FOINT: This discussion is based on facts
and conclusions derived from IPB and an analysis of
b. Know the subject thoroughlY' the AO.
c. Isoiate and logicaliy explain key points' (3) Provide information on the enemy which permits
(1) Brief onlY key Points' later development of enemy capabilities and vulnerabilities-
COACHING POINT: Decide what the conclusionpara- of
(a) List the enemy courses of action which the enemy
the estimate is and tailor the contents of the other
can adopt and which will influence the accomplishment of
graphs to support the conclusions' the friendly mission.
(2) Present essential facts to include those that may be (5) Conclude the briefing.
detrimental to proposed conclusions'
COACHING POIIt{T: State the intelligence officer's
(3) Use additional background material' as required' estimate of the total effect of the AO on the friendly
d. Provide supporting data to substantiate validity ofkey courses of action; courses of action most likely to be
points. adopted by the enemy, including their relative probabil-
COACHINGPOINT:Beforepresentingthebriefing'
ity of adoption; and the effects of enemy vulnerabilities
that can be exploited.
the briefer collects and organizes supporting material
points'
which may be required to explain or expand key FRACTICE:
However, ihis *átetlal is presented only if it is required a. When personnel can walk through this drill, it is time to
to answer questions during the course of the briefing' create new inputs and practice under realistic volume and
e. Select appropri'ate visual aids' time constraints. Any report may need to be transmitted over
the radio. As section proficiency increases practice sending
3. Team chief delivers briefing' reports over the radio ensuring proper radio telephone proce-
COACHINGPOINT:Thebriefingfollowstheintelli- dures are followed.
gence estimate format' The first paragraph is a restate'
outline b. As proficiency is developed, rotate personnel to ensure
äeni of the mission. The remaining paragraphs (see cross training.
àn analysis of the battlefield area based on IPB
Drill 2), an estimate of enemy strengths' capabilities' c. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities of the section
and limitations; and the intelligence officer's conclu- and to maintain soldier interest in the training. Realistic
.iorr, tborrt the total effects of the AO of both friendly situations can include personnel who are absent due to work
and enemY courses of action' and sleep shifts (24-hour operations), and completion of
short-notice command-directed reports and details.

2-65
2-64
d. The 52 must be prepared to operate on the integrated DRil-L 5b
battlefield by practicing at MOPP-4 prior to moving to the
performance stage. Wnitten Reports
f. Incoming reports should not be considered totally com-
plete or accurate. Evaluators should vary input accordingly.
PERFORMANCE: When 52 personnel can perform all TASK: Disseminate intelligence and combat information
tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate manner, inform through a briefing or transmitting over a radio.
the commander or evaluator that the section is ready for eval- CUE: The intelligence officer directs his section to dissemi-
uation or reevaluation. nate intelligence and combat information.
STANDARDS: No prior drills are required. The 52 will
conduct a briefing, in conjunction with other staff members,
that will enable the commander to adopt a specific course of
action based on the unit's contingency mission. The briefing
will follow the intelligence estimate format and will be based
on spot reports that have transmitted intelligence or informa-
tion of immediate value to higher headquarters. An INTSUM
will then be prepared.
SUPPORTING INDIVIÐUAL TASKS: See Appendix A,
Individual Task to Drill Matrix.
ILLUSTRATIONS: None.
PERFORMANCE MEASURES: Found in the walk-
through instructions.
SETUP INSTRUCTIONS:
a. Resources. Based on TOE 07245J4I0. Other type units
should use equipment organic or available to their respective
units.
(1) Carrier command post, light tracked.
(2) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-90.
(3) Radio Set, AN,/VRC-92.
(4) Telephone Set, TA-312/PT (2 each).
(5) Power Supply, vehicle, HYP-57ITSEC.
(6) Administrative supplies including acetate, china
markers, paper, pens, pencils, masking tape, blank forms,
and so forth.
(7) Map board with maps (appropriate scale).
(8) Applicable reference materials, unit OPORD, intelli-
gence estimate, terrain studies, weather forecast, climatology
studies, and current OB holdings.

2-66 2-67
(a) Spot report. One-time reports used to transmit
(9) Other TOE equipment, as necessary'
(opera- information or intelligence of an imrnediate value.
b. Training site. The 52 is collocated with thetheS3TOC must (b) Intetligence estimate. An examination of intelli-
of
tions section) in the BiF TOC' The location gence factors, weather, enemy, and terrain that affect mis-
and be near routes to
ñ;td; for good communications subordinate Àion t""ott plishment. Usually written at division or higher
irigt headquarters' company teams' other good locations and briefed at brigade and battalion.
J"il.,", th; BTF trains' B"ilt-up areas aïe
for the ""i
BTF TOC. If built-up areas cannot be used'
the TOC (c) Intelligence annex. Intelligence document con-
provide cover and con- taining information on enemy forces and formal intelligence
should be located or, " .ut"ire slope to
This drill
gto"tt¿ obsãrvation and fire' taskings. Usually accompanies the OPLAN or OPORD'
cealment fro*
"rr"-v
;;;;1;; be performed itt garrison environment' (d) SITREP. Used to report information about the
"
c. Section instructions: current tactical situation, friendly and enemy.
for field
(1) Arrange the 52 in a realistic configuration (e) INTSUM. A brief summary of intelligence
operations within a TOC (Figure 2-1)' gathered over a specified period of time.
a thorough (Ð Patrot reports. Written by the 52 after the verbal
(2) Ensure that all section personnel have
and procedures' debrief of a patrol.
,rnderstarr¿ing of record'ing devices
(s) FRAGO. A modification to orders, used to briefly
(3) Break the section down into teams to simulate
24-
of team chief and a disseminate instructions.
hour operation. Each team will consist
a
team member. (3) The reports listed above are outlined in FM 34-3
on hand prior Chapter 8. This drill is designed for the preparation of a writ-
(4) Ensure that the required resources are
ten intelligence annex, however, any of the other reports may
to commencement of training' be substituted.
(5) Use only that equipment authorized bv TOE' (a) The intelligence annex is a formal document and an
TA.LK.THROUGH INSTRUCTIONS: annex to the OPLAN or OPORD which disseminates intelli-
a. Orientation. gence information about enemy forces and collection task-
which ings. It should be as brief as possible consistent with clarity'
(1) Intelligence must be reported in a manner
to disseminate Its first paragraph is a summary of the enemy situation
permits its ready ot"' itt"t" are several ways
required to understand the OPLAN or OPORD and may refer
The methods most
combat information and intelligence. to annotated maps, situation overlays, or current intelligence
level are described below'
commonly used at the battalion reports. Subsequent paragraphs contain specific collection
¡v tll most direct means pos-
óï-Utt information is passedusãr' These means vary accord- requirements and instructions. SOP information should not
sible from the cottecio' i" irt" be replaced in the intelligence annex.
t" g ;ìil ;t,rr", lo"álion, and echelon of the- prospective be
may
user and the urgenc]îi trttittf*t"ation' Intelligence
orally'
b. Safety. Normal training and equipment safety precau-
means' or
disseminated electrãni"tl1y, by written tions should be observed.
to higher' c. Demonstration. None.
(2) Intelligence information is disseminated for dis-
the time available
Iower, and adjace;;;i;" t"sed on d. Explanation.
Listed below are the
semination and the;;id' need for it' (1) Use the format to explain how to organize and
b asic report, Z a o"o"-"t'it
pìepared.by brigades and battal-
orally' in a briefing' develop the annex. Explain the purpose of the annex.
ions. These r"port" *uv-¡ïdisseminated Emphasize that the annex must be accurate, thorough, and
l;;;;itt"d orr"t the radio, or in written form' detailed. Explain the information used as input to the annex'

2-69
2-68
COACHING POINT: Additional information and
Tell atl section members where the information can be graphic aids become appendixes to the base document
obtained when it is needed'
and are compiled by the team chief.
(2) Assign each team mernber to prepare a portion of the
each individual's duties involved in cornplet-
b. Know the subject thoroughly.
^rrrr"*.'E*plain
ing the t. Performance measures outline the c. Team member 2 compiies intelligence requirements
^"rigrr-"t
responsibilities of each individual' data.
(1) Compiles and prioritizes PIRs and information
(3) Conduct a brief back. Have each ihdividual explain
requirements.
his role in the battle drill, to include the performance steps
for which he is resPonsible. (2) Compiles intelligence acquisition tasks by subordi-
nate unit.
WALK-THROUGH:InitiatingCue.Thisdritlbeginsrvhen
the Toc has been estabtished and the initial situation has COACHING POINT: Resuits of unit collection man-
been posted on the SITMAP. The commander directs that
his agement from Driils 5 or 6 may be used. Explain that
.tuif pt"p"re an OPORD on the change of mission' The intel- although this is a separate task, it must be performed
Iigenåe sãction prepares the opoRD following the intelli- prior to executing this drill.
gence annex format. 3. Team chief determines special instructions for handiing
PERFORMANCE MEASURES personnel, documents, and material; counterintelligence (CI)
requirements; reports and miscellaneous instructions.
1. Team chiefprepares a detailed outline and tasks appro-
priate personnel to collect information' a. Know the contents of the SOP to prevent duplication.
a. Determine the purpose of the annex' b. Determine mission or situation specific tasks that
should be included as instructions to subordinate units.
b. Determine if a situation overlay is required'
COACHING POINT: Have prepared and on hand the
c. Decide what key information is needed in the annex to division intelligence annex to supply the location of
maximize understanding and minimize annex length'
EPW collection points or CLlinterrogation teams as
2- Teammember 1 compiles enemy force information' needed.
a. Collect mate¡ial. c. Determine mission or situation specific CI tasks that
(1) Assemble all available intelligence and combat should be included as instructions to subordinate units.
information. d. Determine the specific reporting requirements.
COACHING POINT: The annex is based on informa- 4. Team member 1 drafts the intelligence annex.
tion or intelligence that has been transmitted to higher
a. Assembles information and intelligence to be included
headquarters in the form of spot reports or INTREPs'
in the intelligence annex.
Spot reports are one-time reports used by all echelons to
hansmlt intelligence or information of immediate value' b. Formats the intelligence annex to include the following
The report should answer the questions who, what' information.
when, and how. Spot reports using a SALU'TE format (1) Prepares the administrative data.
should be used. The INTREP is prepared when facts (2) Summarizes the enemy situation.
influencing enemy capabilities have been observed or
when a change in enemy capabilities has occurred' (3) Lists in priority inteliigence requirements.
(2) Prepare an overlay of the current enemy situation' (a) PIRs.
(3) Prepare other graphic aids, as required' (b) Inforrnation requirements.

2-70 2-71
(4) Lists by subordinate unit the intelligence acquisition PERFORMANCE; When 52 personnel can perform aII
tasks in this drill in a timely and accurate manner, inform
tasks. the commander or evaluator that the section is ready for eval-
(5) Lists measures for handling personnel' documents' uation or reevaluation.
and material.
(6) Lists documents and equipment required'
(7) Lists CI requirements'
(8) Lists reporting instructions'
(9) Lists other instructions, if required'
(10) Prepare closing administrative data to include:
(a) Acknowletlgment data'
(b) APPendixes.
(c) Officiating data'
(d) Signature of officiai'
annex'
5. Team chief approves and finalizes the intelligence
a. Reviews information and intelligence contained in
the
intelligence annex.
b. Approves the intelligence annex'
c. IIas the intelligence annex typed'
d. Distributes the intelligence annex in the most secure
and expedient manner.
PR,ACTICE:
a. When personnel can walk through this drilf it is and time to
create new inputs attã practice underiealistic
volume
time constraints.
b. As proficiency is developed, rotate personnel to ensure
cross training.
c. Inject realism to fully test the capabilities ofthe section
t" il;i"tãi.t soldìer interest in the training' R-ealistic
;itu.tiÑ;r, i.r"loaãpãt.otttt"t who are absent due to work
""ä
completion of short-
;ã .i;õJlrts (z¿-ttã,ir operations),.and
and details'
;;ti;; ¿åt"-u.td-ditucted ieports
d. The 52 must be prepared to operate on the integrat-ed
u"ltr"ri"ilbv ptt"tióittgãt naopp-Z prior to moving to the
performance stage.
e. Incoming reports should not be considered totally glv'
com-
pl"t" ;;;ä;ãtã.'gï ttors sh ould v arv input accordin
"l"

L-lt)
o nt)
Individual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued)
APPendix A

lndividr¡al Task to Drill Matrix Drill or Collective Task


Leader and lnd¡vidual
Task Number-
a6
Drill or Coliect¡ve Task -ee 69 E

Leader and lndiv¡dual


LEADER TASKS Ë E å:
=2 =
Tâsk Number.

0r-3353 01-0010
ldenlìty Charactens|cs
of Threat Weapons and
B B B

0 1 -3353.01 -0025
Supervrse the fhreãt
Evaluarion Ello(
B B
0r-3353 01-0100
Ma,nlarñ Order of Bâllle
Files

01,3353.03-0060
ldenrrly Probab e Threat
Obleclrves

01.3353.03-01 60
B B
Supervrse Analysrs ol the
Battlefreld Area

01-3353 03-0280
Prepêre Per5onnel Secuíty
B rÌetr ng s D D B

01-3353 04-0020
lden¡ly eftecls ol Terrarn
and Wealher o¡ Th¡ear and
Fíendly Courses ol Aclron
B

B Trârn belore lhe drll

D frarn durrng lhe drrll


i
i

i
i

A-0
lndividual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued) lndividual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued)

Drill or Collect¡ve Task Or¡ll or Collect¡ve Task


Leader and lnd¡v¡dual Leeder and lndiy¡dual
Task Number. Task Number.

-Ë:,!
=ø úe :
i:
LEÂDER TÂSKS
oéss
t€
Ë!ì;s
= = E - =
È: Ei;;s
=_ æ.¡_:

supervrse the Development


of Priority lnlellrgence D D
Requirements (PlR or rR).

01-3353 05-0050
Monitor Mainlehance ol the
Silualion Map and Preparâlron D D
of rhe Situâtion Oveday.

01-3353 05-0110
Monitor Preparalion ol
lhe lnlelligence Journal
D D
01 -3353.05-0r 90
Prepare lntelligence Repods B D
01-3353 05-0230
Analyze lntelligence Sum- 01 -3353 06-01 20
mafies and Âeports lrom Select Emplacemenl Srtes lor
Ground S!rve,llance Râdars
Higher. AdJaceñi, aDd Lower
Headquarters in order lo
D D D Nighl Observatroñ Devrces.
Summarize Probable Courses ând Remotely Emptoyed
ol Eñemy Aclion. Sensors

01-3353.05-0280
Supervrse Preparatron ol
lhe lntelligence Anner
D D
0r-3353.05-0390 01-3353 06-0180
Superv se Drsseñinatron Prêpare Êeconnârssance ând
ol lnformatron and lntet- D D Surver lånce Plan to tñclude
lrgence Deploymeñt of Ground Survert-
0r-3353 06-0040 lance Radârs Remorety Em-
oyed Sensors. añd Palrots
Tåsk Grouñd Reconnarssance
añd Surverllênce Assets
D D P

A-2 A-3
ll

lndividual Task to Drill Matrlx (Continued) lndividual Task to Driil Matrix (Continued)

Drill or Collect¡ve Task Drill or Colleclive Task


Leader and lnd¡vidual Leader and lndividual
Task Number- Task Number.
:3 = É99=- -.E 3g €e :õ

!¿
S
a9 õ =
LEAOER TASKS æ::e E¿z
ä!i:â =r
ooË5 =
LEAOER TASKS
êÉs! Ë=ÈË; c

01'3353 06-0250
PreÞare Patrol Overlay B 01,3353 08-0260
Determrne ând Pfiofrlr?e
0r-3353 08-0070 Probable Threãt Courses B B D
Compule Threal Rate D D
0r-3353 08-0280
01 -3353.08-0r 00
Supe¡vrse Preparation oi
ldentrly Areas ol Prob- B B B D
Éveñt Temolates
D
01-3353 08-0290
01,3353 08-0r r0 Compule Combat Power
Evaluâle lncomrng lnlo¡ R¿lros ol Threat Forces D
malron rn Terms ol Per- vs Fíendly Forces
lrnence. Accurâcy. and
B D B
0r,3353 08-0350

01-3353 08-0r60
PreseñÌ Srtuat oñ UÞdàte B
Dele¡mrne Threal Force 0r-3353 08-0370
Êroñlâ9e ând Depth B B Supervrse Developmenl of
Decrsron Supporl leñplales
D
0t,3353 08,0170
ldentrf y ProþaÞ1e Threât
B B 01-3353 09-0300
Assess Câpabrlrrres añd Lrm,
lalroñs of US Taclrcal
0r,3353 08-0180 Reconnarssance ãnd Survejl- B
Assess rhe Capabrlrty ol lance Se¡sor Sysrems
B B D
01 -3400 06- 1 000
0r-3353 08-0200 Know the Capåbr rires
rde^r ty Ênemy Commrrted Operarrng ChaiacteÍstrcs
Re¡n,orcrn9 and Supporl nq D B D D Oevelopmenl Slraregy and
Specral Oeploymenl Con-
ts B B
s¡derarrons of Drv s on
0r -3353 08-0230
and Corps lnrell geñce and
ldenl fy Felåtrve Vulner
ebrlrly ol fhreâl Forces
B D Êlectron c Warlare Equ pmenl
lndividual Task to Drill Matrix (Gontinued)
lndividualTask to Drill Matrix (Continued)
Drill or Collecl¡ve Task
Dr¡ll or Collective fask
Leader and lndividual
Task Number.
Leader and lndiYidual
Task Number. Ee a9
ú¿ ;å =- a! : 6E 5
*5€ É99 i! -3
- E ¡: = =_i txotvtouaL TAsKS ËÊ!! E E å-' ;3P;¡ c
Ë !::;
=iã=; =a
ooË!

LEAOER TASKS
301 -336-1 304

D Marnlain Order ot B
01-3400.10-0030 Baltle Workbook and Fifes
Þ.ôñ¡.ê Añ All-Source
301-336-1401
Êxtract, Categonze.
o1 -3400.1 1'0220
D D and File Data lor Use iñ
lhe lnterprelalion and Pro-
B B E ts
Review Fepods From De-
ployed lñtelligence and ductron ol ¡ntelligence.
Electronic Warf are Assels
301 -336-1 402
-0240 Inleg¡ate lncoming lnloÊ
o1 -3400.1 1

Re!iew Requests From mation rnto Curreñl B D B


Oeployed Intellìgence
D Holdings.
â^d Eleclronrc Wârtare
301 -336-1 505
Assist rn the Preparatron
INOIVIOUAL TASKS and Presenlalion of B B
301 -336-1 201
B B D lntelligence 8nefings.
Review lñlelligence
Hoìdìngs and RePo(s lo 301 -336-1 801
Delermrôe Commande/s Area
of lnteresl Based oñ
301-336-1 205 Mrssron and Conlrngeôcy
B B
PrePare Orders and Requesls B B
iñ lhe Form of Fragmenlery
Orders SCARF, or lntel' 301 -336-1802
ligence Annexes' Process All-Source lnlel|-
gence l¡lormalloñ to
Develop and Updâte Threal
B D B
301 -336-1 302
Marnlatn Inteì|gence B B Data Base
Journel and lhe Journal
30r -336-1 803
Exlract lnf ormalron From
30l -336-1 303 Threal Data Base to B
PrePare ând Marntâìn Srlua_ B Develop and Updale Târger Dara Base
rron MaÞ and Assocraled
Overlavs.

A-7
lndividualTask to Drill Matrix (Continued) lndividual Task to Dr¡it Matr¡x (Continued)

Orlll or Collectlve Tssk Dr¡ll or Collective Task


Leader and lnd¡vidual
Leader and lnd¡Y¡dual
Task Number.
Task Number. êz
F3.3
:8.¡E -E:
r.9: -: = -ee -Ê E-
E 3E:! =¿ = INOIVIOUAL TASKS n 3€ E E å: =E3:;¡ :-
a !
INDIV¡OUAL TASKS = = =¡
301 -336-2207
301-336- 1804 ts Êxtrâct f rom Colleclron
Develop Combrned Oþstacles
Oveilay.
and Plânñin9 the lnforma- D
lion to be lncorporated
rnlo lhe lnlel{igence Anne¡
301 -336-1 805
Develop Aveñues ol aP' B 301 -336-2301
oroâch usrng Modified coñ_ Evaluate lncoming lnforma-
bined Obstacles Oveday tron rn Accordance B B B
301-336-1806
Determrne MobilitY Cotrr-
dors wilhin ldenlified
B 30r -336-2501

Avenues of APProâch
Drâf I lnrellì9ence Repoils
or Sludies for Drsseñrñalron
B B B
301 -336-1 807 30r -336-2802
Compule Combal Power ol
Threat Forces ol Each
D D Delermrne Te¡râiñ

Avenue ol Approach
Fâclor Matíx Requr¡e-
ments and Overlay Re-
B
301-336-2201
¡dentrfY and Lrsl lnlo.mâ_ B B B 301 -336-2804
lroñ GaPs (PlR anó lR) For Develop Doclfinal
a Specil,c OPeration Temg{ales fo. Threal B
Evalualron
301 -336-2202
Prepare A Lrsliñg of lñdica- B B 301 -336-2805
lors for Each PIR aôd lR For Prioítize Avenues ol
a Specrfrc OPeralioñ- Approâch Accordrng to B
Srze, Dúectñess and Length
301-336-2205
301 -336-2806
Prepare Drall Orders and
B B Develop Srlualro¡ Tem-
Requests to suppod lhe
Colleclron Elfod
pfâles lor Each Avenue B

A-9
A.B
lndividual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued)
lndivldual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued)
Drlll or Colleclive Tssk
D¡ill or Colleclive Task Leader and lndlY¡dual
lâsk Number.
Leader and lndividual -€'-! !: :

Task Number. 4= ¡
INDIVIDUAL TASKS Ë E 3.: E 3= =¡

301 -336-3207
Review lhe PreParalron
and Dissemrnalron ol B B
the lnlellrgence Annex
10 the OPORD

301-336-3ã0
Select lntelligence Col-
lection Agencres or Resources D B
whrch cân Answer Specrlc
Orders end Reouesls

301-336-3301
Êvaluate lncomrnq Reports B B B
301 ^336-3303
Supervrse the Prepâråt on
and Mainte¡ânce of
30r-336-281 1
the Srtuêrroñ Mâp by B D
DeveloP Evenl An-
Subordrnâle Personnel
alysrs Matrrx of Each
Mobrllly Corrrdor wrthrn
301 -336-330s
each aveñue ol APProach
. Organrze lñlellrgence B B B
30r -336-3404
Coordrnete Terra n An-
alysrs to Suppoil lnlel' B
lr9ence

30r-336-3405
Delerm ne Targel Perem-
eters for F & S Operâlrons B

A-11
A-10
,¡ ossary

lndividual Task to Drill Matrix (Continued)

Dr¡ll or Collective Task AA .... ... asemblyarea


AAMSL ... antiaircraft missile
Leader and lndividual
Task Number' a?
ۋ : ADA ... air defense artillery
-=:
J.9¡ -ì =
Õ9.9
E 3P =!
úE
= AO .. area of operations
INDIVIDUAL TASKS E!S;¡ AP antipersonnel
arty . artillery
301.336-3503 B B AT antitank
Preoare Wrltten AnalYsls
AZ . Arizona
301-336-3801
Eslrmâte Eftecls of Wealh_ B B 8....
er UÞóate on Threal
or FrreñdlY Courses of
BDA . trtiiå iu-å*L u.;;.3ff:;:
301-336-3804
Delermrne Threat Prob-.
able Courses 01 Acìions
B B B
bde ..
BMP d:J':i':1""
"i i ü':
i1
soviel af:l:' ;"i#
301-336'3805
Priorrlize Threat Coorses B B bn...
ol aclion Accordlng to
o.^h"hir'rv ôl adoohon
B BTF . u"ti,ii"" å:l'?*"":
301'336-3806
btry .. battery
DeveloP Decrston SuPPor B
cal
C-E ..
*"*: i ru;* :*l-:*rli: :
301-336-4304
SuPervrse the Organrzalron
and Marñlenance ol B D CEWI o,., ¡ ui ;i ; ;
Order ol Batle lnloÊ
malron bY Subordrnale
CI ... "
counterintelligence
C&J . ..... collection and jamming
301-336-4484
Coordrnate Targetrng D
co . company
CP . . command post
CPT .

(Concluded)
CSS
d ....
"";b;; ;;;"i;; :ffili'.T
lndividual Task to Dritl Matrix
Drlll or Collecl¡Ye Task Dec ..
div ..""åitä
division
Leãder end lndividual
Task Number'

INOIVIDUAL lASKS
- 5= -i =
-.9¡
=9:::
ó9.9 .: :
a 3:;!
DP
DTG .
DZ
:: :: ::$J|Jä|åïJåJJ
ECM
30r-336-4801
Templale Target lnteili'
gence Colleclioñ Assels
B B EEFI . . . : : ";;;"li^i "i;;"*"'"1";*:flni*lïî
to Delermine Probable elms elements
Enemy Courses ol Action
en ... ....:..... enemy
EPW
301-336-3001
Oeterñine Correct Clâssi_
Ícalron ând Downgrad¡ng
B B B ESM
equip "ì " "i," "i "
;,,i::Ï.I ilT,"r"å: :*::
equipment
Markiñgs lot Documents
and Malerrals
EW .. electronic warfare

Glossary-1
L-12
FA
F'AAR
FEBA
FLOT
... forward' area
field artillerY
' "
alerting
.......... forward edge ofthebattletrooPs
. . forward line of own
radar
area

" " field manual


MRC
MRD
MRR
MSR
MQSM
:
.
f;:ï#"ffiiläri:l
main supply route
Military Qualification Standards Manual
FM .. ."' fragmentarYorder N.....
FRAG
FROG ............ -... - freerocketover ground NAI .. :......... :......... ";-"J rr"r"r,"äilll
' ' " fire suPPort officer
FSO
ft....
.
feet
NBC
NLT ..
no .... : ::: :
:::Ïii,', :f,::l rï*îm
Assistant Chief of Staff, G2 (Inte-lligence)
.

' GermanY 08... .... orderofbattle


.. . ground surveillance radar OP .. observation post

" ''
' ' howitzer
headquarters
in accordance with
OPLAN
OPORD
pers
:: "i'"i:il:îJ.lili
personnel
PIR . . priority intelligence requirement
Intelligence and Security Command plt....
' ' ' infantrY pos ... ,li3J,i3T
intelligence PSYOP psychological operationS
'' "' intelligencerePort R&S .. ... . reconnaissance and surveillance
. . intelligence summary
of the battlefield
recon ... reconnaissance
. intelligence preparation regt . . . regiment
" " ' information REMS ..... remotely employed sensor
" " ' initial rept ...... report
kilometer
'' ' res
RII ...
Iow-intensitY conflict
' Iines of communication RL
RP
:il:rlil
""' listeningPost RR 1'='.''}:låilgfi
' Iieutenant colonel
landing zone rte .... ... ,,
.. map s .. ... signed
' mobititY corridor s2 ... . Intelligence Officer (US Armv)
mechanized s3 .. .. Operations and Training Officer (US Army)
" " medium SALUTE size, activity, location unit, time, equipmen'c
troops' andtime SAM- . .. . surface-to-air missile
. . mission, enemy' terrain,
SCAk¡- . standard coÌlection asset request format
. . Sep .. .. . ..... September
mg ''':;'ït"*";
. . .. militarY intelligence
sIR ..... . specific information requirement
MI SITMAP situation map
MOPP . . mission-oriented protective posture SITREP . . situation report
mort " " ' mortar soP ....
MP .. "" militarY Police
sP .. ... ::ï'':i :':li:'"ï;ffiåîl:
MRB motorized rifle battalion .

Glossary-S
Glossary-2
ssM ..... surface-to-surface missile
SU r
STATREP statuss report
srP ..... ,ier's training Publi
tdie lication
T........ . troops
tac .; ..... ttactical
TACP -Litactical air controol party ARTEP 34.245.10.DRILL
TAI . . target areas of interest
il
31 DECEMBER 1987
TF tassk force
TL...... ... technicalintell,lligence By Order of the Secretary of the Army:

tk tank
TOC ..... tactical operations.s center
ta
TOE ..... ¡anization and equuipment
tab les of orrga
TRADOC Ar my Trainirngi g and I)octrine Corrmmand n","?:.^;,1"J3,:I"or,.,,
Chief of Staff
US Inited States (of Ar
Un lmerica)
Off icial:
veh ...... vehicle
weather R. L. DILWORTH
wea Brigadier General. Ilnited States Army
wpn .. .'. weapon
The Adjutant General

DISTRIBUTION:

Active Army, usAR, and ARNG: To be distributed in accordance with


DA Form 12-12A, Requirements for ARTEp 34-Zgg_1O (Oty rqr btock
no. 73O) and DA Form 12-114, Requirements for lntelligence and
Electronic Warfare Operations (Oty rqr block no. 1117).

* u.s. G0VERNMENT pRtNTtNG OtFtCt, 1988_526-027 t 601 33

Glossary-4