You are on page 1of 2

From ABC­CLIO's World History: The Modern Era website

http://worldhistory.abc­clio.com/

IRISH POTATO FAMINE
As Ireland approached the 1840s, conditions were ripe for disaster. Over a fourth of its population—2 million out of 8 million—were without regular employment.
Some had found shelter in workhouses built at the expense of local taxpayers as mandated by the Irish Poor Law of 1838. Many more roamed the countryside
begging and sleeping in ditches. Nearly half of the country's rural families lived in windowless, mud cabins of one room and survived on the potatoes that they
could grow on the half an acre or so of land for which they often paid a very high rent. Only the wealthy landowners—many of them absentee landlords living in
England—had any security at all.

Potato Blight

The peasants were forced to rent the land they lived and worked on from wealthy landowners in England. The crop they depended on Irish famine victims
primarily for food and for a portion of their rent was potatoes. Since its introduction to Ireland in 1790, the potato had provided a cheap
and plentiful source of food for Ireland's peasants. The potato could grow in the poorest conditions, with very little labor. That fact was important because the
peasants had to spend most of their waking hours working for their landlords and had precious little time to tend their own crops.

Yet the hardy crop was no match for Phytophthora infestans, the potato blight that struck with a vengeance in 1845. That airborne fungus attacked the potato
plants; it produced black spots and a white mold on the leaves and soon rotted the potato to a pulp. As much as 90% of that year's potato crop was destroyed
or unfit for consumption.

Laissez­Faire Government

The government of Great Britain had long practiced an economic theory known as laissez­faire, which held that it was not a government's job to provide aid for
its citizens or to interfere with the free market of goods or trade. As a result, the British government provided minimal relief to the starving peasants.

Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel did, however, push to repeal the Corn Laws, laws that had been in place since the late 1400s and that protected the investments
of wealthy British landowners by subjecting any foreign crops brought into Britain to high taxes. Those laws had pretty much limited the grain supply to what
was raised in Britain and guaranteed a high price for it. By repealing the laws, Parliament cleared the way for less expensive grains to be brought into Ireland to
relieve the famine, but even then, the peasants had no money with which to buy bread.

Although Peel was successful in securing the repeal, the resulting protest split the British Conservative Party, and he was forced to resign. His successor, Lord
John Russell, was a rigid supporter of laissez­faire and was of very little assistance to the Irish.

Evictions

The blight continued to affect crops for the next few years. Three more crop failures occurred in 1846, 1848, and 1851. Having eaten any of the potatoes
spared by the blight and spent what few coins they had for food, tens of thousands of peasants were unable to pay their rents and were evicted from their
homes. They had no place to go. The workhouses were already overcrowded, and there were no opportunities for employment anywhere. Matters worsened
when in December 1848, cholera and typhus began to spread through the workhouses, pauper hospitals, and cramped jails in Ireland.

Emigration

It seemed that the only viable option was to leave. The Poor Law Extension Act held landowners responsible for providing for their own poor. So, Emigration
many landowners evicted tenants, paid their passage to America or Australia, and ended up with the opportunity to commercialize their
agricultural efforts or change from cultivation to beef and dairy farming. Between 1845 and 1855, nearly 2 million people emigrated from Ireland to America and
Australia, and another 750,000 went to England.

For the emigrants, matters worsened once again. Thousands of people died while crossing the Atlantic. Unregulated shipowners often crowded hundreds of
desperate emigrants onto rickety, undersupplied vessels that earned the label "coffin ships." In many cases, those ships reached port only after losing a third
of their passengers to disease, hunger, and other causes.

The August 4, 1847 edition of the Toronto Globe carried this report on the arrival of an emigrant ship:

The Virginius from Liverypool, with 496 passengers, had lost 158 by death, nearly one third of the whole, and she had 180 sick; above one half of the
whole will never see their home in the New World. A medical officer at the quarantine station on Grosse Ile off Quebec reported that "the few who were
able to come on deck were ghastly, yellow­looking spectres, unshaven and hollow­cheeked . . . not more than six or eight were really healthy and able
to exert themselves."

Starvation in the Midst of Plenty

Authenticated research reveals that the Irish peasants starved in the midst of plenty. Wheat, oats, barley, butter, eggs, beef, and pork were exported from
Ireland in large quantities during the so­called famine. All those products were the property of the wealthy, mostly absentee landowners who felt no obligation to
forego profits in order to feed the masses. In fact, those goods were brought through the worst famine­stricken areas guarded by British regiments and
shipped from guarded ports to England.

In 1861, author John Mitchel charged, "The Almighty indeed sent the potato blight but the English created the famine . . . a million and half men, women, and
children were carefully, prudently, and peacefully slain by the English government. They died of hunger in the midst of abundance which their own hands
created."

The Irish potato famine took more than a million lives and forever changed Ireland in a profound way. It also changed centuries­old agricultural practices by
hastening the end of subsistence farming and ushering in the era of commercial farming. The famine also spurred new waves of emigration and thus shaped
the histories of the United States, Australia, and England as well. Today, more than 13 million Americans have Irish roots.

Continuing Controversy

The Irish Potato Famine has continued to arouse controversy, with some historians arguing that it was a genocide. Recent literature, such as John Kelly's The
Graves are Walking: The Great Famine and the Saga of the Irish People (2012) and Tim Pat Coogan's The Famine Plot: England's Role in Ireland's Greatest
The Irish potato famine took more than a million lives and forever changed Ireland in a profound way. It also changed centuries­old agricultural practices by
hastening the end of subsistence farming and ushering in the era of commercial farming. The famine also spurred new waves of emigration and thus shaped
the histories of the United States, Australia, and England as well. Today, more than 13 million Americans have Irish roots.

Continuing Controversy

The Irish Potato Famine has continued to arouse controversy, with some historians arguing that it was a genocide. Recent literature, such as John Kelly's The
Graves are Walking: The Great Famine and the Saga of the Irish People (2012) and Tim Pat Coogan's The Famine Plot: England's Role in Ireland's Greatest
Tragedy (2012), consider British negligence and policy and how these might be construed as genocide in the Irish context.

ABC­CLIO

Further Reading

Kinealy, Christine. A Death­Dealing Famine: The Great Hunger in Ireland. Chicago: Pluto Press, 1997; O Grada, Cormac. The Great Irish Famine. New York:
Cambridge University Press, 1995; Schrier, Arnold. Ireland and the American Emigration, 1850–1900. Chester Springs, PA: Dufour Editions, 1997; Woodham
Smith, Cecil Blanche Fitz Gerald. The Great Hunger: Ireland, 1845–1849. London: Penguin, 1991.

COPYRIGHT 2019 ABC­CLIO, LLC

This content may be used for non­commercial, classroom purposes only.

Image Credits

Emigration: The Illustrated London News, July 6, 1850

Irish famine victims: Library of Congress

MLA Citation

"Irish Potato Famine." World History: The Modern Era, ABC­CLIO, 2019, worldhistory.abc­clio.com/Search/Display/1186193. Accessed 11 Feb. 2019.

http://worldhistory.abc­clio.com/Search/Display/1186193?sid=1186193&cid=0&oid=0&view=search&lang=&citeId=2&useConcept=False
Entry ID: 1186193