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(Applicable for all the programs, except those granted full accreditation for 5 years as per Jan 2013

Manual)

NBCC Place, 4th Floor East Tower, Bhisham Pitamah Marg,


Pragati Vihar New Delhi 110003
Phone: +91(11)24360620-22, 24360654
Fax: +91(11) 24360682
E-mail: membersecretary@nbaind.org
Website: www.nbaind.org
(December, 2015)
SAR
Contents
Serial Code & Link
Item Page No.
to the Item

PART A Institutional Information

PART B Criteria Summary

Program Level Criteria

1 Vision, Mission and Program Educational Objectives 1

2 Program Curriculum and Teaching – Learning Processes 13

3 Course Outcomes and Program Outcomes 38

4 Students’ Performance 88

5 Faculty Information and Contributions 96

6 Facilities and Technical Support 120

7 Continuous Improvement 125

Institute Level Criteria

8 First Year Academics 134

9 Student Support Systems 150

10 Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources 176

PART C Declaration by the Institution 177


PART A: Institutional Information

1. Name and Address of the Institution: B.I.T SINDRI , P.O. SINDRI INSTITUTE
DHANBAD-828123(JHARKHAND)

2. Name and Address of the Affiliating University: V.B.U. HAZARIBAGH,HAZARIBAGH


JHARKHAND

3. Year of establishment of the Institution: Nov.17th , 1949

4. Type of the Institution:

University

Deemed University

Government Aided

Autonomous

Affiliated

5. Ownership Status:

Central Government

State Government

Government Aided

Self-financing

Trust

Society

Section25Company

Any Other (Please specify)

Provide Details: B.I.T. Sindri is a government engineering college under the Department of
higher, Technical Education and Skill Development, Govt. of Jharkhand.

6. Other Academic Institutions of the Trust/Society/Company etc., if any:


Year of
Name of the Institution(s) Programs of Study Location
Establishment
NO

Note: Add rows as needed.


7. Details of all the programs being offered by the institution under consideration:

Year Increase
Program Year of AICTE Accreditation
S. No. of Intake in intake,
Name increase Approval Status*
Start if any
1 Mechanical 1949 60 105 2003
Engineering
2 Electrical 1949 60 99 2003
Engineering
3 Production 1955 30 55 2003
Engineering
4 Metallurgical 1955 30 54 2003
Engineering
5 Chemical 1956 60 91 2003
Eastern/1- Applying for the
Engineering
3509329120/ first time under
6 Civil 1957 60 98 2003 2018/EOA OBE
Engineering
7 ECE 1957 30 52 2003

8 Mining 1975 30 49 2003


Engineering
9 CSE 1985 30 38 2003

10 IT 2001 40 NA NA
Engineering

* Write applicable one:


 Applying first time
 Granted provisional accreditation for two years for the period(specify period)
 Granted accreditation for 3 years for the period (specify period)
 Not accredited (specify visit dates, year)
 Withdrawn (specify visit dates, year)
 Not eligible for accreditation
 Eligible but not applied

8. Programs to be considered for Accreditation vide this application: (No. 2737 dated
23.01.2018)

S. No. Program Name


1. Computer Science Engineering
2. Information Technology
3. Mining Engineering
4. Electronics and Communication Engineering
5. Production Engineering
9. Total number of employees in the institution:

A. Regular Employees (Faculty and Staff):

2018-19 2017-18 2016-17


Items
Min Max Min Max Min Max

M 57 57 62 62 60 60
Faculty in Engineering
F 03 03 03 03 03 03

M 12 12 12 12 13 13
Faculty in Math’s, Science
& Humanities F 00 00 00 00 00 00

M 219 219 235 235 248 248


Non-teaching staff
F 19 19 19 19 20 20

Table A.9a
Note: Minimum 75% should be Regular/Full Time faculty and the remaining shall be
Contractual Faculty/Adjunct Faculty/Resource Source from industry as per AICTE
norms and standards.

The contractual Faculty will be considered for assessment only if a faculty is


drawing a salary as prescribed by the concerned State Government for the
contractual faculty in the respective cadre and who have taught over consecutive
4 semesters.

B. Contractual Staff Employees (Faculty and Staff): (Not covered in Table A):

2018-19 2017-18 2016-17


Items
Min Max Min Max Min Max

M 75 75 77 77 01 01
Faculty in Engineering
F 15 15 14 14 01 01

M 02 02 07 07 01 01
Faculty in Math’s, Science
& Humanities F 03 03 03 03 01 01

M 00 00 00 00 00 00
Non-teaching staff
F 00 00 00 00 00 00

Table A.9b
10. Total number of Engineering Students:

Item 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16

Total no. of boys 2640 2646 2630

Total no. of girls 453 468 448

Total no. of students 3123 3114 3078


Table A.10

Note: In case the Institution is running AICTE approved additional courses such as MBA, MCA in
the first shift, engineering courses in the second shift, Polytechnic in Second shift etc.,
separate tables with the relevant heading shall be prepared.

11. Vision of the Institution: To provide valuable human resources for the industry and society
through the excellence in technical education and scientific research for the sustainable development.

12. Mission of the Institution:


 To offer the state-of-the-art undergraduate, post graduate and doctoral programs.
 To generate new knowledge by quality research.
 To undertake the collaborative projects with industries and society.
 To develop human intellectual capacity with its full potential.
 To solve the problems of society through innovation through technology.

13. Contact Information of the Head of the Institution and NBA coordinator, if designated:

i Name: Prof. D. K. Singh

Designation: Director

Mobile No: 9431445854

Email ID: director@bitsindri.ac.in

ii NBA coordinator, if designated:

Name: M. G. Tiary and Sanjay Kumar Singh

Designation: Professor

Mobile No: 9475332733, 7070654808

Email ID: mgtiary@gmail.com , sks2102@gmail.com


CRITERION 1 Vision, Mission and Program Educational Objectives 60

1. VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (60)

1.1. State the Vision and Mission of the Department and Institute (5)

Vision and Mission of the Production Engineering Department:

Vision

To become a centre of repute striving continuously towards providing quality education,


research and innovation in the field of Production and Industrial Management

Mission

 To provide quality education at both undergraduate and post graduate levels


 To produce engineering graduates to meet the demands of industries and R&D organizations
 To emphasize on integrating manufacturing technology with industrial management
 To impart latest technological knowledge to students by continuous development of curricula
and faculty
 To contribute to the country and the society at large by enhancing the interaction between
academia and industries

Vision and Mission of the Institute:

Vision

To provide valuable human resources for the industry and society through the excellence in
technical education and scientific research for the sustainable development.

Mission

 To offer the state-of-the-art undergraduate, post graduate and doctoral programs.


 To generate new knowledge by quality research.
 To undertake the collaborative projects with industries and society.
 To develop human intellectual capacity with its full potential.
 To solve the problems of society through innovation through technology.

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1.2. State the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) (5)

PEO1. To comprehend the fundamentals of production and industrial engineering to solve


engineering problems

PEO2. To produce skilled and competent graduates capable of facing the challenges of real
business world and engineering practices

PEO3. To facilitate the acquisition of essential skills such as: analysis, synthesis, problem
solving and critical thinking to industrial problems

PEO4. To develop an attitude for continuous learning and aspiration to excel in all endeavor

PEO5. To improve interpersonal skill, team spirit and employability while believing on the
ethical values

1.3. Indicate where the Vision, Mission and PEOs are published and disseminated
among stakeholders (10)

The stakeholders for this department are:


1. College management
2. Students
3. Faculties
4. Non-teaching Staff
5. Parents
6. Industry
7. Employers
8. Alumni
The Vision, Mission and Program Educational Objectives are published and disseminated in the
following media-
Stake Holders
College website (www.bitsindri.ac.in) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Departmental webpage (www.bitsindri.ac.in/index.php/departments/production) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Training and Placement brochure 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Institute Magazine 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Office of the Head of the Department 1, 2, 3, 4
Departmental Notice Board 1, 2, 3, 4
Departmental Laboratories 1, 2, 3, 4

Apart from these, the Vision, Mission and PEOs are also disseminated during student orientation,
workshops, seminars and other departmental programs

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1.4. State the process for defining the Vision and Mission of the Department, and PEOs
of the program (25)
(Articulate the process for defining the Vision and Mission of the department and PEOs
of the program)

Key steps in drawing up the Vision and Mission Statements are:

Step 1. Drawing up of a draft statement in a Departmental meeting as a basis for further


discussions
Step 2. Preparing the final draft in Board of student meeting.
Step 3. Sent for approval from the University Academic Council and Governing Body.

The process is presented through the following flowchart (Fig. 1.1)

Institute Mission and Vision

Students Drawing a Draft Statement Faculty

Alumni
Parents Preparing Final Draft

Industry

Review Management

No Satisfactory

Yes

Publish Departmental
Mission, Vision and PEOs

Fig 1.1: Flow Chart for defining Mission, Vision and PEOs.

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Key steps in drawing up PEO Statements are:

Step 1: Interaction with various stakeholders, peer groups in correlation with vision and mission
of the department.

Step 2: The main points are consulted and Program Co-ordinator collects the views and submits
to Program Assessment Committee.

Step 3: The views are then analyzed and proceeds further to Department Advisory Board.

Step 4: Based on the assessment done by DAB, PEOs are established

Inputs considered for establishing the PEOs:

Faculty contribution:
All the faculties who were given responsibilities of Course Coordinators were asked to give
inputs regarding formulation of PEOs. Their analysis of different courses gave a basis for
producing the foundation of PEOs.

Alumni feedback:
Alumni being an integral part of the institution have intimate knowledge of the program and
provide valuable input in assessment of PEOs. Alumni feedback was obtained through alumni
survey. Also, an alumni meet is organized every year in the institute which is used for the above
purpose.

Employer response:
Employer feedback was taken as an input for preparing the PEOs of the program as they are
the end users of the graduates.

Departmental Academic Committee (DAC):


It consists of course coordinators, program coordinators and faculties. Program Assessment
Committee provided guidelines for program academic and administration units and student
outcome assessment.

Department Advisory Board:


It consists of Head of the Department, program coordinator, industry representatives, alumni
representative, representatives from professional bodies and academia. The committee is
responsible for effectiveness of the program through evaluation and proposing necessary
changes.

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1.5. Establish consistency of PEOs with Mission of the Department (15)
(Generate a “Mission of the Department – PEOs matrix” with justification and rationale of
the mapping)
Note: M1, M2,… Mn are distinct elements of Mission statement. Enter correlation levels 1,
2 or 3 as defined below:
1: Slight (Low) 2: Moderate (Medium) 3: Substantial (High)
If there is no correlation, put “-”

PEO Statements M1 M2 M3 M4 M5

PEO1 3 2 1 1 -

PEO2 2 3 2 - 2

PEO3 - 2 3 2 1

PEO4 2 - 1 3 2

PEO5 1 1 - - 3

PEO1: This program educational objective is based on acquiring of basic knowledge in


Production and Industrial Engineering. It substantially matches with M1 as in this
course students learn subjects like Manufacturing Processes, Advanced Manufacturing
Processes, Operations Research which act as ladder for development of quality
education. It maps moderately with M2 as the end result of the program is working
effectively in industry and weekly with M3 and M4.
PE02: It is based on producing graduates who are able to face the challenges and
competitiveness of global business arena. It strongly matches with M2 which speaks
about enabling the students to meet the demands of industry as the courses learned in
this program directly impacts industrial exposure. It moderately matches with M1, M3
and M5 as this objective is achieved by M1 and M3 and effects M5 in due course of
time.
PEO3: It is based on the acquisition of skills which are necessary to tackle industrial
problems. As the graduates of this program mainly get recruited in core industries, so
the integration of manufacturing technology with industrial management helps them in
the process. So it strongly matches with M3 and moderately with M2 and M4 as they

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are related with demands of industries and latest technological advancements
respectively as both impacts this PEO.
PEO4: This PEO is responsible for continuous improvement. It substantially matches with M4
as it discusses about imparting the latest technical knowledge by continuous
development of curriculum and faculty strengths. It moderately maps with M1 and M5
as fundamental knowledge is required for continuous improvement as well as attaining
this objective will make sure one contribute to society according to the modern
necessities.
PEO5: It is based on improving ethical and moral values with in turn will help in attaining
team spirit and leadership qualities. This objective strongly matches with M5 which
dictates about contribution to country and society as a whole that can be achieved by
this objective.

Note: In this document wherever the term ‘Process’ has been used its meaning is process
formulation, notification and implementation.

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CRITERION 2 Program Curriculum and Teaching – Learning Processes 120

2. PROGRAM CURRICULUM AND TEACHING - LEARNING PROCESSES (120)

2.1. Program Curriculum (20)

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14
15
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2.1.1. State the process used to identify extent of compliance of the University curriculum
for attaining the Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes as mentioned
in Annexure I. Also mention the identified curricular gaps, if any (10)

(State the process details; also mention identified curricular gaps).


Note: In case all POs are being demonstrably met through University Curriculum
then 2.1.2 will not be applicable and the weightage of 2.1.1 will be 20.

The college is affiliated to Vinoba Bhave University, Hazaribagh. The curriculum of


Production engineering program is designed as per the scheme and syllabus of the university.
The curriculum aims to maintain proper balance between engineering science and their
application in industries. Feedback from Students, Industry and Alumni are taken for indirect
assessment. Mapping is performed for each assessment with POs and PSOs. From the direct
and indirect assessment POs and PSOs are calculated.

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Feedback from Students:

Since the students are the most important stakeholders of the program, their feedback is
considered with utmost importance. The feedback is collected using online forms to allow the
students to provide feedback in a fair way. Collected feedback is discussed in concerned
committees for improving curriculum.

Feedback from Industry:

Industry engages engineering graduates to sustain their competitive edge in market. Therefore,
the curriculum should equip the students to understand the needs and practices of industry.
Experts from industry can provide the insights required to attain such goals. Hence, the feedback
from industry is analyzed and accommodated while formulating/updating the curriculum.

Feedback from Alumni:

Alumni are a measure of long term success of the program. Having exposure of both the actual
functioning of the institute as well as the practices of industry/academia, they act as bridge
between the two. Their feedback helps in curriculum design to meet the need in Engineering and
Technology.

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Courses are analyzed for finding gaps in the curriculum through following steps (Fig. B.2.1.1):

 Feedback from the teacher handling the course.


 Input from the training and placement cell of the college.
 Feedback from the alumni of the college.
 Input from the industry experts and other employers in order to make the course more
vocational as well as job fetching.

Feedback from Students Feedback from Alumni

Needs Identified through Feedback from Academia


Feedback from Industry Gap Analysis

From Internet Resources Feedback from Parents

Departmental Core Committee for Approval

Institute/ University for Approval

Program Curriculum Content beyond Syllabus

Figure B.2.1.1: Gap analysis

After performing the Gap Analysis, it was identified that the syllabus and lab facilities were
inadequate in equipping students with the cutting-edge concepts of research and industrial
applications of Advanced Manufacturing Processes, Advanced Welding Processes, Advanced
Surface Finishing Techniques, Production Management, Quality Control and Improvement etc. So,
to meet the identified gaps, the Departmental Academic Committee took several initiatives
including arranging guest lectures by experts from academia and industry, organizing workshop
on Manufacturing Automation, Robotics and Factories of Future (MARFF 2018), acquisition of
relevant books in the library, providing internet access in the Departmental Library for students
etc. The students are also encouraged to attend different courses organized by Siemens Centre of
Excellence situated at BIT Sindri to learn about modern tools and technologies.

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2.1.2. State the delivery details of the content beyond the syllabus for the
attainment of POs and PSOs (10)

(Provide details of the additional course/learning material/content/laboratory


experiments/projects etc., arising from the gaps identified in 2.1.1 in a tabular
form in the format given below)

Following are the delivery methods of contents beyond the syllabus for the attainment of POs
and PSOs (Table B.2.1.2a):

Sl. No. Mode of Delivery


1 Class Room Lectures
2 Expert Lectures/Video Lectures
3 Presentation/ Projects/ Assignments with the help of research papers and internet resources
4 Group Discussion/Seminar
5 Workshops
6 Hands-on Training
Table B.2.1.2a

Details of the guest lectures are as follows (Table B.2.1.2b-c):

CAY (2017-18)
Sl. Gap Action taken No. of working Resource Person with % of Relevance to
No. hours designation students POs, PSOs
1 Advanced Guest lecture on 3 Dr. N.K. Singh, 80% POs = 1, 5
Manufacturing Additive Associate Professor, PSOs = 1, 3
Processes Manufacturing Dept. of Mech. Engg.,
IIT ISM Dhanbad
2 Combining Non- Guest lecture on 3 Dr. Raj Ballav, 75% POs =1, 2, 5
conventional Processes Hybrid Associate Professor, PSOs =1, 3
for Micromachining Manufacturing Dept. of Manu. Engg.,
NIT Jamshedpur
3 Advanced Guest lecture on 3 Dr. A.M Tigga, 80% POs = 1, 2
Manufacturing LASER Beam Professor, PSOs =1, 3
Processes Manufacturing Dept. of Manu. Engg.,
NIT Jamshedpur
4 Quality Control and Guest lecture on 3 Dr. S.C Srivastava 60% POs = 1, 2, 3
Improvement Six Sigma Professor, PSOs =2
Dept. of Prod. Engg.,
BIT Mesra
5 Production Guest lecture on 3 Dr. S.K Jha, 80% POs = 5, 11
Management Agile Associate Professor, PSOs =2
Manufacturing Dept. of Prod. Engg.,
BIT Mesra
Table B.2.1.2b

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CAYm1
Sl. No. Gap Action taken No. of working Resource Person with % of Relevance to
hours designation students POs, PSOs
1 Advance Welding Guest lecture on 3 Dr. S. Chattopadhyay 80% POs 1, 2, 3
Processes Friction Stir Associate Professor, PSOs 1, 3
Welding Dept. of Mech. Engg.,
IIT ISM Dhanbad
2 Advance Welding Guest lecture on 5 Dr. S. Chattopadhyay 75% POs 1, 2
Processes Electron Beam Associate Professor PSOs 1, 3
Welding Dept. of Mech. Engg.,
IIT ISM Dhanbad
Dhanbad
3 Surface Finishing Guest lecture on 5 Dr. D. Patel Assistant 80% POs 1, 2
Techniques Surfaces Finishing Professor, PSOs 2
Operations Dept. of Manu. Engg.,
NIT Jamshedpur
4 Advanced Tools for Guest lecture on 3 Dr. Pramod Pathak 60% POs 1, 2
Evaluation and Fuzzy Logic Professor, PSOs 1, 3
Analysis Dept. of Management
Studies, IIT ISM
Dhanbad
5 Production Guest lecture on 3 Mr. D. K Srivastava 80% POs 5, 11
Management Importance of GM, Electrosteel, PSOs 2
Information system Bokaro
in Decision Making
Table B.2.1.2c

Note: Please mention in detail whether the Institution has given such inputs and
suggestions to the Affiliating University regarding curricular gaps and possible
addition of new content/add-on courses in the curriculum, to bridge the gap and to better
attain program outcome(s).

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2.2. Teaching - Learning Processes (100)

2.2.1. Describe Processes followed to improve quality of Teaching & Learning (25)

(Processes may include adherence to academic calendar and improving instruction


methods using pedagogical initiatives such as real world examples, collaborative learning,
quality of laboratory experience with regard to conducting experiments, recording observations,
analysis of data etc. encouraging bright students, assisting weak students etc. The
implementation details and impact analysis need to be documented)

 Adherence to Academic calendar

In the beginning of every academic year, the academic calendar is framed and issued to the faculty
members and students. The academic calendar is framed based on the discussions with the
Controller of Examinations, Department Heads and other decision-making authorities. The
framing is carried out before the commencement of the academic year. The calendar is printed and
handed over to the students at the beginning of the academic year. The academic schedule
provides date of commencement of the academic session, duration of semester, dates of class tests,
commencement of mid semester examinations, last working day, commencement of practical and
university examinations, study period, date of reopening of the forthcoming semester etc. adhering
to this pre-decided schedule helps the students as well as the faculty members to plan their
activities including the teaching-learning process, internships or research activities.

 Course file

In the teaching–learning process, the course file plays a vital role. It is prepared by each faculty
member handling their respective courses at least two weeks prior to the commencement of every
semester under the guidance of the DAC. The course file includes course outcomes, lecture plan,
teaching methods, learning outcomes, question bank and mapping of outcomes that can be
effectively utilized for the best delivery. Such documentation is also helpful to maintain continuity
if and when a new faculty takes responsibility of the course.

 Classroom teaching

In the teaching-learning process, the lectures are delivered by the faculty member through a set of
teaching aids and modes of delivery like Chalk & Board, Power point presentation, Video Film,
Models, Charts, Animation etc. (Table B.2.2a)

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Various Mode of delivery used by faculties:
Sl. No. Mode of Delivery
1 Class Room Lecture using Chalk and Board
2 Tutorial
3 Practical
4 Slides Presentation/ Projects
5 Expert Lecture/Video Lecture
6 Group Discussion/Seminar
7 Hand-outs (Additional subject material)
8 Models & Prototypes
Table B.2.2a
Class room lecture:

Lecture is an efficient and traditional method for delivering substantial amount of information and
imparting knowledge to a large number of students. It provides a summary or synthesis of
information from various sources. The faculty member ensures to stimulate the student for
exploring much more on the topic that is delivered with substantial amount of information.

The faculty member ensures that at least a group of students among the batch are attracted towards
the topic and henceforth kindled towards the other modes of teaching aids. Faculty member
explains the concepts, principles solutions to problems and applications of respective subject.

Group Discussion:

Group removes shyness of students and develops their communication skill. It builds their self-
confidence. It nurtures them to express their views regarding a subject in a polite manner.

Group discussions are arranged and facilitated by faculty members. At the end of a group
discussion, the student members have clear and unbiased thoughts. The curriculum often
necessitates recapitulation of the previous course. Recollection of such topics can be effectively
carried out by hosting a Group Discussion rather than a lecture course delivery.

This approach also paves way to improvise the communication and technical presentation skills of
the students. The debate on topics by students effectively improvises the skills of the students. At
times, the faculty member summarizes the topic for the non-participants of the group discussions
such that they appreciate the need for recollection of the topic.

Seminar:

To enhance the teaching / technical delivery skills among individual students’ seminar sessions are
arranged. The choice of the seminar topic is done in such a manner that certain topics post-lecture
requires a marginal change for the consecutive concepts. Seminars are designed for students to
talk about topics in the particular course or lectures in detail. Seminars are a vital part of most
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academic courses and they give opportunity to students to discuss the topics in depth with other
students, and with the faculty member. The debate and argument with other students is very useful
in developing their grasping and understanding ability of the subject. Benefits associated with
seminars include opportunities to-

 Learn novel approaches and ideas from peers


 Clarify the complex concepts

Quiz:

Periodical and quick assessment of the student’s understanding the concepts is carried out by
conducting quiz program. The quiz is either an online one or the traditional paper mode. The scores are
recorded for assessing the student’s understating of the concepts.

Team Teaching:

The unique teaching capability of each faculty member is tapped in this method. The variety of
perceptions of the same subject by different experts is experienced by the students. The method
effectively works for courses of higher levels where the students get a blend of knowledge on focused
topics.

Demonstration:

Learning Engineering demands hands-on demonstrations. Demonstrations need not be working models.
Faculty members choose day-to-day essentials for demonstrations of engineering concepts. The
approach is much suitable for basic level engineering courses so that the student recollects the basic
concept each and every time he looks at the items.

Industrial Visit:

Industrial visits represent one of the important attribute in any engineering undergraduate program that
contribute to the achievement of various essential learning outcomes and program outcomes. It provides
the students an opportunity to learn practically through interaction, and by seeing the working methods
and employment practices.

Project:

Engineering education gets itself a complete structure only after the completion of a real time project.
The project can be either a prototype model or a working on a real-time industry project. While the
former one is guided only by the academic professor and the later one is co-guided by the industry
partner. The major outcome of the teaching aid is to make the students understand the work culture and
adapt themselves in the industrial environment.

National Program of Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL):

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NPTEL provides E-learning through online web and video courses in engineering, science and
Humanities streams. The mission of NPTEL is to enhance the quality of Engineering Education in the
country by providing free online courseware. http://nptel.iitm.ac.in/

Anna EduSat Program:

The Centre for Faculty Development of Anna University – Chennai conducts the ANNA EDUSAT live
interactive audio-video lecture Programs transmitted through Ku-Band provided by ISRO, Bangalore
from January 2006 onwards.

URL: http://www.annauniv.edu/facultydevelopment/edusat.html

SWAYAM is an instrument for self-actualization process. It provides opportunities for a life-long


learning. A learner can choose from hundreds of courses. Every course that is taught at the university /
college / school level is in virtual medium. The courses are taught by best teachers in India and
elsewhere. A student studying in any college can transfer the credits earned by taking these courses into
their academic record.

Tutorial:

Tutorial classes are conducted to train the students in analytical subjects. The total strength of students
is divided into two equal halves and two tutorial classes are handled by two faculty members, so that
special concentration would be given to the weak students. Tutorial classes help the students to improve
their analytical and problem-solving skills. Implementation of tutorial classes helps the students to clear
analytical papers in semester end examination.

Technical Training:

Technical training enhances the students to get in-depth knowledge about their subject.

Technical training refreshes the basics which will be helpful for placement activities.

Specially designed training (soft skills, communication skills) is given to students. Such activities
facilitate the students to win in job recruitment /placement.

Students interaction with Faculty members and students’ feedback:

At the end of each period, students are given enough time to interact with the faculty member for
clarification, on the concepts explained in the session.

This helps the students to get clear knowledge of the course content delivered by the faculty members.

In addition to this, faculty advisors interact with the students allotted to them frequently and counsel the
students when required. The faculty members involve in constructive discussions and activities to
promote the students’ higher-order thinking skills. Students’ feedback will be taken in the starting and

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end of each semester for each subject. .Based on the students’ feedback faculty members will be given
counseling; pedagogy training and team teaching will be suggested for them .

Content beyond the Syllabus:

The faculty member who is teaching the course identifies the important and current topics that are not
covered in the syllabus.

In each theory course, students enrich their knowledge by learning the advanced concepts in the course
that are not prescribed in the syllabus.

Utilization of Moodle and Black Board Software

Course plans, Assignments, Quiz and course materials like PPTs, videos, documents are published in
Black Board software for all the courses so that all the students can get the course materials at any time
whenever they need.

Guidelines to identify weak students and mentoring system:

The faculty members regularly conduct meetings regarding progress of their mentees and are
responsible to identify the students who scored less than 50% marks in their internals.

Under the HoD’s direction, the faculty advisors identify the students who score below 50% marks in
three or more subjects and below 75% attendance. These students are considered as academically weak
students and this fact intimated to their parents.

Identification Criteria Actions Taken


Students scoring less marks  Special classes are being conducted after the regular
college hours.
 Peer teaching is conducted by senior and fellow
students.
 Counseling is given to the students by subject
handling faculty, concerned faculty advisors, Class
Counselors and HoD.
 Students’ performances are intimated to parents.
 Remedial measures (counseling, classes, retest, and
tutorial) are taken.
Failures in Semester End  Examination failure reasons are analyzed.
Examinations  Counseling is given to the student.
 Coaching classes are conducted before the
commencement of semester end examination.
 Assignments are given for analytical courses.
 Discussion on important questions and question bank.

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Guidelines to identify bright students and mentoring system:

Identification Criteria Actions Taken


Rank Holders, Semester Toppers  To motivate to get Gold medals and cash prizes given
& Subject Toppers on Graduation Day.
 To motivate to get Mementos and cash prizes given in
department functions.
 Encouraging them to take part in Research Activities.
 Motivating them to take part in national level
competitions for projects.
 Encouraging them to take part in co-curricular activities
in national and international venues by offering 50% of
total expenditure.
Students with First Class  Motivation to continue Excellency. Encouragement to
get nationwide exposure.
 Motivating them to attend conferences, workshop, and
other co-curricular activities.

28
Sl. University Mode of delivery
No. Course Name
Course Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Semester III
1 MA 3103 Numerical Analysis and Programming √ √ √
2 ML 3101 Material Science √ √
3 MA 3104 Mathematics-III √ √ √
4 ME 3103 Mechanics of Solids √ √ √
5 ME 3104 Thermodynamics √ √ √ √
6 ME 3105 Kinematics of Machinery √ √ √ √
7 MA 3201 Numerical Analysis and Programming Lab √ √
8 ME 3206 Thermodynamics √
9 ME 3207 Kinematics of Machinery √ √
10 ME 3208 Mechanics of Solids √
11 PE 3303 General Proficiency √ √ √
Semester IV
12 MA 4105 Mathematics-IV √ √ √
13 MA 4106 Probability and Statistics √ √ √
14 ME 4108 Fluid Mechanics √ √ √
15 ME 4109 Fluid Machinery √ √ √ √
16 PE 4102 Manufacturing Process I √ √
17 PE 4101 Computer Aided Design √ √ √
18 ME 4210 Fluid Mechanics Lab √
19 ME 4211 Fluid Machinery Lab √
20 PE 4201 CAD Lab √ √
21 PE 4202 Manufacturing Process I Lab √ √
22 PE 4304 General Proficiency √ √
Semester V
23 PE 5103 Production Tooling & Design I √ √
24 PE 5104 Metrology √ √
25 PE 5105 Engineering Economy √ √
26 PE 5106 Manufacturing Process II √ √
27 PE 5107 Industrial Organization & Management √ √ √
28 PE 5203 Production Tooling & Design Lab √ √
29 PE 5204 Metrology Lab √ √
30 PE 5205 Manufacturing Process II Lab √ √
31 PE 5206 Computer application Lab √

29
32 PE 5305 General Proficiency √ √
Sl. University Mode of delivery
Course Name
No. Course Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Semester VI
33 PE 6108 Production Tooling & Design I √ √ √
34 PE 6109 Workstudy & Ergonomics √ √
35 PE 6110 Modern Manufacturing Process √ √
36 PE 6111 Operation Research √ √ √
37 PE 6112 Manufacturing Process III √ √
38 PE 6208 Production Tooling & Design Lab √ √
39 PE 6208 Workstudy & Ergonomics Lab √ √
40 PE 6209 Modern Manufacturing Process Lab √
41 PE 6201 Operation Research Sessional √
42 PE 6306 General Proficiency √
Semester VII
43 PE 7113 Project Engineering √ √
PE 7114 Elective I Enterprise Resource Planning √ √
PE 7115 Human Factors in Engg. &
√ √
Design
44 PE 7116 Mechatronics √ √
PE 7117 Value Engineering √ √
Elective II
PE 7118 Competitive Manufacturing √ √
Strategies
45 PE 7119 Theory of Metal Cutting & Forming √ √
46 PE 7120 Plant Engineering √ √ √
47 PE 7121 Manufacturing Automation & Robotics √ √ √
48 PE 7211 FMS & Robotics Lab/ Course Work √ √ √
49 PE 7212 TMCF Lab √
50 PE 7213 Tour, Training & Colloquium √
51 PE 7214 Project Part I √
52 PE 7307 General Proficiency √
Semester VIII
53 CL 8126 Management Information
√ √
Systems
Elective IV
54 CL 8127 Computer Integrated
√ √
Manufacturing
55 CL 8128 Rapid Prototyping √ √
Elective V
56 CL 8129 Material Management √ √
57 CL 8130 Concurrent Engineering √ √
58 CL 8131 Elective VI Productivity Engineering &
√ √
Management
59 PE 8131 Production Planning & Control √
60 PE 8132 Quality & Reliability Engineering √ √
61 PE 8215 Project Part II √

30
62 PE 8308 General Proficiency √
Table B.2.2a

31
2.2.2. Quality of internal semester Question papers, Assignments and Evaluation (20)

(Mention the initiatives, implementation details and analysis of learning levels related to quality
of semester question papers, assignments and evaluation)

The department conducts three internal assessment tests at, 6th, 12th and 15th week of the semester.
There be two class-tests of 5 marks and one mid-term exam of 20 marks. The duration of class-tests is
45 minutes while that of mid-term exam is 90 minutes. The syllabus for all tests and exams are decided
at the inception of course. End-term exam is conducted by university which be of 100 marks and of 3
hours duration.

Question Papers
 Question papers consist of questions of easy, moderate and difficult level.
 Easy questions are straight and can be answered by most of the students, moderate questions need
analysis of the contents they are taught in the class while difficult questions are generally consist
two to three layer of concepts to test students with extra-ordinary caliber.
 The questions are prepared taking into consideration Bloom’s Taxonomy i.e. based on analysis of
problems, implementation of modern tools, formulation of problems etc.

Assignments
 Assignments issue and submission dates are announced by teachers at the beginning of the course.
 Assignments are given based on doing some rigorous work like collection of data and its
evaluation, analysis etc.
 Assignments are given in form of extension of their course, so they are generally not directly as per
their syllabus.

Evaluation:
 After every assessment faculties explain the solution of question paper so as student able to realize
their mistakes and don’t repeat them in final exam.
 The copies are evaluated and shown to the students within ten days of their exam in order to make
students know the marking scheme and realize their mistakes.
 Assignment are also evaluated by internal and external faculty and its rubrics is discussed with the
students prior to the assessment.

32
2.2.3. Quality of student projects (25)

(Quality of the project is measured in terms of consideration to factors including, but not limited
to, environment, safety, ethics, cost, type (application, product, research, review etc.) and
standards. Processes related to project identification, allotment, continuous monitoring,
evaluation including demonstration of working prototypes and enhancing the relevance of
projects. Mention Implementation details including details of POs and PSOs addressed through
the projects with justification)

Initiatives to improve quality of student projects


 Teachers explain about various fields related with the course work for helping students to decide
the project they can do to their best.
 Special care is taken by teachers before deciding project title so as department mission, vision and
program outcomes are accomplished.
 After deciding all the projects, they are cross checked so as no project get repeated.
 The final project titles are than displayed on the department notice board.
 The faculties encourage students and help them by all means to complete the project in time.
 Students are free to use the machines and equipment of the department and even can take help from
technicians.
 The faculties encourage and help students to write papers and get them published in journals or
present in reputed conferences.

Evaluation scheme of projects


Projects are evaluated by a group of faculty which constitute one faculty from any other college from
the same department. Marks are awarded on the basis of following performance indicators:
1. Final project report
2. Presentation and
3. Viva-voice
Best Projects (2017-2018)
Sl. Title of the Project Students Project Project Guide
No. Conducted at
1 Minimization of defects in Aluminium alloy Sunita Kumari In Industry Prof. Prakash
casting using Quality control tool. Vijay Kumar Kumar
2. Modelling and Simulation of High Speed steel Rahul Oreya In Department Prof. Kashif
Milling cutter Raisingh Samad Hasan Kazmi
3. Design and analysis of shock absorber Alok Kumar In Department Prof. Anand
Anurag Tiwari Kumar
4. Effect of various parameters on strength and Kashif Shakil In Department Prof. Kashif
quality of arc welding joint. Sangi Kerai Hasan Kazmi
Improvement in the productivity in Batch Sanjeev Kumar In Department
5. annealing furnace.in mild steel and CI Rahul Kumar Prof. Subodh
Kumar
Sharma
33
Best Projects (2016-2017)
Sl. Title of the Project Students Project Project Guide
No. Conducted at
1 Productivity improvement of Sourav kr. Singh In Industry A.R.Ansari
Cement Plant Sona Ram Mardi
Sunil Hembram
2. Production of TMT bars Satish Kumar In Department Prof. Rakesh
Abhishek Kumar
Sandeep Kumar
3. Robot gripper movement Ojas Kr. Arya In Department Prof. Prakash
through robotic Programming Pankaj Kumar Kumar
Sadanand Mahto
4. Optimize Process parameter of Jay Kumar In Department Prof. Subodh
Arc Welding Dilip Mardi Kumar
Control of Welding defect in Amit Kumar Bhagat In Department Prof. Prakash
5. mild steel and CI Heera Lal Digar Kumar
Pawan Kumar

Best Projects (2015-2016)


Sl. Title of the Project Students Project Project Guide
No. Conducted at
1 Productivity improvement in Aman Kumar In Industry Prof. Prakash
Casting Industries Kundan Kumar Kumar
Sourav Kr. Sharma
2. Investigation of Process Shashank Raj In Department Prof. R.K
Variables of WJM Mahesh Kumar Srivastava &
Ajeet Kr. Singh Prof. S.K Jha
3. Robot gripper movement Ojas Kr. Arya In Department Prof. Prakash
through robotic Pankaj Kumar Kumar
Programming
Sadanand Mahto
4. Optimize Process parameter Jay Kumar In Department Prof. Subodh
of Arc Welding Dilip Mardi Kumar
Control of Welding defect in Amit Kumar Bhagat In Department Prof. Prakash
5. mild steel and CI Heera Lal Digar Kumar
Pawan Kumar

34
2.2.4. Initiatives related to industry interaction (15)

(Give details of the industry involvement in the program such as industry-attached laboratories,
partial delivery of appropriate courses by industry experts etc. Mention the initiatives,
implementation details and impact analysis)

Initiatives taken:
Invited lectures are conducted to the students by inviting experts from core and IT industry. These
lectures results in lively discussion thus imparting current state of the art knowledge to the students and
faculty members.
Workshops are conducted for the students by the technical experts from industry to acquire and update
the technical skills required for the current trends.
Industrial visits are arranged for the students to give exposure on the industrial environment and work
ethics.
Internships, Summer training or In-plant training
Students are allowed to undergo 4 weeks of internship at Research Organizations / Government
Training Institutes / Public Sector Units / Reputed Academic Institutions / Reputed Industries and the
industry / organization is to be selected with the approval of the department consultative committee.

35
2.2.5. Initiatives related to industry internship/summer training (15)

(Mention the initiatives, implementation details and impact analysis)

Initiatives taken by faculties

 The faculties of the department encourage students to do training during their summer
vacation.
 They even guide students to go for summer training by making they know about the
work done in different industries.
 They also help in completing the paper-work required for getting into a particular
industry.

Sl. Name of the Student Roll No. Name of the Duration Date
No. Company
1. Sunita Kumari 1402020 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/2016 - 15/07/2016
2 Ranjeet Kumar 1402033 DVC, CTPS 1 MONTH 7/06/17 - 7/07/17
3 Shivam Ashish 1402035 SAIL 1 MONTH 4/7/2016 -30/7/2016
5 Sayantan Banerjee 1402036 HEC 1 MONTH
6 Sayantan Banerjee 1402036 SAIL 1 MONTH
7 Neha Raj 1402038 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/16-15/07/16
8 Neha Raj 1402038 SAIL 1 MONTH 07/07/15-21/07/15
10 Ranjan Kumar Singh 1402039 TATA STEEL 1 MONTH 13/06/17 - 13/07/17
11 Ranjan Kumar Singh 1402039 TATA CUMMINS 1 MONTH
12 Nitesh Kumar 1402040 HECL 1 MONTH 15/06/16-14/07/16
13 Avishek Tiwary 1402041 TATA STEEL 1 MONTH 18/05/17 - 08/07/17
14 Avishek Tiwary 1402041 TATA MOTORS 1 MONTH 01/06/16-30/06/16
17 Rishi Saurabh 1402042 SAIL 1 MONTH 20/06/16 - 16/07/16
18 Rishi Saurabh 1402042 BARC 1 MONTH NONE
19 Rahul Kumar Mallick 1402043 HEC 1 MONTH 6/15/2017
20 Shubham Agarwal 1402044 SAIL 1 MONTH 03/10/2016 - 29/10/2016
21 Swapnil Srivastava 1402046 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/16-14/07/16
22 Ashish Kumar 1402047 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/2016-14/07/2016
23 Arbaz Aslam 1402049 Internshala 1 MONTH 4/10/16-24/10/16
25 Rahul Kumar Sharma 1402052 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/2016-14/07/2016
26 Varuna Ranjan Kanth 1402056 DAMODAR 1 MONTH 24/06/2016- 15/07/2016
VALLEY
CORPORATION
28 Rajeev Kumar 1402058 SAIL 1 MONTH
29 Shivam Ashish 1402059 HEC 1 MONTH 15/05/2016 - 14/06/2016
30 Anurag Tiwari 1402060 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/2016 - 14/07/2016

36
31 Manis Kumar 1402061 SAIL 1 MONTH 4/07/16-30/7/16
32 Siddharth Shankar 1402063 SAIL 1 MONTH 3/10/2016 - 29/10/ 2016
Pandey
34 Abhishek Ayush 1402071 TATA MOTORS 1 MONTH 1/10/17 - 5/11/16
35 Anupam Toppo 1402072 SAIL 1 MONTH 04/07/2016 - 30/07/2016
36 Mukta Soreng 1402073 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/16-15/07/16
37 Amit Paul Dung 1402075 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/16-14/07/16
38 Sukesh Hansda 1402078 HEC 1 MONTH 15/06/16 - 14/07/16
Table B.2.2.5.a

37
CRITERION 3 COURSE OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES 120

3. COURSE OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES (120)

3.1. Establish the Correlation between the Courses and the Program Outcomes (POs) and
Program Specific Outcomes (PSOs) (20)
(Program Outcomes as mentioned in Annexure I and Program Specific Outcomes as defined
by the Program).

Program Outcomes

1. Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering


fundamentals and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex engineering problems

2. Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyse complex
engineering problems in engineering reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of
mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.

3. Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and


design system components or processes of engineering that meet the specified needs with
appropriate consideration for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and
environmental considerations.

4. Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and research


methods including design of experiments in engineering, analysis and interpretation of data, and
synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.

5. Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and
modern engineering and IT tools including prediction and modelling to complex engineering
activities in engineering with an understanding of the limitations.

6. The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess
societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to
the professional engineering practice in engineering.

7. Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering


solutions of engineering in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge
of, and need for sustainable development.

8. Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and
norms of the engineering practice.

9. Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader
in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.

10. Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the


engineering community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write
38
effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive
clear instructions.

11. Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the
engineering and management principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and
leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.

12. Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to
engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological
change.

Programme Specific Outcomes


 Graduates will be able to apply knowledge of manufacturing science and industrial engineering
concepts for product, design and development.

 Graduate will be able to optimize production system design parameters like cost, time, and
resources and eliminate redundant steps to make the best method of production.

 Graduate will be able to implement modern tools and techniques of manufacturing and industrial
management to meet the challenges of real business world.

PSO 1 PSO 2 PSO 3

PO 1 3 2 2

PO 2 3 1 2

PO 3 2 1 3

PO 4 3 - 2
PO 5 - 3 3
PO 6 - 1 2
PO 7 - - 2
PO 8 - 2 -
PO 9 - 1 2
PO 10 - 1 2
PO 11 3 2 -
PO 12 - 2 -

39
3.1.1. Course Outcomes (COs)
(SAR should include course outcomes of one course from each semester of study, however,
should be prepared for all courses and made available as evidence, if asked) (05)

Note: Number of outcomes for a course is expected to be around 6


Course Name: Manufacturing Processes I (Fourth Semester) Year of Study: 2017 – 18
No. of course outcome Name of course outcome

Develop the ideas of construction, mechanism, operation and


PE4102.1 application of various type of machine tool used in mechanical
systems
Generate the relationship between various type of cutting
PE4102.2 parameter, tool materials and forces that act in cutting tool for
minimized the power requirement
Prescribe the best technique for various types of machining
PE4102.3
operation performed in different machine tool for optimal
outcomes.
Design manufacturing components part based on machine tools
PE4102.4
knowledge, skills and modern engineering technique.
Table B.3.1.1a
Course Name: Metrology (Fifth Semester) Year of Study: 2017 – 18
No. of course outcome Name of course outcome

Understand the fundamentals of Standards, construction of


PE5104.1 measuring instrument, System of tolerance and limits, measuring
accuracy and alignment.
Calculate the various types of tolerance, allowances, clearances,
PE5104.2 measurements of screw threads and spur gear parameters, errors
and surface roughness.

Construct the system for gauges and comparator for rapid


PE5104.3 measurement in mass production and able to utilize different
measuring instrument for variety of engineering parts.
Apply modern techniques of inspection like dynamic testing of
PE5104.4 machine tools, Concept of on-line inspection and measurement with
close accuracy.

Table B.3.1.1b

40
Course Name: Operations Research (Sixth Semester) Year of Study: 2017 – 18
No. of course
Name of course outcome
outcome
Identify and develop operational research models from the verbal
PE7113.1 description of the real system.

PE7113.2 Know the various techniques of Operation research.

Turn the real life problems into formulations of models and use the needed
PE7113.3 techniques to solve the optimization problem.
Analyse the results and proper recommendations to the decision making
PE7113.4 problem in industrial/management engineering.

Table B.3.1.1c

Course Name: Manufacturing Automation and Robotics (Seventh Semester) Year of Study: 2017 – 18
No. of course outcome Name of course outcome

Analyze fundamentals of Manufacturing and Automation


PE7121.1 techniques like High volume production system, NC production
systems, Group Technology, Robotics, FMS and CIM to develop a
system for high accuracy and productivity.
Develop NC part programming for various types of workpart
PE7121.2 design in CNC machine.
Understand the basic concepts of industrial robots, classification,
PE7121.3 drive system, gripper, actuator and sensors.
Understand and apply methods for the sensorial perception and
PE7121.4
interpretation methods for the control of robots.
PE7121.5 Develop the ideas about robot kinematics and dynamics,
programming and maintenance, supervision of operations and
typical industrial applications.
Table B.3.1.1d

41
Course Name: Quality and Reliability Engineering (Eighth Semester) Year of Study: 2017 – 18
No. of course outcome Name of course outcome

Understand the concept of quality and apply its various tools for
PE8132.1 achieving quality in a process/product.
Apply statistical process control and acceptance sampling methods
PE8132.2 to improve quality of processes or products.
Use tools like Quality circle, house of quality etc. to manage human
PE8132.3 resources to improve product quality and productivity.
Understand the concept of reliability and calculate hazard of
PE8132.4
different production systems using different models.
Table B.3.1.1e

3.1.2. CO-PO and CO-PSOs Matrices of Courses Selected in 3.1.1 (05)

Table 3.1.2.1: COs - POs of Manufacturing Processes I (Fourth Semester)

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
3 2 3 1 1 - - - - - - 2
PE4102.1
3 3 2 3 2 - - - - - - -
PE4102.2
3 3 2 3 3 1 1 1 - - - -
PE4102.3
3 3 3 3 2 1 - 1 - - 1 -
PE4102.4
Average 3 2.75 2.5 2.5 2 0.5 .25 0.5 - - 0.25 0.5

Table 3.1.2.2: COs - POs of Metrology (Fifth Semester)

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
3 2 2 2 2 1 - - 1 1 2 2
PE5104.1
2 3 3 2 2 - - - - 1 2 2
PE5104.2
3 3 3 3 3 1 1 - 2 2 1 2
PE5104.3
3 3 3 3 3 - - - 1 1 2 2
PE5104.4
Average 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.5 2.5 0.5 0.25 - 1 1.25 1.75 2

42
Table 3.1.2.3: COs - POs of Operations Research (Sixth Semester)

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
3 3 3 3 2 - - - - - - 2
PE6111.1
2 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - -
PE6111.2
3 2 3 2 1 - - - - - - -
PE6111.3
2 3 2 3 3 - - - - - - 2
PE6111.4
Average 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 1.75 1

Table 3.1.2.4: COs - POs of Manufacturing Automation and Robotics (Seventh Semester)

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
3 3 2 3 3 2 1 - - 1 1 3
PE7121.1
2 3 3 2 3 - - - - - - 2
PE7121.2
3 2 2 2 3 1 1 - - 1 2 3
PE7121.3
3 3 3 2 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 3
PE7121.4
PE7121.5 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 - 2 1 2 3

Average 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.4 2.8 0.8 0.8 - 0.8 0.6 1.4 2.8

Table 3.1.2.5: COs - POs of Quality and Reliability Engineering (Eighth Semester)

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
PE8132.1 2 2 - 3 3 2 - - 2 - - -
CO1
3 3 2 2 2 3 - - 2 - - -
PE8132.2
PE7121.2 1 3 3 2 3 1 - - 2 - - -
PE8132.3
3 3 1 2 1 1 - - 1 - - -
PE8132.4
Average 2.25 2.75 1.5 2.25 2.25 1.75 1.75

Note:
1. Enter correlation levels 1, 2 or 3 as defined below:
Slight (Low) 2: Moderate (Medium) 3: Substantial (High)
It there is no correlation, put “-”

43
Table 3.1.2.6: COs - PSOs of Manufacturing Processes (Fourth Semester)

CO PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

3 1 1
PE4102.1
3 - 1
PE4102.2
2 2 1
PE4102.3
2 1 1
PE4102.4
Average 2.5 1 1

Table 3.1.2.7: COs - PSOs of Metrology (Fifth Semester)

CO PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 - 1
PE5104.1
2 - 1
PE5104.2
2 - 2
PE5104.3
1 - 2
PE5104.4
Average 2 - 1.5

Table 3.1.2.8: COs - PSOs of Operations Research (Sixth Semester)

CO PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

2 2 1
PE6111.1
3 3 -
PE6111.2
2 2 -
PE6111.3
3 1 3
PE6111.4
Average 2.25 2.0 1.0

44
Table 3.1.2.9: COs - PSOs of Manufacturing Automation and Robotics (Seventh Semester)

CO PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


2 - 2
PE7121.1
- - 3
PE7121.2
2 - 2
PE7121.3
1 1 2
PE7121.4
PE7121.5 2 2 2

Average 1.4 0.6 2.2

Table 3.1.2.10: COs - PSOs of Quality and Reliability (Eighth Semester)

CO PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


- 2 3
PE7121.1
2 2 2
PE7121.2
- 3 3
PE7121.3
2 2 1
PE7121.4
Average 1 2.25 2.25

45
3.1.3. Program level Course-PO matrix of all courses INCLUDING first year courses (10)
Table 3.1.3.1: Mapping courses with Pos

1ST SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

HU 1101 - 2 - - - - - - - 2 2 -

CH 1101 2 2 2 2.5 3 2 2 2 3

PH 1101 2.6 2.2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1.8 2 1.6

MA 1101 3 2 2.5 2.25 - - - - - - -

ME 1101 3 2.75 2.2 2 - - - - - - - 1.75

EE 1101 3 3 - - 1 - - - - - - -

CH 1201
- - - - - - - - - - - -
PH 1201
ME 1201
3 2 2 1.5 1.5 - - - - - - 1.75

ME 1202
3 2 2.2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75

ME 1203
3 2 2 1.5 2 - - 2.25 0 0 2

HU 1301 0 0 0 0 0 - - 2 2 2 2 2

2nd SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

IT 2101 - - - - - - - - - - - -

CH 2102 1.8 1.5 2.5 2.5 2 - 2 - - 3

PH 2102 2.6 2.2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1.8 2 1.6

MA 2102 2 2 3 0 3

ME 2102 3 2.8 2 2.5 - - 1 - - - - 1.6

EC 2101 1.83 2.2 2.5 - 2 - - - - - - 1.25

46
EC 2201
- - - - - - - - - - - -

IT 2201
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ME 2204
3 2 2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75

ME 2205
3 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 0 0 2

MN 2302 - - - - - - - 2 2 2 2 2

47
3rd SEMESTER
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA 3103 3 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - 3

ML 3101 2 2 2 1 2 - 2 2 - - - 3

MA 3104 3 3 2 3 1 2 - 1 - - 3 3

ME 3103 3 3 3 2 1 3 - 2 - - - 2

ME 3104 3 3 2 2 1 - 1 1 - - - 2

ME 3105 3 2 2 2 1 - - - - - - 2

4TH SEMESTER
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA4105 3 3 2 3 1 2 - 1 - - 3 3

MA4106 3 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - 1

ME4107 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 2

ME4108 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 3
PE4101 2.25 2.25 2.5 2 3 1 1 - 0.75 1 0.5 2.5

PE4102 3 2.75 2.5 2.5 2 0.5 0.25 0.5 - - 0.25 0.5

PE4201 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

48
5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE5103 2.6 2.4 2.4 2 1 - - - 2 1.2 - 0.8

PE5104 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.5 2.5 0.5 0.25 - 1 1.25 1.75 2

PE5105 2.25 2 2 2 2 0.5 - - 0.5 0.75 - 1.75

PE5106 3 2.75 2.5 2.5 2.5 0.25 - - 0.25 - 0.25 0.5

PE5107 0.5 1 1 1 0.75 1 - 2 2.25 1.75 2 0.5

PE5203 2.25 1.75 2.5 2.25 1.25 - - - 2.25 - - 0.5

PE5204 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.6 2.8 - - - 1.4 0.2 - 2.2

PE5205 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 0.5 0.25 0.25 1.5 - 1 0.25

PE5206 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - - 0.75 - 2.75

6TH SEMESTER
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE6108 2.4 2.4 2.2 1.8 0.6 - - - 1.6 1.4 - 1.4

PE6109 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 - - - - -

PE6110 2.5 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 - - - - - - 1.5

PE6111 2.5 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.25 - - - - 0.25 - 1.75

PE6112 2.25 3.0 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1.0 - - 2

PE6207 2.5 1.5 2.75 2 1.25 - - - 1.25 - - 1

PE6208 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 1 - - - -

PE6209 2 2.25 2.75 2 2.25 - - - 0.25 - - 2

PE6210 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 1.75 - - - - - - 1

49
7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE7113 2.2 2.0 1.2 1.4 0.2 1.6 0.6 0.4 0.8 0.2 2.2 0.6

PE7117 2 2.75 2 2 1.5 1 - - - - 0.5 0.75

PE7119 2.6 2.6 2.2 1.8 0.8 - 0.4 - 2.4 0.6 - 2

PE7120 2.25 3.0 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1.0 - - 2

PE7121 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.4 2.8 0.8 0.8 - 0.8 0.6 1.4 2.8

PE7211 2.6 1.8 2.6 2.2 3 - 0.2 - 1.8 0.4 - 2.4

PE7212 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE8122 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 3 0.75 0.5 0.25 - - 0.5 0.5

PE8125 2.75 2 2.75 2.5 3 - - - 0.5 - - 2.25

PE8127 1.8 1.7 2.0 1.5 1.8 1.1 0.5 - - - - -

PE8131 2.2 1.8 2 1.8 0.24 1.4 0.4 - 0.2 0.2 - 0.6

PE8132 2.25 2.75 1.5 2.25 2.25 1.75 - - 1.75 - - -

50
Table 3.1.3.2: Mapping courses with PSOs

3RD SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

MA 3103 3 3 2
ML 3101 3 3 2
MA 3104 3 3 2
ME 3103 3 3 2
ME 3104 3 2 2
ME 3105 3 2 2

4TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

MA 4105 3 3 2
MA 4106 3 3 2
ME 4107 3 3 2
ME 4108 3 3 2
PE4101 1.75 1.25 2.25

PE4102 2.5 1 1

PE4201 2.25 0.75 2.5

51
5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE5103 2.6 1.2 -

PE5104 2 - 1.5

PE5105 1.75 1.75 1.5

PE5106 3 2.5 2.5

PE5107 0.5 2.5 1.5

PE5203 2.25 0.25 0.75

PE5204 2 0.8 2.4

PE5205 2.25 2.25 0.75

PE5206 0.25 - 1.5

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE6108 3 1 -

PE6109 3 1.25 1.5

PE6110 3 0.75 2.75

PE6111 2.75 2.75 2.5

PE6112 2.75 - 2.25

PE6207 2 1 0.5

PE6208 3 1.25 1.5

PE6209 2.25 1.75 2

PE6210 2.25 2.0 1.0

52
7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE7113 1.6 2.2 1.6

PE7117 2.0 1.25 1.25

PE7119 3 1.6 -

PE7120 2.66 1.33 1.33

PE7121 1.4 0.6 2.2

PE7211 3 1.4 2.6

PE7212 2.25 0.75 2.5

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE8122 3 1.75 2.5

PE8125 2.5 0.5 2.5

PE8127 1.5 0.6 1.8

PE8131 2.2 2.6 1

PE8132 1 2.25 2.25

53
3.2. Attainment of Course Outcomes (50)

3.2.1. Describe the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of
Course Outcome is based (10)

Implementation of Internal Assessment Test:


 After the commencement of the semester, the concerned faculty conducts two internal
class tests each of 5 marks (once before midterm, other after midterm).
 The program coordinator will inform the course coordinator to set the question papers as
per university norms
 Midterm exam happens every semester of 20 marks where questions are set according to
university norms and half the portion of syllabus is intended to be covered.

Implementation of External Assessment Test:


End term exam is conducted by Vinoba Bhave University at the end of semester. The
exam contributes to 70% of the assessment. It covers all the course outcomes and the
attainable program objectives and program specific outcomes.

CO Assessment Rubrics: Course Outcome is assessed in view of the performance of students in


internal assessment and in university examination of a course. Internal assessment contributes
30% and university assessment contributes 70% to the aggregate attainment of a CO and the same
is depicted in the below Fig. 3.1.

Fig. 3.1. CO assessment weightage

(ii) CO Assessment tools

54
The different assessment tools used to assess CO’s and the recurrence with which the assessment
methods are done and recorded in Table.

CO Assessment Tools
Direct Assessment Tools
Minimum
Course Type Assessment Tools
Frequency
Class Test 1 Once per semester
Mid semester exam Once per semester
Theory
Class Test 2 Once per semester
University Exam Once per semester
Internal evaluation Once per semester
Lab/Sessional External Viva-voce
Once per semester
Exam
Internal evaluation Once per program
Project External Viva-voce
Once per program
Exam

(iii) Assessment Process


The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject wise with a
maximum of 100 marks for theory course and 50 marks for laboratory and other courses. The
project work shall be evaluated in two parts. Project part I which is embedded in 7th semester is of
50marks and Project part II which is incorporated in 8th semester is of 200 marks.

(a) Theory course


As per the university norms, evaluation of theory course is done through internal and external
evaluations for 30 marks and 70 marks respectively.
Maximum
Evaluation Exam Frequency Duration
Marks
Once per
Class Test 1 5 45 min.
semester
Mid
Once per
Internal semester 20 90 min.
semester
exam
Once per
Class Test 2 5 45 min.
semester
University Once per
External 70 3 hrs.
Exam semester
For calculating the CO attainment level, 15 is the cutoff out of 30 marks in the internal attainment
and 25 is the cutoff out of 70 marks in the university exam. The overall CO attainment level for a
particular course is calculated by considering 30% from internal attainment and 70% from the
University exam attainment. The various attainment levels are shown in Table. A sample
assessment is shown in Fig. 3.2.
No. of students having CO
55
marks > cutoff attainment
level
>=80% 3
70%-79% 2
60%-69% 1

(b) Laboratory/Sessional
Laboratory sessions play a key role in the development of technical skills among the students. It
also helps in developing students to work as an individual as well as in a team, as a batch includes
5-6 students. It is customary process of performing an experiment per week and to submit the
complete practical work in journal/record form to the corresponding lab in-charge. Students are
provided with lab manual at the start of semester. Before the commencement of the lab sessions
a complete demonstration is delivered by the corresponding faculty covering the design
aspects and theoretical calculations as required. The students’ performance is evaluated as per
the internal evaluation and external viva voce examination. The internal evaluation constitutes to
60% of the total marks and the external evaluation constitutes to 40% of the total marks. Grading
is done based on the students’ performance as shown in Table. Grade B is taken as the cut-off
level for CO attainment and a similar process like that of theory course is adopted to calculate the
CO attainment level.
Table. Marks and grades for laboratory course and project evaluation
Laboratory Project part 1 Project part II
Grade Marks Grade Marks Grade Marks
A+ 45-50 A+ 45-50 A+ 180-200
A 40-44 A 40-44 A 160-179
B+ 35-39 B+ 35-39 B+ 140-159
B 30-34 B 30-34 B 120-139
C 25-29 C 25-29 C 100-119
C+ 20-24 C+ 20-24 C+ 80-99

(c) Project
Project in the curriculum is divided into two parts. Project part I is incorporated in 7th semester and
Project part II essentially an extension of Project part I is incorporated in 8th semester. Based on
the student’s academic performance and field of interest, project batches (4-5 students per batch)
are formed. The internal evaluation constitutes to 60% of the total marks and the external
evaluation constitutes to 40% of the total marks. Grading is done based on the students’
performance as shown in Table Grade B is taken as the cut-off level for CO attainment and a
similar process like that of theory course is adopted to calculate the CO attainment level.

3.2.2. Record the attainment of Course Outcomes of all courses with respect to set attainment
levels (40)
Program shall have set Course Outcome attainment levels for all courses. (The attainment levels
shall be set considering average performance levels in the university examination or any higher

56
value set as target for the assessment years. Attainment level is to be measured in terms of
student performance in internal assessments with respect the course outcomes of a course in
addition to the performance in the University examination)

Measuring Course Outcomes attained through University Assessments


 Attainment level 1: If 60-69 % students get more than 25 marks
 Attainment level 2: If 70-79 % students get more than 25 marks
 Attainment level 3: If above 80 % students get more than 25 marks

Measuring CO attainment through Internal Assessments (The examples indicated are for
reference only. Program may appropriately define levels)

 Attainment level 1: If 60-69 % students get more than 15 marks


 Attainment level 2: If 70-79 % students get more than 15 marks
 Attainment level 3: If above 80 % students get more than 15 marks

Total Attainment = 50% × (attainment level achieved through university assessment) +


50% × (attainment level achieved through internal assessment)

Table 3.2.2.1: CO Attainment for theory subjects CAYm3 (2015-16)


University Internal COs
Course Name Course Code
Assessment Assessment Attainment
B. Tech 3rd sem

N.A.P MA 3103 1.4 0.9 2.3

Material Science ML 3101 2.1 0.9 3

Mathematics-III MA 3104 0 0.6 0.6

Mechanics of Solids-I ME 3103 0 0.3 0.3

Thermodynamics ME 3104 2.1 0.6 2.7

Kinematics of Machinery ME 3105 2.1 0 2.1

57
B. Tech 4th sem

Mathematics-IV MA 4105 0 0.9 0.9

Probability & Statistics MA 4106 2.1 0.9 3

Fluid Mechanics ME 4107 2.1 0.9 3

Fluid Machine ME 4108 0.7 0.9 1.6

CAD PE 4101 2.1 0.9 3

M.P - I PE 4102 2.1 0.6 2.7


th
B. Tech 5 sem

PTD - I PE 5103 2.1 0.9 3

Metrology PE 5104 2.1 0.6 2.7

Engineering Economy PE 5105 1.4 0.9 2.3

MP - II PE 5106 0.7 0.9 1.6

Industrial Organization & PE 5107 2.1 0 2.1


Management
B. Tech 6th sem

PTD - II PE 6108 2.1 0.9 3

Work Study & Ergonomics PE 6109 2.1 0.9 3

Modern Manufacturing Process PE 6110 2.1 0.9 3

Operation Research PE 6111 2.1 0.9 3

MP - III PE 6112 2.1 0.9 3

B. Tech 7th sem

Project Engineering PE 7113 2.1 0.9 3

Value Engineering PE 7117 2.1 0.9 3

Theory of Metal Cutting PE 7119 1.4 0.9 2.3

Plant engineering PE 7120 2.1 0.9 3

Manufacturing Automation & PE 7121 2.1 0.9 3


Robotics

58
B. Tech 8th sem

Production Planning & Control PE 8131 2.1 0.9 3

Quality & Reliability PE 8132 2.1 0.9 3


Engineering
Management & Information PE 8122 2.1 0.9 3
Systems
Rapid Prototyping PE 8125 2.1 0.9 3

Maintenance Technology & PE8127 2.1 0.9 3


Safety Engineering

Table 3.2.2.2: CO Attainment for laboratory subjects CAYm3 (2015-16)


Course Name Course Code Assessment

B. Tech 3rd sem


Numerical Analysis & programming MA 3201 0
Lab
Thermodynamics Lab ME 3206 3

Kinematics of Machinery Sessional ME 3207 0

Mechanics of Solids-I Lab ME 3208 3

General Proficiency PE 3303 3

B. Tech 4th sem

Fluid Mechanics Lab ME 4210 2

Fluid Machine Lab ME 4211 3

CAD Lab PE 4201 3

MP – I (Workshop) PE 4202 3

General Proficiency PE 4304 3

B. Tech 5th sem

Project Tooling & Design PE 5203 2

Metrology Lab PE 5204 0

MP – II (Welding Lab) PE 5205 2

Computer application Lab PE 5206 1

General Proficiency PE 5305 3

59
B. Tech 6th sem

Production Tooling & Design PE 6207 3

Work Study & Ergonomics Lab PE 6208 3

Modern Manufacturing Process Lab PE 6209 3

Operation Research PE 6210 3

General Proficency PE 6306 3

B. Tech 7th sem

FMS & Robotics Lab PE 7211 2

TMCF Lab PE 7212 3

Tour, Training, & colloquium PE 7213 3

Project Part – I PE 7214 2

General Proficiency PE 7307 3

B. Tech 8th sem

Project Part - II PE 8215 3

General Proficiency PE 8308 3

Table 3.2.2.3: CO Attainment for theory subjects CAYm2 (2016-17)


University Internal COs
Course Name Course Code
Assessment Assessment Attainment
B. Tech 3rd sem

N.A.P MA 3103 1.4 0.9 2.3

Material Science ML 3101 2.1 0.9 3

Mathematics-III MA 3104 2.1 0 2.1

Mechanics of Solids-I ME 3103 0 0.6 0.6

Thermodynamics ME 3104 2.1 0.3 2.4

Kinematics of Machinery ME 3105 2.1 0 2.1

60
B. Tech 4th sem

Mathematics-IV MA 4105 0 0.9 0.9

Probability & Statistics MA 4106 2.1 0.6 2.7

Fluid Mechanics ME 4107 2.1 0.9 3

Fluid Machine ME 4108 2.1 0 2.1

CAD PE 4101 2.1 0 2.1

M.P - I PE 4102 2.1 0 2.1

B. Tech 5th sem

PTD - I PE 5103 2.1 0.9 3

Metrology PE 5104 2.1 0.3 2.4

Engineering Economy PE 5105 2.1 0.9 3

MP - II PE 5106 0 0.9 0.9


Industrial Organization &
PE 5107 2.1 0 2.1
Management
B. Tech 6th sem

PTD - II PE 6108 2.1 0.9 3

Work Study & Ergonomics PE 6109 2.1 0.9 3

Modern Manufacturing Process PE 6110 2.1 0.9 3

Operation Research PE 6111 0.7 0.3 1

MP - III PE 6112 2.1 0.6 2.7

B. Tech 7th sem

Project Engineerng PE 7113 2.1 0.9 3

Value Engineering PE 7117 2.1 0.9 3

Theory of Metal Cutting PE 7119 2.1 0.9 3

Plant engineering PE 7120 2.1 0.9 3


Manufacturing Automation &
PE 7121 2.1 0 2.1
Robotics

61
B. Tech 8th sem

Production Planning & Control PE 8131 2.1 0.6 2.7


Quality & Reliability
PE 8132 2.1 0.9 3
Engineering
Management & Information
PE 8122 2.1 0.9 3
Systems
Rapid Prototyping PE 8125 2.1 0.9 3
Maintenance Technology &
PE8127 2.1 0.9 3
Safety Engineering

Table 3.2.2.4: CO Attainment for laboratory subjects CAYm2 (2016-17)

Course Name Course Code Assessment

B. Tech 3rd sem.


Numerical Analysis & programming MA 3201 0
Lab
Thermodynamics Lab ME 3206 3

Kinematics of Machinery Sessional ME 3207 1

Mechanics of Solids-I Lab ME 3208 3

General Proficiency PE 3303 3

B. Tech 4th sem.

Fluid Mechanics Lab ME 4210 2

Fluid Machine Lab ME 4211 3

CAD Lab PE 4201 3

MP – I (Workshop) PE 4202 3

General Proficiency PE 4304 2

B. Tech 5th sem.

Project Tooling & Design PE 5203 3

Metrology Lab PE 5204 3

MP – II (Welding Lab) PE 5205 3

Computer application Lab PE 5206 3

General Proficiency PE 5305 3

62
B. Tech 6th sem.

Production Tooling & Design PE 6207 3

Work Study & Ergonomics Lab PE 6208 3

Modern Manufacturing Process Lab PE 6209 3

Operation Research PE 6210 3

General Proficiency PE 6306 3

B. Tech 7th sem.

FMS & Robotics Lab PE 7211 3

TMCF Lab PE 7212 3

Tour, Training, & colloquium PE 7213 3

Project Part – I PE 7214 3

General Proficiency PE 7307 3

B. Tech 8th sem.

Project Part - II PE 8215 3

General Proficiency PE 8308 3

Table 3.2.2.3: CO Attainment for theory subjects CAYm1 (2017-18)


University Internal COs
Course Name Course Code
Assessment Assessment Attainment
B. Tech 3rd sem

N.A.P MA 3103 2.1 0.9 3

Material Science ML 3101 2.1 0.9 3

Mathematics-III MA 3104 2.1 0.9 3

Mechanics of Solids-I ME 3103 0 0.6 0.6

Thermodynamics ME 3104 1.4 0.6 2.0

Kinematics of Machinery ME 3105 2.1 0.3 2.4

B. Tech 4th sem

Mathematics-IV MA 4105 2.1 0.9 3

Probability & Statistics MA 4106 2.1 0.9 3

Fluid Mechanics ME 4107 2.1 0.9 3

Fluid Machine ME 4108 2.1 0.9 3

63
CAD PE 4101 2.1 0.9 3

M.P - I PE 4102 2.1 0.6 2.7

B. Tech 5th sem

PTD - I PE 5103 2.1 0.9 3

Metrology PE 5104 2.1 0 2.1

Engineering Economy PE 5105 0.7 0.9 1.6

MP - II PE 5106 2.1 0.9 3


Industrial Organization &
PE 5107 2.1 0.9 3
Management
B. Tech 6th sem

PTD - II PE 6108 3.00 3.00 3.00

Work Study & Ergonomics PE 6109 3.00 3.00 3.00

Modern Manufacturing Process PE 6110 3.00 1.00 2.40

Operation Research PE 6111 3.00 2.00 2.70

MP - III PE 6112 3.00 3.00 3.00

B. Tech 7th sem

Project Engineering PE 7113 2.4 0.6 3

Value Engineering PE 7117 2.4 0.6 3

Theory of Metal Cutting PE 7119 2.4 0.6 3

Plant engineering PE 7120 2.4 0.4 2.8


Manufacturing Automation &
PE 7121 2.4 0.6 3
Robotics
B. Tech 8th sem

Production Planning & Control PE 8131 2.1 0.0 2.1


Quality & Reliability
PE 8132 2.1 0.9 3
Engineering
Management & Information
PE 8122 2.1 0.9 3
Systems
Rapid Prototyping PE 8125 2.1 0.9 3
Maintenance Technology &
PE8127 2.1 0.6 2.7
Safety Engineering

Table 3.2.2.4: CO Attainment for laboratory subjects CAYm1 (2017-18)

64
Course Name Course Code Assessment

B. Tech 3rd sem


Numerical Analysis & programming MA 3201 3
Lab
Thermodynamics Lab ME 3206 3

Kinematics of Machinery Sessional ME 3207 3

Mechanics of Solids-I Lab ME 3208 3

General Proficiency PE 3303 3

B. Tech 4th sem

Fluid Mechanics Lab ME 4210 2

Fluid Machine Lab ME 4211 3

CAD Lab PE 4201 3

MP – I (Workshop) PE 4202 3

General Proficiency PE 4304 3

B. Tech 5th sem

Project Tooling & Design PE 5203 3

Metrology Lab PE 5204 3

MP – II (Welding Lab) PE 5205 3

Computer application Lab PE 5206 3

General Proficiency PE 5305 3

B. Tech 6th sem

Production Tooling & Design PE 6207 3

Work Study & Ergonomics Lab PE 6208 3

Modern Manufacturing Process Lab PE 6209 3

Operation Research PE 6210 3

General Proficency PE 6306 3

65
B. Tech 7th sem

FMS & Robotics Lab PE 7211 3

TMCF Lab PE 7212 3

Tour, Training, & colloquium PE 7213 3

Project Part – I PE 7214 3

General Proficiency PE 7307 3

B. Tech 8th sem

Project Part - II PE 8215 3

General Proficiency PE 8308 3

3.3. Attainment of Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes


3.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for measuring the attainment of
each of the Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes (10)

PO assessment process and tools: PO/PSO assessment is done by giving 80% weightage to direct
assessment and 20% weightage to indirect assessment. Direct assessment is based on CO attainment
where 80% weightage is given to attainment through university exam and 20% weightage is given to
attainment through internal assessments. Indirect assessment is done through program exit survey,
alumni survey and employer survey.

PO Assessment

Direct Assessment
Indirect Assessment
(80% weightage)
(20% weightage)
 From CO attainment
using CO-PO mapping  Alumni Survey
 Employer Survey
 Exit Survey

Fig.4. PO and PSO assessment tools

The various direct and indirect assessment tools used to evaluate POs & PSOs and the
frequency with which the assessment processes are carried out are listed in Table.
66
Assessment tools and processes used for evaluation of PO and PSO attainment
PO, PSO ASSESSMENT TOOLS AND PROCESSES
Course Type Assessment Tools Frequency
Class Test 1 Once per course
Mid Semester Once per course
Theory
Class Test 2 Once per course
Direct Assessment University Exam Once per course
Internal Evaluation Once per course
Laboratory
External Viva voce Exam Once per course
Internal Evaluation Once per program
Project
External Viva voce Exam Once per program
Exit Survey Once in a year
Indirect Assessment Surveys Alumni Survey Once in a year
Employer Survey Once in a year

(a) Direct assessment process: Direct assessment tools described in the below table are used for
the direct assessment of POs and PSOs. Initially, the attainment of each course outcome is
determined using internal as well as University exam assessment. The attainment of each PO
corresponding to a particular course is determined from the attainment values obtained from the
CO attainment and CO-PO mapping values of the course under consideration. Similarly, the
values of PSO attainment are also determined. The overall direct attainment of POs and PSOs is
taken as the average of the PO and PSO attainments of all the courses.

3.3.2. Provide results of evaluation of each PO & PSO (40)


Program shall set Program Outcome attainment levels for all POs & PSOs.
Attainment Level 1: 60% students scoring more than University average percentage marks or set
attainment level in the final examination.

Attainment Level 2: 70% students scoring more than University average percentage marks or set
attainment level in the final examination.

Attainment Level 3: 80% students scoring more than University average percentage marks or set
attainment level in the final examination.

C101, C102 are indicative courses in the first year. Similarly, C409 is final year course. First
numeric digit indicates year of study and remaining two digits indicate course nos. in the respective year of
study.

Direct attainment level of a PO & PSO is determined by taking average across all courses addressing
that PO and/or PSO. Fractional numbers may be used for example 1.55.

67
Indirect attainment level of PO & PSO is determined based on the student exit surveys, employer
surveys, co-curricular activities, extracurricular activities etc.

Table 3.3.2.1: PO Attainment CAYm3 (2015-16)

3RD SEMESTER
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA 3103 2.3 2.3 1.53 2.3 0.76 - - - - - - 2.3

ML 3101 2 2 2 1 2 - 2 2 - - - 3

MA 3104 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.6 0.2 0.4 - 0.2 - - 0.6 0.6

ME 3103 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.3 - 0.2 - - - 0.2

ME 3104 2.7 2.7 1.8 1.8 0.9 - 0.9 0.9 - - - 1.8

ME 3105 2.1 1.4 1.4 1.4 0.7 - - - - - - 1.4

Direct 1.66 1.55 1.23 1.21 0.77 0.11 0.48 0.25 - - 0.1 1.55
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - - 3 3
Attainment

Total 1.93 1.84 1.58 1.56 1.22 0.69 0.98 0.8 - - 0.68 1.84

4TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA4105 0.9 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.3 0.6 - 0.3 - - 0.9 0.9

MA4106 3 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - 1

ME4107 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 2

ME4108 1.6 1.6 1.06 1.06 0.53 0.53 - - - - - 1.6

PE4101 2.25 2.25 2.5 2 3 1 1 - 0.75 1 0.5 2.5

PE4102 2.7 2.47 2.25 2.25 1.8 0.45 0.22 0.45 - - 0.22 0.45

PE4201 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

68
Direct 1.92 2.17 1.91 1.88 1.51 0.65 0.03 0.1 0.25 0.25 0.23 1.56
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment
Total 2.136 2.336 2.128 2.104 1.808 1.12 0.624 0.68 0.8 0.8 0.784 1.848

5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE5103 2.6 2.4 2.4 2 1 - - - 2 1.2 - 0.8

PE5104 2.47 2.47 2.47 2.25 2.25 0.45 0.22 - 0.9 1.12 1.57 1.8

PE5105 1.72 1.52 1.52 1.52 1.52 0.38 - - 0.38 0.57 - 1.33

PE5106 1.59 1.45 1.32 1.32 1.32 0.13 - - 0.13 - 0.13 0.26

PE5107 0.35 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.52 0.7 - 1.4 1.57 1.22 1.57 0.35

PE5203 1.5 1.167 1.67 1.5 0.83 - - - 1.5 - - 0.33

PE5204 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 0 0 - 0

PE5205 2 2 1.67 1.83 1.67 0.33 0.167 0.167 1 - 0.67 0.167

PE5206 0.916 0.67 1 0.67 1 - - - - 0.25 - 0.916

Direct 1.46 1.23 1.15 1.08 1.01 0.22 0.04 0.17 0.85 0.48 0.43 0.66
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 1.768 1.584 1.52 1.464 1.408 0.776 0.632 0.736 1.28 0.984 0.944 1.128

69
6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE6108 2.4 2.4 2.2 1.8 0.6 - - - 1.6 1.4 - 1.4

PE6109 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 - - - - -

PE6110 2.5 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 - - - - - - 1.5

PE6111 2.5 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.25 - - - - 0.25 - 1.75

PE6112 2.25 3.0 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1.0 - - 2

PE6207 2.5 1.5 2.75 2 1.25 - - - 1.25 - - 1

PE6208 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 1 - - - -

PE6209 2 2.25 2.75 2 2.25 - - - 0.25 - - 2

PE6210 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 1.75 - - - - - - 1

Direct 2.51 2.54 2.46 2.28 1.9 0.47 0.36 0.11 0.45 0.18 - 1.18
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - 3
Attainment

Total 2.608 2.632 2.568 2.424 2.12 0.976 0.888 0.688 0.96 0.744 - 1.544

7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE7113 2.2 2.0 1.2 1.4 0.2 1.6 0.6 0.4 0.8 0.2 2.2 0.6

PE7117 2 2.75 2 2 1.5 1 - - - - 0.5 0.75

PE7119 2 2 1.67 1.36 0.6 - 0.3 - 1.82 0.45 - 1.52

PE7120 2.25 3.0 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1.0 - - 2

PE7121 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.4 2.8 0.8 0.8 - 0.8 0.6 1.4 2.8

70
PE7211 1.73 1.2 1.73 1.47 2 - 0.13 - 1.2 0.27 - 1.6

PE7212 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

Direct 2.24 2.1 1.98 1.73 1.69 0.66 0.44 0.05 0.94 0.31 0.58 1.68
Attainment
Indirect
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.392 2.28 2.184 1.984 1.952 1.128 0.952 0.64 1.352 0.848 1.064 1.944

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE8122 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 3 0.75 0.5 0.25 - - 0.5 0.5

PE8125 2.75 2 2.75 2.5 3 - - - 0.5 - - 2.25

PE8127 1.8 1.7 2.0 1.5 1.8 1.1 0.5 - - - - -

PE8131 2.2 1.8 2 1.8 0.24 1.4 0.4 - 0.2 0.2 - 0.6

PE8132 2.25 2.75 1.5 2.25 2.25 1.75 - - 1.75 - - -

Direct 2.4 2.15 2.2 2.11 2.05 1 0.28 0.05 0.49 0.04 0.1 0.67
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.52 2.32 2.36 2.288 2.24 1.4 0.824 0.64 0.992 0.632 0.68 1.136

71
Table 3.3.2.2: PSO Attainment CAYm3 (2015-16)

3RD SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


MA 3103 2.3 2.3 1.53
ML 3101 3 3 2
MA 3104 2.1 2.1 1.4
ME 3103 0.6 0.6 0.4
ME 3104 2.4 1.6 1.6
ME 3105 2.1 1.4 1,4

Direct Attainment 2.08 1.83 1.38

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6


Total 2.264 2.064 1.704

4TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


MA 4105 0.9 0.9 0.6
MA 4106 3 3 2
ME 4107 3 3 2
ME 4108 1.6 1.6 1.06

PE4101 1.75 1.25 2.25

PE4102 2.25 0.9 0.9

PE4201 2.25 0.75 2.5

Direct Attainment 2.10 1.62 1.61

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.28 1.896 1.888

5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

72
PE5103 2.6 1.2 -

PE5104 1.8 - 1.35

PE5105 1.33 1.33 1.14

PE5106 1.6 1.33 1.33

PE5107 0.35 1.75 1.05

PE5203 1.5 0.167 0.5

PE5204 0 0 0

PE5205 1.5 1.5 0.5

PE5206 0.083 - 0.5

Direct Attainment 1.19 0.8 0.70

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 1.314 1.08 1.02

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE6108 3 1 -

PE6109 3 1.25 1.5

PE6110 3 0.75 2.75

PE6111 2.75 2.75 2.5

PE6112 2.75 - 2.25

PE6207 2 1 0.5

PE6208 3 1.25 1.5

PE6209 2.25 1.75 2

PE6210 2.25 2.0 1.0

Direct Attainment 2.66 1.3 1.55

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.728 1.64 1.84

7TH SEMESTER

73
COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE7113 1.6 2.2 1.6

PE7117 2.0 1.25 1.25

PE7120 2.66 1.33 1.33

PE7121 1.4 0.6 2.2

PE7211 2 0.93 1.73

PE7212 2.25 0.75 2.5

Direct Attainment 1.7 1 1.51

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 1.96 1.4 1.808

Table 3.3.2.3: PO Attainment CAYm2 (2016-17)

3RD SEMESTER

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE8122 3 1.75 2.5


PE8125 2.5 0.5 2.5
PE8127 1.5 0.6 1.8
PE8131 2.2 2.6 1
PE8132 1 2.25 2.25

Direct Attainment 2.04 1.54 2.01

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.232 1.832 2.208

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA 3103 2.3 2.3 1.53 2.3 0.76 - - - - - - 2.3

74
ML 3101 2 2 2 1 2 - 2 2 - - - 3

MA 3104 2.1 2.1 1.4 2.1 0.7 1.4 - 0.7 - - 2.1 2.1

ME 3103 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.6 - 0.4 - - - 0.4

ME 3104 2.4 2.4 1.6 1.6 0.8 - 0.8 0.8 - - - 1.6

ME 3105 2.1 1.4 1.4 1.4 0.7 - - - - - - 1.4

Direct 2.08 1.81 1.42 1.46 0.86 0.5 0.16 0.65 - - 0.35 1.8
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - - 3 3
Attainment
Total 2.264 2.048 1.736 1.768 1.288 1 0.728 1.12 - - 0.88 2.04

4TH SEMESTER
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
MA4105 0.9 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.3 0.6 - 0.3 - - 0.9 0.9
MA4106 2.7 2.7 1.8 2.7 0.9 - - - - - - 0.9
ME4107 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 2
ME4108 2.1 2.1 1.4 1.4 0.7 1.4 - - - - - 2.1
PE4101 1.57 1.57 1.75 1.4 2.1 0.7 0.7 - 0.52 0.7 0.35 1.75

PE4102 2.1 1.92 1.75 1.75 1.4 0.35 0.17 0.35 - - 0.17 0.35

PE4201 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

Direct 2.16 2.02 1.75 2.02 1.34 0.72 0.12 0.09 0.217 0.207 0.207 1.5
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment
Total 2.328 2.216 2 2.216 1.672 1.176 0.696 0.672 0.7736 0.7656 0.7656 1.8

5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE5103 2.6 2.4 2.4 2 1 - - - 2 1.2 - 0.8

PE5104 2.2 2.2 2.2 2 2 0.4 0.2 - 0.8 1 1.4 1.6

75
PE5105 2.25 2 2 2 2 0.5 - - 0.5 0.75 - 1.75

PE5106 0.9 0.82 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.075 - - 0.075 - 0.075 0.15

PE5107 0.35 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.52 0.7 - 1.4 1.57 1.22 1.4 0.35

PE5203 2.25 1.75 2.5 2.25 1.25 - - - 2.25 - - 0.5

PE5204 2.6 1.8 1.8 2.6 2.8 - - - 1.4 0.2 - 2.2

PE5205 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 0.5 0.25 0.25 1.5 - 1 0.25

PE5206 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - - 0.75 - 2.75

Direct 2.1 2.18 1.98 1.69 1.75 0.24 0.03 0.18 1.12 0.56 0.43 1.15
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.28 2.344 2.184 1.952 2 0.792 0.624 0.744 1.496 1.048 0.944 1.52

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE6108 2.4 2.4 2.2 1.8 0.6 - - - 1.6 1.4 - 1.4

PE6109 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 - - - - -

PE6110 2.5 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 - - - - - - 1.5

PE6111 0.83 0.83 0.91 0.83 0.75 - - - - 0.08 - 0.58

PE6112 2.02 2.7 1.35 1.35 1.57 1.12 1.12 - 0.9 - - 1.8

PE6207 2.5 1.5 2.75 2 1.25 - - - 1.25 - - 1

PE6208 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 1 - - - -

PE6209 2 2.25 2.75 2 2.25 - - - 0.25 - - 2

PE6210 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 1.75 - - - - - - 1

76
Direct 2.63 2.32 2.82 2.08 1.71 0.45 0.34 0.11 0.44 0.16 - 1.03
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - 3
Attainment

Total 2.704 2.456 2.856 2.264 1.968 0.96 0.872 0.688 0.952 0.728 - 1.424

7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE7113 2.2 2.0 1.2 1.4 0.2 1.6 0.6 0.4 0.8 0.2 2.2 0.6

PE7117 2 2.75 2 2 1.5 1 - - - - 0.5 0.75

PE7119 2.6 2.6 2.2 1.8 0.8 - 0.4 - 2.4 0.6 - 2

PE7120 2.25 3.0 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1.0 - - 2

PE7121 1.96 1.96 1.96 1.68 1.96 0.56 0.56 - 0.56 0.42 0.98 1.96

PE7211 2.6 1.8 2.6 2.2 3 - 0.2 - 1.8 0.4 - 2.4

PE7212 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

Direct 2.33 2.3 1.92 1.79 1.74 0.63 0.43 0.05 1.08 0.33 0.52 1.74
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.464 2.44 2.136 2.032 1.992 1.104 0.944 0.64 1.464 0.864 1.016 1.992

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE8122 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 3 0.75 0.5 0.25 - - 0.5 0.5

PE8125 2.75 2 2.75 2.5 3 - - - 0.5 - - 2.25

PE8127 1.8 1.7 2.0 1.5 1.8 1.1 0.5 - - - - -

77
PE8131 1.98 1.62 1.8 1.62 0.216 1.26 0.45 - - - - -

PE8132 2.25 2.75 1.5 2.25 2.25 1.75 - - 1.75 - - -

Direct 2.35 2.11 2.16 2.07 2.05 0.97 0.29 0.05 0.45 - 0.1 0.55
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.48 2.288 2.328 2.256 2.24 1.376 0.832 0.64 0.96 - 0.68 1.04

Table 3.3.2.4: PSO Attainment CAYm2 (2016-17)

3RD SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


MA 3103
2.3 2.3 1.53
ML 3101
3 3 2
MA 3104
2.1 2.1 1.4
ME 3103
0.6 0.6 0.4
ME 3104
2.4 1.6 1.6
ME 3105
2.1 1.4 1.4

Direct Attainment 1.75 1.88 1.38

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2 2.104 1.704

4TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


MA 4105
0.9 0.9 0.6
MA 4106
2.7 2.7 1,8
ME 4107
3 3 2
ME 4108
2.1 2.1 1.4
PE4101 1.22 0.87 1.57
PE4102 1.57 0.52 1.75
78
PE4201 2.25 0.75 2.5

Direct Attainment 1.96 0.67 1.3

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.168 1.136 1.64

5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE5103 2.6 1.2 -


PE5104 1.6 - 1.2
PE5105 1.75 1.75 1.5
PE5106 0.9 0.75 0.75
PE5107 0.35 1.75 1.05
PE5203 2.25 0.25 0.75
PE5204 2 0.8 2.4
PE5205 2.25 2.25 0.75
PE5206 0.25 - 1.5

Direct Attainment 1.55 0.97 1.1

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 1.84 1.376 1.48

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE6108 3 1 -
PE6109 3 1.25 1.5
PE6110 3 0.75 2.75
PE6111 0.91 0.91 0.83
PE6112 2.47 - 2
PE6207 2 1 0.5
PE6208 3 1.25 1.5

79
PE6209 2.25 1.75 2
PE6210 2.25 2.0 1.0

Direct Attainment 2.43 1.1 1.34

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.544 1.48 1.672

7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE7113 1.6 2.2 1.6

PE7117 2.0 1.25 1.25

PE7119 3 1.6 -

PE7120 2.66 1.33 1.33


PE7121 0.97 0.42 1.53
PE7211 3 1.4 2.6
PE7212 2.25 0.75 2.5

Direct Attainment 2.21 1.63 1.54

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.368 1.904 1.832

80
8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE8122 3 1.75 2.5

PE8125 2.5 0.5 2.5

PE8127 1.5 0.6 1.8

PE8131 1.97 2.33 0.89

Table PE8132 1 2.25 2.25 3.3.2.5:


PO
Direct Attainment 1.99 1.48 1.98

Indirect Attainment 0.6 0.6 0.6

Total 2.192 1.784 2.184

Attainment CAYm1 (2017-18)

3RD SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA 3103 3 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - 3

ML 3101 2 2 2 1 2 - 2 2 - - - 3

MA 3104 3 3 2 3 1 2 - 1 - - 3 3

ME 3103 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.6 - 0.4 - - - 0.4

ME 3104 2 2 1.33 1.33 0.66 - 0.66 0.66 - - - 1.33

ME 3105 2.4 1.6 1.6 1.6 0.8 - - - - - - 1.6

Direct 2.16 2.03 1.58 1.72 0.94 0.43 0.44 0.67 - - 0.5 2.05
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - - 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.328 2.224 1.864 1.976 1.352 0.944 0.952 1.136 - - 1 2.24

4TH SEMESTER

81
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

MA4105 3 3 2 3 1 2 - 1 - - 3 3

MA4106 3 3 2 3 1 - - - - - - 1

ME4107 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 2

ME4108 3 3 2 2 1 2 - - - - - 3

PE4101 2.25 2.25 2.5 2 3 1 1 - 0.75 1 0.5 2.5

PE4102 2.7 2.48 2.25 2.25 1.8 0.45 0.23 0.45 - - 0.23 0.45

PE4201 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - 1 0.75 - 2.5

Direct 2.81 2.68 2.25 2.32 1.68 1.06 0.17 0.20 0.25 0.25 0.53 2.06
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.848 2.744 2.4 2.456 1.944 1.448 0.736 0.76 0.8 0.8 1.024 2.248

5TH SEMESTER
PO1
COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO11 PO12
0

PE5103 2.6 2.4 2.4 2 1 - - - 2 1.2 - 0.8

PE5104 1.92 1.92 1.92 1.75 1.75 0.35 0.17 0 0.7 0.87 1.22 1.4

PE5105 1.2 1.06 1.06 1.06 1.06 0.26 0 0 0.26 0.4 0 0.93

PE5106 3 2.75 2.5 2.5 2.5 0.25 - - 0.25 - 0.25 0.5

PE5107 0.5 1 1 1 0.75 1 - 2 2.25 1.75 2 0.5

PE5203 2.25 1.75 2.5 2.25 1.25 - - - 2.25 - - 0.5

PE5204 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.6 2.8 - - - 1.4 0.2 - 2.2

PE5205 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 0.5 0.25 0.25 1.5 - 1 0.25

PE5206 2.75 2 3 2 3 - - - - 0.75 - 2.75

82
Direct 2.20 1.96 2.07 1.87 1.84 0.26 0.046 0.25 1.17 0.57 0.49 1.092
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.36 2.17 2.26 2.10 2.07 0.81 0.64 0.8 1.54 1.06 0.99 1.473

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE6108 2.4 2.4 2.2 1.8 0.6 - - - 1.6 1.4 - 1.4

PE6109 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 - - - - -

PE6110 2 2 2.2 2 2.2 - - - - - - 1.2

PE6111 2.25 2.25 2.47 2.25 2.02 - - - - 0.22 1.57

PE6112 2.25 3 1.5 1.5 1.75 1.25 1.25 - 1 - - 2

PE6207 2.5 1.5 2.75 2 1.25 - - - 1.25 - - 1

PE6208 3 3 2.5 2.75 2.25 1.5 1 1 - - - -

PE6209 2 2.25 2.75 2 2.25 - - - 0.25 - - 2

PE6210 2.5 2.75 2.5 2.75 1.75 - - - - - - 1

Direct
2.43 2.46 2.37 2.2 1.81 1.42 1.08 1 1.03 0.81 - 1.45
Attainment

Indirect
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 - 3
Attainment

Total
2.54 2.57 2.50 2.36 2.05 1.736 1.46 1.4 1.42 1.25 - 1.76

7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE7113 2.20 2.00 1.20 1.40 0.20 1.60 0.60 0.40 0.80 0.20 2.20 0.60

PE7117 2.00 2.75 2.00 2.00 1.50 1.00 - - - - 0.50 0.75

PE7119 2.60 2.60 2.20 1.80 0.80 - 0.40 - 2.40 0.60 - 2.00

83
PE7120 2.10 2.80 1.40 1.40 1.63 1.17 1.17 - 0.93 1.87

PE7121 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.40 2.80 0.80 0.80 - 0.80 0.60 1.40 2.80

PE7211 2.60 1.80 2.60 2.20 3.00 - 0.20 - 1.80 0.40 - 2.40

PE7212 2.75 2.00 3.00 2.00 3.00 - - - 1.00 0.75 - 2.50

Direct
2.44 2.39 2.17 1.89 1.85 1.14 0.63 0.40 1.29 0.51 1.37 1.85
attainment

Indirect
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
attainment

Total
2.552 2.512 2.336 2.112 2.08 1.512 1.104 0.92 1.632 1.008 1.696 2.08

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

PE8122 3 2.5 2.75 2.5 3 0.75 0.5 0.25 - - 0.5 0.5

PE8125 2.75 2 2.75 2.5 3 - - - 0.5 - - 2.25

PE8127 1.8 1.7 2.0 1.5 1.8 1.1 0.5 - - - - -

PE8131 2.2 1.8 2 1.8 0.24 1.4 0.4 - 0.2 0.2 - 0.6

PE8132 2.25 2.75 1.5 2.25 2.25 1.75 - - 1.75 - - -

Direct 2.18 1.94 2.00 1.92 1.83 1.15 0.42 0.18 0.76 0.2 0.35 1.07
Attainment
Indirect 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Attainment

Total 2.344 2.152 2.2 2.136 2.064 1.52 0.936 0.744 1.208 0.76 0.88 1.456

Table 3.3.2.6: PSO Attainment CAYm1 (2017-18)

3RD SEMESTER

84
COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

MA 3103 3 3 2

ML 3101 3 3 2

MA 3104 3 3 2

ME 3103 0.6 0.6 0.4

ME 3104 2 1.3 1.3

ME 3105 2.4 1.6 1,6

Direct Attainment 2.33 2.08 1.54

Indirect Attainment 3 3 3

Total
2.464 2.264 1.832

4TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


MA 4105 3 3 2
MA 4106 3 3 2
ME 4107 3 3 2
ME 4108 3 3 2

PE4101 1.75 1.25 2.25

PE4102 2.25 0.9 0.9

PE4201 2.25 0.75 2.5

Direct Attainment 2.60 2.12 1.95


3 3 3
Indirect Attainment

Total 2.68 2.296 2.16

85
5TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


PE5103 2.6 1.2 -
PE5104 1.4 - 1.05
PE5105 0.93 0.93 0.8
PE5106 3 2.5 2.5
PE5107 0.5 2.5 1.5
PE5203 2.25 0.25 0.75
PE5204 2 0.8 2.4
PE5205 2.25 2.25 0.75
PE5206 0.25 - 1.5

Direct Attainment 1.68 1.15 1.25


3 3 3
Indirect Attainment
Total 1.944 1.52 1.6

6TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE6108 3 1 -

PE6109 3 1.25 1.5

PE6110 2.4 0.6 2.2

PE6111 2.47 2.47 2.25

PE6112 2.75 - 2.25

PE6207 2 1 0.5

PE6208 3 1.25 1.5

PE6209 2.25 1.75 2

PE6210 2.25 2 1

Direct Attainment 2.57 1.42 1.65

Indirect Attainment 3 3 3

Total
2.656 1.736 1.92

86
7TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE7113 1.60 2.20 1.60

PE7117 2.00 1.25 1.25

PE7119 3.00 1.60 -

PE7120 2.48 1.24 1.24

PE7121 1.40 0.60 2.20

PE7211 3.00 1.40 2.60

PE7212 2.25 0.75 2.50

Direct attainment 2.25 1.29 1.90

3 3 3
Indirect attainment

Total 2.4 1.632 2.12

8TH SEMESTER

COURSES PSO1 PSO2 PSO3

PE8122 2.1 1.22 1.75

PE8125 2.5 0.5 2.5

PE8127 1.5 0.6 1.8

PE8131 2.2 2.6 1

PE8132 0.9 2.02 2.02

Direct attainment 1.84 1.388 1.814

3 3 3
Indirect attainment

Total 2.072 1.7104 2.0512

87
CRITERION 4 Students’ Performance 150

4. STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE (150)

Item CAYm1
CAY CAYm2 CAYm3 CAYm4
(Information to be provided cumulatively for all the shifts with explicit (2018- (2017-
(2016-17) (2015-16) (2014-15)
headings, wherever applicable) 18)
19

54 54 54 54 54
Sanctioned intake of the program (N)

Total number of students admitted in first year minus number of students


migrated to other programs/institutions plus no. of students migrated to this 47 50 51 51 51
program (N1)

Number of students admitted in 2nd year in the same batch via lateral entry
0 0 15 9 11
(N2)

Separate division students, if applicable (N3) 0 0 0 0


0

Total number of students admitted in the Program (N1 + N2 + N3) 47 50 66 60 62

Number of students who have successfully


graduated without backlogs in any semester/year
of study
N1 + N2 + N3 (As (Without Backlog means no compartment or
failures in any semester/year of study)
Year of entry defined above)
I Year II Year III Year IV Year

CAYm1 (2017-18) 51 32

CAYm2 (2016-17) 51+15+0 = 66 34 33+10

CAYm3 (2015-16) 51+9+0 = 60 24 26+5 37+7

CAYm4(LYG) (2014-15) 51+11+0 = 62 26 26+8 32+7 41+9

CAYm4 (LYGm1) (13-14) 55+5+0 = 60 30 24+1 41+2 45+3

CAYm5 (LYGm2) (12-13) 56+3+0 = 59 42 45+3 34+2 46+3

88
Number of students who have successfully
graduated

N1 + N2 + N3 (Students with backlog in stipulated period of study)


Year of entry (As defined above)
I Year II Year III Year IV Year

CAYm1 (2017-18) 51 12

CAYm2 (2016-17) 51+15+0 = 66 8 13+4

CAYm3 (2015-16) 51+9+0 = 60 12 14+2 9+1

CAYm4(LYG) (2014-15) 51+11+0 = 62 19 15+3 13+2 4+0

CAYm4 (LYGm1) (13- 55+5+0 = 60 21 19+3 18+3 18+2


14)
CAYm5 (LYGm2) (12- 56+3+0 = 59 11 10+0 8+1 8+1
13)

4.1. Enrolment Ratio (20) (20)

Enrolment Ratio= N1/N

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2

Sanctioned intake of the program (N) 54 54 54


Total number of students admitted in first year 47 50 51
(N1)
Enrolment Ratio 0.92 0.92 0.94

Average 0.92 ~ 92%

89
4.2. Success Rate in the stipulated period of the program (40)

4.2.1. Success rate without backlogs in any semester/year of study (25)

SI= (Number of students who have graduated from the program without backlog)/ (Number of students
admitted in the first year of that batch and admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry and separate division, if
applicable)

Average SI = Mean of Success Index (SI) for past three batches

Success rate without backlogs in any year of study = 25 × Average

Latest Year of Latest Year of


Latest Year of Graduation minus Graduation minus
Item Graduation, LYG
1, LYGm1 2, LYGm2
(CAYm4)
(CAYm5) (CAYm6)

Number of students admitted in the


corresponding First Year + admitted in 2nd
year via lateral entry and separate 51+11 =62 55+5=60 56+3=59
division, if applicable

Number of students who have graduated 22 22 29


without backlogs in the stipulated period

0.37 0.49
Success Index (SI) 0.35

0.40
Average SI

4.2.2. Success rate with backlog in stipulated period of study (15)

SI= (Number of students who graduated from the program in the stipulated period of course duration)/
(Number of students admitted in the first year of that batch and admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry and
separate division, if applicable)

Average SI = mean of Success Index (SI) for past three batches

Success rate = 15 × Average SI

LYG (CAYm4) LYGm1


Item LYGm2(CAYm6)
(CAYm5)

Number of students admitted in the corresponding


First Year + admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry 51+11=62
55+5=60 56+3=59
and separate division, if applicable

Number of students who have graduated with backlog in 32


the stipulated period 34 26

.52
Success Index (SI) 0.57 0.44

Average Success Index


.51
90
4.3. Academic Performance in Third Year (15)

Academic Performance = 1.5 * Average API (Academic Performance Index)

API = ((Mean of 3rd Year Grade Point Average of all successful Students on a 10 point scale) or (Mean of
the percentage of marks of all successful students in Third Year/10)) x (number of successful
students/number of students appeared in the examination)

Successful students are those who are permitted to proceed to the final year.

Academic Performance CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Mean of CGPA or Mean Percentage of all successful students 7.41 7.41 7.35
(X)

Total no. of successful students (Y) 39 30 42

Total no. of students appeared in the examination (Z) 54 50 50

API = x* (Y/Z) 5.35 4.45 6.17


Average API = (AP1 + AP2 + AP3)/3 5.32

4.4. Academic Performance in Second Year (15)

Academic Performance Level = 1.5 * Average API (Academic Performance Index)

API = ((Mean of 2nd Year Grade Point Average of all successful Students on a 10 point scale) or (Mean of
the percentage of marks of all successful students in Second Year/10)) x (number of successful
students/number of students appeared in the examination)

Successful students are those who are permitted to proceed to the Third year.

Academic Performance CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Mean of CGPA or Mean Percentage of all successful students 7.56 7.76 7.46
(X)
33
Total no. of successful students (Y) 33 31

54
Total no. of students appeared in the examination (Z) 47 45

API = X* (Y/Z) 4.62 5.44 5.14

Average API = (AP1 + AP2 + AP3)/3 5.07

91
4.5. Placement, Higher Studies and Entrepreneurship (40)

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Total No. of Final Year Students (N) 50 54 54 61

No. of students placed in companies or Government Sector (x) 03 26 25 24

No. of students admitted to higher studies with valid qualifying scores N/A 7 7 9
(GATE or equivalent State or National Level Tests, GRE, GMAT etc.) (y)

No. of students turned entrepreneur in engineering/technology (z) N/A NIL NIL NIL

x+y+z= N/A 33 32 33

Placement Index : (x + y + z )/N N/A


0.56 0.61 0.54

N/A 0.57
Average placement= (P1 + P2 + P3)/3

4.6. Professional Activities (20)


4.6.1. Professional societies/chapters and organizing engineering events (5)

Table 4.6.1.1: Events organized in CAYm2 (2015-16)


Name of
Organized
Sl. No. professional Organized Event Title Participation Details
period
societies/ chapters
Workshop on advanced September 2012-13 batch
1.
joining processes 2015 Participants: 23

November 2013-14 batch


2. Lecture on 3D printing
Production 2015 Participants: 37
Engineering Society February 2014-15 batch
3. Workshop on CAD tools
2016 Participants: 49

Lecture on industrial February 2013-14 batch


4.
quality techniques 2016 Participants: 45

92
Table 4.6.1.2: Events organized in CAYm1 (2016-17)
Name of
Organized
Sl. No. professional Organized Event Title Participation Details
period
societies/ chapters
Lecture on renewable 2014-15 batch
1. August 2016
source of energy Participants: 47
Lecture on
Production implementation of November 2013-14 batch
2.
Engineering Society mechatronics in machine 2016 Participants: 36
tools
Workshop on NX 2014-15 batch
3. March 2017
modeling software Participants: 32

Table 4.6.1.3: Events organized in CAY (2017-18)


Name of
Organized
Sl. No. professional Organized Event Title Participation Details
period
societies/ chapters
Workshop on robot September 2014-15 batch
1.
technology 2017 Participants: 24
Lecture on recent
November 2015-16 batch
2. developments in RP
2017 Participants: 39
technology
Production Workshop on Coordinate
Engineering Society measuring machine,
February 2015-16 batch
3. Optical microscope,
2018 Participants: 43
Surface roughness tester,
Interferometer
Workshop on modern 2014-15 batch
4. March 2018
optimization techniques Participants: 27

4.6.2 Publication of technical magazines, newsletters (5)

THE MAGAZINE “SARJANA”


BIT Sindri has its institute magazine published by its students named “Sarjana”. This magazine
provides a platform for students, where the faculties and staffs also contribute to manifest their
creativity.
“Sarjana” is a annual bilingual magazine published in English as well as in Hindi. However it contains
some other articles like technical articles, cartoons, stories, poetries, etc.
"Sarjana" has very rich literary traditions. It contains some of the interviews and articles of some very
renowned personalities of country also.
“Sarjana” also contributes in promoting Rajbhasha Hindi in BIT Campus. It celebrates “Hindi Diwas”
and “Hindi Pakhwada” every year. It organizes some of the very popular programs like Hasya Kavi
Sammelan, Prawah, Kalyapan, Vad-Vivad, Essay Competitions, Cartoon Competitions etc.
BIT Sindri alumni also have a group named “Sarjana Vitaan”, which acts as a supporting senior wing
of “Sarjana”.
For more information about “Sarjana Vitaan” please visit its website www.sarjanavitaan.tk

93
Present office bearers of Sarjana are as follows.
Patron: Prof. (Dr.) D.K.Singh, Director, BIT, Sindri
Convener:
Prof. (Dr.) R.K. Singh, HOD, Chemistry Dept.
Professor-in-Charge:
Prof. Ravi Shankar Prasad, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engg. Dept.
Editor-in-Chief:
Manish Vatsa
Contact Information:
Email ID: sarjanabit[at]gmail.com

4.6.3 Participation in inter-institute events by students of the program of study (10)

(The Department shall provide a table indicating those publications, which received awards in the
events/conferences organized by other institutes.
Table 4.6.3.1:- Participation in events for CAYm1 (2016-17)

Sl No. Name Event Year Event Details Venue Result

1. Akshay Kumar Khanan'16 2016 Robotics IIT Dhanbad Participant


2. Aditi Singh Rush 2.0 2016 Street Play (Drama) IIM Ranchi 3rd
3. IIM
Abhijit Sarkar Eximius 2017 Marketing participant
bangalore
4. Aishwarya
Rush 2.0 2016 Duet Dance IIM Ranchi Winner
Manpreet
5. Abhijit Sarkar Rush 2.0 2016 Singing IIM Ranchi participant
6. IIM
Aditi Singh Eximius 2017 Marketing Participant
Bangalore

94
Table 4.6.3.2:- Participation in events for CAY(2017-18)

Sl
Name Event Year Event Details Venue Result
No.

1. Rajeev Kumar & SUPRA SAE Student Formula Buddha International


2017 19th
Abhishek Ayush INDIA Racing Circuit, Greater Noida

Rush 3.0 2017 Street Play(Drama) IIM Ranchi 2nd


2. Aditi Singh
Spring Fest 2018 Drama IIT Kharagpur Participant

3. Vivek Gupta Spring Fest 2018 Drama IIT Kharagpur Participant

4. SUPRA SAE Student Formula Buddha International


Nishant Saurav 2017 19th
INDIA Racing Circuit, Greater Noida

Lake Side Dreams


Spring Fest 2018 IIT Kharagpur 5th
(Singing)
5. Abhijit Sarkar
Symphony (Solo
Kashiyatra 2018 IIT BHU Winner
Singing)

95
Name of the faculty Member

A. R.
KUMAR

ANSARI
KUMAR
RAKESH
PRAKASH

SUBODH
PhD
M.Tech PhD PhD Degree (highest Degree)

University

VBU

VBU
VBU
VBU
CRITERION 5

QUALIFICATION

2014 2018 2017 2017 Year of higher qualification

Teaching Teaching Teaching HOD of Department Association with the Institution

Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Associate Professor Associate Professor Designation

14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2014 14.07.2014 Date at which designated

Date of Joining in the institution


14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2000 14.07.2000

Production Production Production Production


5. FACULTY INFORMATION AND CONTRIBUTIONS (200)

Department
Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering

Manufacturing
Rapid Prototyping Value Technology, Maintenance
Production and industrial Production and industrial
Engineering, Quality & Technology, Lean Specialization
List of Faculty Members CAY (2018-2019)

management management
Reliability Manufacturing and
Faculty Information and Contributions

Industrial Management

- Faculty receiving Ph.D

-
-
-

During the assessment


year

-
-
-
-

Ph.D Guidance
200

1
1
1
4
Academic Research

Research Publications

Currently Associated(Y/N)

Y
Y
Y
Y

Date of leaving (in case N)

96
Regular Regular Regular Regular Nature of Association
SURYA

PANDA
KAZMI
HASAN
ANAND

KASHIF
KUMAR

SUMANTA
SOURAV

MUKESH
NARAYAN

MUKHERJEE
CHANDRA
ACHARYA
PhD M.Tech PhD M.Tech M.Tech M.Tech

IIT Kharagpur NIT Trichy VSSUT Burla IIT Roorkee IIT Roorkee IIT Roorkee

2018 2017 2018 2014 2017 2017

Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching

Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor

04.09.2018 04.09.2018 01.09.2018 03.01.2018 04.01.2018 03.01.2018

04.09.2018 04.09.2018 01.09.2018 03.01.2018 04.01.2018 03.01.2018

Production Production Production Production Production Production


Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering

Production Manufacturing Production Production and Manufacturing


Industrial Systems Cad, Cam, Robotics Processes
Engineering Technology Engineering Engineering Quality and reliability

-
-
-
-

YES
YES

-
-
-
-
-
-

0
0
3
0
1
0

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

97
Contractual Contractual Contractual Contractual Contractual Contractual
SWAMI
SATISH
KUMAR

SIDDHARTH
M.Tdech PhD

IIT Kharagpur IIT Roorkee

2017 2018

Teaching Teaching

Assistant Professor Assistant Professor

04.09.2018 04.09.2018

04.09.2018 04.09.2018

Production Production
Engineering Engineering

Manufacturing Machine Design


-
YES

-
-

0
2

Y
Y

98
Contractual Contractual
Name of the faculty Member

ANAND
A. R.

KUMAR
KUMAR

ANSARI
KUMAR
RAKESH
PRAKASH

SUBODH
PhD
M.Tech M.Tech PhD PhD Degree (highest Degree)

IIT Roorkee University

VBU

VBU
VBU
VBU
QUALIFICATION

2017 2014 2018 2017 2017 Year of higher qualification

Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching HOD of Department Association with the Institution

Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Associate Professor Associate Professor Designation

03.01.2018 14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2014 14.07.2014 Date at which designated

Date of Joining in the institution


03.01.2018 14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2000 14.07.2000

Production Production Production Production Production Department


Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering

Manufacturing
Manufacturing Rapid Prototyping Value Technology, Maintenance
Production and industrial Production and industrial
Processes Engineering, Quality & Technology, Lean Specialization
List of Faculty Members CAY (2017-2018)

management management
Quality and reliability Reliability Manufacturing and
Industrial Management
-

Faculty receiving Ph.D

-
-
-

During the assessment

YES
year

-
-
-
-
-

Ph.D Guidance

1
0
0
1
5
Academic Research

Research Publications

Currently Associated(Y/N)

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Date of leaving (in case N)

99
Contractual Regular Regular Regular Regular Nature of Association
DEY
KAZMI
HASAN
KASHIF

SOURAV

Y MISHTRI

DEBASHIS
DHANANJA
ACHARYA
M.Tech M.Tech M.Tech M.Tech

IIT Roorkee IIT Roorkee

VBU
VBU
2016 2014 2014 2017

Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching

Contractual Assistant Contractual Assistant


Professor Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor

03.02.2016 10.02.2016 03.01.2018 04.01.2018

03.02.2016 10.02.2016 03.01.2018 04.01.2018

Production Production Production Production


Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering

Production Production Production and


Industrial Systems Cad, Cam, Robotics
Technology Technology Engineering
-
-
-
-

-
-
-
-

0
0
0
1

Y
Y
Y
Y

100
Contractual Contractual Contractual Contractual
Name of the faculty Member

A. R.
KUMAR

ANSARI
KUMAR
RAKESH
PRAKASH

SUBODH
PhD
M.Tech PhD PhD Degree (highest Degree)

University

VBU

VBU
VBU
VBU
QUALIFICATION

2014 2018 2017 2017 Year of higher qualification

Teaching Teaching Teaching HOD of Department Association with the Institution

Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Associate Professor Associate Professor Designation

14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2014 14.07.2014 Date at which designated

Date of Joining in the institution


14.07.2000 18.05.2007 14.07.2000 14.07.2000

Production Production Production Production Department


Engineering Engineering Engineering Engineering

Manufacturing
Rapid Prototyping Value Technology, Maintenance
Production and industrial Production and industrial
Engineering, Quality & Technology, Lean Specialization
management management
Reliability Manufacturing and
List of Faculty Members – CAYm1 (2016-2017)

Industrial Management

- Faculty receiving Ph.D

-
-
-

During the assessment


year

-
-
-
-

Ph.D Guidance

2
7
0

Research Publications
13
Academic Research

Currently Associated(Y/N)
Y Y Y Y
Date of leaving (in case N)

- Regular Regular Regular Regular Nature of Association

101
Manufacturing System
Contractual Assistant

Reconfigurable

N (31.12.2017)
Engineering

Contractual
15.07.2015

15.07.2015

Production
BIT Mesra

Professor
Teaching
2013
ANURAG
M.E
ANAND - - 1

Contractual Assistant

N (31.12.2017)
Engineering

Technology

Contractual
15.07.2015

15.07.2015

Production

Production
Professor
Teaching
M.Tech

2014

NEETU
SINGH VBU - - 0

Contractual Assistant

Engineering

Technology

Contractual
10.02.2016

10.02.2016

Production

Production
Professor
Teaching
M.Tech

DHANANJ
2014

AY - - 0

Y
VBU
MISHTRI
Contractual Assistant

Engineering

Technology

Contractual
03.02.2016

03.02.2016

Production

Production
Professor
Teaching
M.Tech

2016

DEBASHIS - - 1

Y
VBU
DEY

Note: Please provide cumulative information for all the shifts for three assessment years in
above format in Annexure II.

5.1. Student-Faculty Ratio (SFR) (20)


(To be calculated at Department Level)

No. of UG Programs in the Department (n): _____1_____


No. of PG Programs in the Department (m): _____0_____
No. of Students in UG 2nd Year= u1
No. of Students in UG 3rd Year= u2
No. of Students in UG 4th Year= u3
No. of Students in PG 1st Year= p1
No. of Students in PG 2nd Year= p2

No. of Students = Sanctioned Intake + Actual admitted lateral entry students


(The above data to be provided considering all the UG and PG programs of the department)

S=Number of Students in the Department = UG1 + UG2 +.. +UGn + PG1 + …PGn

F = Total Number of Faculty Members in the Department (excluding first year faculty)

102
Year CAY(2018-19) CAY(2017-18) CAYm1(2016-17)

u1.1 64 69 62

u1.2 69 62 63

u1.3 62 63 59

UG1 195 194 184

Total No. of Students in the 195 194 184


Department (S)

No. of Faculty in the 14 11 10


Department (F)
Student Faculty Ratio (SFR) SFR1=S1/F1= 13.92 SFR1=S1/F1= 17.63 SFR2= S2/F2= 18.40

Average SFR SFR=(SFR1+SFR2+SFR3)/3 = 16.65

Student Teacher Ratio (STR) = S / F

Marks to be given proportionally from a maximum of 20 to a minimum of 10 for average SFR


between 15:1 to 20:1, and zero for average SFR higher than 20:1.

5.1.1 Provide the information about the regular and the contractual as per the format mentioned below:

Total number of regular faculty in Total number of contractual faculty


Year
the department in the department
CAY (2018-19) 4 8

CAYm1 (2017-18) 4 5

CAYm2 (2016-17) 4 4

5.2. Faculty Cadre Proportion (25)

The reference Faculty cadre proportion is 1(F1):2(F2):6(F3)


F1: Number of Professors required = 1/9 x Number of Faculty required to comply with 20:1
Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per 5.1
F2: Number of Associate Professors required = 2/9 x Number of Faculty required to comply with
20:1 Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per 5.1
F3: Number of Assistant Professors required = 6/9 x Number of Faculty required to comply with
20:1 Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per 5.1

Professors Associate Professors Assistant Professors


Year
Required F1 Available Required F2 Available Required F3 Available
1 0 3 2 9 12
CAY
1 0 3 2 9 9
CAYm1
1 0 3 2 8 8
CAYm2

103
Average
RF1=1 AF1=0 RF2=3 AF2=2.33 RF3=8.33 AF3=9.66
Numbers

Cadre Ratio Marks= AF1 + AF2 x 0.6 + AF3 x 0.4 x 12.5


RF1 RF2 RF3

= 11.62

If AF1 = AF2= 0 then zero marks

Maximum marks to be limited if it exceeds 25

Example: Student No. = 180; Required number of Faculty: 12; RF1= 1, RF2=2 and RF3=9
Case 1: AF1/RF1= 1; AF2/RF2 = 1; AF3/RF3 = 1; Cadre proportion marks = (1+0.6+0.4) x12.5= 2 5
Case 2: AF1/RF1= 1 ; A F 2 /RF2 = 3 /2; A F 3 /RF3 = 8 /9; C a d r e proportion marks =
(1+0.9+0.3) x12.5 = limited to 25
Case 3 : A F 1 /RF1=0; A F 2 /RF2=1/2; A F 3 /RF3=11/9; C a d r e p r o p o r t i o n m a r k s = ( 0+0.3+0.49)
x12.5 = 9.87

5.3. Faculty Qualification (25)

FQ =2.5 x [(10X +6Y)/F)] where x is no. of regular faculty with Ph.D., Y is no. of regular
faculty with M.Tech., F is no. of regular faculty required to comply 1:15 Faculty Student ratio (no.
of faculty and no. of students required are to be calculated as per 5.1

X Y F FQ=2.5 x [(10X +6Y)/F)]


6 8 15 20.67
CAY
3 8 15 13
CAYm1
0 12 15 12
CAYm2
15.22
Average Assessment

5.4. Faculty Retention (25)

No. of regular faculty members in CAYm2= 8 CAYm1= 9 CAY=12

No. of regular faculty members’ in


CAYm2= (7/8) 88%
CAYm1= (8/8) 100%
CAY = (7/9) 78%
Average faculty retention during last three assessment year = 89%

104
5.5. Innovations by the Faculty in Teaching and Learning

 Use of modern teaching aids like LCD projectors, Interactive panel, Internet enabled
computer systems, Wi-Fi enabled laptops are usually employed in classrooms and other
student learning environments.
 Expert video subject lectures delivered by the various eminent resource persons are
available in the digital library and it facilitates the faculty and students to utilize E-
Tutorials of NPTEL, access E-Journals, Video Conference room, etc.
 Faculty members use visual library, digital library, Auto Desk, Pro E and other Open
Source platforms to make the subject easy to understand.
 A copy of e – learning material is kept in individual department and in digital library.
 The faculty members are encouraged to participate in short term courses, staff
development programs and workshops on advanced topics to keep pace with the
advanced level of knowledge and skills. Over the past years the faculties have been
participating /presenting papers in national/international conferences and publish their
articles in national/international journals to enrich their knowledge.

5.6. Faculty as participants in Faculty development/training activities/STTPs (15)

A Faculty scores maximum five points for participation

Participation in 2 to 5 days Faculty development program: 3 Points

Participation>5 days Faculty development program: 5 Points

Max. 5 per Faculty


Name of the Faculty
CAY CAYm1 CAYm2

Prakash Kumar 5 5 3

Rakesh 5 3 0

Subodh Kumar 5 3 0

A. R Ansari 5 3 0

Sourav Acharya 5 5 NA

Kashif Hasan Kazmi 5 5 NA

Anand Kumar 5 5 NA

Surya Narayan Panda 5 NA NA

Sumanta Mukherjee 5 NA NA

105
Mukesh Chandra 5 NA NA

Satish Kumar 5 NA NA

Swami Siddharth 5 NA NA

60 29 3
Sum

RF= Number of Faculty required to comply 15 15 15


with 15:1 Student-Faculty ratio as per 5.1

Assessment = 3 × (Sum/0.5RF) 24 11.6 1.2


(Marks limited to 15)

Average assessment over three years (Marks limited to 15) = 12.26

5.7. Research and Development (30)

5.7.1. Academic Research (10)

Academic research includes research paper publications, Ph.D. Guidance and faculty
receiving Ph.D. during the assessment period.

Number of quality publications in refereed/SCI Journals, citations, Books/Book Chapters etc.


(6)

Academic Year 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

No. of 10 27 5 14
Publications

Table 5.7.1.2 List of paper publications by faculties in CAYm2 (2015-16)

Sl Title Author/ Volume/Issue/Journal Conference Year


no. Coauthor

1. Delay Analysis of Projects and Prakash Kumar, Volume 12, Issue 6 ,Journal of 2015
Effects of Delays in the Piush Raj Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Mining/Manufacturing (IOSR- JMCE)
industries

2. Tailoring of Specifications for Bipin Kumar Volume 04, Issue 12, International 2015
Random Vibration Testing of Das, Prakash Journal of Research in Engineering &
Military Airborne Equipments Kumar Technology

106
from Measurement

3. Methods for Risk Management Prakash Kumar, Volume 5, Issue 6, The International 2016
of Mining Excavator through Arvind Kumar Journal of Engineering and Science
FMEA and FMECA

4. Root Cause Analysis for Lean Kumar Gaurav, Volume 5, Issue 6, The International 2016
Maintenance Using Six Sigma Prakash Kumar Journal of Engineering and Science
Approach

5. Application of System Prakash Kumar, National Seminar on “Environmental 2016


Dynamics for Solid Waste Srivastava.R.K Issues” Published by Excel India
Management Publishers

6. Metallurgical Wastes and its A.K.Rajak, National Seminar on “Environmental 2016


Effect on Public Health Prakash Kumar Issues” Published by Excel India
Publishers

7. Investigating the condition of a Manoj Kumar, National Seminar on 2016


differential assembly using wear ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Subodh Kumar,
debris analysis Protection, Conservation and
Rajen Kumar
Management
Nayak

8. Optimization of heat treatment Rakesh Vol-04; issue-02, International journal of 2016


processes of steel used in technical research and applications
automotive bearings

9. A simulation approach to Sourav Acharya, Vol 04, issue 3, I’managers journal of 2015
analysis of mixing performance mechanical engineering
for different geometry of Apurbba Sharma
microchannels

10. Experimental investigation in Manjot Cheema, 9TH international workshop on 2015


development of 3D microfactories
microchannels through ultrasonic Sourav Acharya,
machining A K Dwivedi,
Apurbba Sharma

107
Table 5.7.1.3 List of paper publications by faculties in CAYm1 (2016-17)

Sl Title Author/Co Volume/Issue/Journal Conference Year


No. author

1. Conversion of Sponge Iron from Rounak Sneh Volume 13, Issue 5, International 2016
Low Grade Iron Ore and Mill Anand, Prakash Organization of Scientific Research-
Scale through Simulating Kumar, D.N. Journal of Mechanical and Civil
Tunnel Kiln Condition Paswan Engineering

2. Optimization of Welding Pappu Kumar, Volume 4, Issue 11, International 2016


Parameter (MIG Welding) Prakash Kumar Journal of Scientific Research and
Using Taguchi Method Education

3. Application of Agile Shashi Ranjan, Volume 4, Issue 6, International 2016


Manufacturing in Small and Prakash Kumar Journal of Science Engineering and
Medium Scale Industries Technology

4. Kaizen for Quality and Rajesh Mahto, International Journal of Engineering 2017
Productivity Improvement in Prakash Kumar Sciences and Research Technology
Manufacturing Industry

5. Optimization of Heat Treatment Rajesh Volume 4, Issue 2, International 2017


Process Parameter Using Mahto,Sunny Research Journal of Engineering and
Taguchi and Fuzzy Logic Kumar, Shashi Technology
Approach in Bearing Kumar, Prakash
Manufacturing Industry Kumar

6. Diagnostics Expert System for Prakash Kumar, Volume 3, Issue 1, International 2017
Mine Hydraulic Excavators Gaurav Journal of Interdisciplinary Research
Bhadauria

7. Optimal Maintainability of Vivek Kumar, Volume 5, Issue 5, International 2017


Hydraulic Excavator through Prakash Kumar Journal of Research in Engineering and
FMEA/FMECA Science

8. Improving Material Removal Vivek Kumar, Volume 6, Issue 6, The International 2017
Rate and Optimizing various Prakash Kumar Journal of Engineering and Science
machining Parameters in EDM

9. Model Based Fuzzy Logic Prakash International Conference on Evolutions 2016


Approach for Optimal Kumar,Anurag in Manufacturing: Technologies and
Maintenance of Mine Hydraulic Anand Business Strategies for Global
Excavators Competitiveness

108
10. Kaizen for Quality and Rajesh Mahto, National Conference on Advances in 2017
Productivity Improvement in Prakash Kumar Science and Technologies
Manufacturing Industries

11. Diagnostics Expert System for Prakash Kumar, International Conference on Research, 2017
Mine Hydraulic Excavators Gaurav Skilling and Employability in
Bhadauria Mechanical and Automobile
Engineering

12. Implementation of Lean Rajesh Mahto, National Seminar on Improving 2017


Manufacturing Techniques for Prakash Kumar Competitiveness in Manufacturing –
Minimization of Wastes in “Make in India” to “Made in India
Manufacturing Industry

13. Advances in Eco-friendly Tools R.K. Srivastava, National Seminar on Improving 2017
for Environmental Management Prakash Kumar Competitiveness in Manufacturing –
in Manufacturing Sectors “Make in India” to “Made in India”

14. A Subodh Kumar, International Journal for Innovative 2016


Comparative Study of Different Research in Science &
Methods to Estimate the Jamshed Anwar,
Technology (IJIRST), Vol.2, Issue 11
Parameters of Weibull Akash Kumar,
Distributio
Manoj Kumar
Mahto

15. Optimization of Different Subodh Kumar, International Journal of Mechanical 2016


Parameters in Direct Metal Engineering and Technology
Deposition Technique using Ajit Kumar
(IJMET), Vol. 7, Issue. 3,
Taguchi Method Singh
Choudhary,
Jamshed Anwar,
Vinay Sharma,

16. A Subodh Kumar, International Journal for 2016


Comparison of Additive Innovative Research in Science &
A. K.S.
Manufacturing Technologies Technology, Vol. 3, Issue. 1,
Chodhary Anand
Kishore Singh
Amit Kumar
Gupta,

17. Experimental Investigation of Krishna Kant International Journal 2016


Various of Engineering and Technical Research
Pandey , Subodh
Process Parameters During
Vol. 6, Issue. 2,
Kumar
CNC-Turning Using Taguchi
Method

109
18. Analysing Deformation of Steel Praveen Gagrai, International Journal of Engineering 2016
Using Software Research and Technology,
Subodh Kumar
Simulation VOL-5/Issue-10

19. Optimization of Wire EDM Abhinay Kumar International Journal of Scientific and 2016
Parameters of Engineering Research, VOL-7/Issue-
Rajak, Subodh
HOT DIE STEEL-13 by
10,
Kumar,
Taguchi Method

20. Heat Treatment Parameter Ajay Kumar, International Journal of Scientific 2016
Optimization using Taguchi Research
A.R.Ansari,
and Education, VOL-4/Issue-10
Technique
B.N.Roy,
Subodh Kumar

21. Study of failure criteria of steel Sajal Kumar, International Journal of Research in 2017
columns under compression- A Sudhir Kumar Mechanical Engineering Volume 4,
critical review Kashyap, A.R. Issue 4,
Ansari

22. Simulation and experimental Kashif Hasan IVth International Conference on 2016
investigation of mechanical Production & Industrial Engineering
properties of aluminium copper Kazmi,
alloys Ch.S.Vidyasagar,
Anand Kumar,
D.Benny
Karunakar

Table 5.7.1.3. List of paper publications by faculties in CAY (2017-18)

Sl Title Authors/Co Volume/Issue/Journal Conference Year


no. Authors

1. Study of Casting Defects by Sudhir Kishore, International Journal of Engineering 2017


Varying Molding Sand Prakash Kumar Science Invention, Volume 6, Issue 11
Properties and Temperature

2. Implementation of Poka Yoke Bhawesh Kumar, International Journal of Engineering 2017


in Needle Bearing Assembly Rakesh, Prakash Science Invention, Volume 6, Issue 11
Process Kumar

3. Maintenance Prediction using Prakash Kumar, 33rd National Convention of 2017


Diagnostic Expert Systems for Srivastava.R.K Environmental Engineers on Status of
Mine Hydraulic Excavator Technological Advancement to Meet
the Environmental Norms for Indian
Mining and Allied Industries

110
4. New Generation Robot: A Prakash Kumar National Seminar on Techno- 2017
Manufacturing Transformer Nationalistic Interventions for
Enhancing Innovativeness

5. Green Supply Chain Prakash Kumar National Conference on Science and 2018
Management in Indian Technology of Special Steels &
Automotive Industry: Nanomaterials
Complexities and Challenges

6. Synthesis of Al-Y composite by Kashif Hasan Advances in Materials & Processing: 2017
spark plasma sintering and Challenges & Opportunities
analysis of its tensile properties Kazmi, Anand
by FEM Kumar,
Ch.S.Vidyasagar,
D.Benny
Karunakar

Table 5.7.1.4. List of paper publications by faculties in CAY (2018-19)

Sl no. Title Authors/Co Volume/Issue/Journal Conference Year


Authors

1. Condition Based Maintenance Prakash Kumar International Journal of Science, 2018


and Machine Diagnostics Engineering and Technology (IJSET)
System for Heavy Duty Earth Volume 6, Issue 5, pp. 227-236, ISSN
Moving Machinery 2395-4752

2. Optimization of the Process Rakesh Kumar International Journal for Research in 2018
Parameters for MIG Welding Raushan, Prakash Engineering Application &
of Dissimilar Welding Using Kumar Management, Volume-04, Issue-08,
Taguchi Method Nov 2018, pp. 164-169. ISSN: 2454-
9150

3. Effect of Process Parameters Abhishek Kumar, International Journal for Research in 2018
of Weld Joints on Submerged Prakash Kumar Engineering Application &
Arc Welding Management, Volume-04, Issue-08,
Nov 2018, pp. 188-194. ISSN: 2454-
9150

111
4. Study the Effect of Tool Shyamdeo Ram, International Journal of Science, 2018
Rotational Speed and Welding Prakash Kumar Engineering and Technology, Volume
Speed on Mechanical 6, Issue 6, November- December-
Properties of Two Different 2018, pp. 256-268. ISSN 2348– 4098
Welded Aluminum Alloy

5. Optimization of TIG welding Vikas Kumar, Dr. International Journal for Research in 2018
parameters for improvement of Rakesh Engineering Application &
strength and hardness Management, Volume-04, Issue-08,
Nov 2018, ISSN: 2454-9150

6. A comparative study on Md Warif, Kashif International Journal for Research in 2018


Mechanical and Physical Engineering Application &
characteristics of Al-SiC-Egg Hasan Kazmi Management, Volume-04, Issue-08,
Composites fabricated by Stir Nov 2018, ISSN: 2454-9150
Casting Process
7. A novel concept of MFC based Kumar, S., Advanced Energy and Nano Materials 2018
energy harvesting systems (ANEM-2018), 12th-14th December
Upadhyay, S. H., 2018, The University of Western
and Singh K.S Australia, Perth

8. Shape control analysis of Kumar, S., 14th International Symposium on 2018


inflatable membrane structures Materials in the Space Environment,
using an adaptive genetic Upadhyay, S. H., 1st -5th October, 2018 Biarritz, France
algorithm and Singh K.S

9. New adaptive design of Kumar, S., and 4th International Conference and 2018
membrane based reflector for Exhibition on Satellite & Space
space application Upadhyay, S. H Missions (Satellite-2018), 18th-20th
June, 2018 Rome, Italy

10. Experimental verification of Kumar, S., and 16th European Conference on 2018
novel analytical wrinkling Spacecraft Structures Materials and
control mechanism of planar Upadhyay, S. H Environmental Testing, (ECSSMET-
membrane reflector for space 2018), 28th May -1st June, 2018,
application Noordwijk, Netherlands
11. Revaluation of Ball-Race S.N. Panda, S Advances in Intelligent systems and 2018
conformity effect in rolling computing
element bearing life using PSO Panda,
D.S.Khamari,
P.Mishra, A. K.
Pattanaik

12. Productivity improvement of Subodh Kumar, Interantional Journal of Advanced 2018


continuous casting through Scientific Research and Management,
utilization of Caster speed using Surya Narayan vol. 3, Issue 12, ISSN 2455-6378
Goal Programming technique Panda, Somnath
Chattopadhyaya

112
Table 5.7.1.5: List of faculties awarded PhD

Sl no. Name of Faculty University Year of Award of


PhD

1. Dr. Surya Narayan Panda VSSUT Burla 2018

2. Dr. Sumanta Mukherjee IIT Kharagpur 2018

3. Dr. Satish Kumar IIT Roorkee 2019

Table 5.7.1.6: List of faculty membership in Professional bodies

Sl. No. Name of the staff Membership in Professional Bodies

1. Dr. Prakash Kumar Life Member of Science for Society, Jharkhand


Associate Member - Institution of Engineer
(India).
Member of the Academic Council of Government
Tool Room & Training Centre (GTRTC), Dumka.

Life Member - Indian Society for Technical


Education (I.S.T.E.)

. Executive Member (Production Engineering


Division, Dhanbad local centre) of Institution
of Engineers (India).
2. Dr. Rakesh ISTE Life Member
Life Member of Jharkhand science society
3. Dr. Subodh Kumar Associate Member of The Institution of Engineers
(India),

Life Member of Indian Society for Technological


Education

4. Sourav Acharya Life Member of Institution of Engineers (India)

113
5.7.2. Sponsored Research (5)
Funded research:
(Provide a list with Project Title, Funding Agency, Amount and Duration) Funding amount (Cumulative
during assessment years):

Amount > 20 Lacks – 5 Marks


Amount >= 16 Lacks and <= 20 lacks – 4 Marks
Amount >= 12 Lacks and < 16 lacks – 3 Marks
Amount >= 8 Lacks and < 12 lacks – 2 Marks
Amount >= 4 Lacks and < 8 lacks – 1 Mark
Amount < 4 Lacks – 0 Mark

5.7.3. Development activities (10)

 Research laboratories

 Metrology Laboratory
 Modern Manufacturing Laboratory

 Instructional materials

 Lab Manuals
 Suppliers Manual
 NPTEL lecture notes
 Course plan given by faculty members

 Centre of excellence lab I

 Centre of excellence lab II

5.7.4. Consultancy (from Industry) (5)

(Provide a list with Project Title, Funding Agency, Amount and Duration) Funding amount (Cumulative

during assessment years):


Amount > 10 Lacks – 5 Marks
Amount >= 8 Lacks and <= 10 lacks – 4 Marks
Amount >= 6 Lacks and < 8 lacks – 3 Marks Amount >= 4 Lacks and < 6 lacks – 2 Marks Amount >=
2 Lacks and < 4 lacks – 1 Mark Amount < 2 Lacks – 0 Mark

5.8. Faculty Performance Appraisal and Development System (FPADS) (30)

Faculty members of Higher Educational Institutions today have to perform a variety of tasks
pertaining to diverse roles. In addition to instruction, Faculty members need to innovate and conduct
research for their self-renewal, keep abreast with changes in technology, and develop expertise for effective
implementation of curricula. They are also expected to provide services to the industry and community
for understanding and contributing to the solution of real life problems in industry. Another role relates
to the shouldering of administrative responsibilities and co- operation with other Faculty, Heads-of-
Departments and the Head of Institute. An effective performance appraisal system for Faculty is vital for
optimizing the contribution of individual Faculty to institutional performance.

114
115
116
5.9. Visiting/Adjunct/Emeritus Faculty etc. (10)

Adjunct faculty also includes Industry experts. Provide details of participation and contributions in
teaching and learning and /or research by visiting/adjunct/Emeritus faculty etc. for all the assessment
years: Provision of inviting/having visiting/adjunct/emeritus faculty (1)
Minimum 50 hours per year interaction with adjunct faculty from industry/retired professors etc.
(Minimum 50 hours interaction in a year will result in 3 marks for that year; 3 marks x 3 years =
9 mark)

Table 5.9.1: Visiting/adjunct/emeritus faculties for CAYm1 (2017-18)


Sl no. Name of the Faculty Designation No. of hours Topic of Discussion
handling
1. Dr. K.K. Singh Associate 3 nanomaterial’s
Professor,
Department of
Mechanical
Engineering, IIT
ISM Dhanbad
2. Dr. N.K. Singh Associate 3 Additive
Professor, Manufacturing
Department of
Mechanical
Engineering, IIT
ISM Dhanbad
3. Dr. Raj Ballav Associate 3 Micromachining
Professor,
Department of
Manufacturing
Engineering, NIT
Jamshedpur
4. Dr. A.M Tigga Professor, 3 Laser Beam
Department of Machining
Manufacturing
Engineering, NIT
Jamshedpur
5. Dr. S.K Jha Associate 3 Agile Manufacturing
Professor,
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra
6. Dr. S.C Srivastava Associate 3 Six Sigma Quality
Professor, Control
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra

117
Table 5.9.2: Visiting/adjunct/emeritus faculties for CAYm2 (2016-17)
Sl no. Name of the Faculty Designation No. of hours Topic of Discussion
handling
1. Dr. S. Chattopadhyay Associate 3 Friction Stir
Professor, Welding
Department of
Mechanical
Engineering, IIT
ISM Dhanbad
2. Dr. R.K Srivastava Visiting Faculty, 3 Reliability Centered
Department of Maintenance
Management
Studies, IIT ISM
Dhanbad
3. Dr. S. Chattopadhyay Associate 3 Electron Beam
Professor, Welding
Department of
Mechanical
Engineering, IIT
ISM Dhanbad
4. Dr. D. Patel Assistant 3 Super Finishing
Professor, Techniques
Department of
Manufacturing
Engineering, NIT
Jamshedpur
5. Dr. Pramod Pathak Professor, 3 Fuzzy Expert
Department of Systems
Management
Studies, IIT ISM
Dhanbad
6. Dr. Vijay Pandey Associate 3 Advanced
Professor, optimization
Department of techniques
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra
7. Dr. S.C Srivastava Associate 3 Online Inspection
Professor,
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra
8. Mr. D.K Srivastava GM, Electrosteel, 5 Information System
Bokaro for Decision making

9. Dr. S.C Srivastava Associate 3 Taguchi analysis


Professor,
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra

118
10. Dr. R.K Srivastava Visiting Faculty, 3 Inventory Control
Department of Models
Management
Studies, IIT ISM
Dhanbad
11. Dr. S.K Jha Associate 3 Recent
Professor, Developments in
Department of Production Control
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra

Table 5.9.3: Visiting/adjunct/emeritus faculties for CAYm3 (2015-16)


Sl no. Name of the Faculty Designation No. of hours Topic of Discussion
handling
1. Dr. S.K Jha Associate 3 Lean and Green
Professor, Manufacturing
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra
2. Dr. Sandeep Mondal Associate 3 Marketing
Professor, IIT ISM management
Dhanbad
2. Dr. Sandeep Mondal Associate 3 Organizational
Professor, IIT ISM Behavior
Dhanbad
4. Dr. A.P Burnawal GGSETC, Bokaro 3 Dynamic
Programming

5. Dr. A.K Amar Associate 3 Geometric


Professor, Modelling
Gaya College of
Engineering, Gaya

119
CRITERION 6 Facilities and Technical Support 80

6. FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT (80)


6.1. Adequate and well equipped laboratories, and technical manpower (30)
Weekly Technical Manpower support
No. of utilization
Sl. Name of the students per Name of the status
No. Laboratory Setup (Batch Important equipment (all the courses Name of the
Designation Qualification
Size) technical staff
for which the
lab is utilized)
Karan Behal,
Computer with Engineer
Computer Vivek Sagar B.E
1. associated software Technical
Aided Design 1 (68) Verma, Snehansu Mechanical
(Siemens Lab) 7 hrs. Services
Adhikari
Spot welding machine,
Submerged Arc
welding machine,
Gyan Mohan
Plasma Arc cutting,
Welding Singh and Welder I.T.I
Metal inert gas welding
Upendra Kisku.
machine, Tungsten
5 hrs.
06 (56) inert gas welding
2.
machine.
Indicator test set, Slip
gauge, Mechanical
comparator, Straight
edge, Crown Surface
plate, Combination
angle gauge, Precision
block level, Bevel
Protractor,
Autocollimator, Angle
block set, Gear roller Final year
Teaching
Metrology tester, Interferometer, Students B.Tech./B.E
Assistant
Profile projector, (M.Tech.)
Pneumatic comparator,
Portable surface
3.
roughness tester,
C type adjustable snap
gauge, Dial snap
gauge, C-jet dial type 3 hrs.
05 (57)
air gauge, Caliper
checker, Height meter
heavy duty, Digital

120
height gauge, Steel slip
gauge set, Screw thread
micrometer, Tool
maker’s microscope,
Telescope gauge.
Vivek Sagar Engineer
Computer Computer with B.E
Verma, Snehansu Technical
4. Application 1 (57) associated software 3 hrs. Mechanical
Adhikari Services
Trade mill mac-matrix,
Sphygmomanometer &
Final year
B.P. instrument, Teaching
Work Study Students B.Tech./B.E
5. Pin Board assembly Assistant
5 (57) (M.Tech.)
Set,
6 hrs.
Box bead Set.

Electro Chemical
Machine, CNC Wire
Modern Final year
Cut EDM, Teaching
Manufacturin 3 hrs. Students B.Tech./B.E
6. CNC Drill Trainer, Assistant
g Process (M.Tech.)
14 (57) EDM Drilling
Machine.

Spot welding Robots,


Arc welding Robots,
Flexible Material Handling Engineer
B.Tech.
Manufacturin Robots, CNC Turning, Ravi Kumar Technical
7. Mechanical
g System Training Kits (Milling Services
06 (56) & Turning) 3 hrs.
(Siemens Lab)
Turret Lathe, High
Speed Lathe, Shaper
machine, Vertical
Milling machine,
Drilling Machine,
Slotting machine,
Theory of Final year
Double ended bench Teaching
Metal cutting Students B.Tech./B.E
8. grinder, Radial Assistant
and Forming. (M. Tech.)
grinding machine,
Universal grinder,
5 (56) 3 hrs.
Surface grinder,
Centerless grinding
machine, Broaching
machine.
Table B.6.1

121
6.2. Additional facilities created for improving the quality of learning experience in
laboratories (25)
Areas in which
students’ are expected
Sl. Reason(s) for to have enhanced Relevance to
Facility Name Details Utilization
No. creating facility learning POs/PSOs
Advanced &
3D Printer, Practical
MIG Welding PO1, PO3,
Knowledge in Automation and
1. Siemens Lab Robot, CNC modern 3 hrs./ week
Robotics
PO5, PSO1,
Vertical Milling Manufacturing PSO3.
Machine. process and for
Model:-Spectra project work.
To conduct
plus, Elevated research
Coordinate
Bridge type activities and Automated Inspection PO4, PO5,
2. Measuring 12 hrs./ week
with ISO enhance the and Measurement. PSO2.
Machine.
10360-2MPEE knowledge of
standard latest technology
accuracy. in To meet theand
inspection
needs of the
measurement.
students and
provide
Text Books, reference
Reference facilities. Production, Industrial
Departmental PO1, PO4,
3. Books, Journals, To refer 6 hrs./ day and Management
Library PO10, PO12.
Project / advanced Engineering.
seminar report. information for
technology,
projects and
past research
activities
Table B.6.2
undertaken
6.3. Laboratories: Maintenance and overall ambiance (10)
by the students.
All the labs are well equipped and maintained
 Maintenance of the instruments are carried out when necessary.
 Technical Staffs are well trained for maintenance.
 Conditions of chairs/benches are good.
 Air Circulation for laboratories is good.
 Lighting in the laboratories is adequate.
 Window curtains are provided for good visibility.
 LED Projectors are provided for CAD Laboratories.
 Conventional black and white boards are provided.

122
6.4. Project laboratory (5)
 MATLAB is used for carrying out finite element analysis which is necessary for
characterization studies in the field of mechanical, automobile and structural engineering.
 Advanced Metrology lab is used for inspection and measurement for different materials
used for various engineering parts.
6.5. Safety measures in laboratories (10)
Sl. No. Name of the Laboratory Safety measures
 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 Electrical wires protected by MCB, RCBO and fuses.
 Proper PC system is used.
 First aid box and Fire extinguisher are kept in laboratory.
Computer Aided Design
1  Avoiding the use of damaged equipment’s and provides needful
equipment’s and components.
 Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 Avoiding the use of cell phones.

 General Rules of Conduct in Laboratories are displayed.


 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 Hand gloves, Safety shoes, Welding goggles, should be used in the lab
 First aid box, Fire extinguisher & Hand gloves are kept in laboratory.
2. Welding
 Students are wearing Lab Uniform.
 Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 Loose clothing and jewels etc. are prohibited
 Long hair must be completely covered.

 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed for each instrument.


 First aid box, Fire extinguisher are kept in laboratory.
Metrology  Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
3.
 Maintain a clean and organized laboratory.
 Loose clothing and jewels etc. are prohibited.
 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 Electrical wires protected by MCB, RCBO and fuses.
 Proper PC system is used.
 First aid box and Fire extinguisher are kept in laboratory.
4. Computer Application
 Avoiding the use of damaged equipment’s and provides needful
equipment’s and components.
 Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 Avoiding the use of cell phones.

123
 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 Electrical wires protected by MCB, RCBO and fuses.
 First aid box and Fire extinguisher are kept in laboratory.
5. Work Study
 Avoiding the use of damaged equipment’s and provides needful
equipment’s and components.
 Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 General Rules of Conduct in Laboratories are displayed.
 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 First aid box, Fire extinguisher & Hand gloves are kept in each
laboratory.
Modern Manufacturing
6.  Students are wearing Lab Uniform.
Process
 Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 Hand gloves, Safety shoes, should be used in the lab
 Loose clothing and jewels etc. are prohibited
 Long hair must be completely covered.
 Electrical wires protected by MCB, RCBO and fuses.
 First aid box, Fire extinguisher & Hand gloves are kept in each
laboratory.
Flexible Manufacturing
7.  Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
System
 Hand gloves, Safety shoes, Welding goggles, should be
used in the lab
 Loose clothing and jewels etc. are prohibited
 General Rules of Conduct in Laboratories are displayed.
 Specific Safety Rules for students displayed.
 First aid box, Fire extinguisher & Hand gloves are kept in each
laboratory.
Theory of Metal cutting  Students are wearing Lab Uniform.
8.
and Forming.  Periodical servicing of the lab equipment’s.
 Maintain a clean and organized laboratory,
 Hand gloves, Safety shoes, should be used in the lab
 Loose clothing and jewels etc. are prohibited
 Long hair must be completely covered.

124
CRITERION 7 Continuous Improvement 50

7. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (50)

7.1. Actions taken based on the results of evaluation of each of the POs & PSOs (20)

Identify the areas of weaknesses in the program based on the analysis of evaluation of POs &
PSOs attainment levels. Measures identified and implemented to improve POs & PSOs
attainment levels for the assessment years.

Actions to be written as per table in


3.3.2.

Examples of analysis and proposed


action

Sample 1-Course outcomes for a laboratory course did not measure up, as some of the
lab equipment did not have the capability to do the needful (e.g., single trace oscilloscopes
available where dual trace would have been better, or, non-availability of some important
support software etc.). Action taken-Equipment up-gradation was carried out (with details of
up-gradation)

Sample 2-In a course on EM theory student performance has been consistently low with
respect to some COs. Analysis of answer scripts and discussions with the students revealed
that this could be attributed to a weaker course on vector calculus.

Action taken-revision of the course syllabus was carried out (instructor/text book changed too
has been changed, when deemed appropriate).

Sample 3-In a course that had group projects it was determined that the expectations from this
course about PO3 (like: “to meet the specifications with consideration for the public health and
safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental considerations”) were not realized as
there were no discussions about these aspects while planning and execution of the project.
Action taken- Project planning, monitoring and evaluation included in rubrics related to these
aspects.

125
POs Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement – CAYm1 (2017-18)
Attainment
POs Target Level Observations
Level
PO1: Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an
engineering specialization to the solution of complex Production Engineering problems.
2.57 2.49 Students able to formulate problems in terms of mathematical equations
PO1
which enable them to analyse problems in more accurate way analyse
problems.
Action 1: Tutorial classes were conducted to help students understand and solve difficult problems and concept.
Action 2: Faculties take remedial classes for students who couldn’t perform well in exams.
PO2: Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyse complex engineering problems in
Production Engineering reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences, and
engineering sciences.
2.44 2.39 Attainment is satisfactory
PO2

Action 1: Students are explained mathematical formulations with real life examples for having a sound understanding
of the concepts.
PO3: Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design system
components or processes of Production Engineering that meet the specified needs with appropriate consideration
for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental considerations.
2.27 2.26 Attainment is satisfactory
PO3

Action 1: Assignments are given to design solution for management problems using concepts of industrial
engineering.
Action 2: Conducted extra classes in SIEMENS Lab for 3D Modelling and its applications.

PO4: Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and research methods
including design of experiments in Production Engineering, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of
the information to provide valid conclusions.
2.15 2.19 Attainment achieved.
PO4

Action 1: A computer lab has been set-up where students are taught various management and design software.

PO5: Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern
engineering and IT tools including prediction and modelling to complex engineering activities in Production
Engineering with an understanding of the limitations.
1.8 1.92 Attainment achieved.
PO5

Action 1: Conducted invited talk on modern manufacturing tool and Robotics by industrial expert through workshop.
PO6: The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health,
safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice
in Production Engineering.
1.26 1.32 Attainment achieved.
PO6

Action 1: Students are given projects to solve managerial and management problems faced by people in campus and
living in nearby villages.

126
PO7: Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions of
Production Engineering in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and need for
sustainable development.
0.74 0.97 Attainment achieved.
PO7

Action 1: Projects are given by faculty of devising technique to clean water and reduce solid wastes so as to save
people from their harmful effects.
PO8: Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of the
engineering practice.
1.03 0.96 Planned Expert lecture on professional ethics and managerial skills.
PO8

Action 1: Lectures on professional ethics and social welfare are given by director sir and HOD sir are given to the
students.
PO9: Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse
teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.
1.18 1.32 Attainment achieved.
PO9

Action 1: Projects pertaining to the latest problems were analysed with frequent interactions from industrial experts
and to distribute the work within the team towards its execution of through academic projects.
PO10: Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering
community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design
documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions.
0.75 0.97 Attainment achieved.
PO10

Action 1: Classes related to communication skills were conducted as per plan during the respective periods.
PO11: Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the engineering and
management principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and
in multidisciplinary environments.
1.36 1.11 Students able to apply their knowledge to sort out environmental
PO11
problems.
Action 1: Workshop on importance of clean environment and engineering methods to clean it.
PO12: Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in
independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change.
1.73 1.87 Attainment achieved.
PO12
Action 1: Conducted special GATE classes by faculties of TEQIP and coaching institute.
Table B.7.1a

PSOs Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement – CAYm1 (2017-18)

PSOs Target Attainment Observations


Level Level
PSO1: Graduates will be able to apply knowledge of manufacturing science and industrial engineering concepts for
product, design and development.
2.4 2.36 Student able to decide method for manufacturing any product
PSO1
considering its cost and strength requirement.

127
Action 1: Assignments are given to every student to fabricate any kind of product using the manufacturing processes
taught in the class.
Action 2: Students learn to use modern manufacturing machines so as they able to manufacture product with greater
accuracy and in less cost.

PSO2: Graduate will be able to optimize production system design parameters like cost, time, and resources and
eliminate redundant steps to make the best method of production
1.77 1.85 Attainment achieved.
PSO2

Action 1: Students learn to use design and industrial engineering software in Siemens lab.

PSO3: Graduate will be able to implement modern tools and techniques of manufacturing and industrial
management to meet the challenges of real business world.
1.84 1.94 Attainment achieved.
PSO3

Action 1: Students are given assignments relating application of industrial engineering tools in dealing real time
problems.
Table B.7.1b

POs Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement – CAYm2 (2016-17)


POs Target Level Attainment Level Observations

PO1: Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an
engineering specialization to the solution of complex Production Engineering problems.
2.57 2.42 Students able to solve the mathematical problem related fundamental
PO1 concepts.
Action 1: Arrange remedial classes for complex problem related to fundamentals subject.
PO2: Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyse complex engineering problems in
Production Engineering reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences, and
engineering sciences.
2.44 2.29 Students able to formulate the concept of manufacturing and industrial
PO2 engineering and analysis the latest research.
Action 1: Incorporation of more numerical during their regular lectures.
PO3: Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design system
components or processes of Production Engineering that meet the specified needs with appropriate consideration
for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental considerations.
2.27 2.2 Attainment is satisfactory
PO3
Action 1: Include more practical classes related to latest software like AutoCAD, Ansys and Solid Work for modelling
and simulation for design purpose.
PO4: Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and research methods
including design of experiments in Production Engineering, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of
the information to provide valid conclusions.
2.15 2.08 Research knowledge of various topics related to production engineering
PO4 have increased and implement to various problem.
Action 1: Extra classes were conducted for numerical subjects beyond the regular planned classes.

128
PO5: Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern
engineering and IT tools including prediction and modelling to complex engineering activities in Production
Engineering with an understanding of the limitations.
1.8 1.86 Attainment achieved.
PO5
Action 1: Conducted invited talk on modern manufacturing tool and Robotics by industrial expert.
PO6 : The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health,
safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice
in Production Engineering.
1.26 1.06 Students able to develop new model for exiting technology for social
PO6 purpose like health, safety etc.
Action 1: Conducted projects on eco-friendly manufacturing technic to minimize the health hazards problem in
industries.
Action 2: Conducted special classes on Alternative Materials for Aerospace application by latest manufacturing
technic.
PO7: Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions of
Production Engineering in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and need for
sustainable development.
0.74 0.78 Attainment achieved.
PO7
Action 1: Conducted expert talk on Environmental science and used of renewable sources of energy in industries for
sustainable developments
Action 2: Emphasis on latest development of modern technology for manufacturing to reduce the consumption of
natural resource.
PO8: Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of the
engineering practice.
1.03 0.75 Students know about the various aspects related to ethical principles
PO8 related to industries and responsibilities towards society.
Action 1: Include subject related to ethical principles, norms and responsibility in 7 th Semester curriculum.
PO9 : Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse
teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.

1.18 1.12 Attainment is satisfactory


PO9
Action 1: Projects pertaining to the latest problems were analysed with frequent interactions from industrial experts
and to distribute the work within the team towards its execution of through academic projects.

PO10 : Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering
community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design
documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions.
0.75 0.85 Attainment achieved.
PO10
Action 1: Projects pertaining to the latest problems were analysed with frequent interactions from industrial experts
and to distribute the work within the team towards its execution of through academic projects.
PO11 : Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the engineering and
management principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and
in multidisciplinary environments.
1.36 0.85 Works as a team members to solve the complex problem and project
PO11 related to engineering and industries.

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Action 1: Conducted extra classes on Product Life Cycle Management in summer vacation.
PO12 :. Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in
independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change.
1.73 1.63 Students able to learn latest advancement in various technology related
PO12 to production technology.
Action 1: Conducted Expert talk on Necessities of Higher studies and research scope related to production
engineering.
Table B.7.1c

PSOs Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement – CAYm2 (2016-17)

PSOs Target Attainment


Observations
Level Level

PSO1: Graduates will be able to apply knowledge of manufacturing science and industrial engineering concepts for
product, design and development.
2.4 2.18 Student able to decide method for manufacturing any product
PSO1
considering its cost and strength requirement.

Action 1: Workshop explaining concept and significance of modern manufacturing methods.


Action 2: Conduct mini project related to fundamental concept in every semester.

PSO2: Graduate will be able to optimize production system design parameters like cost, time, and resources and
eliminate redundant steps to make the best method of production
1.77 1.63 Student able to optimize variables to minimize its total cost and time.
PSO2

Action 1: Students are given projects to remove unwanted steps involve in manufacturing and management
processes of any industrial problems.

PSO3: Graduate will be able to implement modern tools and techniques of manufacturing and industrial
management to meet the challenges of real business world.
1.84 1.75 Students able to do analysis of real time problems to make maximum
PSO3
profit.

Action 1: Students are given assignments relating application of industrial engineering tools in dealing real time
problems.

Table B.7.1d
Action N:
7.2. Academic Audit and actions taken thereof during the period of Assessment (10)
(Academic Audit system/process and its implementation in relation to Continuous
Improvement)
 Faculty development program
Faculties have to go through faculty development program which is sponsored by the
college itself. The FDP helps faculties to understand basic techniques of teaching,
controlling classrooms besides methods to design question papers. It also helps teachers

130
in honing their communicating skills required for a teacher. They are also taught about
best practices of dealing with various kinds of subject matters with students. After
completion of program an assessment is done and a feedback form is also filled in order
to improve the program in future.
 Lecture/ Lab evaluation
The HOD keep a track of methods being used by faculties to teach different subjects and
taking lab classes. He even randomly visit to classroom to take feedback from students
and direct faculties corrective measures if there be any. Senior faculties guide new
faculties in preparing lesson plan and ask them to teach accordingly.

 Course file evaluation


Course file is prepared by faculty as per the guidelines given by HOD. It constitutes the
syllabus of the subject, previous year question papers, lesson plan and lecture notes. The
course file is checked by HOD or any senior faculty and feedback is given to the
concerned faculty and asked to incorporate the corrections.

Actions taken to improve


 Faculty members incorporate changes suggested by the academic committee, if any gaps
are found, to ensure quality deliverables.
 Faculty members have to match the pace of their deliverables as per the students’
requirements as well as they have to schedule the lecture plans in such a way that the
syllabus is completed on time. To achieve this they can arrange extra lectures and cope-
up the syllabus.
 Regular analysis of the results of internal assessment examination of all subjects is done
and concerned faculties are guided to take necessary actions. Remedial classes are
scheduled in reference to academic progress of the student.
 Faculty members attend FDP as required for the overall development of teaching skills in
terms of communication, methods and technical.
 The academic audit is carried out at the beginning of the semester as soon as the faculty
members are ready with their course files.
 The academic observation is carried out considering two criteria – feedback from
students (requested to the authorities) and randomized observation.
 FDP for communication skill development and improving methods of teaching-learning
are being carried out regularly by the learning and development department.
 Technical FDP, expert lectures, seminars etc. are being arranged by the individual
departments at least once in a semester.

7.3. Improvement in Placement, Higher Studies and Entrepreneurship (10)


Assessment is based on improvement in:
 Placement: number, quality placement, core industry, pay packages etc.
 Higher studies: performance in GATE, GRE, GMAT, CAT etc., and admissions in
premier institutions.

131
 Entrepreneurs.

Following is the table indicating the placement breakup in private and public sector besides
moving to higher education after clearing GATE exam:

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Total No. of Final Year Students (N) 50 54 54 61

No. of students placed in companies or Government 03 26 25 24


Sector (x)

No. of students admitted to higher studies with valid


qualifying scores N/A 7 7 9
(GATE or equivalent State or National Level Tests, GRE,
GMAT etc.) (y)

No. of students turned entrepreneur in N/A NIL NIL NIL


engineering/technology (z)

x+y+z= N/A 33 32 33

Placement Index : (x + y + z )/N N/A


0.56 0.61 0.54

N/A 0.57
Average placement= (P1 + P2 + P3)/3

CAYm1 (2017–18)

S.No. Name of The Company Number of students


Placed
1. TATA CUMMINS 1
2. MAHINDRA FIRST CHOICE WHEELS INDIA LIMITED 1
3. TATA CONSULTANCY SERVICES 2
4. VEDANTA RESOURCES 2
5. TATA STEEL (PPO + INTERNSHIP) 1
6. MOTION EDUCATION PRIVATE LIMITED 5
7. CAPITALVIA GLOBAL RESEARCH PRIVATE LIMITED 1
8. TRIANGLE TELE INCORPORATIONS 6
9. CAREER POINT PRIVATE LIMITED 2
10. OPTIMUS 1
11. VEDIKA CREDIT CAPITAL LIMITED 1

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7.4. Improvement in the quality of students admitted to the program (10)
Assessment is based on improvement in terms of ranks/score in qualifying state
level/national level entrances tests, percentage marks in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics
in 12 th Standard and percentage marks of the lateral entry students.

Item CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

- - -
National Level Entrance No. of Students admitted

Examination (Name of the - - -


Opening Score/Rank
Entrance Examination) - - -
Closing Score/Rank

- 51 51
State/University/Level Entrance No. of Students admitted

Examination/Others 587 827 692


Opening Score/Rank
(JCECE) 7365 10624 9656
Closing Score/Rank
- 15 9
No. of Students admitted
Name of the Entrance
17 6 15
Examination for Lateral Entry or Opening Score/Rank
lateral entry details 315 238 167
Closing Score/Rank

75.9 73.2 74.1


Average CBSE/Any other Board Result of admitted students
(Physics, Chemistry & Maths)

Table B.7.4

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CRITERION 8 First Year Academics 50

8. FIRST YEAR ACADEMICS (50)

8.1. First Year Student-Faculty Ratio (FYSFR) (5)

Assessment = (5 × 20) / Average FYSFR (Limited to Max. 5)

Number of Branches approved

1. Mechanical Engineering (105)


2. Electrical Engineering (99)
3. Production Engineering (54)
4. Metallurgy Engineering (54)
5. Chemical Engineering (91)
6. Civil Engineering (98)
7. Electronics and Communication Engineering (52)
8. Mining Engineering (49)
9. Computer Science & Engineering (38)
10. Information Technology (40)

Total intake = 680

Data for first year courses to calculate the FYSFR:

Number of students Number of faculty


(approved intake members (considering
Year strength) fractional load) FYSFR
CAY 680 32 21.25
CAYm1 680 32 21.25
CAYm2 680 32 21.25
Average 680 32 21.25
Assessment= (5 × 20)/Average
FYSFR (Limited to Max. 5) 4.7

Table B.8.1

8.2. Qualification of Faculty Teaching First Year Common Courses (5)

Assessment of qualification = (5x +3y) / RF, x = Number of Regular Faculty with Ph.D, y =
Number of Regular Faculty with Post-graduate qualification RF = Number of faculty
members required as per SFR of 20:1, Faculty definition as defined in 5.1

134
Assessment of faculty
Year X Y RF qualification (5x + 3y)/RF
CAY (2018-19) 20 12 32 4.25
CAYm1(2017-18) 19 13 32 4.18
CAYm2(2016-17) 19 13 32 4.18
Average Assessment 4.13

Table B.8.2

8.3. First Year Academic Performance (10)

Academic Performance = ((Mean of 1st Year Grade Point Average of all successful Students
on a 10-point scale) or (Mean of the percentage of marks in First Year of all successful
students/10)) x (number of successful students/number of students appeared in the
examination) Successful students are those who are permitted to proceed to the second year.

Year number of number of students mean of the Academic


successful appearing in the percentage of Performance
students examination marks in first year
of successful
students/10
CAY (2017-18) 753 1004 7.32 5.49
CAYm1 1003 1357 7.7 5.69
(2016-17)
CAYm2 1025 1401 7.54 5.52
(2015-16)

Academics Year Branch Appeared for No. Successful Academic


Examination Students Performance
CAYm1(2018-19) Mechanical 100 96 6.56
Electrical 98 81 6.52
Production 47 31 4.55
Metallurgy 49 36 5.25
Chemical 83 69 6.68
Civil 101 72 5.31
ECE 49 37 5.31
Mining 48 26 3.56
CSE 36 26 5.64
IT 42 31 5.76
Mechanical 102 76 5.63
Electrical 96 76 6.25
Production 51 38 5.64
CAYm1(2016-17) Metallurgy 53 41 5.78
Chemical 91 68 5.64

135
Civil 99 66 5.14
ECE 51 42 6.67
Mining 52 33 4.74
CSE 41 31 5.85
IT 42 31 5.75
Mechanical 105 80 5.78
Electrical 98 79 6.14
Production 51 28 3.97
Metallurgy 55 41 5.55
CAYm1(2015-16) Chemical 93 72 5.80
Civil 100 73 5.62
ECE 54 43 6.01
Mining 53 36 5.06
CSE 41 31 5.67
IT 40 30 5.77

8.4. Attainment of Course Outcomes of first year courses (10)

8.4.1. Describe the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the
evaluation of Course Outcomes of first year is done (5)

 Internal assessment is 30 marks which include class test as 10 marks


and mid semesters as 20 marks.
 Out of three classes test (CT) best of two are considered and this
mark is added with the mid semester marks.
 For assessment the performance of students in conduction of target
internal assessment level 15 out of 30 and external assessment level
CAY (2017-18) 25 out of 70 is considered.
 The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for prescribe course outcome.
 For laboratory assessment the performance of the students in
conduction of each experiment 5 marks, for lab internal test 10
marks and external lab exam (viva voce) 10 marks.

 Internal assessment is 30 marks which include class test as 10 marks


and mid semesters as 20 marks.
 Out of three classes test (CT) best of two are considered and this
mark is added with the mid semester marks.
 For assessment the performance of students in conduction of target

136
CAY (2016-17) internal assessment level 15 out of 30 and external assessment level
25 out of 70 is considered.
 The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for prescribe course outcome.
 For laboratory assessment the performance of the students in
conduction of each experiment 5 marks, for lab internal test 10
marks and external lab exam (viva voce) 10 marks.
 Internal assessment is 30 marks which include class test as 10 marks
and mid semesters as 20 marks.
 Out of three classes test (CT) best of two are considered and this
mark is added with the mid semester marks.
 For assessment the performance of students in conduction of target
CAY (2016-17) internal assessment level 15 out of 30 and external assessment level
25 out of 70 is considered.
 The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for prescribe course outcome.
 For laboratory assessment the performance of the students in
conduction of each experiment 5 marks, for lab internal test 10
marks and external lab exam (viva voce) 10 marks.

8.4.2. Record the attainment of Course Outcomes of all first-year courses (5)

Mapping of First year courses. The following tables are the details of all first-year
courses mapping. As the first-year courses taught at institutional level the specific
PSO mapping is not taken in to consideration. The syllabus of the academic year
2017-18 has been modified and hence the mapping listed separate table.
Refer to 3.2.2 for further details.

2017-18 mapping for Chem., Mech., Prod., Mining and Metallurgy Branches:

Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Maths I 3 2 2.5 2.25 - - - - - - - -
Engineering 2.5 1.5 1.6 - 2 1 - - 2 1.8 - -
Physics

137
English for - 0.4 - - 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.6 3 0.4 0.6
Communication
Electrical 3 3 1
Technology
Introduction to 3 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 - - 2
Manufacturing
Process
Physics Lab 3 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
Electrical 1.7 1.7 - - 0.5 - - - - - - -
Technology Lab 7
Extra Academic - - - - - - - 3 2 - - 3
Activity II
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative
arts)
Maths II 2.6 2 2.5 2 2.6 - - - - - - -
Engineering 2.2 2 2 2.5 - 3 2 - 2 - 2 3
Chemistry
Mechanics 3 2.75 2.2 2 - - - - - - - 1.75
Computer 1.83 2.2 2.5 - - - - - - - - 1
Programing and
Data Structures
Engineering 3 2 2.24 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ 1.75
Drawing and
Graphics
Chemistry Lab 1.67 2 2.25 - - - 2 - 1.75 - 2.5
Computer 3 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
Programing and
Data Structures
Lab
Extra Academic - - - - - - - 3 2 - - 3
Activity II
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative
arts)
1.5 1.4
Average Mapping
2.58 1.97 2.20 2.04 1 7 1.47 2.20 2.07 2.20 1.25 2.01

2017-18 mapping for ECE, CSE, IT, CIVIL and Electrical Branches:

Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Maths I 3 2 2.5 2.25 - - - - - - - -
Engineering Chemistry 2.5 1.5 1.6 - 2 1 - - 2 1.8 - -
English for Communication - 0.4 - - 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.6 3 0.4 0.6
Engineering Drawing and
3 3 1
Graphics
Computer Programing and Data
3 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 - - 2
Structures
Chemistry Lab 3 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
Computer Programing and Data
1.7 1.7 - - 0.57 - - - - - - -
Structures Lab
Extra Academic Activity II - - - - - - - 3 2 - - 3

138
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative arts)
Maths II 2.6 2 2.5 2 2.6 - - - - - - -
Physics 2.2 2 2 2.5 - 3 2 - 2 - 2 3
Mechanics 3 2.75 2.2 2 - - - - - - - 1.75
Electrical Technology 1.83 2.2 2.5 - - - - - - - - 1
Introduction to Manufacturing
3 2 2.24 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ 1.75
Process
Physics Lab 1.67 2 2.25 - - - 2 - 1.75 - 2.5
Electrical Technology Lab 3 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
Extra Academic Activity II
(NSO/NSS/NCC - - - - - - - 3 2 - - 3
Yoga/Creative arts)
Average Mapping 2.58 1.97 2.20 2.04 1.51 1.47 1.47 2.20 2.07 2.20 1.25 2.01

2016-17 and 2015-16 sessions:

Course Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
HU1101 Professional - 0.4 - - 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.6 3 0.4 0.6
Communication in
English
CH1101 Engineering 1.5 2 - 2 - 1.7 1.5 - 2 - - 1.7
Chemistry -I
PH1101 Engineering 2.25 1.5 1.5 - 2 1 - - 2 1.8 - 1
Physics -I
MA1101 Mathematics-I 3 2 2.5 2.25 - - - - - - - -
ME1101 Engineering 3 2.75 2.2 2 - - - - - - - 1.75
Mechanics
EE1101 Basic Electrical 3 3 - - 1 - - - - - - -
Engineering
CH1201 Chemistry Lab 1.75 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
PH1201 Physics Lab 3 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
ME1201 Engineering 3 2 2 1.5 1.5 - - - - - - 1.75
Mechanics Lab
EE1201 Electrical 3.00 2 1 - - - - - - - - -
Engineering Lab
ME1202 Engineering 3 2 2.2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics-I
ME1203 Workshop Practice- 3 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 - - 2
I
ME1301 General Proficiency - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
IT2101 Fundamentals of 1.8 2.2 2.5 - - - - - - - 1 -
Computer and
Programming
CH2102 Engineering 2 1.6 - - 2 1.6 2 - 2 2 - 1.8
\chemistry-II
PH2102 Engineering 2.25 1.5 1.5 - 2 1 - - 2 1.8 - 1.5
Physics-II
MA2102 Mathematics-II 2.6 2 2.5 2 2.6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _
ME2102 Engineering 3 2.8 2 2.5 - - 1 - - - - 1.6
Thermodynamics
EC2101 Basic Electronics 2 2.25 2.3 - -- - - - - - - 1

139
EC2201 Basic Electronics 3 2 1.8 1 1.4 1 - - 3 - 2 1
Lab
IT2201 Computer - 1.50 1.20 2.03 - - - - - 0.80 - -
Programming Lab
ME2204 Engineering 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics -II
ME2302 General Proficiency - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
Average Mapping 2.59 1.98 1.95 1.90 1.74 1.13 1.22 1.50 2.01 2.43 1.90 1.62

8.5. Attainment of Program Outcomes from first year courses (20)

8.5.1. Indicate results of evaluation of each relevant PO and/or PSO, if applicable (15)

PO Attainment: Mention first year details from table 3.1.3

2017-18 mapping for Chem., Mech., Prod., Mining and Metallurgy Branches:

Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Maths I 2.72 1.81 2.27 2.04 - - - - - - - -
Engineering 2.17 1.30 1.39 1.73 0.87 1.73 1.56 - -
Physics
English for - 0.40 - - 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.60 0.60 3.00 0.40 0.60
Communication
Electrical 2.60 2.60 - - 0.87 - - - - - - -
Technology
Introduction to 2.68 1.79 1.79 1.34 1.79 - - - - 1.79
Manufacturing
Process
Physics Lab 3.00 2.00 - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 1.30 2.25
Electrical 1.70 1.70 - - 0.57 - - - - - - -
Technology Lab
Extra Academic - - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 - - 3.00
Activity II
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative
arts)
Maths II 1.91 1.47 1.83 1.47 1.91 - - - - - - -
Engineering 2.05 1.87 1.87 2.33 2.80 1.87 1.87 - 1.87 2.80
Chemistry
Mechanics 1.84 1.69 1.35 1.23 - - - - - - - 1.07
Computer 1.34 1.61 1.83 - - - - - - - - 0.73
Programing and
Data Structures
Engineering 2.12 1.41 1.58 1.41 1.41 1.24
Drawing and
Graphics
Chemistry Lab 1.67 2.00 2.25 - - - 2.00 - 1.75 - 2.50
Computer 3.00 2.00 - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 1.30 2.25
Programing and

140
Data Structures
Lab
Extra Academic - - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 - - 3.00
Activity II
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative
arts)
Average
Mapping 2.22 1.69 1.80 1.64 1.24 1.36 1.42 2.20 1.99 2.14 1.22 1.93

2017-18 mapping for ECE, CSE, IT, CIVIL and Electrical Branches:

Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Maths I 2.96 1.97 2.47 2.22
Engineering Chemistry 2.20 2.00 2.00 2.50 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00
English for Communication 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.60 0.60 3.00 0.40 0.60
Engineering Drawing and 3.00 2.00 2.24 2.00 2.00 1.75
Graphics
Computer Programing and 0.63 0.76 0.87 0.35
Data Structures
Chemistry Lab 1.67 2.00 2.25 - - - 2.00 - 1.75 - 2.50
Computer Programing and 3.00 2.00 - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 1.30 2.25
Data Structures Lab
Extra Academic Activity II 3.00 2.00
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative arts)
Maths II 2.11 1.63 2.03 1.63 2.11
Physics 2.00 1.20 1.28 1.60 0.80 1.60 1.44
Mechanics 2.20 2.02 1.61 1.47 1.28
Electrical Technology 2.24 2.24 0.75
Introduction to 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.50 2.00 2.25 2.00
Manufacturing Process
Physics Lab 3.00 2.00 - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 1.30 2.25
Electrical Technology Lab 1.70 1.70 - - 0.57 - - - - - - -
Extra Academic Activity II - - - - - - - 3.00 2.00 - - 3.00
(NSO/NSS/NCC
Yoga/Creative arts)
Average Mapping 2.29 1.71 1.86 1.89 1.35 1.40 1.47 2.20 2.02 2.11 1.25 1.90

Session 2016-17:

Course Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
HU1101 Professional - 0.38 - - 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.57 0.57 2.86 0.38 0.57
Communication in
English
CH1101 Engineering 1.45 1.93 - 1.93 - 1.64 1.45 - 1.93 0 0 1.64
Chemistry -I
PH1101 Engineering 1.68 1.12 1.12 - 1.49 0.75 - - 1.49 1.34 - 0.75
Physics -I
MA1101 Mathematics-I 1.06 0.71 0.88 0.8 - - - - - - - -
ME1101 Engineering 1.06 0.97 0.78 0.71 - - - - - - - 0.62

141
Mechanics
EE1101 Basic Electrical 1.70 1.7 - - 0.57 - - - - - - -
Engineering
CH1201 Chemistry Lab 1.75 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
PH1201 Physics Lab 3.00 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
ME1201 Engineering 3.00 2 2 1.5 1.5 - - - - - - 1.75
Mechanics Lab
EE1201 Electrical 3.00 2 1
Engineering Lab
ME1202 Engineering 3.00 2 2.2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics-I
ME1203 Workshop 3.00 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 - - 2
Practice-I
ME1301 General - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
Proficiency
IT2101 Fundamentals of 1.66 2.02 2.3 - - - - - - - 0.92 0
Computer and
Programming
CH2102 Engineering 1.97 1.58 0 0 1.97 1.58 1.97 0 1.97 1.97 0 1.78
\chemistry-II
PH2102 Engineering 1.80 1.2 1.2 - 1.6 0.8 - - 1.6 1.44 - 1.2
Physics-II
MA2102 Mathematics-II 1.63 1.25 1.57 1.25 1.63 - - - - - - -
ME2102 Engineering 2.44 2.28 1.63 2.03 - - - - - - - 1.3
Thermodynamics
EC2101 Basic Electronics 1.33 1.5 1.53 - - - - - - - - 0.67
EC2201 Basic Electronics 3.00 2 1.8 1 1.4 1 - - 3 - 2 1
Lab
IT2201 Computer - 1.5 1.2 2.025 - - - - - 0.8 - -
Programming Lab
ME2204 Engineering 3.00 2 2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics -II
ME2302 General - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
Proficiency
Direct Attainment 1.53 1.51 1.44 1.43 0.92 1.00 0.99 1.73 2.05 1.57 1.38 1.98

Session 2015-16:

Course Subject Program Outcomes


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
HU1101 Professional - 0.37 - - 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.56 0.56 2.78 0.37 0.56
Communication
in English
CH1101 Engineering 1.40 1.87 - 1.87 - 1.59 1.4 - 1.87 0 0 1.59
Chemistry -I
PH1101 Engineering 1.86 1.24 1.24 - 1.65 0.83 - - 1.65 1.49 - 0.83
Physics -I
MA1101 Mathematics-I 0.96 0.64 0.8 0.72 - - - - - - - -
ME1101 Engineering 1.70 1.56 1.25 1.13 - - - - - - - 0.99
Mechanics
EE1101 Basic Electrical 2.04 2.04 - - 0.68 - - - - - - -
Engineering
CH1201 Chemistry Lab 1.75 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

142
PH1201 Physics Lab 3.00 2 - - - - - - 3 2 1.3 2.25
ME1201 Engineering 3.00 2 2 1.5 1.5 - - - - - - 1.75
Mechanics Lab
EE1201 Electrical 3.00 2 1
Engineering Lab
ME1202 Engineering 3.00 2 2.2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics-I
ME1203 Workshop 3.00 2 2 1.5 2 - - - 2.25 - - 2
Practice-I
ME1301 General - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
Proficiency
IT2101 Fundamentals of 0.83 1.01 1.15 - - - - - - - 0.46 0
Computer and
Programming
CH2102 Engineering 2.00 1.6 - - 2 1.6 2 0 2 2 0 1.8
\chemistry-II
PH2102 Engineering 1.47 0.98 0.98 - 1.31 0.65 - - 1.31 1.18 - 0.98
Physics-II
MA2102 Mathematics-II 1.47 1.13 1.42 1.13 1.47 - - - - - - -
ME2102 Engineering 2.68 2.5 1.79 2.23 - - 0.89 - - - - 1.43
Thermodynamics
EC2101 Basic Electronics 0.91 1.02 1.04 - - - - - - - - 0.45
EC2201 Basic Electronics 3.00 2 1.8 1 1.4 1 - - 3 - 2 1
Lab
IT2201 Computer - 1.5 1.2 2.025 - - - - - 0.8 - -
Programming
Lab
ME2204 Engineering 3.00 2 2 2 2 - - - - - - 1.75
Graphics -II
ME2302 General - - - - - 0.6 0.6 1.2 0.6 3 2.4 1.2
Proficiency
Direct Attainment 2.11 1.59 1.49 1.59 1.53 1.03 1.17 1.48 1.88 2.28 1.79 1.47
8.5.2. Actions taken based on the results of evaluation of relevant POs (5)

(The attainment levels by direct (student performance) are to be presented through


Program level Course-PO matrix as indicated)
PO Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement - CAY – Mention for relevant Pos

2017-18 action plan for Chem., Mech., Prod., Mining and Metallurgy Branches:

POs Target Attainment Observations


Level Level

PO1: Engineering Knowledge

PO1 2.58 2.22 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We motivate students to participate in technical seminars and workshops to improve their basic technical
knowledge and also converting their ideas to apply in real life situations.
PO2: Problem Analysis

PO2 1.97 1.69 Attainment is satisfactory

143
Action: We encourage the students to acquire the knowledge regarding problem analysis.
PO3: Design/development of Solutions

PO3 2.20 1.80 Attainment is satisfactory

Action: We motivate students to adapt suitable methodology for the solution of engineering problems to benefit public
health and safety.
PO4: Conduct Investigations of Complex Problems

PO4 2.04 1.64 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Students are motivated to attend the workshops to gain knowledge and apply it to carried out
experiment and analyze the results.
PO5: Modern Tool Usage

PO5 1.51 1.24 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: To enhance knowledge regarding engineering applications some engineering laboratories have been modernized
with modern tools, equipments and software’s.
PO6: The Engineer and Society

PO6 1.47 1.36 Attainment is achieved


Action1: For the practical knowledge, students are sent to the nearby industries such as SAIL, ACC,
Maithen Hidden Project etc.
PO7: Environment and sustainability

PO7 1.47 1.42 Attainment is achieved


Action: Students are given projects regarding energy generation and environmental protection. We teach them about the
recent environmental disorder like global warming and encourage them to develop methods and technique to fight with
such challenges.
PO8: Ethics

PO8 2.00 2.00 Attainment is achieved


Action: Corporate lectures and motivational talks are regularly arranged.
PO9: Individual and team work

PO9 2.07 2.00 Attainment is achieved


Action: Institute has organized several workshops which provide a platform for students to work in a team or a group.
PO10: Communication

PO10 2.20 2.14 Attainment is achieved


Action: To develop communication skills among the students, group discussions are arranged by the institute. Institute is
also going to establish a communication lab rich with softwares.
PO11: Project management and finance

PO11 1.25 1.22 Attainment is achieved


Action: Students are given free hands for arranging special talks, workshops, and technical events like paper
presentation, modeling, quiz events.

144
PO12: Life – long learning

PO12 2.10 1.93 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Additional tutorial classes are arranged to clarify the concepts. We teach by using PPTs, live
demonstration of topics using video lectures. Lecture contents include new technological
developmental tools and the detailed knowledge of concepts.

2017-18 action plan for ECE, CSE, IT, CIVIL and Electrical Branches:

POs Target Attainment Observations


Level Level

PO1: Engineering Knowledge

PO1 2.58 2.29 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We inspire students to participate in technical events to improve their basic knowledge towards the real-world
application.
PO2: Problem Analysis

PO2 1.97 1.71 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We motivate the students to think about modelling of the real-life problems and using their subject
knowledge.

PO3: Design/development of Solutions

PO3 2.20 1.86 Attainment is satisfactory

Action: To meet the specified needs with appropriate considerations for the public health and safety, and the cultural,
societal, and environmental considerations with methodology of design solutions for complex engineering problems.
PO4: Conduct Investigations of Complex Problems

PO4 2.04 1.89 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We inspire the students to take part in workshops and conferences to gain knowledge of new
ideas and apply it to carried out experiment and analyze the results.
PO5: Modern Tool Usage

PO5 1.51 1.35 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: To specify fulfillment of requirement in engineering applications the modern labs are developed to demonstrate
the use of Modern tools like MATLAB, Mathematica, Maple, Adams, Cadence etc. Also, we use some other tools for
teaching such as Moodle technique.
PO6: The Engineer and Society

PO6 1.47 1.40 Attainment is satisfactory


Action1: Encourage the students for industrial and societal visit to expand their practical knowledge also social
knowledge with the effect of improved practices in engineering in terms social issues.
PO7: Environment and sustainability

145
PO7 1.47 1.47 Attainment is satisfactory
Action: Students are motivated to indulge in projects based on the green energy sources/utilization of renewable energy,
in refer to environmental issues.
PO8: Ethics

PO8 2.20 2.20 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Career readiness program, corporate lectures and motivational talks are arranged.
PO9: Individual and team work

PO9 2.07 2.02 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Institute has organized several programs which provides a platform to work in individual as well as a group in
the fields of engineering such as project works, cultural events etc.
PO10: Communication

PO10 2.20 2.11 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: To enhance various aspects of technical/ communication talks by group discussions, presentations and new
learning outcomes, soft skills training is imparted.
PO11: Project management and finance

PO11 1.25 1.25 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Student are guiding the management principles how to manage and implicates the project.
PO12: Life – long learning

PO12 2.01 1.90 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: The concepts were cleared using PPTs, live demonstration of topics using video lectures,
lecture contents include new technological developmental tools and the detailed knowledge of
concepts. Additional Classes conducted to clarify the concepts. Students would be encouraged to
correlate their theoretical knowledge with real life application of various semiconductor devices.

Session 2016-17:

POs Target Attainment Observations


Level Level

PO1: Engineering Knowledge

PO1 2.59 2.03 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We inspire students to participate in technical events, other events where their basic knowledge should convert
to application matching with defined level of their standards.
PO2: Problem Analysis

PO2 1.98 1.55 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: We motivate the students to gain the knowledge to tackle the real-life problem and their possible
engineering solutions.

146
PO3: Design/development of Solutions

PO3 1.95 1.48 Attainment is satisfactory

Action: To meet the specified needs with appropriate considerations for the public health and safety, and the cultural,
societal, and environmental considerations with methodology of design solutions for complex engineering problems.
PO4: Conduct Investigations of Complex Problems

PO4 1.90 1.44 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Students are motivated to attend the workshops to gain knowledge and apply it to carried out
experiment and analyze the results.
PO5: Modern Tool Usage

PO5 1.74 1.13 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: To specify fulfillment of requirement in engineering applications the modern labs are developed to demonstrate
the use of Modern tools like MATLAB, Arduino, LabView, Cadence etc.
PO6: The Engineer and Society

PO6 1.13 0.92 Attainment is satisfactory


Action1: Encourage the students to visited industry to expand their practical knowledge with the effect of improved
practices in engineering in terms social issues.
PO7: Environment and sustainability

PO7 1.22 1.00 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Students are motivated to indulge in projects based on the green energy sources/utilization of renewable energy,
in refer to environmental issues.
PO8: Ethics

PO8 1.50 0.99 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Career readiness program, corporate lectures and motivational talks are arranged.
PO9: Individual and team work

PO9 2.01 1.73 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Institute has organized several programs which provides a platform to work in individual as well as a group in
the fields of engineering.
PO10: Communication

PO10 2.43 2.05 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: To enhance various aspects of technical/ communication talks by group discussions, presentations and new
learning outcomes, soft skills training is imparted.
PO11: Project management and finance

PO11 1.90 1.57 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Student are guiding the management principles how to manage and implicates the project.
PO12: Life – long learning

147
PO12 1.62 1.38 Attainment is satisfactory
Action: Additional Classes conducted to clarify the concepts. Students would be encouraged to
correlate their theoretical knowledge with real life application of various semiconductor devices. The
concepts were cleared using PPTs, live demonstration of topics using video lectures, lecture contents
include new technological developmental tools and the detailed knowledge of concepts.

Session 2015-16:

POs Target Attainment Observations


Level Level

PO1: Engineering knowledge

PO1 2.40 1.50 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Students are encouraged to participate in technical events, extra tutorial class to solve more
problems and practical knowledge to solve engineering problems
PO2: Problem analysis

PO2 1.89 1.43 Attainment is satisfactory


1. Action 1: Workshops and several seminars are conducted to concern about the principle of
theory and practical knowledge regarding analysis of new problems
PO3: Design/development of solutions

PO3 1.93 1.47 Attainment is satisfactory

Action: Extra tutorial classes are being planned for discussion of the previous course/problems and
their solution and providing new assignments.
PO4: Conduct investigations of complex problems

PO4 1.70 1.41 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Extra classes are recommended for new problems and their solution confer to engineering
related issues.
PO5: Modern tool usage

PO5 1.58 0.91 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Students are being motivated to visit industry and to understand the uses of modern
instrument which help them hands on experience.
PO6: The engineer and society

PO6 0.99 0.98 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Technical discussions are being conducted to enhance the engineering application for society
welfare.
PO7: Environment and sustainability

PO7 1.02 0.99 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Technical talk on engineering issues is conducted for the professional development and usage

148
of changes in technology.
PO8: Ethics

PO8 1.00 1.71 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Workshops are being conducted to improve the knowledge regarding Ethical values in their
profession effectively.
PO9: Individual and team work

PO9 1.82 2.03 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Several programs have been arranged which provides a platform to work in individual or in a group regarding
engineering related discussion.
PO10: Communication

PO10 2.33 1.49 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Presentations have been arranged to increase the communication between the students as a
new learning outcome.
PO11: Project management and finance

PO11 1.58 1.38 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Student are guiding the management principles how to manage the project and its outcome.

PO12: Life-long learning

PO12 1.51 1.95 Attainment is satisfactory


Action: Practical approach of teaching to be adapted and students are encouraged to correlate their
theoretical knowledge with real life application of various semiconductor devices.

Table B.8.5.2

149
CRITERION 9 Students Support Systems 50

9. STUDENT SUPPORT SYSTEMS


9.1 MENTORING SYSTEM TO HELP AT INDIVIDUAL LEVELS (5)
Type of mentoring: Professional guidance / career advancement / course work specific /
laboratory specific / all-round development. Number of faculty mentors: Number of students per
mentor: Frequency of meeting:
(The institution may report the details of the mentoring system that has been developed for the
students for various purposes and also state the efficacy of such system).

Mentoring System:
A new strategy to access and motivate students is initiated .All faculty and students of all
semesters were divided into mentor mentee.

Under each faculty there will be 13 students. They would look into assigned student’s academic
progress, discuss with other faculty about their behavior in classroom and should observe any
unusual behavioral patterns and incidents. With the constant interaction with students, they
would highlight importance of Personality Development Program (PDP).

Mentoring:
Mentoring of the students is our top priority. Each teacher takes keen interest to mentor students
under him. A diary is maintained for each student where various details like Personal
Information, Previous meeting details, Academic Performance etc. recorded. The mentors meet
the students periodically and monitor their performance and their activities. Guidance regarding
the lagging issues is provided. Occasionally meeting with parents are also arranged.

Professional Guidance:
The department is well equipped with knowledgeable human resources in the form of members
of faculty who by keeping themselves of developments offer guidance to the prospective
professionals in addition to the classroom teaching. Senior faculty members, Director of the
Institute, persons from industries and other leading institutions and research labs are also invited
for the professional guidance of the students.

Career advancement:
The Training & Placement cell has been active not only in arranging campus recruitment drives,
but also offering awareness and training for the students. Members of faculty handling different
courses interact with students in clearing their entire concept oriented and test based mechanics
of the respective courses. The teachers after first of formative evaluation guide the students as far
as student specific gray areas are concerned.

We have the provision of Steel Chair Scholarship for the 05 Metallurgical Engineering students
and besides that our students are benefitted by the number of scholarships offered by the
following.

1. State Govt.

150
2. Railway
3. Tata Steel
4. North America Alumni Association
5. SAIL etc.
These act as the motivational factor for the students and they apply their special efforts to be in
the race of beneficiaries.

Lab specific:
Each of the lab sessions is conducted by 2 teachers along with non-teaching staff, in order to
have special care for the students while experiments are being handled. A demonstrative
presentation is given by the teacher concerned before every experiment. The Laboratory records
are evaluated after the experiment is held. In other words, there is active involvement of the
members of faculty in pre experiment stage, at the time of experiment and after the experiment.
Teacher takes care of all the students and also there is always the provision of revision or special
classes as per the requirement of students.

Efficacy of the System:


The mentoring system developed by the college has been proved to be effective considering
different parameters.
The involvement of students in the academics has been increased, like class work attendance,
paper presentations, presentation of models in exhibitions, participation in cultural activities etc.
Because the number of students allocated to each of the mentor is limited to maximum of 13,
personal interaction on regular basis has been taken up.
9.2 FEEDBACK ANALYSIS AND REWARD / CORRECTIVE MEASURES TAKEN, IF
ANY (10)

 Feedback collected for all courses:- YES

 Specify the feedback collection process:-

The institute has a well-designed feedback form which is given to all the students towards the
end of every semester. The feedback form can be filled by the students without revealing their
identity, if they so wish.

Common feedback form is designed at the institutional level for all the programs by considering
all the dimensions of the teaching-learning process such as lesson plan, student interactions,
clearance of doubts, communication, pace of coverage, subject knowledge, punctuality, etc. The
feedback form is distributed manually to each student and filled forms are collected back by the
faculty coordinator in the absence of the concerned faculty under the supervision of the HOD.
The data will be analyzed in the scale of 0 to 5 and Net Performance Weighted Index (NPWI) is
calculated for each and every course including laboratories

The students of each class are guided to the Central Computing Facility as per a pre- planned
schedule. The students are given 14 questions concerning the faculty who are dealing with theory
papers and 9 questions for faculty and staff dealing with Laboratories or workshops. The

151
questionnaire is designed to enable them to give their opinion as Excellent, Very Good,
Satisfactory or Poor. Using a computer program the score of each faculty is computed and shall
be forwarded to the Principal. The students are also allowed to write whatever comments they
want to make about the teachers which will be finally checked by Principal and HOD and
forwarded to the faculty concerned.

S.No Description Remarks


1 Feedback collected for all courses? YES
2 Specify the feedback collection process: Hard copy without revealing the student

3 Who collects the feedback? Staff members are nominated for


collecting feedback.
4 When feedback is collected? Once in each semester after completing the
last sessional exam
5 Percentage of students participating Nearly 70%
 Percentage of students participating: - Nearly 70%.
 Specify the feedback analysis process: - Points scored by each teacher are totaled. Detailed
comments are also compiled for the class as a whole, pertaining to the teacher and pertaining
to the subject.

The feedback collected from students are first analyzed at the level of HOD and then at the level
of faculty appraisal committee, headed by the Principal. The contents of the feedback will be
shared with each faculty member individually. The feedback system works as an eye opener for
the faculty.

 Frequency of collection is done once in a semester:


At the end of semester sessional exams

 Basis of reward / corrective measures, if any: - Teachers are counseled by the Head of the
Department based on the critical/negative feedback from the students. The important
feedbacks related to the academic activity are discussed in the departmental meeting and
appropriate suggestions are implemented. This normally results in the resolution of the
problem. There is also the system of awards in the form of public appreciation and
appreciation letter & entry into the CR.

Rewards:
Entry into CR
Letters of appreciation
Encouragement in terms of privileges
Appreciations through mention in public functions

Corrective Measures
Counseling to overcome weakness identified
Extending facilities for augmentation of teaching skills

 Number of corrective actions taken:

152
 Shift of focus between tutorials and theory.
 Supplement the knowledge with the help of senior and experienced faculties on
specified topics.
 Appropriate stress and additional training on various components of soft-skills.
 Introduction of lectures on ethics and value systems.

9.3 STUDENT FACILITIES


(Assessment is based on feedback collection, analysis, and corrective action taken in respect
of library, computing facilities, canteen, sports etc.)
For the metrics of facilities (computer, library, sports & clubs, canteen and stationary), 1 to 10-
point questionnaire as used. Along with them, space was provided for expressing the opinion. All
students of B. Tech. are considered for evaluation. The scale is to a Very Great Extent: 5; To a
Great Extent: 4; To a Moderate Extent: 3; To Some Extent: 2; Not at All: 1.The 15 points are
averaged and converted into percentage. The metric values are given in the table below.
Compilation of responses and converted into percentages
Description Percentage marks, %

Library

Computer

Sports & Clubs

Canteen

Stationary

Overall

153
Students Facilities Feedback Form
Feedback points on facilities: To a Very Great Extent: 5; To a Great Extent: 4; To a Moderate
Extent: 3; To Some Extent: 2; Not at All: 1
To a Very To a To a To Not
S. Great Great Moderate Some at
Description Extent Extent Extent Extent All
No.
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)

How do you rate the


1. overall environment of
the institute?

Are you satisfied with


the facilities offered by
2. the library of your
institute?

How do you rate the


general amenities like
3. toilets, drinking water
in the institute?

How do you rate the


environment of the
4. canteen in terms of
ambience, taste and
operating hours?

Are you satisfied with


the training programs
5. offered by the training
and placement cell of
the college?

Are you satisfied with


6. the hostel facility
offered to you?

How do you rate the


7. response on any
complaint given by the

154
student on any issue?

Are you satisfied with


the method of
8. mentoring adopted by
the institute?

How do you rate the


extent of co- curricular
9. and extracurricular
activities offered by the
institute?

Are you satisfied with


the sports and clubs
10. facilities in the
institute?

Are you satisfied with


11. the speed of the internet
in the institute?

Is the transportation
12. provided by the institute
adequate?

Is the health centre


13. available in the
campus?

Are you satisfied with


14. stationary in the
institute?

Are you satisfied with


15. gym facilities in the
institute?

Signature of the student

155
9.4 SELF LEARNING
(The institution needs to specify the facilities, materials and scope for self-learning/ learning
beyond syllabus, Webinars, Podcast, MOOCs etc. and evaluate their effectiveness)

Scope for self-learning


The Teaching – Learning process and the curriculum adopted by the Institution creates ample
scope for Self–learning of the students.

 The concepts involving analysis and logical reasoning are discussed in the classrooms and
the students are advised to apply them to solve problems individually for enhancing their
learning.
 Advanced and relevant concepts beyond the scope of the subject are given to the students in
classes for literature collection and comprehension of scope of the subject.
 The labs equipped with software and equipment is available beyond working hours for
practice and learning individually.

 Library provides the students requisite facilities and support for self-learning.
 Computer Centre with internet facility is available for the benefit of students for exposing
them to information relevant to their domain and learn on their own.
 Lectures on topics beyond the scope of curriculum delivered by experts from the industry
and eminent teachers from institutions of repute ignite the students to pursue their interest
in self-learning and development.
 We have developed software material package for the availability of the students to
obtain and to refer to the material for their presentations and for self-learning.
 The software material package consisting of different modules offer material for GRE,
TOEFL, IELTS, GMAT presentations and mini projects are made available to access
from different corners of the college.
 The Institute is also a member of IUCEE Consortium through which it regularly conducts
various webinars for the faculty and students
 Virtual labs are also regularly conducted to the students apart from the normal laboratory
experiments in order to acquaint them with the practical exposure of conduct of
experiment.
 The students are regularly encouraged to take up MOOCs courses which enhance their
learning capabilities to a great extent.
 Facilities of SWAYAM & MOOC have also been extended to the students

156
Contents of Self Learning Module:

1. Time series CDs / IEG CDs / Sonnet CDs Department Wise, CDs supplied along with
text books
2. Association activities
3. NPTEL / MIT courseware / learning / web learning
4. Central Library
5. Infosys campus content program / JKC content

6. Multimedia Programs

7. Emailing & Net browsing

8. Audio visual materials Audio cassettes & Video cassettes

9. Science Exhibitions

10. Printed materials Handouts

11. Group discussion & Role play / peer discussion / Brain storming sessions

12. Downloaded video lessons from YouTube, Viddler, Vimeo.

13. University Distance Learning Materials

14. GRE / TOEFL / IELTS material / Hard and soft copies

15. GATE material / Hard and soft copies

16. Field work / Educational tours

17. Paper presentations in Technical Seminars

18. Yahoo groups Education groups


19. Lecture notes by faculty
20. Educational documentaries & Educational movies
21. Sharing of Library facilities with the mentor Institution IIT (ISM) Dhanbad

157
9.5 Career Guidance, Training, Placement (10)
Career Guidance Cell
B.I.T. Sindri welcomes the best recruiters in India and abroad to its campus. It gives immense
pleasure to invite for participation in BIT campus recruitment program to recruit B.I.T. Sindri
graduates available in large numbers exceeding 700 in this organization. The candidates for
recruitment are expected to get their degree during summer. In this institute, pre-final year
students go for summer internships.
The following is the constitution of the committee-

S.No Name Position Department

1 Prof. Dr.Ghanshyam Training and Placement Physics


officer

2 Prof.Ranjan Kumar Departmental Coordinator Mechanical


T.P.O

3 Prof. Shashi Minz Departmental Coordinator Electrical


T.P.O

4 Prof. NishikantKishku Departmental Coordinator Civil


T.P.O

5 Prof. Imtiyaz Ahmad Departmental Coordinator Electronics


T.P.O

6 Prof.Raghunandan Departmental Coordinator IT & CSE


Kumar T.P.O

7 Prof. Sagaram Hembrom Departmental Coordinator Metallurgical


T.P.O

8 Prof. Rakesh Departmental Coordinator Production


T.P.O

9 Prof. P.K Singh Departmental Coordinator Geology


T.P.O

10 Prof. Amar Kumar Departmental Coordinator Chemical


T.P.O

158
Objectives of the Committee:

1. Guidance for competitive & civil service examinations.


2. Career Counseling.
3. Exchange of Technology.
4. Giving suggestions to students to further studies through TOEFL, GRE, M. Tech, MS etc.
5. Training in spoken English, Skill Development and arranging different tests and model
exams.
6. Arranging guest lectures on different events.
7. IT / Management seminars and group discussions.
8. Projects tie-up so for Engg. / MBA etc. for minor / major projects.
9. Material supplies to each student for their future plans for different courses and how to
appear.
10. Technology transformation based on exhibitions and seminars.
11. Recent trends and further actions.
12. Information supply to different students with printed material and guidance.

Seminars Organized (Year Wise):


2018-2019
S.No Title Resource Persons Target Date No. of
Audience students
1 5-day workshop on  Dr. Somnath Faculty 03-07 Pre-final
Manufacturing Chattapadhyay, Member, October and Final
Automation Associate Prof, Industrial 2018 year
Robotics and Department of Person, students
Factory of Future Mechanical Production
(MARFF – 2018) Engineering,IIT and
PRODUCTION (ISM), Dhanbad Mechanical
ENGINEERING  Dr. Vinay Sharma, Engineering
DEPARTMENT Professor, Students
Department of
Production
Engineering, BIT
Mesra (Deogarh
Campus)
 Dr. Joyjeet Ghose,
Associate Professor,
Department of
Production

159
Engineering, BIT
Mesra
 Dr. Vijay Pandey,
Professor,
Department of
Mechanical
Engineering, BIT
Sindri
 Prof S. C
Srivastava, Visiting
faculty, IIT (ISM)
Dhanbad

160
161
2017-18

S.No Title Resource person Target Date No. of


Audience students

1 2 day workshop on Dr. R.P. Gupta 3-4 March 2017 127


MATLAB and its
application in Prof. Shashi Minj
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT

2 2 day workshop on Prof. D.V.Gadre 8-9 april 2017 153


Microcontroller and
embedded system Prof. Dr.R.P.Gupta

Fig: - Two day workshop day on MATLAB and its application

162
Fig: - Two day workshop on Microcontroller and embedded system

Training & Placement Cell-

The Management of B I T Sindri constituted a separate Training & a separate Placement


Cell with the objective of providing placements for its students after the successful completion of
their education. The also prepares the students to face tough competition in today’s corporate
environment. It organizes various seminars to create competitive awareness among the students.
It is headed by Prof. Dr. Ghanshyam Professor-In charge Placement, Prof. Dr. D. K Tanti
Professor-In charge Training respectively and supported by staff members and student co-
coordinators from each department.

Activities:

 Keeping in view of the growing importance of General English, Soft skills and General
aptitude in the today’s competitive world, the department imparts excellent training to all the
students in all the above three areas from .

 The Training and Placement Department consists of 6 full time faculty members having rich
experience in competitive field.

 Using their rich experience, the faculty members prepare training material and test papers to
meet the requirements of the students appearing for various campus recruitment drives.

163
 The Department aims to fulfill the requirements of the students of all branches of B. Tech,
M.Tech.

 This Department is given a separate session for three hours in a week by each branch of B.
Tech, M.Tech in all the three areas of English, Soft Skills and aptitude .

 The Department regularly conducts “Campus connect program” (both FP & SS) to make the
students competent.

 Eminent people from various fields are invited for giving guest lectures, seminars and for
conducting workshops.

Objectives:-
 To increase the number of campus selections of students

 To increase the number of reputed companies visiting the college for recruitments.

 To train the students in various areas like soft skills, aptitude, group discussion, interviews
and English.

 To invite various corporate people to the college for conducting workshops / seminars and
conferences.

 To establish MoUs with various corporate for the all round development of the students.

 To secure more than 75% Placement record.

 To invite corporate to set up their “Center of Excellence” in the college.

Infrastructure:

 Separate Placement Department with full time faculty members.

 Separate Placement Library and reading room

 Reference material for several competitive exams, like GRE, CAT, GMAT, TOEFL, IES,
etc.

 Seminar Hall with 300 capacity

 LCD Projector and Public Audio System

 Separate interview rooms and Group Discussion cabins

164
 Computer lab (with LAN) for conducting online exam with 150 systems

Companies Recruited through ON / OFF Campus Recruitments


Some of the major companies visiting our campus for recruitments in recent years are-

1. AAKASH
2. ABCIL
3. ABIRA
4. ACC
5. ACCENTURE
6. ADANI GROUPS
7. ADANI TRANSMISSIONS
8. ADHUNIK GROUP
9. AESL
10. AFCON
11. ALLEN INSTITUTE
12. AMBUJA CEMENT
13. ARE
14. ARICENT TECHNOLOGIES
15. BHARATI INFRATEL
16. BHUSHAN STEELS LTD
17. BHUSHAN POWER
18. BRG GROUP
19. BUCKS GAINER
20. CCCL
21. CESC
22. CONCIERGE TECH LTD
23. DAIMLER INDIA COMMERCIAL VECHICLE PVT LTD
24. DIRECT-I
25. DVC
26. DVC MINING
27. ELECTRO STEEL
28. ENCON
29. EIL
30. ERA INFRA
31. ERRICSON INDIA

165
9.6 Entrepreneurship Cell (5)
Entrepreneurship Development Cell aims to improve and generate a culture of innovation and
development of entrepreneurial spirit amongst the students and budding entrepreneurs and start
their own enterprise. It also attempts to train and equip them with knowledge and resources them
need to build successful business.
Prof. Prakash Kumar, HOD of Production is the Coordinator & Dr. RP Gupta is the Co-
Coordinator of the Cell.
Recently on April 15, 2018, an entrepreneurship workshop was successfully organized, report of
which is presented as below:
The Startup cell under TEQIP, B.I.T. Sindri, is working adamantly in order to achieve its
goal. Yesterday, it hosted Entrepreneurs Meet 2018 to motivate the budding entrepreneurs and
ignite the spark of struggle in them. Inaugurated by the eminent personalities along with
Director, B.I.T. Sindri, Project Coordinator, TEQIP and Coordinator of Startup cell, Dr.
Prakash Kumar.

Starting with the inaugural speech, Dr. Prakash highlighted the significance of startups
nowadays and assured that B.I.T. Sindri is dedicated to nurture its student and help them to
create their lives and those of their communities. Emphasizing on change he added- to entice
change the prerequisites are energy, power and intelligence.

Director, while blessing with his speech, he presented the example of how Steve Wozniak
derogatory comments on creativity and how Anand Mahindra countered him. Adding further,
he said 21st century students are not copy paste students but they are innovative, much
courageous students. He repeated his words of working for the development of students.

Moving further, Dr. G Kumar (Project Coordinator TEQUIP) stressed on the fact that ROI of
BIT sindri is very good, better than some of the best colleges of the country. Students of our
college are some of the best. He also shared his recent approach to cater the best to the
students.

The guest of honour Mayor of Dhanbad Chandra Shekhar Aggarwal shared his experience on
being a bureaucrat, entrepreneur and a politician share his wisdom. Being a graduate from
NIT Warangal he talked about his old days and guided the entrepreneurs present with his
wisdom.

Eminent personalities honoured the event were Abhinav Shah, Co-Founder Osam Dairy;
Saurav chaudhary, CEO of Lemnit; Partha Sharma, DoIT and e Gov; Gaurav Singh, Co-
Founder MyPerfectice, Vikash Kumar Prajapati, Founder of Putoos Graphics LLP, Saurav
Karmakar, MD I B Arts Pvt. Ltd.,

Mayor Chandra Shekhar Aggarwal was the chief guest and Mr. Harendra singh, CEO of
Asarfi Hospital was guest of honor of the event.

166
Areas covered under this meet were:
1. Life cycle of Startup
2. Challenges for Startups
3. Government support and Initiatives
4. Legal aspect
5. Project Financing
6. Market Scenario

167
Fig: - News Coverage of the Workshop

Photograph of the workshop

Vision/Goal of Start-up Cell:

Creating a vibrant and dynamic Startup Ecosystem in Technical Institutions by playing a role of
pre-incubator to promote, facilitate support system to innovative and entrepreneurial students and
faculties to convert their innovative ideas/problems to tech-solution with a feasible business
model stage.
Role of Pre-Incubator is to connect various student clubs ( Idea clubs, Innovation Clubs, Start-up
Clubs) to come up with tech solutions for the problems from Industry, Society, and Market to
generate Ideas/Proof of Concepts (PoCs) and helping them to get converted to Prototypes and
mentor them to develop business models ready. Therefore, creating a strong pipeline of quality
and quantity tech based potential start-ups for incubators industry to take further.

Objective of Start-up Cell:

1. To Develop a Critical Mass of Motivated Students & Faculties with Entrepreneurial


Orientation & Skill
2. To Build Infrastructure Support for Innovation & Early Stage Enterprise development
and Enabling Access to Resource & Facilities at Institute
3. To Enhance In-House Competency Development to Serve Potential and Early Stage
Entrepreneurs and Student Innovators at the Institute.
4. To Strengthen the Inter Department and Inter-Institutional linkage, Incubators and Other
Ecosystem Enablers at Different Levels.

168
Startup Cell Coordinator Name & Contact Details:
Team Designation Stream/Discipline Email Contact
Members

Prof. D.K. Chairman Director (ECE) director@bitsindri.ac.in +91- 9431445854


Singh

Dr. Prakash Coordinator Associate kprakash_71@yahoo.co.in +91- 9431340536


Kumar Professor & Head
Production Engg.

Dr. R.P. Gupta Co- Assistant rgupta@bitsindri.ac.in +91- 8340432424


Coordinator Professor,
Electrical Engg.

Team Detail (list of Faculty Facilitators with Designation and Stream)


Team Designatio Stream/Discipli Email Contact
Members n ne

Dr.Rajan Kumar Asst. Prof. Mechanical replyrajan@gmail.com +91- 9431576131

Dr. S Hembram Asst. Prof. Metallurgy hembromsangram@gmai +91- 9798427706


l.com

Dr. Amit K Asst. Prof. Chemical mt_gupta@yahoo.com +91- 9835785852


Gupta

Prof. NK Kisku Asst. Prof. Civil nkiskubit@gmail.com +91- 9431755099

Dr. Arvind Asst. Prof. ECE Aksingh738@gmail.com +91- 8986567899


Kumar

Prof.Raghunand Asst. Prof. CSE & IT raj.bit06@gmail.com +91- 8709859629

169
an Kr

Anand Kumar Asst. Prof. Production Engg ak204204@gmail.com +91- 7253046056

Mr. Asst. Prof. Electrical Engg. biswaranjan.ee@gmail.c +91- 9437274388


Biswaranjan om
Mishra

Mr. Praveen Asst. Prof. Electrical Engg. kumar.iitism@gmail.co +91- 9798682966


Kumar m

Mr. Kaushik Asst. Prof. Electrical Engg. kaushiksunnypaul@gmai +91- 7858017372


Paul l.com

Mr. Matta Mani Asst. Prof. Electrical Engg. Che.shankar@gmail.com +91- 9298200592
Sankar

Sanjay Kumar Asst. Prof. Chemical Engg sksanjay.chemical@gma +91- 9445168367


il.com

Debasish Asst. Prof. Metallurgical deb100dmt@gmail.com +91- 9903408856


Chatterjee Engg

Saurabh Jain Asst. Prof. Mining Engg sjjsr37@gmail.com +91- 9475386703

A Ranjith Asst. Prof. Computer ranjith.a265@gmail.com +91- 7981195876


Science

JagveerVerma Asst. Prof. ECE jagvirverma@rediffmail. +91- 9977500078


com

Facilities available for Start-up cell in the Institute:

i) SIRTDO ( Small Industry Research , Training and Development Organization)


ii) Centre of Excellence Lab established by SIEMENS

170
Functions of Startup CELL:
The basic objective of startup cell of B.I.T. Sindri will be to promote employment opportunity to
society. The objective can be obtained by following activities:
1. To organize Entrepreneurship Awareness Camps, Entrepreneurship Development
Programmes and Faculty Development Programmes in the institute and industry.
2. To develop and introduce curriculum on Entrepreneurship Development at various levels
including UG and PG level.
3. To conduct different types of test and survey for identifying entrepreneurial skill in
students and faculty.
4. To guide and assist prospective entrepreneurs on various aspects such as preparing
project reports, information on various technologies and providing them aid through our
students and alumni.
5. To organize guest lectures, audio video talks, Seminars, etc. for promotion and growth of
entrepreneurship skill.
6. To arrange visits for students and faculty to industries for prospective entrepreneurs.
7. To conduct skill development training programmes leading to self-employment through
our Centre of Excellence Lab established by SIEMENS.

Training Programmes Organized:

S. No Date Name of the Workshop / Seminar Resource Person

Motivation Talk delivered to the students Dr. B. S. Sahay,


about role of Entrepreneurship in Director IIM Raipur
1. March,2018 Engineering & ways to develop own Start-
ups

Entrepreneurship Awareness Camp:

171
Motivational Speech by Dr. B. S. Sahay, Director IIM Raipur.

9.7 Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities (10)


Games and Sports facilities

Physical facilities

Built-up Area
Sl.No Name of the Area Plinth Area
(sqmtr)

1) (A) Badminton Outdoor 14m x 7m

(B) Table Tennis Hall 15.5m x 6m

(C) Gymnasium Hall 9m x 6m

(D) Department Room 6m x 6m

(E) Store Room 6m x 6m

2) Playground consists of 400 mtrs Athletic Track , Volley 200m x 150m


Ball , Hand Ball , Football , Basketball , Kabaddi , Kho-
Kho , Long Jump , Short put , Javelin , Discuss throw and
Cricket Field.

172
List of Equipment
Sl.No List of Equipment in the Gymnasium

1 Squat Press

2 Multi Purpose Bench

3 Steel Dumbbell – 70 Kg

4 Bench Press

5 Leg Press

6 Seated Chest Press

7 Rowing Machine - 02

8 Tread Mill - 02

9 Dumbbells / Plate Rack - 04

10 16 stations Equipment Set - 04

No of Student’s Usage - Day Wise

Sl.No Name of the Facility Availability for No. of Student’s


Usage Usage

1 Volley Ball Courts 2 24

2 Basket Ball Court 1 24

3 Table Tennis Board 3 14

4 Badminton Court 2 20

5 Hand Ball Court 1 12

6 Kabaddi Court 2 40

7 Kho – Kho 1 36

8 400 metres Athletic Track 1 40

173
9 Shuttle Badminton ( in hostel ) 6 40

10 Gymnasium hall 2 100

Board Activities of the Department

 Coaching provided to the participating teams.


 Preparation of Play fields for the use of players from time to time.
 Conduct of Selection trials to pick up talented players for participation at Intercollege.
 Providing games and sports material for the regular practice.
 General fitness purpose gymnasium equipment i.e. 25 individual stations available for the
students.
 Calling quotations for the purchase of quality sports materials.
 Organizing practice matches for different events from time to time.
 Providing sports inform for the students for participation in tournaments.
 Conducting internal games and sports competitions for men and women students.
 Conducting games and sports for the staff of the college both teaching and nonteaching.
 Providing T.A, D.A and Sports Uniform to the College team players for participation.
Arts Club
Arts Club is one of the oldest Students Cultural Society at B.I.T. Sindri. It has a long rich
tradition of Art and Culture. It provides a platform to Bitians to exhibit their hidden talents.
Arts Club is quite popular in BIT due to its popular stage shows and cultural programs. It not
only helps in preserving our rich art and cultural heritage, but entertains BIT during the hard and
busy academic life.
It has mainly four sections:

1. Vocal Section
2. Instrumental Section
3. Dance Section
4. Drama Section

The students at Arts Club learn and practice throughout the year during their leisure period. It
gives them an opportunity to relieve as well as prepare for upcoming events.

174
The Arts Club is always appreciated by all dignitaries and audiences arriving in different cultural
programs. It gives an immense satisfaction of being associated with the rich Indian Culture along
with the modern technical education.

Patron: Dr. D.K.Singh, Director, B.I.T., Sindri


Professor-in-Charge: Prof. (Dr) Ghanshyam.
 BIT Cultural Society
BIT Cultural Society is one of its own kinds, which exclusively focus on the rich cultural
heritage of Jharkhand. It provides a platform to showcase the variety of cultural wealth that long
lived in Jharkhand.

175
CRITERION 10 Governance, Institutional Support and Financial 120
Resources

10. GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES


(120)

10.1. Organization, Governance and Transparency (40)

10.1.1. State the Vision and Mission of the Institute (5)


(Vision statement typically indicates aspirations and Mission statement states the broad
approach to achieve aspirations)

Vision of the Institution:

To provide valuable human resources for the industry and society through the excellence in
technical education and scientific research for the sustainable development.

Mission of the Institution:


 To offer the state-of-the-art undergraduate, post graduate and doctoral programs.
 To generate new knowledge by quality research.
 To undertake the collaborative projects with industries and society.
 To develop human intellectual capacity with its full potential.
 To solve the problems of society through innovation through technology.
10.1.2. Governing body, administrative setup, functions of various bodies, service rules,
procedures, recruitment and promotional policies (10)
List the governing, senate, and all other academic and administrative bodies; their memberships,
functions, and responsibilities; frequency of the meetings; and attendance therein, in a tabular
form. A few sample minutes of the meetings and action-taken reports should be annexed.

10.1.2.1 List of governing body


This is the apex governing body for the Institute duly constituted by the Secretary, Dept.
of Higher Technical Education and Skill Development Dept., Govt. of Jharkhand vide its letter
No. 374, Dated 03.5.2017 (Annexure). It consists of fourteen members. Its last meeting was held
at B.I.T. Sindri on 24.3.2018 and its next meeting is due on 30th June 2018.

176
 Appraisal regarding appointment of Contractual faculties through NPIU ( 73 ) & State
Govt. ( 13/20 )
 Establishment of industrial CoE labs in collaboration with Siemens Private India
Ltd. at B.I.T. Sindri.
 MoUs with
 TATA Steel Jamshedpur (for Research, Consultancy and Internship).
 CIMFR Dhanbad (for Research, Consultancy and Internship).
 SAIL R & D Center, Ranchi (for Research, Consultancy and Internship).
 University of Aarhus, Denmark (for teaching and research).
 IIT (ISM) Dhanbad (for academic collaboration to Promote Research and
Teaching).
 Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai (for Soft Skill training to
enhancement employability).
 Myperfectice. E. Pvt. Ltd (for soft skill Development, GATE, CAT and other
Aptitude test to enhance employability).

 Appraisal regarding renovation and new construction out of 175 crore sanctioned
by the State Govt.
 Approval on the issues like :
 Delegation of certain powers to the HOD’s/Sr. Administrative Office/Professor
In Charge Academics
 Action Plan of TEQIP – III
 Faculty Restructuring
 Staffs pay fixation
 Ph.D. registration
 Appointment of two supporting staff for TEQIP

10.1.2.2 Academic Section


This is the highest decision making body for academic affairs at B.I.T. Sindri. This is
headed by Director of the Institute and the Registrar/Prof. In Charge Academics.
 The Main function of this section is to formulate rules and regulations for the academic
affairs of the Institute, like curricula revision, unfair means cases, formation of academic
calendar, moderation of results, counseling and admission through JCECE.
 This section also takes care of PG & Research activities, including PG admission,
registration, regulation, Ph.D. registration etc.

177
This section consists of following Officers:
Sl. Nos Name of Officers Role & Remarks
Responsibility
1 Prof. Upendra Prasad In Charge, PG
2 Dr. Jitu Kujur In Charge, UG
3 Dr. JN Mahto Asst. In Charge, UG

4 Sri Anil Kumar Singh Section Officer

10.1.2.3 List all other Academic and Administrative bodies/ Centers.


Research Committee
Name of Centers Name Designation Phone No.
Robotic Center Dr.Ramjee Prasad Gupta, Asst. Professor-in- +91-9431288425
Prof. EE Charge
Nano Technology Cell Dr. Kunal Kumar, Asst. Prof. Professor-in- +91-9431912543
Chemistry Charge
Incubation and Dr. Amit Kumar Gupta, Asst. Professor-in- +91-9835785852
Entrepreneurship Cell Prof. Chemical Engg. Charge
Green Energy Cell Dr. Rajen Kumar Nayak, Asst. Professor-in- +91-9939709574
Prof. Mechanical Engg. Charge

Research and Development Committee


Name of Member Department Designation of Phone No.
Member
Prof. Sanjay Kumar Singh Prof., Mech. Engg. Convener +91-7070654808
Prof. Manoj Kumar Prof., Mech. Engg Member +91-9430374658
Dr. Rajen Kumar Nayak Asst. Prof., Mech. Member -
Engg.
Dr. Amar Prakash Sinha Associate Prof. Member -
ECE
Dr. Sagaram Hembrom Asst. Prof. Meta. Member -
Engg.

Institute Level Committee for Prevention of Sexual Harassment


Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Mrs. Rekha Jha Chairman +91-9334475980
Smt. SangeetaKumari Member
Smt. SalominaThithiyo Member
Smt. UshaJ ha Member
Smt. Neelam Kumari Member

178
Industry Institute Interaction Cell
Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Prof. S.C. Roy Chairman +91-835352391
Sri P.K. Sharma Member
Dr. Pankaj Kumar Member +919334774797
Dr. Imtiyaz Ahmad Member

U.P.S.C. Cell and G.A.T.E. Forum


Research Name Designation of Phone No.
Committee Member
U.P.S.C. Cell Prof. Manoj Kumar Professor-in-Charge +91-9430374658
G.A.T.E. Forum Dr. Imtiyaz Ahmad Professor-in-Charge

Remedial Class Cell


Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Dr. B. Jha Convener
Dr. Ujjwal Kumar Nayak Member +91-9835723160
Dr. Ajay Oraon Member +91-8579079171
Dr. Manoj Kumar Mishra Member +91-9430316658
Sri T.P. Singh Member

Campus Infrastructure Development Committee


Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Sri Shyam Kishore Kumar Convener
Sri Chitranraj Sharma Member +91-9430134006
Dr. P.K. Singh Member
Sri Manoj Kumar Singh Member +91-9431506944
Prof. D.K. Tanti Member +91-8292500311
Sri Nishikant Kishku Member
Sri A.G.P. Kujur Member +91-9471161624

Ground Water Table Mapping Committee


Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Dr. P.K. Singh Convener
Sri Chitranraj Sharma Member +91-9430134006

Water Supply, Sanitation and Waste Management Committee


Name of Member Designation of Member Phone No.
Dr.Ran Vijay Singh Chairman +91-9430829823
Sri P.K. Sharma Member
Dr. P.K. Singh Member
Sri Mahendra Kumar Bhagat Member +91-9934103164
Sri Shashi Minz Member +91-9430705812

179
List of Administrative Body
Office Office Bearer Phone No.
Senior Administrative Officer Prof. G. Kumar +91-9431123438
Administrative Officer Sri Shyam Kishore
Kumar
Chairman, Industries Institute Interaction Cell Prof. S.C. Roy +91-9835352391
Prof.-in-Charge, Continuing Education Cell Prof. G. Kumar +91-9431123438
Information Officer Prof.G. Kumar +91-9431123438
Prof-in-Charge, Academics (UG) Dr. Jitu Kujur +91-7250980546
Prof-in-Charge, Academics (PG) Prof. Upendra Prasad +91-7979892998
General Warden Prof. PankajRai +91-9430103417
Prof-in-Charge, Central Library Prof. PankajRai +91-9430103417
Prof.-in-Charge, Data Center & System Prof. A.G.P. Kujur +91-9471161624
Administrator
Prof.-in-Charge, Electric Substation Prof. D.K. Tanti +91-8292500311
Accounts Officer Sri. RajendraMurmu +91-9934536994
Stores Officer Dr. S.P. Mishra +91-9431169666
Purchase Officer Prof. Manoj Kumar +91-9431506944
Placement Officer Prof. Ghanshyam +91-7870023825
Professor-in-Charge, Canteen SriP.K. Sharma
Training Officer Prof. D.K. Tanti +91-8292500311

Placements Committee
Prof. Ghanshyam Training and Placement Officer
Sri Sunil Kumar Choudhary Training and Placement Officer-I
Sri Ajay Oraon Training and Placement Officer-II
Sri Rajeev Ranjan, Training and Placement Officer-III

Dr. Rajan Kumar Departmental Coordinator, T.P.O., Mechanical Engineering


Sri Shashi Minz Departmental Coordinator, T.P.O., Electrical Engineering
Sri Nishikant Kishku Departmental Coordinator, T.P.O., Civil Engineering
Dr. Imtiyaz Ahmad Departmental Coordinator, T.P.O., Electronics &
Communication Engineering
Sri Raghunandan Kumar Departmental Coordinator, Information Technology and
Computer Science and Engg.
Dr. SagaramHembrom Departmental Coordinator, Metallurgical Engineering
Dr. Rakesh Departmental Coordinator, Production Engineering
Dr. P.K. Singh Associate Professor, Geology Department
Dr. Amar Kumar Departmental Coordinator, Chemical Engineering

10.1.2.4 Service rules, procedures.

180
B.I.T. Sindri is a purely State Govt. Institution and is under the administrative/financial and
managerial control of Dept. of Higher Technical Education & Skill Development Department,
Govt. of Jharkhand. Our hierarchal set up is as given below:
Chief Minister, Govt. of Jharkhand

Minister, Deptt. of Higher Tech Ed. &


Skill Development, Govt. of Jharkhand

Secretary, Deptt. of Higher Tech Ed. &


Skill Development, Govt. of Jharkhand

Director, BIT Sindri cum Dean Faculty


of Engg.,

Prof. In Charge,
Heads of the Placement Officer
1. Academic
Departments Training Officer Chief Counselor &
2. Administration
3. Accounts Team of
3. Examination General Warden & Counselors
4. Purchase 23 Hostel Wardens &
5. Library Hostel Asst. Wardens
6. Store
7. Sports
8. Clubs & Societies
etc.
Supporting Staff
Lab Instructor
Lab Attendant Asst. TPO Hostel Darwan
Supporting Staff Asst. Training Officer
Supporting Staff

Fig.:- Hierarchal set up of B.I.T. Sindri

10.1.2.5 Recruitment procedure (Faculty)

B.I.T. Sindri is an institution with a global vision and a noble mission. People are our
strength & pride. Beside the pride, social recognition and joy to work at B.I.T. Sindri, it provides
an excellent opportunity to excel in your career. At B.I.T. Sindri we believe that our growth is
the derivative of the growth of each one of us. To achieve our vision of leadership through talent
development, we are always looking out for creative, talented, result oriented individuals who
are ambitious, love challenges and have a passion to excel in technical education career.

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All the regular faculty recruitments including Professors, Associate Professors, and
Assistant Professors at B.I.T. Sindri are made through Jharkhand Public Service Commission
(JPSC), Ranchi as per the guidelines of AICTE. Department of Higher Technical Education &
Skill Development, Govt. of Jharkhand sends the vacancy position to JPSC which makes the all
India advertisement and on the basis of number of applications received follows the recruitment
process through written test/interview. Recommendation of JPSC is sent to the Department and
then the Department after the consent of the concerned Minister, sends to the cabinet for
approval. After pproval from the Cabinet, final notification is made by the Department for
jo98ning of the concerned persons in the concerned Departments of the Institute.

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10.1.2.6 Recruitment procedure (Staff)
Recruitment of staff is done by the staff selection committee of the Govt. of Jharkhand as per the
criteria laid down by the Govt.
However, there is also the provision of recruitment under compensate ground after the death of the
working parents in the State Govt. Departments.

10.1.3. Decentralization in working and grievance redressal mechanism (10)


Decentralization of the power is clearly stated in the Fig. shown above.
Heads of the Departments take care of the follow of time table, routine process of sanctioning of
leave etc. makes recommendation for the purchase of equipment’s, books, stationeries with the
help of the faculties and staff of the Department.
Head of the Department also has the financial power of purchase of the item worth Rs. 50,000/-
and the faculties have the power to purchase the items upto Rs. 10,000/-.

Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance redressal cell including


 Anti-Ragging Committee
Consisting of General Warden and team of Hostel Superintendents and Asst. Hostel
Superintendents along with the representatives of Final Year students. List of full committee

183
is attached as Annexure.
 Sexual Harassment Committee.
For the generic indiscrimination and also for the safety and security & for providing
conducive environment to the working lady staff and girls staff, the instate has Sexual
Harassment Committee, which is attached as Annexure.
10.1.4. Delegation of financial powers (10)
Chairman BOG - More than 50 lac from the TEQIP fund
Director of the Institute - Between 5 – 50 lac from the TEQIP fund
Upto 10 lac for a unitary item from the State Govt.
fund
Principal Coordinator, TEQIP - Upto Rs. 5.00 Lac.
Heads of the Departments - Upto Rs. 50,000/-
Faculty Members - Upto Rs. 10,000/-
Prof. In Charge - As per the budgetary allocation
Placement In Charge - As per requirement
Sr. Administrative Officer - As per requirement

10.1.5. Transparency and availability of correct/unambiguous information in public


domain (5)
(Information on policies, rules, processes and dissemination of this information to stakeholders
are made available on the web site)

10.2. Budget Allocation, Utilization, and Public Accounting at Institute level (30)
Summary of current financial year’s budget and actual expenditure incurred (for the institution
exclusively) in the last three financial years is given below:

Total Income at Institute level: For CFY, CFYm1, CFYm2 &CFYm3

CFY: Current Financial Year, CFYm1 (Current Financial Year minus 1), CFYm2 (Current
Financial Year minus 2) and CFYm3 (Current Financial Year minus 3)

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For CFY

Total No. of students:


Total Income: Actual expenditure (till …):
31/03/2018

Fee Govt. Grant(s) Other Recurring Non- Special Expenditure per student
Sources including recurring Projects/Any
(specify) Salaries other, specify

3,88,17,06 43,29,40, NIL ------ 21,89,70,347/ 18,42,03,97 ------ 40,31,74,320/3114=1,29


4/- 500/- - 3/- 471/-

Table B.10.2a

For CFYm1
Total Income: Actual expenditure (till …): Total No. of
31/03/2015 students:

Fee Govt. Grant(s) Other Recurring Non- Special Expenditure per


Sources including recurring Projects/Any student
(specify) Salaries other, specify

1,68,17,143 26,58,0000 NIL IRG 192964594/- 51078165/- ------ 244042759/3078=7928


/- 0/- 6/-
3460483/-

Table B.10.2b

For CFYm2
Total Income: Actual expenditure (till …): Total No. of
31/03/2016 students:
Other
Fee Govt. Grant(s) Recurring Non- Special Expenditure per
Sourcs
including recurring Projects/Any student
(specify)
Salaries other, specify

1,6210340 26,463523 NIL IRG 185982760/- 71290398/- ------ 257273158/3024=8507


/- 6/- 7/-
3857035/-

Table B.10.2c

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For CFYm3

Total Income: Actual expenditure (till …): Total No. of


31/03/2016 students:

Fee Govt. Grant(s) Other Recurring Non- Special Expenditure per


Sources including recurring Projects/Any student
(specify) Salaries other, specify

1,5206442 28533135 NIL IRG 216546144/- 40022099/- ------ 256568243/3024=848


/- 9/- 44/-
1244403/-

Table B.10.2d

Actual Actual Actual Actual


Items Budgeted expenses Budgeted expenses Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Expenses
in CFY in CFY in CFYm1 in CFY in CFYm2 in CFYm2 in CFYm3 in CFYm3
2017-18 (till 2016-17 m131/3/17 2015-16 31/3/16 2014-15 31/3/15
31/3/18…)

30865500/ 30865500/- 21579000/- 21578348/-/ 30776000/- 30776000/- --- -----


Infrastructure -
Built-Up
21000000/ 20928305/- 99,00,000/- 9897732/- 10800000/- 9991177/- 10700000/- 10656638/-
Library -
70600000/ 53175779/- 17772000/- 6216438/- 6600000/- 6506857/- 15500000/- 15046637/-
Laboratory -
equipment

67721000 66654430/- 7200000/- 2753051/- 14900000/- 11948320/- 8700000/- 8686842/-


Laboratory
consumables
20053800 200371701/ 180764000/ 180629241/ 168261000/ 167923546/ 169277000/ 157708444/
Teaching and 0/- - - - - - - -
non-teaching
staff salary

350000/- 20813/- 250000/- nil 501000/- 173380/- ------ -------


Maintenance
and spares
------ ------ ---------- --------- ------- ---------- ------ --------
R&D
2125000/- 1985773/- 100000/- 73936/- 100000/- 37871/- 1020000/- 37003/-
Training and
Travel
--- 29172019/- 28460000/- 22894013/- 32697236/- 29916007/- 80134359/- 64432679/-
Miscellaneous
expenses *

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-- ---
Others,
specify

43294050 403174320/ 265800000/ 244042759/ 264635236/ 257273158/ 285331359/ 256568243/


Total 0/- - - - - - - -

TableB.10.2b

10.2.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (10)

Since the institution is in developing phase ,college management has made it clear that
fund should not be a hindrance factor for the healthy rate of growth .Adequate budget is
allocated and expenditure is monitored .In no circumstances ,teaching learning process is made
to suffer because of fund shortage.

10.2.2 Utilization of allocated funds (15) Fund utilization can best be understood by
the surrender budget. Each year after the close of the Financial Year on 31st March, we prepare
the surrender list and send to the Govt. Last 3 years surrender budget is attached herewith.

Sr. Financial Funds Allocated Funds utilized % of


Year utilization
2017-18 Recurring 22,00,75,000/- 21,89,70,347/- 99.50

Non- Recurring 21,28,65,500/- 18,42,03,973/- 86.54

2016-17 Recurring 19,44,21,000/- 19,29,64,594/- 99.25

Non- Recurring 7,13,79,000/- 5,10,78,165/- 71.56

2015-16 Recurring 18,80,84,000/- 18,59,82,760/- 98.88

Non- Recurring 7,65,51,236/- 7,12,90,398/- 93.13

2014-15 Recurring 24,22,31,359/- 21,65,46,144/- 89.40

Non- Recurring 4,31,00,000/- 4,00,22,099/- 92.86

10.2.3. Availability of the audited statements on the institute’s website (5)

Audited statements are available at centralized level.

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10.3. Program Specific Budget Allocation, Utilization (30)

Total Budget at program level: For CFY, CFYm1, CFYm2 &CFYm3


CFY: Current Financial Year, CFYm1 (CurrentFinancialYearminus1), CFYm2 (Current
Financial Year minus 2) and CFYm3 (Current Financial Year minus 3).

B. Tech in Production Engineering


For CFY
Total Budget: Actual expenditure (till…): Total No. of
students:

Non recurring Recurring Non Recurring Recurring Expenditure per


student

NA

For CFYm1
Total Budget: Actual expenditure (till…): Total No. of
students:

Non recurring Recurring Non Recurring Recurring Expenditure per


student

NA

For CFYm2
Total Budget: Actual expenditure (till…): Total No. of
students:

Non recurring Recurring Non Recurring Recurring Expenditure per


student

NA

For CFYm3
Total Budget: Actual expenditure (till…): Total No. of
students:
Non recurring Recurring Non Recurring Recurring Expenditure per
student

NA

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TableB.10.
3a
Note: Similar tables are to be prepared for CFYm1, CFYm2 &CFYm3.

Actual
Budgeted expenses in Budgeted Actual Budgeted Actual Budgeted Actual
Items in CFY CFY(till inCFYm1 Expenses inCFYm2 Expenses inCFYm3 Expenses
…) inCFYm1 inCFYm2 inCFYm3

Laboratory 44,16,252 44,16,252 37,700 37,700 0 0 0 0


equipment

Software 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Laboratory 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
consumable

Maintenance and 12,401 12,401 12,401 12,401 12,401 12,401 12,401 12,401
spares

R& D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Training and 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000

Travel
Miscellaneous 2,00,000 + 2,00,000 + 0 0 0 0 2,00,000 + 2,00,000 +
expenses * fire fire fire fire
extinguisher extinguishers extinguishe extinguishe
s rs rs
46,33,653 46,33,653 55,101 55,101 17,401 17,401 2,17,401 2,17,401
Total

TableB.10.3b

* Items to be mentioned.

10.3.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (10)


(Program needs to justify that the budget allocated over the assessment years was adequate for
the program)
Major part of the allocation is for the salary. However, the State Govt. takes full care of the
requirement of the Institute. Institute makes demand from the e-Govt. under the Plan & Non
Plan Heads and the Govt. is kind enough to release the allocation after proper scrutiny.
Recently Govt. sanctioned Rs. 175 crore for the new constructions and also for the renovation
of all buildings including, academic, administrative & residential.

189
Govt. has also sanctioned several crore for establishing the Centre of Excellence in the form of
Siemens Lab in the Institute.
10.3.2. Utilization of allocated funds (20)
(Program needs to state how the budget was utilized during the last three assessment years)
Fund utilization can best be understood by the surrender budget. Each year after the close of the
Financial Year on 31st March, we prepare the surrender list and send to the Govt. Last 3 years
surrender budget is attached herewith.
10.4. Library and Internet (20)

(Indicate whether zero deficiency report was received by the Institution for all the assessment
years. Effective availability/purchase records and utilization of facilities/equipment etc. to be
documented and demonstrated)
10.4.1. Quality of learning resources (hard/soft) (10)
 Relevance of available learning resources including e-resources
 Accessibility to students
 Support to students for self-learning activities
10.4.1.1 Titles and volumes per title (4)
Number Of New Editions Number Of New Volumes
Year Number Of New Titles Added
Added Added
CFYm2 1500 -- 6000
CFYm1 2000 -- 7000
CFY 4000 -- 10000

10.4.1.2 Scholarly journal subscription are available.


Details CFY CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3
Hard and soft Springer, IET, ASME Springer, MGH, IET,
Science -- --
copy and ASCW ASME and ASCW
Engg. And Springer, IET, ASME Springer, MGH, IET,
As soft copy -- --
Tech. and ASCW ASME and ASCW

10.4.1.3 Digital Library facilities are also available. More than 250 e-books, an exclusive
server, internet, fantastic space room for sitting are available.
10.4.1.4 Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals

Expenditure (Indian Rupees)


Year
Book Magazines/journals (for hard copy subscription)
CFYm2 8800000 1000000
CFYm1 8899421 9983110
CFY 19880000 1080594

10.4.2. Internet (10)


 Name of the Internet provider: Rail wire and BSNL
 Available bandwidth: 100 Mbps and 34 Mbps

190
 Wi-Fi availability: No
 Internet access in labs, class rooms, library and offices of all Departments: Yes
 Security arrangements: Yes (anti-virus) Kaspersky endpoint security (3 years) Renew for
next three years.

Declaration

I undertake that, the institution is well aware about the provisions in the NBA’s accreditation
manual concerned for this application, rules, regulations, notifications and NBA expert visit
guidelines in force as on date and the institute shall fully abide by them.

It is submitted that information provided in this Self-Assessment Report is factually correct. I


understand and agree that an appropriate disciplinary action against the Institute will be
initiated by the NBA, in case any false statement/information is observed during pre-visit,
visit, post visit and subsequent to grant of accreditation.

Date: Signature & Name

Place: Head of the Institution with seal

191