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FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY FEMA Manual 9620.

1 / October 1990

NATIONAL SHELTER
SURVEY INSTRUCTIONS
NATIONAL FACILITY SURVEY
RECEPTION AND CARE SURVEY
Date Number
MANUAL August 27, 1991 9620.1, Chg 1 SL

National Shelter Survey Instructions


1. Purpose. This change transmits four new pages to FEMA
Manual 9620.1, National Shelter survey Instructions, dated
October 1990. The new pages are provided to correct original
pages.
2. Action Required. Holders of FEMA Manual 9620.1 will make the
following changes and file this transmittal in front of FEMA
Manual 9620.1 for reference purposes.
Page Changes:
Remove Insert
Page 8-17 Page 8-17
Page 8-24 Page 8-24
Page 8-28 Page 8-28
Page 10-6 Page 10-6
3. Asterisks. New or revised material appearing on change
pages is indicated by asterisks immedia ly opposite new or
revised material.

G c. Peterson
Associate Director
state and Local Programs
and Support

Distribution:
B(HqDivChiefs)
F(FldOivChiefs)
FEDERAL EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY

Date Number
MANUAL October 24, 1990 9620 .1 SL

National Shelter Survey

Foreword

This manual provides guidance for conducting surveys and analyses associated
with the National Shelter Survey. Specific information is provided for
fallout shelter analysis, determining relative fire vulnerability, determining
relative blast protection, natural ventilation analysis, and congregate-care
survey and analysis.

Adherence to the survey and analysis procedures presented in this manual will
promote the uniformity and effectiveness of th data gathering, analysis, and
reporting process.

Associate Director
State and Local Programs
and Support Directorate

Distribution: B(HqDivChiefs)
F(FldDivChiefs)
October 24,1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Contents

Foreword
Contents
Page Paragraph

Chapter 1 - General Information

Purpose 1-1 1-1


Applicability and Scope 1-1 1-2
Authority 1-1 1-3
References 1-1 1-4
Policy 1-1 1-5
Responsibilities 1-2 1-6
Definitions 1-3 1-7
Reporting Requirements 1-3 1-8
Forms Prescribed 1-4 1-9

Chapter 2 - Technical Requirements

General 2-1 2-1


Survey and Analyses Locations 2-1 2-2
The Use of Data Collection, Evaluation, and
Reporting Forms 2-3 2-3
Fallout Shelter Spaces 2-4 2-4
Basements 2-4 2-5
Key Plan Sketch 2-4 2-6
Processing Data 2-5 2-7
Base Maps 2-5 2-8
Standard Location (SL) 2-5 2-9
Coordinates 2-5 2-10
Survey of Military Installations (MI) 2-6 2-11
Sign Posting and Maintenance 2-6 2-12
Hospitals 2-6 2-13
Emergency Operating Center (EOG) 2-6 2-14
Mines and Caves 2-7 2-15
Quality Control 2-7 2-16
Liaison with Local Emergency Management Officials 2-8 2-17
Data Submittal 2-8 2-18
Support Data Retention 2-9 2-19

Chapter 3 - Estimating and Analyzing Shelter Yield (EASY II)

General 3-1 3-1


Principles of Shielding 3-1 3-2
General Instructions for FEMA Form 85-6 3-1 3-3
EASY II Solution Examples 3-3 3-4
Area Factors 3-18 3-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24,1990

Chapter 4 - Calculating Fallout and Relative Blast Protection Spaces


(
General 4-1 4-1
Computing Fallout Shelter Spaces 4-1 4-2
Relative Blast Protection Spaces 4- 7 4-3

Chapter 5 - Natural Ventilation Analysis Procedures

General 5-1 5-1


Natural Ventilation Criteria 5-1 5-2
Natural Ventilation Procedures 5-1 5-3
Shelter Ventilation Estimator Instructions 5-2 5-4
Single Opening 5-6 5-5
Two or More Openings 5-6 5-6
Apertures in Window Wells and Areaways 5-9 5-7
Reporting Natural Ventilation Shelter Spaces 5-12 5-8

Chapter 6 - Determining Relative Blast Protection

General 6-1 6-1


Instructions for Completing FEMA Form 85-7 Relative
Blast Protection 6-1 6-2

Chapter 7 - Determining Relative Fire Vulnerability

General 7-1 7-1


Instructions for Completing the Relative Fire
Vulnerability Survey (Reverse side of FEMA (
Form 85-7) 7-2 7-2
Rating 7-5 7-3

Chapter 8 - National Facility Survey and Reception and Care Survey Data Input
Form

General 8-1 8-1


Instructions for Recording Information on
FEMA Form 85-5 8-1 8-2

Chapter 9 - Instructions For The Delete Facility Record Form

General 9-1 9-1


Restrictions 9-1 9-2
Instructions for Completing FEMA Form 85-36 9-1 9-3

Chapter 10 - Instructions For the NFS-RAC Data Base Correction Form

General 10-1 10-1


Instructions for Completing FEMA Form 85-28 10-1 10-2
October 24,1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 11 - Instructions For The National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet

General 11-1 11-1


Instructions for Completing FEMA Form 85-49 11-1 11-2
Summaries Required on FEMA Form 85-49 11-3 11-3

Chapter 12 - Resubmittals

General 12-1 12-1


Work Unit Numbers 12-1 12-2
Packing Sheets for Resubmittals 12-1 12-3

Chapter 13 - National Fallout Shelter Technical Criteria

General 13-1 13-1


Technical Criteria 13-1 13-2

Appendixes

A - Floor Area Usability Factors


B - Zonal Ventilation Requirements by County
C - Shelter Ventilation Estimator
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.l

Chapter 1
( General Information

1-1. Purpose. This manual provides the Federal Emergency Management


Agency's (FEMA's) policy and procedures for conducting National Facility
Survey (NFS) and Reception and Care (RAC) Surveys.

1-2. Applicability and Scope. The provisions of this manual are applicable
to all organizational elements with assigned responsibilities for performing
shelter surveys for the purpose of updating and maintaining the National
Shelter Survey (NSS) master file which contains the NFS/RAC.

1-3. Authority. Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended.

1-4. References.

a. FEMA Manual 1520.9, Autocheck Survey Information System (ASIS)


Personal Computer Manager System.

b. Civil Preparedness Guide (CPG) 1-38, Federal Emergency Management


Agency Guide to Comprehensive Cooperative Agreement.

c. CPG 1-3, CCA General Program Guidelines.

d. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons, 1977, Department of Defense and


Department of Energy.

e. Nuclear Attack Planning Base - 1990 (NAPB-90), National Aim Point


List, January 1990.

f. FEMA Technical Report (TR)-62, Increasing Blast and Fire Resistance


in Buildings.

g. FEMA 125-133, Attack Environment Manuals, Chapters 1-9.

h. FEMA TR-20, Volume 4, Protective Construction, Nuclear Blast


Resistant Design.

i. FEMA 147, Development of Wall Upgrade Procedures for Shelters in


Host Area Buildings.

j. FEMA TR-87, Standards for Fallout Shelters.

k. FEMA TR-52, Nuclear Radiation Shielding.

1. FEMA TR-55, Shelter Analysis for Nuclear Defense (SAND).

m. FEMA TR-20, Volume 1, Shelter Design and Analysis.

n. FEMA TR-68, Mass Thickness Manual for Walls, Floors, and Roofs.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

1-5. Policy. It is FEMA's policy to conduct survey activities that support (


attack related civil defense preparedness planning. Survey priority is
established by FEMA region and State and local emergency management officials.

1-6. Responsibilities.

a . The Director. FEMA, is responsible for developing and coordinating


civil defense programs to enhance Federal, State, local, and private sector
capabilities for national security emergency crisis management, population
protection, and recovery in the event of an attack on the United States.

b. The Associate Director, State and Local Programs and Support


Directorate (SLPSD), is responsible for assisting the Director, FEMA, in
developing and coordinating civil defense programs for crisis management and
population protection.

c . The Regional Directors and Heads of Field Establishments are


responsible for the following:

(1) Ensuring implementation of the NFS and RAC Survey Programs


conform to the guidelines established;

(2) Serving as the central point of contact for all facility survey
activities within the States under their jurisdiction;

(3) Utilizing directives issued by headquarters to the maximum


extent practical, and supplementing by local issuances (as needed); and

(4) Assisting and establishing survey priority in cooperation with


FEMA headquarters, State, and local emergency management officials.

d. The Assistant Associate Director, Office of Civil Defense, SLPSD, is


responsible for the following:

(1) Developing plans and procedures for implementing the NSS


Program; and

(2) Assisting and establishing survey priority in cooperation with


FEMA region, State, and local emergency management officials.

e. The Chief. Emergency Management Systems Support Division, SLPSD, is


responsible for the following:

(1) Developing technical and analytical procedures in support of


the NSS Program;

(2) Developing procedures for reporting survey data to the NSS


inventory; and

(3) Establishing and monitoring quality control procedures for the


NSS Program.

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October 24, 1990 FE:t-'f.A Manual 9620. 1

( f. The States are responsible for the following:

(1) Ensuring implementation of the NSS program in accordance with


the Comprehensive Cooperative Agreement (CCA); and

· (2) Assisting and establishing survey priority in cooperation with


FEMA region and local.emergency management officials.

1-7. Definitions. For purposes of this manual, the following terms are
defined:

a. NFS Program. A program to produce architectural/engineering


surveys of buildings to indicate their suitability for population protection
against the effects of nuclear attack.

b. RAC Survey Program. A program to produce architectural/engineering


surveys of buildings to identify their suitability for reception and care
(temporary lodging) from the effects of natural and technological disasters
including nuclear attack, and their suitability for upgrading to improve
fallout protection. The RAC surveys are performed in areas where the blast
overpressure is anticipated to be less than 2 pounds per square inch (psi).

c. Natural Hazard Vulnerability (NHV)_ Survey Program. Survey to


evaluate a building's relative vulnerability to natural hazards, e.g.,
earthquake, wind, tornado, and flood.

1-8. Reporting Requirements.

a. The Office of Management and Budget (0MB) has approved FEMA's use of
the National Shelter Program collection of information to obtain and analyze
information to identify buildings that are suitable for population protection
against the effects of a nuclear attack and reception and care from the
effects of a natural or technological disaster. The forms used for data
collection purposes and their estimated public reporting burden are listed
below, and have been assigned 0MB control number 3067-0154.

(1) FEMA Form 85-5, National Facility Survey and Reception and Care
Data Input Form, 1 hour;

(2) FEMA Form 85-6, EASY II Graphical Solution Form, 20 minutes;

(3) FEMA Form 85-7, Direct Effects Data Collection Form, 10


minutes;

(4) FEMA Form 85-28, Data Base Correction Form, 10 minutes;

(5) FEMA Form 85-36, Delete Facility Record Form, 10 minutes; and

(6) FEMA Form 85-49, National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet, 10


minutes.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

b. The estimated public reporting burden includes the time to review


(
instructions, search existing data sources, gather and maintain the data
needed, and complete and review each form. Send comments regarding this
burden estimate or any aspect of the collection, including suggestions for
reducing the burden, to Information Collection Management, Federal Emergency
Management Agency, 500 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472; and to the Office
of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget,
(Paperwork Project 3067-0154), Washington, DC 20503.

1-9. Forms Prescribed. This manual prescribes the use of the following forms
which may be obtained from the Printing and Publication Division, Office of
Administrative Support (OAS), using FEMA Form 60-8, Requisition for
Publications and Blank Forms:

a. FEMA Form 85-5, National Facility Survey and Reception and Care
Survey (Data Input Form);

b. FEMA Form 85-6, EASY II Graphical Solution Form;

C. FEMA Form 85-7, Direct Effects Data Collection Form;

d. FEMA Form 85-28, NFS-RAC Data Base Correction Form;

e. FEMA Form 85-36, Delete Facility Record; and

f. FEMA Form 85-49, National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet. (

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October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Chapter 2
(
Technical Requirements

2-1. General. This chapter provides general instructions and procedures for
the NFS and RAC surveys.

2-2. Survey and Analyses Locations.

a. Surveys and analyses are conducted either in high nuclear-hazard


areas or RAC areas, as identified in FEMA publication Nuclear Attack Planning
Base - 1990 (NAPB-90), National Aim Point List, January 1990. The National
Aim Point List presents an estimate of the potential physical effects of a
nuclear attack on the United States in terms of the degree of the potential
risk. Generally, areas where the blast overpressure is anticipated to be at
least 2 psi are considered to be high nuclear-hazard areas. All other areas
are treated as RAC areas.

(1) Buildings not in the National Shelter Survey (NSS) Inventory.


The following surveys and analyses are performed for buildings which are not
documented in the NSS inventory:

(a) High Nuclear-Hazard Areas.

(i) Fallout Protection Analysis. Buildings that appear


to meet minimum fallout protection requirements shall be analyzed using the
FEMA Estimating and analyzing shelter yield (EASY II) method of analysis in
order to determine the fallout protection factor (PF) category and the number
of shelter spaces for each story in the building. The results of the EASY II
analysis are reported on FEMA Form 85-5, for each building that meets the
fallout protection minimum requirements.

(ii) Natural Ventilation Analysis. The natural


ve~tilation analysis procedure is used to determine the number of fallout
shelter spaces the available natural ventilation will support in basements and
first stories with limited apertures.

(iii) Relative Blast Protection Analysis. The relative


blast protection analysis is performed on a building selected for survey
provided the building has a basement that is completely below the ground.
Basements with 1 foot or less exposure are considered as completely below
ground basements for the relative blast protection analysis. See
subparagraph 3-2a for the basic basement definition to be applied to the basic
fallout shelter survey.

~- The number of relative blast protection spaces


is based on the net area in the basement without regard to natural
ventilation.

Q. Analysis results are reported on FEMA


Form 85-5.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24,1990

(iv) Relative Fire Vulnerability Analysis. The relative


fire vulnerability survey is performed on all buildings selected for survey (
provided the building has a basement that is completely below the ground, and
the building has also been selected for the relative blast protection
analysis.

~- Basements with 1 foot or less exposure are


considered as completely below ground basements.

Q. Analysis results will be reported on FEMA


Form 85-5.

(v) Hazardous Buildings. Buildings which are


dilapidated, structurally unsafe, or contain an abundance of potentially
hazardous supplies or equipment which cannot be moved are not surveyed .

(vi) Private Buildings. Residences, farm buildings, and


grain elevators are not surveyed.

(b) Reception and Care Areas. Unless otherwise directed by


the Engineering and Survey Branch, Emergency Management Systems Support
Division, SLPSD, all buildings containing a minimum of 400 square feet of
usable space are analyzed for congregate care inventory. Survey results are
recorded in Section C, FEMA Form 85-5, and submitted for processing.

(i) Surveys will also be performed for buildings


meeting minimum fallout requirements including fallout protection, natural
ventilation, and congregate care. (
(ii) Analysis results are recorded in Sections Band C
on FEMA Form 85-5 and submitted for processing.

(iii) Authorization by the Engineering and Survey Branch,


Emergency Management Systems Support Division, SLPSD, is required if RAC
surveys are to be conducted in high nuclear-hazard areas. Only mass reception
and care type facilities for which the NFS survey (section B, FEMA Form 85-5)
has been performed will be considered for authorization.

~- Hazardous Buildings. Buildings which are


dilapidated, structurally unsafe, or contain an abundance of potentially
hazardous supplies or equipment which cannot be moved will not be surveyed.

Q. Private Buildings. Residences, farm buildings,


and grain elevators are not surveyed.

(2) Buildings Already in the NSS Inventory.

(a) Buildings surveyed for the purpose of updating existing


data in the NSS inventory shall be subject to criteria established for
buildings which are not already in the inventory.

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October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(b) A specific survey and analysis is not required if the


( results presently in the inventory are correct.

(c) When a building is selected for updating , its entire data


file should be reviewed to ensure compliance with current survey policy.

2-3. The Use of Data, Collection, Evaluation, and Reporting Forms . The
following forms are used for survey and analysis and may be obtained as li s t e d
in paragraph 1-9:

a. FEMA Form 85-6, EASY II Graphical Solution Form.

(1) This form is utilized to compute the PF category by analyzing


each story in each structure surveyed. One or more forms may be required for
each structure and, with proper control, several stories may be analyzed on
each form.

(2) In high-rise buildings, separate PF category computations are


not required on every ~tory provided the PF categories and spaces can be
assumed based on PF category bracketing techniques .

(3) The results of the analysis must be recorded for all the
stories in the building meeting the PF criteria.

b. FEMA Form 85-7, Direct Effects Data Collection Form. This form is
utilized to analyze buildings with fully buried basements in high nuclear-
hazard areas to determine their relative fire and blast vulnerability.

c. Natural Ventilation Analysis.

(1) This analysis is performed in all basements and first stories


with limited apertures, using the FEMA natural ventilation analysis
procedures.

(2) All survey work is conducted on the basis that commercial power
is not available.

(3) Shelter capacity, in basements or first-story areas, is


adjusted to reflect the power-off concept. However, only structures which are
being surveyed or updated, in current priority areas, are adjusted at this
time. Remaining facilities are adjusted as the respective areas are updated,
without revisits solely for this purpose.

(4) The results of this analysis are reported in section B, FEMA


Form 85-5.

d. NFS and RAC Survey.

(1) Section A identifies the facility data submitted, together with


type of data reduction and computer processing required.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24,1990

(2) If the building being surveyed is in a high nuclear-hazard area


and only NFS-type data are being reported, sections A and B must be completed, (
and section C is to remain blank.

(3) If the building is located in an RAC area, and only RAC-type


data are being reported, sections A and Care completed, and section B left
blank.

(4) Sections A, B, and Care completed when NFS and RAC type data
are being reported.

(5) Section C is used to report the results of the congregate care


housing survey, and information relative to the feasibility of modifying a
structure to improve the PF category.

2-4. Fallout Shelter Spaces.

a. Fallout shelter spaces are reported, in section B, FEMA Form 85-5,


on the basis of area, natural ventilation, or auxiliary power. (See
chapter 8, page 8-23, figure 8-16.)

b. When calculating fallout shelter spaces, commercial power is assumed


to be off whether it is produced by oil, gas, coal, or water.

c. Area factors on FEMA Form 85-6 are used in calculating fallout


shelter spaces in aboveground locations.

2-5. Basements. (
a. All buildings with fully buried basements are surveyed if the
minimum PF category at the midpoint is PF category O or better, since the
center PF category, in a fully buried basement, is normally lower than at the
basement periphery. If no fully buried basement exists then PF category 1 is
the minimum fallout protection requirement.

b. Basements with one foot or less exposure are considered as fully


buried basements.

c. All belowground spaces are computed under N ventilation procedures,


except when standby power and 7-day fuel supply exist to satisfy emergency
requirements, including ventilation equipment.

d. Area factors on FEMA Form 85-6 do not apply to basement locations.

2-6. Key Plan Sketch.

a. Formal shelter location sketches are not made.

b. A simple thumbnail sketch of the overall building plan should be


drawn in the key plan/remarks section of the data input form for every
building surveyed.

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October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

c. The sketch should include a north arrow, the address street, and the
( nearest cross street.

2-7. Processing Data.

a. In areas where the States are conducting the surveys under the
CCA's, State offices should maintain survey and other data records, including
delete and identification change actions which do not require field visits.

b. Regional offices maintain these data when the surveys are performed
by regional personnel.

2-8. Base Maps.

a. Base maps showing all NFS facilities surveyed are prepared.

b. If the region or State has an alternate method, in lieu of base


maps, this method may be used.

c. Once the survey for the selected areas has been completed and the
facilities located on these maps, copies are to be made and furnished as
required to the local emergency management official.

d. Reproducible maps are not annotated.

2-9. Standard Location (SL).

a. The SL identification system as described in the National Location


Code (NLC) 1962, prepared by the Bureau of the Census, is applicable for
survey purposes.

b. The SL boundaries, as defined in the NLC, are to be used for all


survey work, irrespective of city boundary or other changes.

2-10. Coordinates.

a. In most areas, United States Geological Survey quadrangle


topographic sheets (7-1/2-and 15-minute series) are available and, in other
areas, aeronautical charts may be used.

b. In areas where 7-1/2 minute sheets are used, readings of 1 second


are possible and should be recorded for latitude and longitude.

c. The readings are to be taken from the shelter location plotted on


the maps to an accuracy of plus or minus 100 feet on the center line of the
building.

d. Each facility surveyed will have a unique latitude and longitude


entry.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

2-11. Survey of Military Installations (MI).


(
a. The regional offices should be responsive to requests for survey of
previously unsurveyed military buildings and/or updating of existing
structures because of changes in survey criteria.

b. The MI commanders should stipulate they do not have the capability


to analyze their own structures.

c. Survey requests from MI commanders should be accommodated within


existing FEMA regional capabilities.

d. Because of the requirement for specific PF values and shelter area


assignment to meet military survival programs, the FEMA SAND analysis system
is utilized for survey purposes, in lieu of the EASY II method.

2-12. Sign Posting and Maintenance.

a. Signs will not be posted by regional personnel.

b. The presence of shelter signs observed during the field visit


should be reported on FEMA Form 85-5.

2-13. Hospitals.

a. The minimum requirements for shelter survey as shown in chapter 13,


National Fallout Shelter Criteria, are to be observed.
(
b. The standards published in FEMA TR-87 are used for planning and not
applied to the survey program.

2-14. Emergency Operating Center (EOC). An EOG is defined for survey


purposes as a building which has been designated to function as an EOG by the
local emergency management official. The building does not have to conform to
FEMA's standards for EOC's.

a. All existing criteria for facility surveys apply to EOG surveys,


except that EOC's located in high nuclear-hazard areas are surveyed regardless
of the level of fallout protection calculated.

b. EOC's with qualifying fallout shelter spaces are assigned Oas the
first digit of the facility number.

c. EOC's without qualifying fallout shelter spaces are assigned X as


the first digit of the facility number.

d. The relative blast protection and the reiative fire vulnerability


surveys are performed on an EOC only if the EOC is "iocated in a high nuclear-
hazard area and has fallout space in the basement.

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October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

e. The letters EOC must be included in the name of the facility ,


( section A, item 12, FEMA Form 85-5.

2-15. Mines and Caves.

a. Due to requirements for extensive shelter space in some areas,


mines and caves in high nuclear-hazard and reception and care areas are to be
examined .

b. Mines and caves that meet minimum technical criteria (see


chapter 13) are incorporated into the NFS and RAC inventories .

c. Shelter space is reported on the basis of 10 sq ft per person for


all usable areas.

d. It is assumed that emergency power is provided for emergency


ventilation equipment and lighting.

2-16. Quality Control.

a. Fallout Shelter Analysts. Survey work accomplished by summer-


hires, college students, technicians, or State contracts are reviewed by an
experienced certified Fallout Shelter Analyst prior to submission of the data
to the data processing center. Fallout Shelter Analysts should ensure the
following data are correct:

(1) Identification coding appears to be correct;

(2) Structures have been properly analyzed and the correlation


between the various segments of the survey appear normal;

(3) Data on overhead and wall mass, aperture, and partitions are
consistent;

(4) All data are capable of being read and deciphered. Letters I,
~. ~. and e are properly marked, and unapproved symbols are not used in data
fields; and

(5) All items are filled and zeroes entered in the rightmost block
of data fields which do not carry information, except in those areas where
blanks are permitted.

b. Buildings Updated. Existing files should be reviewed for all


buildings to be updated prior to initiating a new survey to determine the
following:

(1) The accuracy of previous surveys;

(2) The availability of field notes; and

(3) The specific surveys and analyses to be updated.

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FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(
2-17. Liaison with Local Emergency Management Officials.

a. Operational guidance is received from the FEMA Regional Directors,


and coordination accomplished with State and local emergency management
officials, in order to ensure the success of the survey program.

b. The survey office must contact the appropriate officials prior to


beginning survey operations in any area. Based on local agreement, local
emergency management officials are furnished survey results as soon as FEMA
Form 85-5 has been readied for submission to the data processing center.

2-18. Data Submittal. The results of the field surveys are submitted for
processing by the hardcopy direct mail route or the Autocheck Survey
Information System (ASIS) route.

a. Hardcopy Direct Mail.

(1) All data is submitted by the survey office through FEMA


regional offices for processing.

(2) Data accepted by the processing center is reduced to magnetic


tape and incorporated into the data base.

(3) Data forms are retained by the processing center until their
contents have been added to the master file.
(
(4) Minor corrections may be made by the data processing personnel
and an annotated copy returned to the region.

(5) Facility documents which cannot be processed are returned to


the action office.

b. ASIS.

(1) Data submitted through ASIS must be verified by the region


prior to being submitted for evaluation by the FEMA edit program.

(2) Failed records are returned to the action office in a format


similar to the hardcopy direct mail route with appropriate annotations.

(3) Data submitted must be prepared using the current FEMA-


developed ASIS program. Alternates will not be accepted.

(4) States should notify the region when a file has been created
and is waiting for verification.

(5) Data should be backed up prior to transmittal.

(6) Hardcopy of all supporting data is maintained by the State.

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(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( c. Distribution of FEMA Form 85-5. When FEMA Form 85-5 is used to


submit survey data for processing, distribution of copies is as follows:

(1) Original to data processing (through regional office);

(2) First copy to regional office;

(3) Second copy to local Emergency Management Official, if


required; and

(4) Third copy to State Emergency Management Director, if


required.

2-19. Support Data Retention. The following procedures are used for data
retention:

a. All support data developed for the NFS-RAC surveys are retained by
the office responsible for the survey.

b. Support data may be reduced to microfiche and the original stored .

c. Support data may not be destroyed.

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October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Chapter 3
( Estimating and Analyzing Shelter Yield (EASY II)

3-1. General. The EASY II method of determining the radiation protection is


achieved by use of FEMA Form 85-6 (figure 3-1). The EASY II approach is
advantageous to the surveyor in that the form can be completed in the field
and the PF category entered on FEMA Form 85-5 . Additionally, FEMA Form 85 - 6
is retained as a permanent record of the PF category evaluation.

3-2 . Principles of Shielding. The basic principles of geometry and barrier ,


as a means of reducing radiation, are used in the FEMA Form 85-6 PF
computation. The form employs a technique which provides the analyst with a
qualitative PF category in fully buried basements, partially belowground
basements, and aboveground stories. The PF category solution determined in
section 8 is the answer obtained as the surveyor follows through each
appropriate section of the form. The output is not a specific PF value, but a
PF category or range of PF values.

a . A basement , for EASY II analysis purposes, is defined as the highest


story where all walls are completely or partially below the ground .

b. If any wall is completely above the ground, the story is not a


basement.

c. Subbasements are the stories beneath the basement.


(
3-3. General Instructions for FEMA Form 85-6. FEMA Form 85-6 consists of
eight sections. Sections 1 through 7 require input values, described below,
and section 8 provides the PF category solution. Each story is analyzed
separately, but a single form may be used for more than one story.

a. EASY II Sections. The solution procedure begins at section 1 and


continues through each section until a solution is determined in section 8.

(1) Section 1 is used to input exterior wall mass thickness and the
percentage of apertures in the exterior walls.

(2) Section 2 is used to input the height of the detector above the
contaminated plane. The detector is located 3 ft above and in the center of
the story being analyzed.

(3) Section 3 is used to input the percentage of a building's


perimeter which is mutually shielded.

3-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-1

EASY II Graphical Solution Form (


0MB NV. 3067-IJ/54
EASY II GRAPHICAL SOLUTION FORM ltzpares March 31, 1993

EXTERIOR WALL (psf) STANOARO LOCATION PAAT NO. _ _ _


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fEMA form 85-6. JUNE 90 REPLACES PREVIOUS EDITIONS


3-2
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(4) Section 4 is used to reflect the mass thickness of the interior


( partitions.

(5) Section 5 is used to input the extent a basement wall is


exposed.

(6) Section 6 is used to adjust the analysis results when the story
width (narrowest dimension) is greater than 40 feet.

(7) Section 7 accounts for the roof area, the distance the detector
is located below the roof, and the total overhead mass thickness between the
detector and roof source plane.

(8) Graphical solution lines created in sections 1-7 intersect in


section 8 and determine the PF category.

b. PF Categories. The PF categories and their corresponding PF ranges


are shown in figure 3-2.

Figure 3-2

PF Categories

PF Category PF Range

X 1-9
(
0 10-19
1 20-39
2-3 40-99
4+ 100+

3-4. EASY II Solution Examples.

a. Aboveground Stories. Figure 3-3 illustrates a typical three-story


building with a basement identified as building 1. The EASY II analysis, in
this case, is being performed for story 02. (NOTE: The first story or story
01 of a building is defined as the lowest story having at least one wall fully
exposed or at grade level.) All the building data necessary to support the
analysis are shown in figure 3-4. Figure 3-5 illustrates the graphical
solution for the second story.

3-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-3
(
Building 1

X 0•7 0
ca
X
3

2
0

0
0
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--- (
'0 1 0


&:
u,

8 0'
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PLAN SECTION x-x

3-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620. l

( Figure 3-4

Building 1 Asswnptions

Story 02

Detector location . . 3 ft above


story 02 floor
Exterior wall mass thickness. 150 psf
Percentage apertures . . . . 50%
Height above contaminated plane 13 ft
Percentage of perimeter mutually
shielded . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 percent
Interior partitions . . . . . . . N/A
Basement wall, percentage exposed N/A
Story width (narrowest) dimension 60 ft
Roof area . . . . . . . 5400 sq ft
Distance to roof . . . . 17 ft
Overhead mass thickness . . . . . 100 psf
Floor mass thickness 50 psf
Roof mass thickness . . 50 psf

In the above given data, the following computations were performed :

Height above contaminated plane


(
Contaminated plane to floor of story 01 0 ft
Height of story 01 10 ft
Floor of story 02 to the detector __Lfi
Total Height 13 ft

Percent of perimeter mutually shielded

Building perimeter= 60 ft+ 90 ft+ 60 ft+ 90 ft


= 300 ft
Length of side mutually shielded= 90 ft
90 ft
Percent of perimeter mutually shielded= 300 ft 30 percent

Distance to roof

Story 03 height 10 ft
Floor of story 03 to detector _]__f_t
Total Distance 17 ft

3-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-5
(
Second Story EASY II Solution
EASY II GRAPHICAL SOLUTION FORM

£XTERIOR WALL {ps~~ I p4 2 -QQ22PART


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ST,.ND,.RD LOCATION NO.~

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3-6
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( b. Step-by-Step Solution for the Aboveground Case. Although this


illustrative example is for story 02 , more than one story can be analyzed on
the same form by using different colors or different types of lines to
represent each solution.

(1) Section 1. Exterior Wall Mass and Aperture Percentage . The


exterior wall and percent of apertures is to be plotted as shown in
figure 3-6.

Figure 3-6

Section 1 Plot

1a . Entry Point

EXTERIOR WALL (psfr{


I
-
20 50 100 )50 200
.,,,
,
...
j ~
10
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1 b. Entry Point
.
j '

-- -1 c . Entry Point
for Section 2

(a) Exterior Wall Mass Thickness. Circle the appropriat e wall


mass thickness. From this point draw a curved line through section 1 along or
parallel to the nearest curved line.

(b) Aperture Percentage. Circle the appropriate perc e nt of


a pertures. From this point draw a horizontal line until it intersects with
t h e c urved line from (a) above. Draw a vertical line from the intersection to
the bottom of section 1, which becomes entry point for section 2 . If
a p ert ur e s do not exist, a vertical line is drawn from entry point la to the
bottom of section 1.

(2) Section 2, Height Above Contaminated Plane. The effect of th e


height of the detector above the contaminated plane on fallout radiation is
determined in section 2, figure 3-7. The form can accommodate height values
up to 100 feet .

(a) For buildings taller than 100 feet, the following


procedure is used:

(i) Draw a 45-degree projection from the top of se c tion


2 (s o lution point from section 1) to the bottom.

3-7
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(ii) From this point move to the right the equivalent


distance of one vertical grid line (10 psf) for every 10 feet of additional (
height.

(b) For heights of less than 100 feet use the section 2
illustration, and follow the steps illustrated.

(c) Section 2 should not be used for partially exposed or


completely belowground stories. When these stories are encountered, project a
vertical line from the entry point to the bottom of section 2.

Figure 3-7

2a. Entry Point


from Section 1

100

2b. Entry Point 2c. Entry Point


to Section 3

(d) Entry point 2a in figure 3-7 is the solution point


(
determined in section 1 and the entry point for the section 2.

(e) Circle or enter the average detector height, in feet,


above the contaminated plane in entry point 2b in figure 3-7.

(f) From entry point 2a, in figure 3-7, project a 45-degree


line until it intersects with the horizontally projected line from entry
point 2b. At the point of intersection, draw a vertical line from the point
of intersection to the bottom of section 2.

(3) Section 3, Percent of Perimeter Mutually Shielded .

(a) An adjacent building or barrier which has a minimum total


mass thickness of 120 psf should be considered to provide mutual shielding for
a story provided the building or barrier is within 15 feet, and is at least a s
high as the story being ana}.yzed.

(b) If the barrier is an adjacent building, the total mass


thickness between the facility being analyzed and the ground source plane
includes the mass thickness of the exterior walls and interior partitions of
the adjacent building.

3-8
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(c) When an adjacent barrier or building has a total mass


( thickness less than 120 psf, it should not be treated as a mutual shield.

(d) The percentage of the building perimeter that is mutually


shielded is determined by the ratio of the length of the shielded portions of
the exterior wall to the perimeter of the building.

(e) Ninety feet of building 1 are shielded, representing 30%


of the building perimeter.

(f) Figure 3-8 illustrates the correct entries in section 3


for building 1.

Figure 3-8

Section 3 Plot.

Point
Section 2

Entry Point Entry Point


Section 4
(g) Entry point 3a in figure 3-8 is the solution point
determined in section 2 and the entry point for section 3. From this point
draw a line to the lower right corner of section 3.

(h) Circle or insert the percentage of the perimeter that is


shielded and draw a horizontal line from entry point 3b until it intersects
with the line from (g) above.

(i) From the intersection i: . subparagraph 3-4b(3) (h), draw a


vertical line to the bottom of section 3.

(4) Section 4, Interior Partitions.

(a) Building Stories without Interior Partitions. Building 1


has no interior partitions in story 02. Therefore a vertical line is drawn
straight down from the solution line in section 3 to the bottom of section 4,
as illustrated in figure 3-9.

3-9
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-9
(
Section 4 Plot

4a . Entry Point
1, from Section 3
I'-, ,, ' r--.,r--.. "
~
"'~
2!;
', "'" 'I'- ""r--. ', 'I'-
"'z
50

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--- ' ', "11 "'-
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4b. E n try P o int
l 5C
' ' 4 C. Entry Point
to Section 5
(b) Building Stories with Interior Partitions.

(i) Partitions used in the EASY II analysis must be


considered as barriers to nuclear radiation from all building sides.

(ii) Double-loaded corridor partitions can be used,


even though no partitions exist at the end of the corridor.

(iii) Treat the opened ends of the corridor as


apertures in the partitions and adjust the mass thickness accordingly. (
(iv) In order to determine the effect of interior
partitions on the analysis, use the following procedures:

E· Determine the interior partition mass


thickness (psf) by inspection or use of FEMA TR-68.

Q. Where the solution line from section 3


enters section 4, draw a line parallel to the guidelines.

£. Enter or circle the mass thickness in


section 4.

Q. From this point,draw a horizontal line until


it intersects the line drawn in Q. above.

g. From the point where the two lines


intersect, draw a vertical line to the bottom of section 4.

f. When a partition contains doors or other


apertures, use the formula to adjust the mass thickness in figure 3-10.

3-10
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 3-10
(
Adjusting Interior Partition Mass Thickness

Adjusted mass thickness

where X = x.1 (1-Ap )

where Xi is the mass thickness of the partition

and AP is the percentage of apertures in the


partition.

Partition mass thickness 80 psf

Percent apertures in partition 20%

Adjusted mass thickness Xi (1-AP)

80 (1-.20)

64 psf

(5) Section 5, Basement Wall, Percent Exposed. Basement wall


(
exposure is not calculated for building 1 because an aboveground story is
being analyzed. The use of this section is explained in the building 2
analysis explanation. Extend the solution line straight down through
section 5.

(6) Section 6 1 Story Width (Narrowest) Dimension. The size of the


building is considered in the EASY II method and it assumes, as typical, that
the center detector position is 20 feet from the exterior wall (40-foot wide
story). If the story width exceeds 40 feet, a final adjustment is made as
follows:

3-11
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-11
,.., - - - - - - - S a . Entry Point r
60 ' ' ' from Section 4
I I I\. r-...
..,0 50
!\. !\. !\. !\. I'\.
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0 0 :.1 200
... - z - 6 ' ' r--- r'-- ' ' ' "'\ "
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' '
6 b. Ent r y
300

Point
'
I\.
'-
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to Section 8

(a) From the section 6 entry point, draw a line parallel to


the printed guidelines.

(b) Circle or insert the story width, in feet. From this


point draw a horizontal line until it intersects the line in figure 3-11 6a.

(c) From the intersection in figure 3-11 6b, draw a vertical (


line to the bottom of section 6.

(d) If story width is 40 feet or less, continue the solution


line from section 5 to the bottom of section 6.

(7) Section 7, Roof Contribution. Three basic parameters are


needed to input the roof contribution: roof area, distance to roof, and
overhead mass thickness. The procedures are illustrated in figure 3-12:

3-12
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 3-12
( Sections 7 and 8 Plot
MOOF AREA (SQ FT)

- 200 ~00 1,000 2


4 7 a 10
3
11

II
{';") 10,000
II 11
: 1.2
- (20 l 3 5 6 7 8 11 11
00 JO I I 3 4 5 6 ; ,....,,.
II
40 l I I 3
•3 5 5 7 7
s ,,

Entry Point from


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z
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tiO
70
80
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l
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y

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Section 6 - ...
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-
0

Overhead Mass Thickness


Entry Point

EASY II Solution

(a) Roof Area. Circle the roof area. If the actual roof area
does not appear, use standard rounding off procedures, (i.e., if the roof area
is 5400 square feet, circle 5 (5000)).

(b) Distance to Roof. Circle the number which most closely


represents the distance from the detector to the roof and go across
horizontally to the column with the circled roof area. The value recorded in
the intersected box becomes one of the entry points to section 7. Circle this
value at the top of section 7.

3-13
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(c) Total Overhead Mass Thickness. Circle or enter the total


overhead mass thickness (psf) and draw a line along or parallel to the nearest
printed curved line. (
(d) Solution for Section 7. From the point where the curved
line int.ersects the vertical line from the circled value at the top of
section 7, draw a horizontal line through section 7 to the border of
section 8, which now·becomes an entry point to section 8.

(8) Section 8. Shelter PF Category. The PF category for the story


being analyzed is determined by the intersection of the overhead and ground
contributions solution lines.

(a) Overhead Contribution. Extend the horizontal line from


section 7 through section 8.

(b) Ground Contribution. From the entry point from section 6,


draw a vertical line through section 8 to the bottom border.

(c) EASY II Solution. Shelter PF Category. Section 8 is


segmented by curved lines. The areas falling within the curved lines are
assigned PF category values. The PF category area where the lines from (a)
and (b) intersect establishes the PF category existing in the center of the
shelter area analyzed.

(9) Area Factors. The area factors which are determined on the
FEMA Form 85-6 are used in calculating fallout shelter spaces, as described in (
paragraph 4-2.

c. Partially Belowground Basements. The procedure for solving the PF


category in a story which is partially below the ground (generally referred to
as a partially exposed basement) is similar to the building 1, aboveground
stories illustration. The floor plan and section sketches in figure 3-13
represent a simple one-story building with a partially exposed basement and
are used for the partially belowground basement illustration. Figure 3-14
shows the assumptions made about the building and figure 3-15 illustrates the
completed form.

3-14
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 3-13
( Building No. 2 - Partially Exposed Basement
- ~ - - - - - - ~ ----·. --·~-----1
C:

X
D•7 X
.......
1
Detector
0

B D
--- (0

7 0' 7 0'
I• .. 1 I• .. I
PLAN SECTION X-X

Figure 3-14

Building 2 Assumptions

Exterior wall mass thickness (exposed portion only) 125 psf

Percentage apertures . . . None

Height above contaminated plane N/A

Percentage of perimeter mutually shielded None

Interior partitions . . None

Basement wall, percentage exposed 25 Percent

Story width (narrowest) dimension 70 ft.

Roof area . 5000 sq. ft.

Distance to roof. 15 ft.

Overhead mass thickness 100 psf

3-15
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-15
(
Partially Exposed Basement EASY II Solution
EASY II GRAPHICAL SOLUTION FORM

EXTERIOR WALL f) STANO.-RO LOCATIQMJ642-Q02.2 PART NO,.Q..1_


20 so 100 ~ 215 1 so 200
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3-16
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(1) Section 1, Exterior Wall Mass. Enter the assumed building


( 2 wall mass thickness (125 psf) and from this point drop a vertical line to
the bottom of section 1, as illustrated in figure 3-16.

(2) Sections 2. 3, and 4. These sections are not applicable


in this case. Extend the solution from section 1 through sections 2 and 3 to
the bottom of section 4.

(3) Section 5, Basement Wall Exposure. The percentage of the


basement wall exposed is determined as the ratio of the average height of the
exposed portion of the wall, divided by the total vertical height of the
basement wall.

Figure 3-16

Basement Wall Exposure Plot

- 5 a. Entry Point
from Se ction 4
,,
' " ' ' ' ' '
60
I I .... ....
'~ I'.. I'-.
'
' "~' . ~" '
0 50
I'\ '
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1115-J'~

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.
Sb. Entry Point

(4) Solution from Sections 1 through 4. From the solution


line entry point, draw a line parallel to the diagonal guide lines.

(5) Percentage of Basement Wall Exposed. Circle or insert the


percentage of the basement wall exposure and from this point draw a horizontal
line until it intersects the line drawn in figure 3-16. From this point, draw
a vertical line to the bottom of section 5.

(6) Sections 6, 7, and 8. The same procedures are used as


described in building 1, sections 6, 7, and 8.

d. Building 3, Completely Belowground Basements. To determine the PF


category for the completely belowground area, calculate the roof contribution,
as described in section 7 for building 1. The solution line from section 7 is
drawn to the vertical border line between sections 7 and 8. Where the two
lines intersect determines the PF category of the basement as illustrated in
figure 3-17.

3-17
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 3-17

Building 1, Completely Belowground Basement Plot (

EASY II Entry Point


Soluti on O ver head Area

,.JD
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V,

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lili..
0

3-5. Area Factors. Area factors are determined by extending the vertical
solution line (ground contribution) from the PF category solution point to the
bottom of the form. The intersection of the vertical line with a particular
scale gives the area factor for that PF category, as described in chapter 4
and illustrated in figure 3-18 .

3-18
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 3-18
( Plotting Area Factors

\' .,.
,- .
II
I
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.... , I l ,.:.
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(
CM. O
0 .1 . 2 .3 .• . 5 .6 .7
•• ,0

3-19
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Chapter 4
( Calculating Fallout and Relative Blast Protection Spaces

4-1. General. Results obtained from the EASY II graphical solution analysis
and the relative blast protection analysis are used to determine the fallout
and relative blast protection spaces existing in NFS facilities.

a. Fallout Spaces. Fallout spaces are computed based on natural


ventilation for belowground stories and first stories that have limited
apertures.

(1) A natural ventilation analysis is not required for stories


above the first story.

(2) It is assumed that commercial power will not be available


during an emergency.

(3) In instances where standby auxiliary power exists, there must


be adequate power to satisfy emergency requirements, including ventilation
equipment, and enough fuel available to operate the auxiliary power for a
period of 7 days, if the natural ventilation analysis is to be omitted.

b. Blast Spaces. Computation of relative blast protection spaces


assumes adequate ventilation exists in the basement.

( c. Minimum Area Per Space. Fallout and relative blast protection


spaces are allocated 10 sq ft of usable area to one shelter space.

4-2. Computing Fallout Shelter Spaces. Fallout shelter spaces are computed
in ~ccordance with the following instructions:

a. Usable Floor Area. Determine the usable floor area by one of the
following methods :

(1) Actual estimate made by the surveyor; or

(2) Usability factor obtained from appendix A.

b. PF Category. The highest PF category available in the potential


fallout shelter area is determined by the EASY II method, as described in
chapter 3.

(1) Aboveground Areas. In aboveground cases, the highest PF


category area is assumed to be near the detector location (center of the room)
and the PF category decreases as you move away, as shown conceptually in
figure 4-1.

4-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 4-1
(
Aboveground Area Factor Concept

Less than Cat 0


Cat 0
Cat 1
Cat 2-3

Cat 4+
ffi_
- - Detector

(2) Completely Belowground Areas. In completely belowground


basement cases, the PF category at the center detector is assumed to be the
same throughout the area as shown conceptually in figure 4-2. Basement areas
with one foot or less exposure is considered as completely belowground
stories. If the center detector location is PF category O and is the best PF
category in the building, report the PF category O spaces in the NFS, as (
illustrated conceptually in figure 4-2.

Figure 4-2

Belowground Area Factor Concept

Cat O

4-2
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( (3) Partially Belowground Basement Areas. In partially belowground


basement areas, the PF category at the center detector is assumed to be the
same throughout the area. If the best PF category in a partially belowground
basement is PF category 0, do not report the building in the NFS unless higher
PF categori~s exist elsewhere in the building.

(4) Subbasement Areas. In subbasement areas, the PF category at


the center detector is assumed to be the same throughout the area.

c. Area Factors. Area factors are used to determine what portions of


the usable shelter area lie within the various PF categories.

(1) The area factors are used for aboveground stories only.

(2) Engineering judgment must be used when applying area factors


since the factors represent generalized conditions. If, for example, the
story being analyzed had significant mutual shielding on only one side of the
building, the shielded side would have the greater protection and must be
favored when determining the shelter area.

d. Determination of Area Factors. By continuing the vertical (ground


contribution) line from section 8 down to the bottom of the form, it will
intersect with the four area factor scales.

(1) The intersection of the vertical line with a particular scale


( gives the area factor for the PF category.

(2) The lower PF category area factor scale includes the cumulative
area factors of the higher categories. Thus, when determining the area factor
for an individual PF category, the cumulative area factors of the higher PF
categories must be subtracted. Figure 4-3 demonstrates this subtraction
process and expresses the result as an adjusted area factor.

(3) When the PF category solution vertical line intersects a PF


category area factor scale that is higher than the actual PF category
solution, there will be no spaces for that PF category. For example, the
solution line from section 8 on the form might cross the PF category 4+ area
factor line, but you cannot use the Area Factors for PF Category 4+ unless the
analysis solution line from the ground contribution and the roof contribution
actually meet in PF category 4+ in section 8 of the form.

e. Calculation of Shelter Area by PF Category When Interior Partitions


Are Not Significant.

(1) When interior partitions are not essential to the PF category


determined on the form, multiply the adjusted PF category area factor by the
usable area, beginning with the PF category established in section 8.

(2) Continue the same calculation for each lesser PF category,


ensuring the area factors are adjusted, as illustrated in figure 4-3.

4-3
FEMA Manual 9620.J October 24, 1990

(3) This procedure is explained in figure 4-4 where a usage area


of 1600 square feet is assumed. The adjusted area factors are taken from (
figure 4-3, example 1.

Figure 4-3

Examples of Adjusted Area Factors

...
I' " I
1 lat

I
., Example 1.
I ~ ~

I
I .. .
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... 1
, ~ 11

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-i..
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.
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' ... ~

Cat ••
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.
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FACTORS
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.7 .8

17 .8
II 1.0

I 1.0
(

Best
PF Cat
PFCat
Rang e
Example 1:
__ Area Factor
From Scale
_.:,..:....;...,;._;;;~..;._
Adjusted
Area Factor

4+ 0.60 0.60

L-0 2-3
1
0
0.81
0.89
0.90
0.21 (. 81-.60)
0.08 (.89-.81)
0.01 (.90-.89)

Example 2:
.f+- 0.00 0.00
2-3 2-3 0.50 0.50
1 0.61 0.11 (.61-.50)
0 0.70 0.09 (.70-.61)

Example 3:
.,i+ 0.00 0.00
0 2-3 0.31 0.00
1 0.49 0.00
0 0.59 0.59

4-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Figure 4-4

Applying Adjusted Area Factors

PF Category 4+ area 1600(. 60) 960 sq ft

PF Category 2-3 area 1600(. 21) 336 sq ft

PF Category 1 area 1600(.08) 128 sq ft

PF Category 0 area 1600( .01) 16 sq ft

The balance of the usable area (1600 - 1440), or 160 square


feet, is less than PF category O (PF 10) and is not used
in reporting fallout shelter space in the FEMA Form 85-5,
NFS-RAC Data Input Form.

f. Fallout Shelter Space Computation. Fallout spaces are computed as


10 square feet of usable shelter area per space by dividing the PF category
shelter areas calculated in figure 4-4 by 10. The computation process begins
with the PF category established on the form and continues for the lesser PF
categories. The calculations are illustrated in figure 4-5.

Figure 4-5

Fallout Shelter Space Computation

PF Category 4+ spaces 960 sg ft 96 spaces


10 sq ft

PF Category 2-3 spaces 336 sg ft 33 spaces


10 sq ft

PF Category 1 spaces 128 sg ft 12 spaces


10 sq ft

PF Category O spaces 16 sg ft 1 space


10 sq ft

4-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

g. Fallout Shelter Space Computations When Interior Partitions Are


Significant . Interior partitions may affect the fallout shelter space (
computation . Buildings having heavy interior partitions such as corridors,
stairwells, or vaulted areas require further evaluation to assure proper
a llocation of shelter spaces by PF category. When the PF category is directly
dep e ndent upon the existence of interior partitions, the area enclosed by the
partitions m1Jst be compared to the area represented by the area factor and
overall building dimensions. Start with the highest PF category determined,
PF category 4+, for example, and proceed as follows:

(1) PF Category 4+ Spaces. Use the width times the length behind
the partition, times the percentage of usable area, divided by 10 square feet
or the width times the length of the entire story, times the percentage of
usable area, times the area factor for PF category 4+ spaces, divided by 10
square feet, whichever yields the lesser number of PF category 4+ spaces.
Equations are shown below:

(a) Behind Partition,s


w x 1 x % Usable Area
10 sq ft

or;

(b) Entire Story


W x L x % Usable Area x PF Cat 4+ Area Factor
10 sq ft

(2) PF Category 2-3 Spaces. Use the width times the length of the (
entire story, times the percentage usable area, times the PF category 2-3 area
factor, divided by 10 square feet, less the PF category 4+ spaces, as
illustrated in the following equation:

(W x L x Percent Usable Area x PF Category 2-3 Area Factor) - PF Category 4+


10 sq ft Spaces

(3) PF Category 1 Spaces. Use the width times the length of the
entire story, times the percentage usable area, times the PF category 1 area
factor, divided by 10 square feet, less the PF category 2-3 and higher spaces,
as illustrated in the following equation:

(W x L x Percent Usable Area x PF Category 1 Area Factor) - PF Category 2-3


10 sq ft and higher Spaces

(4) PF Category O Spaces. Use the width times the length of the
entire story, times the percentage usable area, times the PF category O area
factor, divided by 10 square feet, less the PF category 1 and higher spaces,
as illustrated in the following equation:

(W x L x Percent Usable Area x PF Category O Area Factor) - PF Category 1 and


10 sq ft higher Spaces

4-6
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.l

h. Fallout Shelter Space Computations for Partially and Completely


( Belowground Stories. Since the area factors on the EASY II form do not apply
to belowground stories, the area factor for such locations is essentially one .
Therefore, the spaces are determined simply by the following formula:

Fallout Shelter Spaces net usable area


10 sq ft

i. Ventilation Basis. Because of the assumption that no commercial


power is available after a nuclear attack, the number of shelter spaces
calculated may not be the actual amount of available shelter space. The final
determining factor is the availability of adequate ventilation for the people
in the shelter.

(1) Calculation of spaces due to adequate ventilation is described


in chapter 5.

(2) Spaces in aboveground areas where apertures exist on each


story, or basement areas where adequate natural ventilation exists, are
calculated using the area basis (i.e . , 10 sq ft per shelter space).

(3) A natural ventilation analysis is performed on all belowground


areas and first story areas having limited or no apertures. The results of
this analysis are then compared with the spaces calculated on an area basis.

4-3. Relative Blast Protection Spaces. Relative blast protection spaces are
( computed only for basements in buildings in high nuclear-hazard areas and only
if the basement has a relative blast protection Code A, C, D, or G.

a. Ventilation and area factors are not considered when determining the
number of relative blast spaces.

b. Relative blast spaces are computed by dividing the usable area by 10


sq. ft. per space. Assume, for example, that the basement has a net area of
1600 sq. ft. and it has an acceptable blast code. The blast spaces are
calculated as follows:

Relative Blast Spaces 1600 sq ft 160


10 sq ft

4-7
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Chapter 5
(
Natural Ventilation Analysis Procedures

5-1 . General. The natural ventilation procedures are designed to evaluate


the maximum ventilation in shelters, in order to establish the number of
people who can occupy the shelter area with a reasonable expectancy of
survival. The calculated number of spaces (number of people) is then compared
to the number of spaces calculated by the protection factor computation using
the EASY II method. The lesser of the two numbers is reported in section B of
FEMA Form 85-5.

5-2. Natural Ventilation Criteria. All NFS shelter spaces located in


belowground and in windowless, or nearly windowless, first stories are
analyzed to determine the number of spaces that can be supported by natural
ventilation. In preparing this analysis, assume that all commercial
electrical power is off during a major emergency.

a. If the shelter area can be ventilated by existing mechanical


equipment powered by auxiliary standby generator(s) having at least 7 days of
fuel in storage, a ventilation analysis is not required and spaces are
computed on the basis of 10 sq. ft. per space.

b. The following ventilation concepts are assumed in natural


ventilation analyses:
(
(1) Warmed air rises--is forced upward by cooler air;

(2) There must be an escape route for warmed air above the heat
source; and

(3) Shelter occupants are the heat source and air flows to them.

5-3 . Natural Ventilation Procedures. The natural ventilation procedures


consist of analyzing the area of apertures available for ventilation, zonal
ventilation requirements, air path distance, and aperture head and sill height
differential as defined below:

a. Area. Area refers to the net clear openings (apertures) that remain
after all glass is removed, e.g . , windows (assuming that the glass can be
broken when needed), doors, stairwells, hatches, etc. The net clear openings
function together as air inlets and air outlets. Air inlets and outlets must
be equal in order to be used in a ventilation analysis.

b. Zonal Ventilation Requirements in Cubic Feet Per Minute (cfm).


Zonal requirements for ventilation in cfm of fresh air have been established
for the Nation and are adequate to control the effective temperature in
shelters for an acceptable percentage of time. Zonal ventilation requirements
are illustrated in appendix B.

5-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

c. D Distance. D distance is the average distance along the path air


must travel from an aperture functioning as an air inlet to the midpoint of (
the shelter area, then on to the outlet aperture where the air exits the
building.

d. Height Difference (AH). The AH is the difference between the


highest effective aperture head and the lowest effective aperture sill, when
analyzing a single air flow path. The head height is measured where the air
reaches outside the structure and is the highest point in an opening, e.g.,
the top of a window or door opening. The sill height is measured at the
bottom or lowest point in an opening, e.g., the bottom of a window or door
opening.

5-4. Shelter Ventilation Estimator Instructions. The shelter ventilation


estimator (SVE) is used to compute the maximum number of ventilated shelter
spaces. The SVE circular slide rule may be cut and assembled from appendix C.
Using the SVE, determine the maximum number of ventilated spaces existing in
the fallout shelter area and compare them to the spaces computed by the EASY
II graphical solution method. The SVE analysis requires evaluations of
aperture area, zonal cfm, D distance, and head to sill AH, which are performed
in sequential order as described below:

a . Aperture Area . Place pointer marked AREA at the number of net


square feet of aperture available to the shelter area for ventilation. (See
figure 5-1, step 1.)

b. Required Cubic Feet of Air Per Minute (CFM). Determine from


appendix B the CFM of fresh air required to control the temperature in the (
shelter area. Read the ventilated spaces on the outer ring adjacent to the
applicable CFM requirements. (See figure 5-2, step 2.)

c. D Distance. When the D distance exceeds 100 feet, place the INDEX
arrow at the number of ventilated spaces computed in subparagraph 5-4b and
read the adjusted number opposite the D distance. This reduces the space
previously computed. (See figure 5-2, step 3.) Omit this step when the D
distance is less than 100 feet.

d. AH. When the AH exceeds 10 feet, place the INDEX arrow at the
number of spaces computed in subparagraphs 5-4b or 5-4c above and read the
corrected value opposite the AH value on the scale. The adjusted figure
should be higher. This will increase the spaces previously computed. (See
figure 5-3, step 4.) Omit this step when the AH is 10 feet or less.

5-2
(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 5-1
(
Using The Shelter Ventilation Estimator

Step 1 . Given: Area= 15 sq ft


Set the AREA arrow at 15 sq ft

~-
~ c,·t ·
....
" ~t SHELTER
~
VENTILATION

ESTIMATOR

5-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 5-2
(
Using the Shelter Ventilation Estimator

Step 2. Given: Zonal CFM = 10


Read: 54 VENT SPACES opposite 10 cfm on the above
shelter ventilation estimator.

Step 3. Given: D Distance= 500 ft Set the INDEX arrow


at 54 VENT SPACES. Read 38 VENT SPACES
opposite 500 ft. No adjustment for D
distance if 100 ft or less.

SHELTER (
VENTILATION

ESTIMATOR

5-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.l

Figure 5-3
(
Using The Shelter Ventilation Estimator

Step 4. Given: AH Height Difference= 15 ft Reset


INDEX arrow at 38 VENT SPACES. Read 55
VENT SPACES opposite AH 15 ft. Do not
adjust for AH at 10 ft or less.

., c,·t·
~-
,, ..,."
~ SHELTER
~
VENTILATION

ESTIMATOR
(

Total Ventilation Spaces~ 55

5-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 Octoher 24, 1990

5-5 . Single Opening . When the shelter area has one opening , the opening
functions as an air inlet and air outlet . The inlet portion of the opening (
may be below the floor but the outlet portion must be entirely above the floor
area and the natural ventilation area (equal amounts of air inlets and air
outlets) limited to twice the area of the air outlets, as illustrated in
figure 5-4.

Figure 5-4

Single Opening Functioning As Air Inlet and Air Outlet

3•
~

L
D
,...

PLAN ELEVATION (

Effective Aperture Area - 21 sq ft (2 times outlet area)

Inlet Area .l..1L..2 10-1/2 sq ft


2

Outlet Area .l..1L..2 10-1/2 sg ft


2

5 - 6. Two or More Openings. When two or more openings provide ventilation to


a shelter area, the relative position of their heads and sills to each other
must be examined in order to identify air inlets and outlets which will
function together.

5-6
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

a . AH 10 Feet or Less. As long as the AH of the openings functioning


( together does not exceed 10 feet, the effective aperture area is equal to the
total net area of all the apertures serving the shelter area as shown in
figure 5-5. It is assumed that one half of the total aperture area acts as an
air inlet, and the other half as an air outlet.

Figure 5-5

Two or More Openings Functioning As Air Inlets and Air Outlets

3'
~

Since AH for all the openings is less than 10 feet, the effective aperture
area is equal to:

1-door 3 x 7 21 sq ft
2-windows 3 x 1 Q sq ft
Total Effective Area 27 sq ft

b. Averaging D Distance. The D distance in figure 5-5 may be averaged


if all distances in the computation are less than 50 feet, or the shortest
distance is at least one half of the longest distance. When neither condition
is met, separate analyses may be required for the various apertures.

5-7
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

c. AH Greater Than 10 Feet. When the distance from the lowest sill to
the highest head of apertures considered to function together in an air path
exceeds 10 feet, more than one ventilation analysis might be required. (
(1) If the apertures are of unequal area, a portion of the lowest
apertur~ acting as an air inlet must be combined with an equal amount of an
aperture serving as an air outlet. Their combined areas represent the
effective aperture area for one analysis.

(2) If the AH for all the remaining apertures is 10 feet or less,


total net area of the apertures becomes the total effective aperture area for
a second analysis as shown in figures 5-6 and 5-7.

Figure 5-6

Two Openings, Unequal Effective Areas,


AH Greater Than 10 Feet

5-8
October 24, 1990 FEHA Manual 9620.1

Figure 5-7
(
Ventilation Computations for the Building in Figure 5-4

Air Path No. 1

Effective aperture area is equal to the net area of the window and an
equal net area taken from the lowest part of the door.

Window 3 x 1 3 sq ft
Door 3 x 1 l sq ft
Total Effective Area 6 sq ft

Step 1. Set the AREA arrow on the SVE opposite 6 sq ft


APERTURE AREA.

Step 2. Assume an 8 cfm ZONAL CFM requirement. Read 32


VENT. SPACES.

Step 3. Since AH for this air patn is 11 feet, set the


INDEX arrow opposite 32 VENT SPACES to adjust the spaces.

Step 4 . Read 40 spaces opposite AH equals 11 feet. (Assume


D distance is less than 100 feet. Therefore, no
adjustment required.)
(
Total Ventilation Spaces for Path No. 1 40

Air Path No. 2

Having used the lower 3 ft x 1 ft section of the door in the first path
to function as an air inlet with the window which functions as an air
outlet, a 3 ft x 6 ft opening in the upper portion of the door remains
for air path No. 2. AH for this opening is only 6 feet. Therefore, the
effective aperture area is equal to 3 ft x 6 ft or 18 sq. ft. There is
no adjustment required for AH or D distance, assuming a D distance of
less than 100 feet.

Step 1. Set the AREA arrow on the SVE opposite 18 sq ft


APERTURE AREA.

Step 2. Read 90 VENT SPACES opposite 8 ZONAL CFM

Step 3. Since there is no adjustment for AH or D


distance, total VENT. SPACES for air path No. 2 90

Total VENT. SPACES= Air Path No. 1 40


Air Path No. 2 90
130

5-9
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

5-7. Apertures in Window Wells and Areaways. Apertures in window wells and
areaways must be carefully evaluated in order to determine the effective (
aperture area. The effective area of an aperture below the top of an areaway
or window well cannot exceed the total cross section of the opening at the top
of the areaway or window well (see figure 5-8). When the opening at the top
of the areaway or window well is a limiting factor, the effective aperture
area is the sum of:

a. The part of the window above the window well or areaway and the
cross section of the opening at the top of the window well or areaway;

b. The total area derived is then compared to the actual area of the
aperture in the window well or areaway. The lesser area governs and becomes
the effective aperture area used in the analysis;

c. When the opening at the top of the window well or areaway is a


limiting factor, AH must be calculated by first establishing an effective sill
height as follows:

Effective Sill Height

real sill height+ area of aperture - effective area


width of aperture

d. The AH becomes the distance from the calculated effective sill to


the highest head height in the air path being analyzed.

5-10
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Figure 5-8
(Part 1 of 2)
Apertures in Window Wells and Areaways

1,

X
Window
well
3,

.-.••.-.. ... - . .,
( •. ~--. --~ ~.•.A •,

• • • "!fl' • .
-::-:~·
X

PLAN SECTION X-X

Determine the effective aperture area as follows:

The part of the window above 3' x l' = 3 sq ft


the window well

Plus the cross-section of l' X 3' .l sq ft


the opening at the top of 6 sq ft
the window well

Total effective aperture area is equal to 6 sq.


ft. in lieu of the actual window area which is 3'x
3' or 9 sq ft

Since the opening at the top of the window well is a


limiting factor, the effective sill height is
determined figure 5-8, part 2:

5-11
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 5-8
(Part 2 of 2)
(
Effective Sill Height=
reai sill height+ area of aperture - effective area
width of aperture

3 + 9 sq ft - 6 sq ft 4 feet
3

f.The calculations in figure 5-8 indicate the effective sill height is


4 feet above the floor instead of 3 feet, as shown in the sketch . Since the
window is only 3 feet high and the new effective sill height raises the sill
another foot from the bottom of the window, this leaves a AH of only 2 feet.

g. With the exception of excessively tall apertures in deep window


wells and areaways, the AH will obviously be less than 10 feet and of no
significance to the analysis.

5-8. Reporting Natural Ventilation Shelter Spaces.

a. Spaces in Basement Areas. Since the PF category area factor for


belowground shelter spaces is always 1.0, all of the shelter spaces are
considered to be in a single PF category. Therefore, the comparison between
naturally ventilated spaces and EASY II fallout spaces is direct. The
basement spaces are reported as illustrated in figure 5-9.

Figure 5-9

Reporting Basement Fallout Spaces

Assume that the following information has been


determined for a basement location:

Basement EASY I I Ventilated Spaces Recorded


PF Category Spaces Spaces on Data Input Form
2-3 183 94 94

Complete FEMA Form 85-5 as follows:

.;
•. IL
PF CAT 0
.
,
~F CAT I
n.
PF CAT 2·3
.
,
PF CAT•·
SPACES SPACES SPACES SPACES

BASEMENT

5-12
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

b. Spaces in First Stories with Limited Apertures. When the PF


( category for any aboveground story is other than 0, the fallout spaces are
separated into various PF categories using appropriate PF category area
factors. If the ventilation is limited on the first story and cannot
accommodate all the fallout spaces, record as many of the higher PF category
spaces as possible, as illustrated in figure 5-10.

Figure 5-10

Reporting Fallout Spaces for First Stories with Limited Apertures

Total Ventilated Spaces 122


First Story EASY II Spaces Recorded
PF Category Spaces on DIF

4+ 0 0
2-3 96 96
1 72 26
0 116 0

Complete FEMA Form 85-5 as follows:

14.
•;
II.
P, Cit. 0
,.. PALLOUTa ... LTU•

... c.,.,
11. .
,
PPC:...:11•:II "Cat.••
~ ...c.. aPACH aPACII P'ACU

FIRST STORY

5-13
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 6

Determining Relative Blast Protection

6-1. General. The relative blast protection analysis shall be performed for
all buildings located in high nuclear-hazard areas provided the buildings
selected have basements that are completely belowground. If a basement has
exterior walls exposed not more than one foot, the basement may be treated as
though it is completely belowground for the relative blast protection
analysis. In order to perform the analysis, data indicated on FEMA Form 85-7,
must be collected by on-site inspection and/or from architectural working
drawings. The analysis results in the determination of a relative blast
protection code and reflects relative blast protection. Basement areas which
are analyzed using this system should not be represented as blast shelters
since the resulting code reflects only relative protection.

6-2. Instructions for Determining Relative Blast Protection. The words


section and item refer to sections and items on FEMA Form 85-7. Guidance is
provided in chapter 8 for items 1-7.

a. Section A, General Data.

(1) Item 1, Standard Location. See chapter 8.

(2) Item 2, Facility No. See chapter 8.


(
(3) Item 3 I Building Name. See chapter 8.

(4) Item 4, Address. See chapter 8.

(5) Item 5, City. See chapter 8.

(6) Item 6, State. See chapter 8.

(7) Item 7, Zip Code. See chapter 8.

b. Section B, Structure Analysis Data.

(1) Item 1, Special Facility. If the facility being analyzed is


classified as a Special Facility (e.g., mine, cave, tunnel, underpass,
et cetera) the relative blast protection code is A and no additional
structural data is required for the coding process.

(2) Item 2, Is There a Basement in This Facility?

(a) Check yes only if there is a completely belowground


basement or a subbasement in the building.

6-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(b) If the basement does not meet the requirements of a


completely belowground basement and the relative blast protection analysis is (
b e ing performed based on the existence of a subbasement, this should be
indicated on the relative blast protection analysis form and should be noted
in the remarks section of FEMA Form 85-5.

(c) If the building has a completely belowground basement and


a subbasement, the relative blast protection analysis should be based on the
basement.

(d) If there is no completely belowground basement or


subbasement in the building, the relative blast protection survey should be
discontinued.

(3) Item 3. Number of Subbasements. Include all stories beneath


the basement. If two or more partial subbasements exist at the same level,
they should be counted as one subbasement.

(4) Item 4, Floor System Over Basement. Inspection of the floor


system over the basement or partial basement is required to determine whether
the floor system is wood, flat plate, slab with flat beam, or other floor
system type. Many buildings surveyed fall into the category Other. When more
than one type of floor system exists over the basement, base the entry on the
weakest, significant (over 1/3 of the usable area) portion of the structure.

(a) Wood. Wood floor systems are designed to carry light


loads and are most frequently found in houses, apartments, schools, and
relatively small office buildings. Generally, joists are centered 16 inches (
apart and spans seldom exceed 20 feet. Finished floors may be wood or
lightweight overlay material such as masonite, plywood, tile, carpet,
et cetera.

(b) Flat Plate.

(i) The flat plate floor construction is economical and


in recent years has replaced flat slab or flat beam construction. Flat plate
construction is most easily identified by the absence of beams, girders, drop
panels, or capitals at the columns (see figure 6-2).

(ii) Flat plate floor systems, when subjected to extreme


loads, develop stress failure resulting in a critical shear failure around the
columns. In basement locations, the entire floor may drop around the column,
leaving a small portion of the flat plate floor at the top of the column, as
illustrated in figure 6-3.

(iii) A common variation of flat plate construction is


the waffle slab where neither capitals nor drop panels are used.

6-2
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(c) Slab with Flat Beam. A slab with flat beam floor
( construction is used frequently in below-grade parking garages to maximize
headroom. The flat beam, as defined for survey purposes, extends beneath the
slab and its exposed area is at least twice as wide as it is deep, with the
measurements taken below the slab.

(d) Other. Other floor systems include all floor systems


except wood; flat plate and slab with flat beam. Two common types are
illustrated in figure 6-4. Some other floor systems are the following:

(i) Flat slab;

(ii) Slab and concrete beam;

(iii) Slab and steel beam;

(iv) Concrete joists;

(v) Precast concrete system;

(vi) Open web joist; and

(vii) Simple concrete slab bearing on exterior walls


with no columns.

6-3
FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY "rj
OM/I N/J . .'I/Jli7 - OI.S-1
DIRECT-EFFECTS PATA COLLECTION
( ltlsL/\TIVE Ill.AST l'llUTl-:CTION)
/t::r111rt'-" Mnn·h ,'J 1, 19!):J
!
~
A. GENERAL DATA E. RELATIVE BLAST PROTECTION CODES Ill

1. S. L. 2. Fae. No.
§
Ill
I-'
3. Building Name
\0
4. Address

5. City G. Stalr. 7. Zip


f"LOW
Cll/\fH
°'
N
0
......
B. STRUCTURE ANALYSIS DATA
,..
l
1. Special Facility (mine . caue. trumt!l, etc.) [:J Yes D No
If yes sliip to Section C.
2. Is there a basement in this facility? D Yes D No C,
If 1101, 110 additio11a/ data required. • r-,. I-'•

3 . Number of subbasements : I SPECIAL


FACILITY
I BASEMENTS
:::0 Ii
(D
I-' ()
(D

4 . Floor sys tem over basement: D Wood D Slat, with flat I.mom
Ill rt
r:r.
t
ti'l
D Flnt plate D Other <: Hi
(D Hi
(D 'Tj

°' I
5. Number of stories above basement:

6. Number of basemen t open ings:


I CLASS " A" I IS FLOOR OVER
t:;l:l ()
,_. rt
Ill tll
I-'•
()Q
~
.i::-- ,~ YES A BASEMENT Ii
CLASS "D" tll C, (D
7 . Area of all basement openings: sq . ft . ~
WOOD SYSTEM/
rt Ill
8. Average basement wall exposure : It. "tl rt
°'
t
I
Ii Ill
NO I-'
0 0
c. RELATIVE BLAST PROTECTION CODES(circle one class) ~ 0
IS OVERHEAD
() I-'
CLASS "A" CLASS "C" CLASS "D" CLASS " G"
SLAB A FLAT
rt I-'
YES I-'• (D
CLASS "G" PLATE OR 0 ()
~
D. RELATIVE BLAST PROTECTION SPACES FLAT BEAM ;j rt
SUPPORTED/ '--' I-'•
1. Area of basement ls): sq . ft .
0
;j
2. Percent usable area in basement(s):

3 . Total Spaces:
%
t NO

0
()
rt
0
CLASS "C"
O'
ro
"1
Surveyor: Date : N
.
.i::--

......
\.0
ID
FEMA Form 85-7, JUN 90 REPLACES PREVIOUS EDI flONS 0

.-.... -.....
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 6-2
( Flat Plate Floor System

Figure 6-3

Flat Plate Failure

Crltlcal Shear Failure


~Around Column

/ -"-----/---
6-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 6-4

Flat Slab and Concrete Beam System


(

a. Flat Slab System b. Concrete Beam System

The concrete beam floor system differs from the slab with flat
beam construction in that the beam is not normally twice as wide as it is
deep.
(
(5) Item 5, Number of Stories Above Basement. Enter the total
number of aboveground stories. The total includes all stories except
basements and subbasements.

(6) Item 6, Number of Basement Openings. Locate and count all


significant openings which penetrate the basement envelope. These should
include windows, doors, interior stairways, and utility shafts.

(7) Item 7, Area of All Basement Openings. Compute and enter the
total area, in square feet, of all basement openings identified in item 6.

(8) Item 8, Average Basement Wall Exposure. Compute and enter the
average height of the exposed portion of the basement exterior wall. The
height determined should be rounded to the nearest foot and should represent
the condition around the entire basement perimeter. If the height is greater
than one foot on any wall, the relative blast protection survey should not be
conducted unless the building contains a subbasement .

6-6
(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

c. Section C, Relative Blast Protection Codes.


( (1) Circle the relative blast protection code determined from the
flow chart on FEMA Form 85-7.

'(2) Enter the flow chart with the type of floor system directly
over the basement in order to determine the relative blast protection code.
The code determined mu~t be reported in section B of FEMA Form 85-5.

(3) The possible relative blast protection codes are A, C, D,


and G. A description of each code is provided in figure 6-5.

Figure 6-5

Relative Blast Protection Codes

Description

A Special facilities (Mine, Cavern, Cave,


Tunnel, Subway et cetera.)

C Basement(s) of structures where the


overhead floor system is other than wood,
flat plate or flat beam.

( D Basement(s) of structures where the overhead


floor system is wood.

G Basernent(s) of structures where the


overhead floor system is flat plate or slab supported
by a flat beam.

d. Section D, Relative Blast Protection Spaces.

(1) Item 1, Area of Basements. Compute the gross area of the


basement and subbasement(s) and enter the total area in square feet.

(2) Item 2, Percent Usable Area in Basement(s). Enter the percent


of total basement area that can be used for shelter. The usable area can be
an estimate made by the surveyor or computed by applying the usability factors
from appendix B to the gross area.

(3) Item 3, Total Spaces. Determine the total number of relative


blast protection spaces by dividing the net usable area in the basement(s) by
10 square feet. The total spaces must be recorded in section B of FEMA
Form 85-5.

e. Surveyor, Date. Enter the name of the surveyor who performed the
analysis and the date the analysis was conducted.

6-7
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 7

Determining Relative Fire Vulnerability

7-1. General. The relative fire vulnerability analysis will be performed for
all buildings in the high nuclear-hazard area for which a relative blast
protection analysis was conducted.

a. The following are two main areas of concern in determining a


shelter's vulnerability to fire and fire spread:

(1) The shelter building itself; and

(2) The buildings located in the surrounding area.

b. Since buildings in the immediate vicinity of the shelter building


have more influence on the shelter building's vulnerability to fire spread
than those further out, the surrounding area has been broken into two separate
areas for the purpose of this survey. These two areas are the buildings
within 50 feet of the shelter building and those beyond 50 feet, but less than
500 feet away.

c. Each area is surveyed and the data recorded on the Relative Fire
Vulnerability Survey illustrated in figure 7-1, by checking the appropriate
box. The survey and the two flow charts described below appear on the reverse
( side of FEMA Form 85-7.

d. Two flow charts, illustrated in figure 7-3, along with the data
recorded on the survey are used to determine two separate numerical ratings
which denote the shelter building's vulnerability due to its occupancy (use)
and construction.

e. A numerical rating is obtained for the surrounding area by


considering the use of buildings within 50 feet of the shelter building, use
of those beyond 50 feet but less than 500 feet, and the density of buildings
within the latter area.

f. By appropriate weightings of the numerical ratings, an overall


rating is obtained which denotes the shelter building's relative vulnerability
to fire and fire spread. A higher numerical rating signifies less
vulnerability.

g. The instructions that follow give the procedure to be used in


filling out the survey and in the determination of the final rating. In
paragraph 7-2, the paragraph numbers shown on the left correspond to paragraph
numbers on the survey.

7-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

7-2. Instructions for Completing FEMA Form 85-7 . The paragraph titles
(i.e., A.I.a and A.l.b., et cetera) correspond to paragraph numbers on FEMA
Form 85-7, illustrated in figure 7-2.
(
a. Section A, Shelter Building Data.

(1) A.l.a . , Occupancy (Use) Fire Load Description . Use the


information in figure 7-1 to determine if the building has negligible, light,
moderate, or high occupancy (use) fire load description rating .

(2) A.l.b. 1 Occupancy (Content) Fire Load Description. Use the


definitions below to determine the occupancy (content) fire load description:

(a) Noncombustible. This category consists of metal desks,


metal files, etc., or limited wood office furniture.

(b) Combustible. This category consists of wood desks, wood


files, office supplies not in metal cabinets, or other flammable material,
i.e., drapes, et cetera.

(3) A.2.a., Protective Devices. The following constitute adequate


protective devices:

(a) Wet or dry automatic sprinkler systems on all aboveground


floors, or wet standpipe systems with hoses on each aboveground floor; or

(b) At least one 2-1/2 gallon extinguisher per 3,000 square


feet, or equivalent. (
(4) A.2.b. 1 Water Supply. Water supply for protective devices is
to be classified as follows:

(a) Internal; or

(b) Public.

(5) A.3.a., Floor Construction. Use the following definitions to


determine if the floors are noncombustible or combustible:

(a) Noncombustible Floor. Reinforced concrete, steel deck


with or without concrete topping, concrete, or other cement-type topping or
formboard. All of the above supported on concrete or steel beams, girders,
trusses, or columns. Wood flooring over concrete or carpeting should not
affect classification.

7-2
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Figure 7-1

Occupancy (Use) Fire Load Description

Negligible

Boiler houses, power houses Coal storage, bulk grain, salt


Brick storage, stone storage
crushing, et cetera Halls, gymnasiums
Machine shops and metal Houses, hotels, apartments
working Libraries, offices, courthouses
Storage of metal implements Schools, laboratories, telephone
or machinery not packed exchanges
or crated
Water treatment and sewage
disposal plants
Aircraft hangars
Moderate Asphalt mixing plants
Department and variety stores
Amusement parks, bowling (premises crowded)
alleys, theaters Flammable liquid processing
Automobile service stations, Petroleum refineries
repair and parking Plastic manufacturing
garages Rubber tire storage
Churches Stockyards
Cold storage warehouses Textiles, clothing, mattress
Department and variety stores manufacturing or storage
(premises not crowded) Warehouses, general
Most manufacturing plants Wastepaper yards
(not involving large Wood working and lumber yards
amounts of combustibles
or flammables)
Restaurants
Retail stores and shops,
general

(b) Combustible Floor. Ordinary wood joists with or without


ceilings, mill and semimill construction, wood flooring on steel beams or
joists.

(6) A.3.b., Roof Deck Construction. Use the following definitions


to determine if the roof deck is noncombustible or combustible:

(a) Noncombustible Roof Deck. Reinforced concrete, precast


concrete, steel construction protected by metal lath and plaster, or by fire-
rated acoustical ceilings, any concrete or gypsum roof on exposed steel
supports, metal deck, or metal on concrete supports.

7-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(b) Combustible Roof Deck. Metal or cement asbestos panels on


wood supports, ordinary wood joist construction, mill construction, wood deck (
on metal or concrete supports, plastic panels on wood or metal supports.

(7) A.3 . c .• Roof Covering. Use the following definitions to


determine if the roof covering should be classified as good or poor :

(a) Good Roof Covering. Gravel, slag, slate, or tile.

(b) Poor Roof Covering . Wood shingles, tar paper, or other


than above coverings.

(8) A.3.d .• Interior Partitions and Ceilings. Use the following


definitions to determine if the interior partitions and ceilings are
combustible or noncombustible:

(a) Noncombustible. Any other material not listed below.

(b) Combustible. Heavy timber, ordinary wood, and wood-frame


construction.

(9) A.3.e .• Enclosed Stairways and Elevators. If the stairways and


elevators have complete floor to ceiling partitions around them, the stairways
and elevators can be considered closed. The partitions must be constructed of
noncombustible material.

b. Section B .• Building Occupancy (Use) in Surrounding Area.

(1) B.l.a. through B.l.d .• Use Fire Load Hazard Within 50 Feet.
(
(a) Use the information in figure 7-1 to determine the fire
load description for the buildings within 50 feet.

(b) To determine the type of occupancy in the buildings in the


area within 50 feet of the shelter building, refer to a zoning or Sanborn map,
visually inspect the area, or request the information,

(c) Choose the building with the worst occupancy that offers
exposing walls to the shelter building. Exposing walls are walls that do not
touch the building being rated.

(2) B.2 . a. through B. 2.d .• Use Fire Load Hazard Between 50 and 500
Feet. Use the same procedure as described in the preceding paragraph. except
that the type of buildings to be selected should be chosen from those that are
in preponderance in the area between 50 and 500 feet from the shelter
building.

(3) B.3.a. through B.3.c .• Building Density . Estimate the density


of buildings (ratio of area occupied by buildings to total area) within the
area between 50 and 500 feet from the shelter building. The levels of density
are low--less than 40 percent. moderate--40-70 percent. and high-- more than
70 percent.

7-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(4) B.4 . • Formula (Surrounding Area Summary). Insert the indicated


( weights derived from B.l, B . 2, and B.3 in the appropriate boxes. Perform the
indicated addition. Insert the resulting sum in the appropriate box in
paragraph C of the Relative Fire Vulnerability Survey Form.

7-3 . Rating. The overall rating is obtained as follows:

a. Using the data recorded in paragraph A of the survey form, choose


the appropriate boxes on the flow charts and follow the indicated arrows to
the last box;

b. The number at the bottom of the column in which the last box is
located is the numerical rating for that flow chart;

c. Proceed by following instructions at bottom of the flow chart;

d. With all the numerical ratings in the boxes of paragraph C, perform


the indicated addition to arrive at the overall numerical rating; and

e. The letter code is determined from the range within which the
numerical rating falls. The letter codes are shown at the bottom of
figure 7-2.

7-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 7-2

Relative Fire Vulnerability Survey


(
A. SHELTER BUILDING DATA

1. Occupancy (Use and Content) Fire Load


a. Use fire load: (1) Negligible or light
b. Content fire load: (1) Noncombustible
a o
(2) Moderate or high
2) Combustible
0
2 . Procection ·
a. Protective devices: (1) AdequateO(2) Inadequate
b. Water supply for protective ,eytces: (1) Internal water supplyo
0
(2) Public water supply only

3. Construction
a. Floors: (1) Noncombustible
o
(2) Combustible
o
b. Roof deck: (1) NoncombustibleQ (2) Combustible D
c. Roof covering: (1) Good 0(2) Poor D
d. Interior partitions and ceilings: (1) jonjombustible
oD
(2) No partitions or suspended ceilings (3) Combustible
e. Stairways and elevators (shafts): (1) EnclosedO(2) Not enclosed 0
B. BUILDING OCCUPANCY (USE) IN SURROUNDING AREA

l. Use Fire Load Hazard (<'.50') 2. Use Fire Load 11.lzard (50-500')
a. Negligiblij(wgt:12} a. Negligiblij(wgt:4)
b. Light (wgt: 9) b. Light (wgt:3)
c. Moderate (wgt: 6) c. Moderate (wgt:2)
d. High . (wgt : 3} d. High (wgt:l) (
3. Building Density (50-500')
a. Low (<407.) §(wgt :3)
b. Moderate (40-707. (wgt:2)
c. High (>707.) (wgt: 1)

(Enter indicated weights in appropriate boxes in Formula, below.)

4. Formula (B.4)
(B.2) (B.3) (Total)
L] D + +
D =

(Enter Total in appropriate Rating box below.)


D
c. RATING

Flow Flow B.4 Overall Rating


Chart Ill

- io ,o
Chart #2 Total Numerical Letter Code

D +
D +
D 46-51 --+ A
39-45 --. B
32-38 __,.. C
25-31 _. D
18-24 ---+ E
13-17 __. F

7-6
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Figure 7-3
(Part 1 of 2)

Flow Chart No. 1 (Occupancy)

MODERATE
OAHIGH
USE

ADEQUATE
,tlOTECTIVE
OEVICES

INADEQUATE NON•
'ROTECTIYE COMBUSTIBLE
OEVICES INTI:ANAL CONTENT
WATER
SUPPLY

PUBLIC NOT ENCLOSED


WATER ENCI.OSEO SHAFTS
SUl'9'LY °"LY SHAFTS

4 8 IZ 16

7-7
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 7-3
(Part 2 of 2)
(
Flow Chart No. 2 (Construction)

POOR NON•
ROOF COM8USTl8LE
COVERING PARTITIONS
COM8USTl8LE
----------+...-+-..-4 INTERIOR
PARTITIONS
1-....t - . . _ - t ~ - t - - - -

INADEQUATE NQ
PROTECTIVE PARTITIONS
DEVICES

INTERNAL
WATER
(
SUPPLY

PU8LIC NOT ENCLOSED


WATER SUPPLY ENCLOSED SHAFTS
ONLY SHAFTS

8 12 16

7-8
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 8

National Facility Survey and Reception and Care Survey


Data Input Form

8-1. General. FEMA Form 85-5, illustrated in figure 8-1, is used to report
information collected in the NFS and RAC survey. FEMA Form 85-5 is generally
referred to as the DIF. The DIF is divided into the following three sections :

a. Section A, Identification. This section is completed in all cases.

b. Section B, National Facility Survey Data. This section is completed


when NFS data are being entered.

c. Section C, Reception And Care Survey Data. This section is


completed when data are being reported for a building surveyed for reception
and congregate care purposes.

8-2. Instructions for Recording Information on the NFS and RAC. All numeric
entries are right justified and leading zeros not entered except for coded
entries. Alphabetic entries are left justified and unused data entry blocks
remain blank unless specific instructions indicate otherwise. Detailed
instructions referenced to the section and item numbers appearing on the DIF
are explained below:

( a. Section A, Identification. Enter the county name in the space


provided at the top of the form before proceeding to item 1.

(1) Item 1, Standard Location. Enter the eight digits or letters


of the National Location Code, 1962. The National Location Code divides the
United States and certain outlying possessions into Standard Location (SL)
areas. They are identified by a nine digit designation. The ninth digit is
not recorded on the DIF. The SL boundaries are to be used in all survey work
irrespective of city boundary or other changes. An example of a typical SL is
shown in figure 8-2.

8-1
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 8-2
(
Standard Location Example

Example:

341100010 Represents a complete SL code identification. The


first four digits identify the county (or equivalent, such
as a parish, independent city or district in certain
states) and the last five digits identify the serial number
within that county or equivalent.

The first digit represents one of the 10 FEMA Regions;


e.g., Region 3.

The second digit represents the state, alphabetically,


within the Region; e.g., Maryland.

The third digit, a number or letter, represents an area


within the state; e.g., the Baltimore Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area (SMSA). An SMSA is a metropolitan area,
generally one county, with at least one central city. One
through nine and A through Fare reserved to indicate
SMSA's, in alphabetical sequence, within each state (except
Texas) where the number of SMSA's runs through L. In those
cases where the SMSA lies in more than one state, the parts
are listed under the respective states. Letters G through
Q, (M through Qin Texas), indicate special groupings of
counties within a state. Letters R through Z indicate
residual groupings of counties within a state.

The fourth digit, a number or letter, represents the county


(or equivalent); e.g., Anne Arundel County,

The fifth through eighth digits represent the serial number


identifying the SL. The SL corresponds to ·a census tract,
a ward, an enumeration district, a census county division,
a minor civil division, or an urban place. An SL generally
does not have less than a population of 2,500 and does not
exceed 500 square miles, although there are a few
exceptions in sparsely populated areas.

The ninth digit indicates whether or not the SL is made up


of small census areas. Zero indicates a single census
area. Numbers one through nine or letters A through Z
indicate subdivisions.

8-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 Octobe r 24, 1990

(2) Item 2, Facility (FAG) No.

(a) Enter the five-position FAG number. Any numbering system (


devised must ensure nonduplication within any SL area . The leftmost space is
coded in accordance with the Facility Number Codes shown in figure 8-3 .

(b) .Facilities with only RAC-type shelter will contain X in


the leftmost space and will not reflect other alphabetic or numeric
characters, even though the facility may qualify by ownership definition, i . e.
National Guard Armory, Army, Navy, or Air Force Reserve facilities, et cetera .
The X indicates there is no qualifying fallout shelter space on file or being
reported for this building.

(3) Item 3, Minor Civil Division (MCD). Enter the appropriate MCD
code as published in the Bureau of the Census, 1980 Census Population, and
Housing, Geographic Identification Code Scheme, PHC (R)-3.

(4) Item 4, Place. Enter the appropriate place code as published


in the Bureau of the Census, 1980 Census Population and Housing, Geographic
Identification Code Scheme, PHC (R)-3.

(5) Item 5, Survey Office . Select and enter the survey office
code from those shown in figure 8-4.

8-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 8-3
(
Facility Number Code (First Digit)

The codes, as listed below, are placed as the first digit or the
leftmost figure of the five-digit facility number to identify sensitive
federal facilities and certain open facilities. A sensitive facility as used
here, is one which requires a security clearance for entrance.

First digit 0-9 and A-F apply only to facilities containing


qualifying fallout shelter space.

0 Facilities not covered below 1/


A Army National Guard Armories

B Army Reserve Centers

C NAV/MAR Corps Reserve Training Centers

D Air Force Reserve Centers

E Air National Guard Armories

F Coast Guard

( 1. us Army open

2. us Army sensitive

3. us Navy open

4. us Navy sensitive

5. us Air Force open

6. us Air Force sensitive

7. DOE, NASA, NSA open

8. DOE, NASA, NSA sensitive

9. Other Federal Government sensitive

X No qualifying fallout shelter space

1/Includes: privately-owned; State and local government; Federal


Government office buildings; military industrial plants and military supply
activities not having quarters and family housing; US Army Civil Works
structures not located on an active military installation; privately-owned
facilities in which military activities are tenants.

8-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 8-4

Survey Office Codes (

Description

01 Survey performed and DIF prepared


entirely by summer-hire.

02 Reserved.

03 Reserved.

04 Survey performed and DIF prepared


entirely by regional engineers.

05 Survey performed and DIF prepared


entirely by State contract, including
students hired by States.

06 Survey and DIF prepared entirely by


college students, other than summer-hires.

07 Survey and DIF preparation by others


than those shown above, including
private sector contracts.

08 Reserved for quality control. (


(6) Item 6 1 Update Action.

(a) Select and enter the appropriate update action code from
those illustrated in figure 8-5.
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 8-5
( Update Action Codes

NFS Data RAC Data NFS & RAC


Description Only Only Data

01 Change SL A 1-11 A 1-11 A 1-11


and/or
facility
number

03 Delete A 1-8 A 1-8 A 1-8


facility
record

Al Change A A A
Section
A data
only

A2 Add new A, B A, C A, B, C
facility
record

( B2 Data change A, B A, C A, B, C
to existing
record

B4 Same as B2, A, B A, C A, B, C
plus change
SL and/or
facility
number

(b) The following are special update actions and procedures


which should be considered when updating existing data records or submitting
new records.

(i) If new or revised RAC survey data are added to an


existing NFS record, submit as B2 or B4 action, as applicable.

(ii) If new NFS survey data are added to an existing RAC


record, submit as B4 action and change existing RAC X facility number to the
new NFS facility number.

(iii) When update codes B2 or B4 are used to modify


existing records, i.e. sections A, B, or C, re-enter all of the unchanged
data as well as the new data for the section being modified.

8-7
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

;;, (iv) When revising an existing NFS or RAC record, data


in the file for all data fields left blank on the new submittal will be picked (
up by the computer and added to the revised data record. Therefore, in order
to remove data, such as fire and blast information from an existing record for
a building that is no longer in a nuclear high-hazard area, enter zero in the
rightmost space of the data fields containing data to be removed .

(v) When Update Action Codes 01, Al, B2 and B4 are


used for buildings that have no structural code (item A-9) data available,
enter XXX in item A-9.

(vi) If an existing NFS facility is to be changed to an


RAC facility only:

~- Delete the existing NFS facility, Code 03; and

Q. Submit as a new RAC facility record, Code A2,


with an X in the first space of the facility number.

(vii) Caution should be exercised in the use of update


action codes 01 and B4. The SL-FAG number used in items A-1 and A-2 must
exist in the NFS-RAC data base. The new SL-FAG number used in item A-11 will
be added to the data base.

(viii) Update codes 01 and B4 cannot be used to change


the SL when the first four entries of the SL, i.e. region, State, area within
the State, and county (RSAC) are being changed. Instead, delete the old (
record (Code 03) and resubmit the facility in the new SL (Code A2).

(ix) If new natural hazards data are added to an


existing NFS and/or RAC record, submit as an A2 update action .

~- The NFS-RAC and the Natural Hazards


Vulnerability (NHV) files are separate and distinct. The computer does not
cross reference these files. Updating a facility in the NFS-RAC file is
possible only if that facility already exists on the NFS-RAC master file.
Likewise, updating a facility in the NHV file is only possible if that
facility already exists on the NHV master file.

g. When a new facility is being submitted on the


NFS-RAC form and the NHV form at the same time, the update action code for
both forms should be A2.

(7) Item 7. Type of Survey.

(a) This data entry represents the type of survey data being
submitted on the DIF. If the DIF contains NFS data, enter a 1 under the N.
If RAC data are submitted, enter a 1 under the R. Enter 1 under N and R when
the NFS and RAC data are submitted on the same DIF. Enter O when the 1 is
inappropriate.
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(b) Update Action Codes 01, 03, and Al do not require entries
in the NFS or RAC parts of the DIF. Therefore, when the DIF is submitted with
any of these update action codes, enter 00 as the Type of Survey.

(8) Item 8, Survey Date. Enter the survey month and year, e.g.,
March 1990 is entered as 0390.

(9) Item 9, Structural Codes.

(a) Enter the appropriate structural code for the building


being analyzed. Three spaces are provided for this entry . The first entry
represents the type of structure; the second entry represents the predominant
floor/ceiling system, i.e. the floor system over the first story or the roof
system of a one story building; and the third represents the predominant type
of exterior wall.

(b) Enter XXX if data in the master file are being modified
without benefit of an on-site inspection and the structural code is not known .

(c) The master file might contain a two-digit number


representing a physical vulnerability code. This number is not entered as the
structural code since it does not conform to the current structural codes
descriptions.

(d) Select the structural code from those shown in


figure 8-6.
(

8-9
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 8-6
(
Structural Codes

Type of Structure (First Entry)

1. Quonset Type or Light Steel Frame - Butler Type


2. Wood Frame
3. Wallbearing
4. Steel Frame
5. Reinforced Concrete Frame
6. Composite Steel/Concrete Frame
7. Tunnels and Earth-Covered Structures
8. Mines and Deep Underground Facilities

Type of Floor and Roof System (Second Entry)

1. Sawn Timber Joist


2. Timber I-Beam, Manufactured Wood Truss, or Composite Timber/Steel Joist
3. Glued-Laminated Beam and Joist
4. Precast Concrete Plank or Tee Sections
5. Reinforced Concrete Cast-in Place Slab
6. Reinforced Concrete Flat Plate
7. Steel Deck w/Concrete Topping (Steel Frame Supported)
8. Steel Deck With or Without Concrete Topping
(Open-Web Steel Joist Supported)
9. Lightweight Tension Structure (
0. Light Metal Roof
A. Wood Decking on Metal Joist (Open Web)
B. Steel Box Panels

Type of Wall (Third Entry)

1. Masonry, Unreinforced
2. Masonry, Reinforced
3. Reinforced Concrete
4. Precast Concrete
5. Infill Masonry
6. Corrugated Metal
7. Architectural Cladding
8. Wood or Metal Siding on Sheathing on Wood or Metal Studs
9. Stucco on Wood or Metal Studs
0. Glass
A. Brick Veneer on Wood or Metal Studs
B. Log Construction

8-10
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

If the structure is a special facility, i.e. numbers 7


( (e)
and 8 under type of structure, enter 7 or 8 in the first space of the
structural code and X in the second and third spaces.

(f) If the structure is a lightweight tension structure,


enter X in the first and third spaces of the structural codes and 9 in the
second space.

(10) Item 10, FSA No. Enter your FSA Certification Number. If the
surveyor is not certified, item 10 must be completed by a FEMA-certified FSA.
The Emergency Management Systems Support Division, Engineering and Survey
Branch maintains the listing of all FEMA certified FSA's.

(11) Item 11, Change Existing Record To. Enter the corrected SL
and FAG number.

(12) Item 12, Building Name. Enter the Building Name, abbreviated
only where necessary, not to exceed 22 spaces. If a building has no name,
enter a descriptive name, e.g., Apt. Bldg., Off. Bldg., et cetera.

(13) Item 13, Building No. Enter the building number, not to
exceed six spaces. Right justify the entry and suppress leading zeros. The
following guidance is provided:

(a) A hyphen(-) is an acceptable entry, but must occupy one


space.
( (b) Letters may be used as part of the building number, e.g.,
for 115A North Street, enter 115A.

(c) Omit fractions if included in the building number, e.g.,


for 118-1/2 Elm Street, enter 118.

(d) Facilities with more than one building number, enter the
smallest number, e.g., 107-109 Cranston Street, enter 107.

(e) Facilities without building numbers may be left blank;


however, where possible, assign a number and enter an asterisk(*) in the
rightmost space of item 12, building name data block. Some examples of
possible street number assignments are shown in figure 8-7.

(14) Item 14 Direction. Enter the direction when it precedes the


street name. Left justify the entry. If directional data are not applicable,
leave blank. The following are three examples of directional information:

(a) E. West Liberty Street, enter E;

(b) SW New York Avenue, enter SW; and

(c) Georgia Avenue, NW, leave blank. If direction


follows street name, enter direction with street name in item 15.

8-11
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 8-7

Building Number Examples


(

banple 1 Example 2 Example 3 gJ


CTJI
m
DID ITJ [DI] IT]~[!] I 302 I H
A C
• D E F G

IC L M

ITfil [JJ [2!I]


e-mple 4

Example 1. Enter either 106 or 108. Building B falls in number


sequence between buildings A and C and since even numbers are assigned to one
side of the s.treet and odd numbers to the other, either 106 or 108 may be
assigned.

Example 2. Enter 208 for building D and 212 for building F. Where
buildings are on corners, ensure that the number assigned falls in proper (
sequence to buildings in adjacent blocks. In all cases, the number assigned
should be as close as possible to the nearby building numb~r.

Example 3. Enter 302 for buildings H, I, and J. All buildings in a


complex and within the same block should be assigned the same number, unless
each building has its own number. If more than one building in the complex is
surveyed, differentiate in item 12, building name data block. The same
rationale may be applied to buildings located on a university campus where
street numbers are not assigned.

Example 4. Enter 201. If there are no buildings on the same side


of the street and in the same block, find the first numbered building in the
adjacent blocks to the right and/or left and assign the appropriate odd or
even number which falls between the two addresses.

(15) Item 15, Street Name. Enter street name, abbreviated where
necessary, not to exceed 15 spaces. The following guidelines will be used:

(a) Abbreviations. Vowels may be dropped where necessary,


beginning with the rightmost vowel in the rightmost word. Do not drop vowels
which start the beginning of a word.

8-12
(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(b) Common Abbreviations. Common abbreviations such as ST


( (Saint) and FT (Fort) which can be confused with other words should not be
used; instead spell them out .

(c) Compound Names. Compound street names such as Queens


Chapel Road will be entered with spaces between the words and abbreviated as
appropriate.

(d) No Street Name. Enter the appropriate description of the


facility location if not situated on a street and record an asterisk(*) in
the rightmost space of the data field, e.g., for the intersection of State
Highway 65 and US Highway 95, enter INT S65 US95*.

(e) Numeric Street Name. Numbers will be used where


appropriate. The following are examples of numeric street names:

(i) Fourteenth Street, enter 14TH ST.

(ii) 12-1/2 Street, enter 12-1/2 ST.

(iii) Half Street, enter HALF ST.

(f) Post Office Box . PO Box will not be used.

(g) Punctuation. Period(.) and comma(,) will be omitted.


The hyphen(-) may be used to indicate the word and; however, the hyphen must
I have a space preceding and following, except when used to connect a whole
number and fraction, as in the following:

(i) Elm and Cedar Streets, enter EI.M - CEDAR STS.

(ii) Eleven and One Half Street, enter 11-1/2 ST.

(h) Street Designation . Street, road, route, highway, etc . ,


designations should be abbreviated into two letters; the first letter of the
word followed, in most instances, by the first consonant . Examples of street
abbreviations are shown in figure 8-8.

8-13
FEMA Manual 9620.l October 24, 1990

¥, Figure 8-8

Standard Street Abbreviations


(

Alley ............... AL
Avenue .............. AV
Boulevard ........... BL
Circle .............. CR
Court ............... CT
Drive ............... DR
Extension ........... EX
Lane ................ LN
Parkway ............. PR
Pike ................ PK
Place ............... PL
Plaza ............... PZ
Road ................ RD
Street .............. ST
Terrace ............. TR
Way ................. WY
Square .............. SQ

(16) Item 16. City. Enter the city name, abbreviated where
necessary, not to exceed 11 spaces. In rural areas, outside a place, enter
the MCD name, item 4. Do not use the ZIP code city name in lieu of an actual
city name.

(17) Item 17. State. Enter the standard state alpha code.

(18) Item 18, ZIP Code. Enter the appropriate ZIP Code as
published in the US Postal Service National ZIP Code Directory.

(19) Item 19. Nearest Cross Street. Enter the name or route number
of the nearest intersection (cross street, highway, or rural road) not to
exceed 15 spaces; abbreviations are acceptable. If two or more intersections
are equidistant, use the most prominent intersection. If all are equally
prominent, select any one. Do not leave blank. Enter the best description
possible.

(20) Item 20. Use Code.

(a) Select the use code(s) from those listed in figure 8-9
that best represent the current use of the building. Up to three sets of
codes may be selected.

8-14
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Figure 8-9

Use Class Codes

Residential Commercial (Cont.)


11 Apartments 56 Restaurants/cafeteria/
12 Dormitory/barracks bars/snack bars
13 Row houses and duplexes 57 contractors/building
14 Motels/tourist courts supplies
15 Condominiums 59 Others
16 Nursing/convalescent homes
17 Hotels Industrial
19 Other 61 Factory/plant/
manufacturing center
Educational 62 Food processing plants
21 Kindergarten/elementary 69 Other
school
22 Junior high/high/ Amusement/Meetings
preparatory school 71 Theatre/auditorium
23 College/university 72 Community center
24 Business/professional 73 Bowling lanes
25 Correctional schools 74 Fraternal/sorority hall
26 hi.brary or museum 75 Health club/fitness
27 Gymnasium Centers
29 Other 76 Senior citizens centers
79 Other
( Religious
31 Church/synagogue Transportation
32 Retreat/monastery/convent 81 Railroad station/terminal
33 Church hall/recreation 82 Bus station/terminal
center 83 Airport terminal
39 Other 84 Airport hangars
85 Marine terminal
Government and Public Service 86 Automotive repair and
41 Hospital storage
42 Clinic/medical office 87 Automotive sales
43 Utilities 88 Gasoline service stations
44 Communication facilities 89 Other
45 Offices 8A Trucking warehouse/
46 Jails/prisons/correctional distribution terminal
institutions
47 Armories/monuments/memorials Miscellaneous
48 Fire Station 99 Categories not covered
49 Other above
4A Post Offi_ce
4B Police/Sheriff station

Commercial
51 Offices
52 Food Stores
53 Stores other than Food Stores
(
54 Warehouses
55 Banks/financial_ institutions

8-15
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(b) The first set should represent the predominant use. If


the building has only one use code, enter the code under item 20-A and a zero (
in the rightmost space of items 20-B and 20-C.

(c) The second and third codes should describe the next most
predominant uses of the building.

(21) Item 21, Own. Enter the appropriate ownership code from those
listed in figure 8-10.

Figure 8-10

Ownership Codes

The code in this section represents who the


owner actually is, rather than the tenant.

1. Federal Government
2. State government
3. Local government
4. Private
5. Other

(22) Item 22, Special Facility (SF).

figure 8-11.
(a) Enter the appropriate SF code from those listed in (
(b) If a building exists over a mine, cave, tunnel, subway,
or underpass (SF Codes 1-5), submit two DIF's, one for the SF and one for the
aboveground structure. Treat SF's with codes SF 1-5 as basements.

Figure 8-11

Special Facilities Codes

1. Mines
2. Cavern or cave
3. Tunnel
4. Subway
5. Underpass
6. Storage-type
8. Inactive military works
9. Other
0 Not SF

8-16
August 27, 1991 FEMA Manual 9620.1, Chg 1

( (23) Item 23 1 Emergency Operating Center (EOC). Enter 1 to


indicate that the facility or part of the facility serves as an EOC, Include
EOC in the building name, item 12. Enter Oto indicate facility is not an
EOC.

(24) Item 24 1 Stories. Enter the total stories excluding


basements. If there are no stories aboveground, enter O.

(25) Item 25 1 Floor System Over Basement.

(a) Enter the code from figure 8-12 to indicate the type of
floor over the basement.

(b) Enter O if there is no basement.

(c) When more than one type of system exists, enter the
weaker system if it is more than 10 percent of the basement unless the system
is over an EOC. If the system is less than 10 percent but involves the EOC,
it should be indicated.

(d) When information for a building which is already in the


master file is being modified and submitted for processing without benefit of
an on-site inspection or survey information already on file, enter 99 in *
item 25 to indicate no data.

Figure 8-12
( (Part 1 of 2 )

Type of Floor System Over the Basement

1. Sawn lumber joists with plywood/sheathing


2. Manufactured lumber joists with plywood/sheathing
3. Glued-laminated beams and joists with plywood or planks
4. Heavy timber beams and joists with planks

Concrete
5. Reinforced concrete one-way joist or one-way slab
6. Reinforced concrete flat plate or flat beam
7. Reinforced concrete flat slab
8. Reinforced concrete two-way slab
9. Reinforced concrete waffle slab
10. Precast prestressed concrete tees, double tees, or
hollow-core plank

Comb i nation
11. Open-web steel joists with reinforced concrete slab
12. Structural steel floor frame with reinforced concrete
slab
13. Manufactured wood/steel composite open-web joists
with plywood
14. Compacted dirt or earth fill, undisturbed soil or rock

8-17
FEMA Manual 9620.1
October 24, 1990

Figure 8-12 (Part 2 of 2)


(
One-Way and Two-Way Slabs

r ---1 ,-------7
I I
I
I -1
I
- .
SUPPORTING - I- I

+
wALLS OR BEAMS I
I I I
I _1 I I
I I I I
I ONE-WAY I I I
SPAN TWO-WA,Y SPAN
I I I ! I
L ___ ...J
L - - - -~ - - - - .J

Slab Bays of Long Rectangular Shape Indicate


one-way Slab; Squarish Shape Indicates Two-way.

(26) Item 26, Auxiliary Power. Auxiliary power procedures are as


follows:

(a) If the building has an emergency generator, the surveyor


is to determine the number of days the generator can be operated based on the
on-site fuel supply. It is not anticipated that any measurements of fuel
tanks will be required. Rather, the building owner or engineer should be (
asked.

(b) Enter the number of days in the space provided.

(c) If there is a generator, but the amount of fuel is


unknown, enter X in the rightmost space.

(d) Enter O in the rightmost space if no emergency generator


exists.

(e) Emergency generators powered by natural gas qualify as


auxiliary power.

(f) Enter X if there is no natural gas storage tank or if the


number of days the natural gas could support the generator is not known.

(27) Item 27, Latitude. Enter the degrees, minutes, and the
seconds of latitude for the facility. If seconds cannot be determined
accurately, enter to the nearest ten seconds.

(28) Item 28, Longitude. Enter the degrees, minutes, and the
seconds of longitude for the facility. If seconds cannot be determined
accurately, enter to the nearest ten seconds.

(29) Item 29, Hazardous Materials. Enter 1 to indicate Yes, and 0


to indicate No in the spaces provided.

8-18
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(a) Hazardous Materials On Site.


(
(i) Significant quantities of unusually hazardous
materials must be on the facility's site for this item to pertain. The fuel
supply for an emergency power generator would not be considered significant
enough to meet this definition, nor would small quantities of solvents,
cleaning compounds, lubricants or other materials commonly found in machine
shops, vehicle maintenance garages, or janitorial closets.

(ii) In general, a barrel or a larger container of a


flammable, explosive, or toxic substance must be present to answer Yes to this
question. One exception is laboratory chemicals, including radioactive
substances, which are usually found in smaller quantities, but which would
still qualify as hazardous materials under this category.

(iii) Buildings which contain an abundance of hazardous


materials which cannot be moved will not be surveyed.

(b) Hazardous Materials Off Site.

(i) If there is within a quarter mile of the


facility's site a major source of hazardous materials, then the answer to
this question will be Yes.

(ii) The following would be major sources of hazardous


materials:
(

~- Paint factories;

Q. Chemical plants;

£. Plating factories;

Q. Petrochemical refineries;

g. Storage facilities;

f. Cargo ship loading areas;

_g. Truck freight depots;

h. Railroad freight yards;

i,_. Sewage treatment plants; and

i- Electronic semiconductor
fabrication plants.

(iii) Many ordinary types of businesses commonly found


in commercial districts that contain hazardous materials, such as gas stations
or dry cleaners, are not considered as major sources of hazardous materials.

8-19
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(30) Item 30, Year Built. Enter the year the facility was built .
If unknown, estimate the year and enter O in the leftmost space and the
estimated year in the remaining three spaces , e . g., 1951 ( estimated), enter
(
0951.

~ (31) Item 31a, Handicapped Access (First Story).


'
(a) Enter 1 to indicate that the building has architectural
or engineering features to facilitate entry into the first or ground story by
physically handicapped persons.

(b) Enter 0 if provisions have not been made to accommodate


the physically handicapped or no aboveground stories present .

* (32) Item 31b, Handicapped Access (Basement Story) .

(a) Enter 1 to indicate that the building has architectural


or engineering features to facilitate entry into the basement.

(b) Enter O if provisions have not been made to accommodate


the physically handicapped or no basement present. If an elevator is present
enter "0" since survey is performed on a power off basis.

b. Section B, NFS Data.

(1) Item 1. Building Population. Enter an estimated building


population for the entire building. The closest estimate will probably be
obtained from the building manager. Minimum time should be spent on this (
item. The following may be used to estimate the building population:

(a) Use 3.6 people per unit for apartment buildings .

(b) Use one person per 100 square feet of gross area for
office buildings.

(2) Item 2, Fire. Enter the overall fire vulnerability code


developed on FEMA Form 85-7.

(3) Item 3, Air Source. Enter 1, 2, or 3 to indicate whether the


ventilation to the lowest story is mechanical, natural, or both. The codes
are defined as follows:

(a) Code 1 - mechanical ventilation;

(b) Code 2 - natural ventilation; and

(c) Code 3 - mechanical and natural ventilation.

8-20
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(4) Item 4. Type of Shelter Signs. Select the code representing


( the type of shelter sign existing on the exterior of the building at the time
the survey was conducted. The codes are as follows:

(a) Code 0 - no sign posted;

(b) Code 1 fallout shelter sign posted;

(c) Code 2 tornado shelter sign posted; and

(d) Code 3 - both fallout and tornado signs posted.

(5) Items 5-11. Blast Shelter and Fallout Shelter.

(a) Relative blast surveys are conducted only in high


nuclear-hazard areas and limited to buildings with fully buried basements,
whereas fallout surveys are conducted in both reception and care and ~1igh
nuclear-hazard areas.

(b) Relative blast shelter survey data are reported where


applicable for special facilities and fully buried basements.

(c) Fallout shelter survey data are reported where applicable


for special facilities, basement(s), the first story, and the second story and
above.

(d) Figure 8-13 indicates the entries allowed in items 5 and


7 on the DIF.

Figure 8-13

Allowable Entries (Items 5 and 7)

Item 5. Relative Item 7. Fallout


Blast Shelter
Protection Basis
Location Codes

Special Facility A A, N, p
Basement(s) C, D, or G N, p
First Story A, N, p
Story 02 and above A, p

(6) Item 5. Blast Code.

(a) Enter the relative blast protection code determined on


FEMA Form 85-7. The codes are explained in figure 8-14.

(b) Blast code assignment is based on the weakest significant


(over 1/3 of the usable area) portion of the structure. Structural
differences may occur in rambling structures where basement overhead floor
systems differ, apertures or total stories vary, or where add-on construction
exists.

8-21
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 8-14 (
Blast Codes

Description

A Special facilities (mine, cavern, cave, tunnel,


subway, storage-type, inactive military works,
other)

C Basement(s) of structures where the overhead


floor system is other than: wood, flat plate,
or flat beam.

D Basement(s) of structures where the overhead


floor system is wood.

G Basement(s) of structures where the overhead


floor system is flat plate or slab supported
by a flat beam.

(7) Item 6. Blast Spaces. Enter the blast spaces for the
basement. If there is no basement, items 5.a through 11.a must be left blank.
(
(8) Item 7-11. Fallout Shelter by PF Category Groupings. The
fallout shelter spaces by category groupings are determined from the EASY II
Analysis, or other PF category computation as defined in figure 8-15.

Figure 8-15

PF Category Groupings

PF Cat Groupings PF Range

10 - 19
20 - 39
40 - 99
100 and greater

(9) Item 7. Basis.

(a) Enter the applicable basis code for the shelter location.

(b) If there is an entry in item 7, there must be an entry in


at least one of the items 8, 9, 10 or 11 for the basement.

8-22
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.l

(
(c) Combine the spaces when a basement and subbasement(s)
exist.

(d) If there is an entry in item 7 for the first story and


the second story and above, there must be an entry in one or more of items 8,
9 , 10 or 11 for the applicable story .

(e) The basis codes are explained in figure 8-16.

Figure 8-16

Basis Codes

Basis
Code

A Area . Aboveground areas where adequate ventilation and


apertures exist on each story.

N Natural Ventilation. All belowground and first story


areas having limited or no apertures as analyzed by the natural
ventilation analysis procedures . This computation will be made
for all basement areas irrespective of the number of apertures.
(
p Auxiliary Power. Buildings which have standby auxiliary power
will be identified in section A, FEMA Form 85-5.

Before shelter spaces are computed on a P basis, the


fuel supply must be available for 7 days and the generator
capacity must be adequate to satisfy all power requirements.

If the generator can supply only emergency lights,


shelter spaces are to be computed on the N basis.

(10) Item 8, PF Category 0 S:gaces. Enter PF category O spaces for


the applicable shelter location.

(11) Item 9, PF Category 1 S:gaces. Enter PF category 1 spaces for


the applicable shelter location.

(12) Item 10, PF Category 2-3 S:gaces. Enter PF category 2 - 3 spaces


for the applicable shelter location .

(13) Item 11, PF Category 4+ S:gaces. Enter PF category 4• spaces


for the applicable shelter location .
(

8-23
FEMl>. ~.anual 9620.1, Chg 1 August 27, 1991

c. Section c, Reception And Care Survey Data. (


( 1) Item 1, Basement/sl.

(a) Area /sq ft). Enter the total floor area located in all
basements and subbasements. Use exterior dimensions. If there is no
basement, enter zero (0) in the rightmost block.

(b) Percentage Usable. Enter the percentage of the total


basement and subbasement floor areas that is usable. Private living quarters
are to be treated as unusable area. If none of the area is usable, enter 00.

(2) Item 2, First Floor.

(a) Area /sq ft). Enter the total floor area of the first
floor. Use exterior dimensions.

(b) Percentage Usable. Enter the percentage of the total


first floor area that is usable. If none of the area is usable, enter 00.
Private living quarters are not to be treated as usable area.

( 3) Item 3, Second Floor and Above.

(a) Total Area /sq ft). Enter the total floor area of the
second and subsequent floors. Use exterior dimensions.

(b) Percentage Usable. Enter the percentage of the total (


floor area of the second and subsequent floors that is usable. If none of the
area is usable, enter 00. Private living quarters are not to be treated as
usable area.

(4) Item 4, Roof.

(a) Surface Area /sq ft}.

(i) Enter the total estimated area of the roof surface


of the buii~ing. This is the actual area and not the plan area. Do not
* include eaves or overhangs.

(ii) If the area in items 1, 2, 3 or 4 above exceeds


99,999 square feet, the facility may be subdivided into separate buildings and
assigned separate facility numbers.

(iii) If the facility is entirely underground, such as a


mine or cave, enter zero in line 4.

(b) Percentage of Building Under Long Span Roof.

(i) Estimate and enter the percentage of the building


area (plan) which is under a long span roof.

(ii) For the purpose of this survey, a long span roof


is defined as an unsupported span exceeding 80 feet in length, such as might
be found over an auditorium or gymnasium.

8-24
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.l

( enter 99.
(iii) If the entire building is under a long span roof,

(iv) Enter O if no long span roof exists.

(5) Item 5. Exterior Wall Length (Feet). Enter, in feet, the


averaga lengths of the A front and B side of the building.

(a) Front. Compute the average front wall length by summing


the total length of all exterior walls facing both to the front and to the
rear of the building, then divide by two.

(b) Side. Compute the average side wall length by summing


the total length of all exterior side walls of the building, then divide by
two.

(i) Twice the sum of the front and side lengths should
equal the perimeter of the building.

(ii) If either computed average length equals or


exceeds 999 feet, enter 999.

(iii) If the facility surveyed is entirely under the


ground with undefined dimensions such as a mine or a cave, enter zero in the
rightmost spaces of the Exterior Wall Length data blocks.
/
(iv) If the building has an irregular shape then the
perimeter of the building should be divided by 4 and the result entered for
both the front and side.

;,. (6) Item 6. Wall Exposure. Ground to 1st Floor(+/- Feet).

(a) Wall exposure, ground to first floor, is the average


distance from the ground level to the first floor.

(b) A plus (+) indicates the first floor is above ground


level and a minus(-), below ground.

(c) If exposure equals or exceeds 9 feet, enter 9. If 50


percent or more of a particular wall is attached to another building, enter X.
An X indicates that a side is mutually shielded.

(d) Building sides are identified as side A, building address


side . Sides B, C, and Dare assigned clockwise from side A.

(e) Enter X for each side of a Special Facility that has 50


percent or more of its length covered by earth or similar barrier.

(7) Item 7. Best PF Category (Lowest Storvi. Enter the best


existing PF category calculated for the basement. If no basement, enter the
best existing PF category calculated for the first story of the building.

(8) Item 8. Adequate Heat. Enter the appropriate code to indicate


whether the heating system for the building is adequate as described in
figure 8-17.

8-25
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 8-17
(
Heat Codes

Description

0 No. Inadequate Heat. The heating system


handles less than half the building.

Description

1 Yes. Adequate Heat. The heating system


handles more than half the building.

(9) Item 9. Medical Facilities. Enter 1 to indicate the building


has medical facilities (hospital, clinic, doctor's office, dentist's office,
convalescent home, sanatorium, etc.), and Oto indicate medical facilities do
not exist.

(10) Item 10, Pharmacy Facilities. Enter 1 to indicate the


building has a pharmacy which dispenses drugs, and Oto indicate that pharmacy
facilities do not exist.

(11) Item 11, Water Source. Enter the water source code as
described in figure 8-18.
(
Figure 8-18

Water Source Codes

Description

0 No water supply
1 Domestic or industrial well
2 Public system (reservoir, deep
well, etc.)
3 Other

(12) Item 12, Dining Facilities. Exclude private living quarters


when collecting data for items 12-15.

(a) Dining Facilities Type. Enter the dining facilities type


code as shown in figure 8-19. Provisions for food storage, preparation, and
service areas must be available to qualify as a dining facility.

8-26
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620,1

Figure 8-19
(
Dining Facilities Type Codes

Description

0 None
1 Restaurant
2 Cafeteria
3 Snack bar
4 Other

(b) Seats. Enter the seating capacity. The seating capacity


is the total number of people that can be seated normally at tables and/or
counters at one time. Enter a zero in the rightmost space if there are no
seats.

(c) Kitchen Burners.

(i) Enter the number of kitchen burners or equivalent


cooking units (ECU's) in the building.

(ii) Enter a zero in the rightmost space if there are


no kitchen burners.

(iii) For the purpose of this survey, ECU's may be


computed as follows:

~- Each square foot of grill equals one ECU;

Q. Each cubic foot of oven space equals one ECU;


and

£. Institutional cooking kettles with built-in


heating elements or deep fryers each count as one ECU.

(13) Item 13, Commodes. Enter the total number of commodes


existing in the building. Do not include urinals. If number equals or
exceeds 99, enter 99. Enter zero if there are no commodes.

(14) Item 14, Showers. Enter the number of showers in the


building. Where stall showers are provided, the number to be entered is the
number of stalls. For open shower areas, the number of shower heads
determines the number of showers. Enter zero if there are no shower heads.

(15) Item 15, Beds. Enter the total number of beds existing in the
building. If the number equals or exceeds 999, enter 999. If none, enter a
zero.

8-27
FEMA .Manual 9620.1, Chg 1 August 27, 1991

(16) Item 16, Fallout shelter Upgradability.


(
(a) All usable shelter area located in the basement and first
floor will be upgradable except where structural characteristics prohibit
expedient upgrading. Figure 8-20 is provided to assist in determining
upgradability.

(b) Expedient shielding techniques used to upgrade RAC


facilities consist of mounding soil against exposed walls and, in one- and
two-story buildings, placing soil overhead.

(c) The volume of soil required for upgrading will be


calculated by computer means from survey data.

(d) Enter zero if the building is not upgradable.

* (e) Enter 1 if only the basement is upgradable.

* (f) Enter 2 if only the 1st story is upgradable.

* (g) Enter 3 if the basement and 1st story is upgradable.

Figure 8-20

Nonupgradable Conditions
(
Not Upgradable
One-Story Buildings BSMT 1st STORY

Roof (weak) X
Roof> 30° slope X
Terrain> 30° decline X X
Apertures> 50% any side (1st story) X
Butler or similar type metal X
Floor to ceiling height greater than 20 ft. X
First story private residence X X

Not Upgradable
Two or More Stories BSMT 1st STORY

Terrain> 30° decline X X


Apertures> 50% (1st story) X
Second story private residence X

Not Upgradable
Special Facilities BSMT 1st STORY

Mines, caves, tunnels, subways and


underpasses. (Upgrading not required) N/A N/A

8-28
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(17) Item 17, Distance to Soil.


(
(a) Enter the appropriate code to indicate the distance to
soil that could be used to upgrade the facility's fallout protection.

(b) Enter "1" if the soil is from 0 yards to 20 yards away.

(c) Enter "2" if the soil is 20-100 yards away.

(d) Enter "3" if the soil is 100 or more yards away.

(18) Surveyed By and Date. Enter the name of the surveyor who
performed the survey and the date the facility was surveyed.

(19) Checked By and Date. Enter the name of the person who checked
the form and the date.

d. Survey Codes. The survey codes shown in figure 8-21 are used
frequently by surveyors in the NFS and RAC surveys.

8-29
>'rj

~
FACILITY NUMBER CODE fFlrsl digill SPECIAL FACILITIES CODES USE CLASS CODES
The code-s. IS described below, will be 1 Mines Iunicer.tatll!D
ptace<.I 1s lhe first digtl or the lelt-mosl ligure 2 Cnwern or C11vo Rcsldcntld 81 Rallroad Stat'lon/Tarisln1l
11
ol.lht? s--digil lacilily number to idenlity
sensitive Fedenl facllilles and certain open
J Tunnel
<4 Subway 12
Aparca.anu
Doraltory/1,arrack.s 82 !u1 Scation/Tarrdnal ::s:
Ill
1l Rov house• and duplex•• 8) Airport T•r•lnal
facilities . A sensitive Jacilily as used here, is 5 Underpass ::l
14 Moteh/tourht couru 84 Airport llangars
one which 1equ11es I secutily clearance for 6 S1orag1Hype (::
8 lnacIIve military wo,ks 15 Condomlnlwu BS Harine Tat•lnal
en1r1nce. 16 Nuralng/conval••c•nt home& 86 Autoaotlve R~p•lr and Ill
9 Other I-'
Flr>I dl9II (0-9 & A-F do nol apply lo "RAC O Nol Special Faclllly 17 Hotels Storage
only" Flclllllto), 19 Ocher 87 Auto,.oclve Salaa \0
STRUCTURAL CODES 88 Caaolln• S•rvlce Statlon1
·o Facllilles not covered below Edu,; 1; l r,nal 89 Other °°'
N
A Army Nallonal Guard Armories The strnclurnl codes are inlended lo 21 i:.indergarten/ehiaenury SA Trucking Uanhousa/ 0
rcnresenl s1,uctu,al characterls11cs lhnl school Dl1trlb1.1tlon Tar1alnal
B Army Reserve Cenlers dclcmune lhe resistance ol a suuclure lo
holh 1,,1c,,,1 i\nd verhcal loi'ds. The litst hr.Id
Junior high/high/
prep•r•tory school
.....
C NAV/MAR Corps nes1trve T,"ining 1nd1c;1lcs the lypo of slruc.lme or h;,nun!J ttLJul.lA!l.lilliI
ll Col lege/unlvenlty 99 Catagorh• not covered
Centers system. lhc second llcld im.J1cntes the floor 24 Bus lness/prof esaional
;md ,ool syslem. and the lhud hclc.J ind1ca1cs above
21 Correctional schools
0 Ai, force Reserve Cenle,s the wall syslem. 26 Llbrary or auseuo STATE ANO REGION CODES
E Ai, NA1ioni'I Guard Armotles 17 Cymnaslwa
Inc of Structuu Cftrst: £otctl 29 Ocher (lncfudlnt U .S. T•ulloAH of Ch1,,n and lht
UorUu,n 1,h,tuu hl,nd1J
F Co:isl Guard
Quonuc Typ• or Llghc Sue\ Fu•• • Buthr Type n,glo" s1,l,Abbt"l1llo,1,
U.S. Army - open Uood fr•ni•
Wu1.!na
31 Church/synagogue CT, MA. LC(. NU, Al, YT
2 U.S. Army - sensilive Vellbearlng 32 Retreat/monastary/convent NJ, NY, f'R. VI
4 Scee\ Frarae 33 Church hall/recreation
3 U.S. Navy - open S R.•lntorced Concreca Fr••• center Ill DC. OE, MO, PA. VA, W\/

• U.S. N"·,y - sensilive 6 Co,-poslte Steel/Concreca Franie 39 Other IV Al, fl. QA.. kV, MS, NC
7 Tunnah and [arch•Covered Scrucc:uus SC. 1N
5 U.S. Air Force - open I Hlnes and Dup Underground Facllltlu Gci\·rrnment and Public Secvlce V ll. IN. Ml. I.AN, 011, WI C/) >rj
41 Hospital vr AR. lA, NI.A . OK. t X (:: I-'•
6 U .S. Air Force - sensitive
l.!2.L.2C rtoor and BogLm_u. Lil!S.2nLin.tul 42 Cl inic/K•dlca.l o!fic• VII IA, KS, MO, NE ti (J'Q
DOE, NAS/1, NSA - open 4] Utllitles <! ~
00 Sa\ffl Tl•b•r Jolsc :..:. Communication facllltics VIII co. MT, NO, sn. UT. WY (I) ti
a DOE. NASA, NSA. - sensilivo OCfices Al. CA, UI, NV, CU, UA '-<! (I)
I
l,..l
9 Olhe, Fede,al Government - sensitive
Th1ber I-Be•ra, H•nuhctured \lood Truu, or Co11poslt1
Tl11,ber/Stul Jolst
4~
..:.o Jal ls/pr1sons/cornctlon•l " ... K. 10. on. WA
0 institutions () 00
l Cluad•Larwlnacad lurw and Jolac
X No qualifying fallout sheller space 47 Arraories/monW1encs/ae11oriala 0 I
l.i Pracast Concrete Phnk or Ta, S•ctlons PROTECTION FACTOR p.. N
S R•ln!arced Concr1ta Cut•in Place Slab
.. s fire Station
NOTE - Includes: Privately-owned; Slille i.9 Other CATEGORIES
(I) I-'
nnd local governmenl; federal Governmenl & Reln!orced Concret• Flat Plate l..A Post Offlca Ul
oll•ce buildings: M1htary indus111al plants and 7 Steel Oeck v/Concnta Topping (Sual. Frarae Supporud) 46 Poltce/SherlH Station In order 10 ,educe lhe voluminous p,01ecllon
m1hl11ry supply 1c11wil1es nol having Quar1e,s 8 Ste•\ Deck Uith or Ulthout Concrete Topping faclot numbers 10 1 manageable quanllty,
and family housing: U.S. Army C1v1I Wotks (Open-Uab Steel Jolie Supported) p,01ec1ion lac1011 are grouped into Pf
sltuctu,es nol localed on an aclive military rn~tlll~l cnle9011es and ranges as shown below:
9 Llght,.,•ight T•nslon Struccur•
1nsl;ill;ihon: PuvAlely-owned fac1h1es 111 wtuch )l Offices
m1hla1y ;ic11v111es a,e lenanls. 0 Light Hee.al Roo( r,ol~cllon factor (PF) n,ducllon llclor
A Uood Decking on Hatal Johe (Open Veb) )2 Food Stores
B Steel Box Panels n Stores other than Food Store Cal~go,y nangt R1ngf
54 Uarahou1a1
B Banks/Flnanclal Jnstltuttonl 8 Over 1.000 0010, leu
r.x~•lLJibll'.!LfntI.tl 1 S00-1 .000 .002-.001
)6 Ruuurantl/CaC.tad•/ 2so-•oe
OWNERSHIP CODES G .004-.00l
H11onry, Unrelnt'orccd Bars/Snack ht'I 5 1so-2•9 .001-.00•
0
The code In thi, scclion ,eprcscnls who lhC?
ownr.t acluaJly 1s, 1o1Uler lho1n lhc 1en,1nl.
Haaonry, Raln(orced
Re ln(orcad Concnu
S7 Contuecou/8ulhJln1
Suppl ha •
J
100-1•9
70-99
.010-.007
.01•-.010 (")
rt
)9 Othera 2 •0-69 .Ol5-.0U
I fedcr,I Government 4 Pr•ca1t Concreta :10-J9 .050- Ol5 0
I
2 SI.tie Go~emmenl 5 In Cl 11 Hasonry 0 10-19 , 100-.050 o'
:J Local Governmcnl 6 Corrugated Hetal ln!!!1u.cla.l 1-9 1.000-,100 (I)
6l factory/Plant/ X
-4 Pt1vollt 7 Archluccuc-•l ClaJdlng ti
5 Olher t Uood oc Hetal Sldlng on Shaathlng on Uood or Haul StuJ H•nufacturlnt; Centat'
62 Food f'roceult1G, l'lanta SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
9 StucC:o on Uood or Hae,,\ Studs N
69 Other To elimlnale possible sornces ol e,,o,. lhe ~
0 Chu
A Brldc Veneer on Uood oc Hetal Scuds following alphabelic lelle, 1 will be p,inled 111
~:!t.!!tn.t.LH1rtlnt1 incJ1caled:
8 Log Conscrucclon
71 1l1eacu/Aucll torlrna
O wilh a slosh d
.....
72 Cornrwunicy Cancar \0
71 lovl lng l.anas I wilh • bar I \0
74 Futernal/Sororlcy 11•11 0
7~ llealth Cluh/rltmus Z wilh I ha, -4
C•ntera
S wllh a line ..S
76 Senlo!" Cl~l~11u Cantara
7? Other

.-......
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Chapter 9
(
Instructions for the Delete Facility Record Form

9-1. General. FEMA Form 85-36, (illustrated in figure 9-1), is used to


remove facilities from the nationwide NFS-RAC Inventory. FEMA Form 85-36
should be transmitted to the applicable regional survey office for processing.

9-2. Restrictions. Extreme caution should be exercised when deleting


facility records. Once a record is deleted, it cannot be reinstated unless a
new DIF is submitted.

9-3. Instructions for Completing the Delete Facility Record Form. The word
Item used in the following paragraphs corresponds with the items listed on
FEMA Form 85-36.

a. Item 1. Facility Name. Print the facility name as it appears in the


NFS All Facility Listing or the RAC All Facility Listing.

b. Item 2. Standard Location. Enter the regional, State, area, and


county code (RSAC) SL number exactly as it appears in the NFS all facility
listing or the RAC all facility listing. Do not enter more than one RSAC per
delete facility record form.
(
c. Item 3, Facility Number. Enter the facility number exactly as it
appears in the NFS all facility listing or the RAC all facility listing.

d. Remarks. The remarks area is provided for narrative comments.

e. Signature, Date, and Jurisdiction. Enter FEMA coordinator's


signature, date, and the jurisdiction represented.

9-1
O/IIIJNO.3067-0154 ~
Expire, Marclt31,1993
~
FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
:s:
Ill
NATIONAL FACILITY SURVEY AND RECEPTION AND CARE SURVEY
z ::,
Ill C:
(DELETE FACILITY RECORD! rt Ill
I-'• r--'
0
FACILITY INPUT DATA ::,
Ill
r--'

°'
N

1. Facility Name (As it appears


For submitting office

2. Standard Location 3. Ficilily No. S.011 U·Acl Ty Surv~v 0.Ue


For FEMA use only

Edir Otte Punch D1te Work Unit No.


1-rj
Ill
.
0
,-....
(")
in the All Facility Listing) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 I-'•
r--'
0 7 0 3 I-'•
rt
0 7 0 3 '<:
0 7 0 3 C/l
0 7 0 3 ,,
C:

0 7 0 3 <
(t)
0 7 0 3 '<:
1-rj
0 7 0 3 g;- 1-'·
00
0 7 0 3 p.
C:
'"1

N
I
0 7 0 3 :::-J
(t)
(t)

0 7 0 3 (")

0 7 0 3
(t)
'O

I
r--'
rt
0 7 0 3 I-'•
0 7 0 3 ,,..,
0,

0 7 0 3 ;...
0 7 0 3 ::,
p.

n
REMARKS:
THE BUILDINGS LISTED ABOVE ARE NONEXISTENT. THEY
,,
Ill
(t)
HAVE BEEN DEMOLISHED. RAZED, GUTTED BY FIRE OR
OTHERWISE MADE NONEXISTENT. C/l
,,
C: 0
(")
<
(t)
rt
0
SIGNATURE: '<: O'
Local Coordinator Dau (t)
'"1
N
JURISDICTION:
.
-l:--

,-....


0
FEMA Form 85-36, JUN 90 REPLACES PREVIOUS EDITIONS

---.,
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 10

Instructions For The NFS-RAC Data Base Correction Form

10-1. General. FEMA Form 85-28, NFS-RAC Data Base Correction Form, figure
10-1, is printed on self-carbon paper and is designed to correct selected data
fields that are recorded in the NFS-RAC master-file data base.

a. FEMA Form 85-28 provides an expedient means of updating such items


as name and address changes and other general data found in section A of FEMA
Form 85-5.

b. FEMA Form 85-28 is not used to modify information which was


submitted in sections Band C of FEMA Form 85-5.

c. When using the FEMA Form 85-28, the surveyor should review the
complete data file for the facility, and if it is determined that major
changes are required in order to meet current survey policy, or if essential
data such as floor over basement and structure type are missing, the changes
should be made using FEMA Form 85-5 instead of the FEMA Form 85-28.

d. Completed FEMA Form 85-28 will be submitted through prescribed


channels for processing.

10-2. Instructions for Completing the FEMA Form 85-28. All numeric entries
will be right justified and leading zeros entered. Items below relate to
items on the form. Caution should be exercised to ensure correct placement of
data with relationship to the number of positions allocated to the data field.

a. Item 1. Standard Location. Enter the standard location as it


appears on the DIF or NFS-RAC report being corrected. Do not enter more than
one RSAC per DBC Form.

b. Item 2. Facility Number. Enter the facility number as it appears


on the DIF or NFS-RAC report being corrected.

c. Item 3. Survey Office. Survey office code 08 is preprinted on the


form.

d. Item 4. Update Action. Update action code 02, which denotes a


change of one or more specified data fields, is preprinted on the form.

10-1
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

e. Item 5. Type. Enter the applicable code as to the condition of the


( NFS-RAC master file data base illustrated in figure 10-2.

Figure 10-2

NFS-RAC Master File Data Base Codes

Condition

1 NFS facility record only


2 RAC facility record only
3 NFS and RAC facility
record

f. Item 6. Survey Date. Enter the date the data for the facility was
updated, e.g., September, 1987 is entered as 0987.

g. Item 7. Data Field Code. Enter the appropriate data field code for
the data field to be changed as defined in figure 10-6. Note the code relates
directly to section designations and item numbers appearing on the DIF. For
example, section+ item+ sub-item= code (see figure 10-3).

Figure 10-3

Examples of DIF Section, Item, Sub-Item, Data Field Code


and Item Title

DIF Sub- Data Field


Section Item Code Item Title

A 13 Al30 Building Number


A 20 A A20A Use Code

h. Item 8, Change Existing Data to. Enter the corrected data for the
indicated data field code recorded in item 7. Make sure that the data
recorded relate to one data field only per line and that the information is
recorded in the same format as it is on the DIF, i.e., use the same number of
spaces.

(1) All numeric data fields will be right justified within their
data field and leading zeros entered.

(2) If total spaces filled in exceed the number of spaces allotted


on the DIF for that item, the data field will be truncated.

(3) Alphabetic data is left justified and the remainder of the


data field, if any, is not zero filled. For example, if the building number
is to read 7320 and the building name is to read Family Dollar Store, complete
the form as shown in figure 10-4.

10-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

i. Item 9, FEMA Use Only. Leave this section blank.


(
j. DBC Originator.

(1) Submitter and Title. Enter submitter's name and title on this
line. Enter date where indicated.

(2) Coordination. If the DBC form is prepared by State or local


personnel and requires validation, enter the regional engineer's name on the
coordination line. Enter the date where indicated.

(3) Remarks. The remarks area is provided for narrative comments.

Figure 10-4

Example of a Building Name and Number Change

7- Data 8.
Field Olange Existing Data to:
Code
23 l2'i 12, ~

~ I 1, /'
....... A M11 I y r {1 LL AIR! .sJ-r (1 i; ~
I I I I

AI ~ n 1 '::l ? /'
(

10-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(4) One or More Data Field Changes. One or more data fields
associated with one standard location and facility number may be changed at
one time. For example, if section A, item 12, building name, is to be changed
by the regional engineer and, at the same time, the MCD, and place codes are
to be added, complete the form as shown in figure 10-5.

Figure 10-5

Example of a Building Name, FIPS, and Place Codes Change

2. 2 ... 4e 11. 8. 1• Data -8 .

-tu
C
'· Standard Location ;J
Facility it; &
,.
Survey Field O,ange Existing Data to :
R SAC
1

I JI I
4 II
SLA

II' - .,
I 9
Number

- - Ir: 11.::. ~o 80
Jo.:
:::, ,( ~
~3 14 111 111 17 ,.
Da(~

Lr-]
-
,., I
-
zi 12:1

Al
Code
1:11 21

I? ~ rr1~ E IP 11 1 C IC ~ :, ' ~ ,~ ~ IL 117 11 IE


.
2 '
08 02
08 02
08 02
,~ °'
lh l:::i I/ it I IC
1....

1, 1, l'I? Ir I(

10-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1, Chg 1 August 27, 1991

Figure 10-6
(
NFS-RAC Master File Data Field Codes

(Column headings refer to the FEMA Form 85-28. Items A-1, A-2, A-5, A-6, A-7,
A-8, A-10 and A-11 cannot be updated by the DBC Form.)

No. of Data Field


Section Item Spaces Item Name Code

A 3 3 MCD (FIPS Code) A030


4 4 Place (FIPS Code) A040
9 3 Structure Type A090
12 22 Building Name Al20
13 6 Building Number Al30
14 2 Direction Al40
15 15 Street Name Al50
16 11 City Al60
17 2 State Al70
18 5 Zip Code Al80
19 15 Cross Street Al90
20a 2 Use Code A20A
20b 2 Use Code A20B
20c 2 Use Code A20C
21 1 ownership A210
22 1 Special Facility Code A220
23 1 EOC Code A230 (
24 3 Stories A240
25 2 Basement A250
26 2 Auxiliary Power A260
27 6 Latitude A270
28 7 Longitude A280
29a 1 Hazard. Materials On A29A
29b 1 Hazard. Materials Off A29B
* 30 4 Year Built A300
* 31a 1 Handicap (1st Story) A31A
* 31b 1 Handicap (Basement) A31B

10-6
(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 11

Instructions for the National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet

11-1. General. FEMA Form 85-49, figure 11-1, is printed on self-carbon paper
and assembled 25 sets.per pad, each set consisting of four color-coded sheets.
The first three copies (white, yellow, and blue) accompany each shipment of
source documents and the pink copy retained by the submitter. Disposition of
packing sheets is as follows:

a. The white original is retained by FEMA,

b. The yellow copy is retained by FEMA,

c. The blue copy is returned to the submitter; and

d. The pink copy is retained by the submitter.

e. The packing sheet will accompany each shipment and cover up to a


maximum of 200 source documents, provided that all documents are for the same
county and prepared on the same type form. There should be only one RSAC per
packing sheet.

f. The following forms require accompaniment of packing sheets:

( (1) FEMA Form 85-5;

(2) FEMA Form 85-28; and

(3) FEMA Form 85-36.

11-2. Instructions for Completing the National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet.
The packing sheet is completed as follows:

a. Form No. Enter the form number for the documents attached
thereto.

b. Field Office Code. Enter the two-digit field office (region)


code.

c. Shipment Number. Assign and enter a sequential shipment


number.

d. Date Shipped. Enter the date of shipment.

11-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Figure 11-1
(
National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet
0MB NO.3067-0154
Expires March31, 1993

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY FORM NO

FIELD OFFICE CODE


NATIONAL SHELTER SURVEY WORK UNIT NO
PACKING SHEET SHIPMENT NO

DATE SHIPPED DATE RECEIVED

STANDARD FACIL STANDARD FACIL STANDARD FAC IL SJANDARD FACIL


LOCATION NO LOCATION NO LOCATION NO LOCATION NO
'
1 26 51 76

2 27 52 77

3 28 53 . 78

4 29 54 79

5 30 55 80

6 31 5€ 81

7 32 57 82

8 33 58 83

9 34 59 84

10 35 60 85

11 36 61 il6

12 37 62 87

13

14
38

39
63

;;.:
ea
69
(
15 JO 65 ~

16 .J1 ,j6 91

17 42 e; 92

18 J3 68 93

19 JJ 69 9J

20 45 70 95

21 J6 71 96

22 .J7 /2 g;
I

23 J8 , .J <;E l
I
24 49 .. '*' I
i
25 50 " ' 00 I
I I
NO. NFS ONLY

NO. RAC ONLY


NO. A1-A11 ONLY

NO. A ONLY
II
NO. NFS/RAC COMBINATJON NO. DELETES

TOTAL DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED -- --·-------- -----·--

FEMA Form 85-49. JUN 90 REPLACES PREVIOUS EDITIONS

11-2
(
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

e. Work Unit No. Leave blank.


(
f. Date Received. Leave this section blank.

g. SL and FAG Number. Enter in numeric-alpha ascending sequence, the


SL and FAG number of each document attached thereto.

(1) If documents are in sequence, the beginning and ending numbers


may be listed up to the maximum of 200 documents per packing sheet.

(2) When FEMA Form 85-28 is submitted, each SL and FAG number on
this form should be listed on the packing sheet.

11-3. Summaries Required on the National Shelter Survey Packing Sheet. The
documents accompanying a packing sheet must be summarized and reported at the
bottom of the packing sheet. The type of summary varies depending on the
documents submitted and is explained as follows:

a. FEMA Forms 85-36 and 85-28.

(1) Enter the total number of documents (separate forms) and the
total number of facilities submitted with the packing sheet.

(2) Record the totals in the space identified as Total Documents


Submitted. If, for example, there were four data base corrections forms
submitted on which 34 facilities were listed, enter the totals as 4/34.
Similarly, if there were six delete facility record forms with a combined
total of 85 facilities, enter 6/85 on the line identified as Total Documents
Submitted.

b. FEMA Form 85-5.

(1) Various types of data submittals are possible on this form.


The summary on the packing sheet used to transmit the forms should reflect the
number of forms in each data type. The possible data types are:

(a) NFS only;

(b) RAC only;

(c) NFS/RAC combination;

(d) Items Al-All only;

(e) All of section A only; and

(f) Deletes.

(2) When summarizing these forms, determine the type of data on


each of them. If, for example, a form contains both NFS and RAC data, it is
counted in the NFS/RAC combination category.

11-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(3) If the form is being used to delete a facility, it is included


in the delete category. (
(4) Update action code 01 requires data in section A, items 1-11
only. When the data input form contains this type of data, include it in the
summary under No. Al-All Only.

11-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Chapter 12

Resubmittals

12-1. General. When errors or omissions are detected on the survey documents
submitted, the data processing personnel change all correctable data and
return a copy of the corrected form to the regional engineer's office for
review. If the changes are acceptable, no additional action is required.
When the data processing personnel are unable to make corrections due to a
lack of information or if their adjustment is not acceptable to field
personnel, the data must be resubmitted.

12-2. Work Unit Numbers. The data processing personnel assign work unit
numbers to all data forms on which changes have been made, and to forms that
must be rejected. The work unit number is a key data control element placed
on each resubmitted document.

a. Corrections or changes are made directly on the original form which


has been returned to the field for action. When this is done, the work unit
number is already on the document. Make all corrections using a red pencil or
red marking pen.

b. A separate packing sheet should be prepared for each group of work


unit numbers being returned for reprocessing, and new submittals should not be
combined with resubmittals on the same packing sheet.

( 12-3. Packing Sheets for Resubmittals. A packing sheet must accompany all
resubmittals. Procedures for completing the packing sheet are explained in
chapter 11. All resubmittals are submitted through the channels established
for DIF submittals.

12-1
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(
Chapter 13

National Fallout Shelter Technical Criteria

13-1. General. An acceptable shelter is one which during the shelter stay
time can keep the total radiation dose within the limits of human tolerance
and provide the basic need for air for an optimum number of people. If the
total dose is kept below 200 roentgens, serious illness or death will probably
not occur. Whether an existing shelter can provide the shielding protection
necessary to limit the total dose will depend upon the physical
characteristics of the shelter, its location relative to probable fallout, and
the intensity of the fallout.

13-2. Technical Criteria.

a. Shielding. PF category 1 or higher facilities are surveyed. If


the best PF category is in the completely belowground basement of a facility,
the facility is surveyed if the PF category is O or higher.

b. Capacity. Ten or more contiguous spaces per building or facility.

c. Space.

(1) Head Room. Minimum of 6-1/2 feet for 50 percent of the


( occupants and not less than 4 feet for the remainder.

(2) Floor Area (General). Ten square feet of usable shelter space
per person.

(3) Floor Area (Hospitals). Ten square feet of usable shelter


area per person. Hospitals should not be resurveyed to comply with the above.
However, on subsequent updating, spaces should be adjusted to conform to these
criteria.

d. Shelter Access. At a minimum, shelter facilities should have at


least one unit of access. In no case shall a single passage width be less
than 24 inches. Variations in loading time, availability of shelter, and
other local considerations, make it unrealistic to establish a limited
capacity for a shelter. Limitations on capacity (if any) should be made by
the population protection planner as required.

e. Structural Stability. Structures must comply with local codes.


Those which have been condemned or are scheduled for removal should not be
surveyed. The following applies to special facilities:

(1) Natural caves or caverns by the nature of their existence for


long periods of time are considered to have demonstrated sufficient structural
stability to warrant surveying.

13-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(2) Mines and other manrnade, underground structures excavated in (


sound formations, which are presently being operated or have recently been in
use, are considered structurally acceptable for surveying. However, for mines
idle for a few years, specific information on their structural soundness
should be obtained from available records such as the Bureau of Mines
publications prior to surveying.

(3) Tunnels designed by conventional methods and lined, where


necessary, with standard materials such as concrete, steel, and brick, are
considered structurally acceptable for surveying unless there is evidence of
obvious defects.

f. Ventilation. Existing spaces in belowground and in windowless


aboveground areas are based on the FEMA Natural Ventilation Analysis
procedures shown in chapter 5.

g. Safety.

(1) Hazardous utility lines, such as steam, gas, oil, etc., should
not be located in or near the shelter, unless provision is made to control
such hazards by valving or other means before the shelter is occupied.

(2) Mines which have, or may have, hazardous gases should not be
surveyed.

(3) The station and tunnel of subways, with an electrified third


rail from which power can be cut off, should be surveyed.
(
h. Electrical. In structures, electrical power is assumed to be off
for NFS surveys.

i. Caves. In caves, the following additional considerations pertain:

(1) Entrances and passageways should have a minimum height of 4


feet, except for short passages.

(2) Eliminate areas requiring hazardous access or rigging .

(3) Eliminate areas with floor slopes exceeding ten percent.

(4) Eliminate areas with high density of formations.

(5) Eliminate areas which are extremely muddy or contain standing


water.

j. Public Areas. Shelter areas in apartment buildings, condominiums ,


and similar facilities are limited to public areas such as corridors and
basements.

13-2
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Appendix A

Floor Area Usability Factors

Floor area usability factors were developed from a large inspection sample of
NFS facilities. The floor area factors assume gross usability with all
moveable objects removed, such as furniture, files, stored objects, or other
noninstalled equipment .

Average Usability Factors


Building Use Outside Outside Inside
Classification Area (sq.ft.) Dimensions Dimensions

Residential
Basement 5400 .79 .84
First Story 8700 .84 . 88
Upper Stories 8500 .82 .86
Educational
Basement 7000 .82 .87
First Story 14300 .86 . 89
Upper Stories 12000 .83 .87
Religious
Basement 6400 .81 .86
First Story 8600 .83 .87
Upper Stories 7600 .83 .88
Government and Public Service
(
Basement 6300 .81 .86
First Story 14300 .84 .87
Upper Stories 16000 .86 .89
Commercial
Basement 7600 .81 .86
First Story 12100 .86 .90
Upper Stories 11000 .86 .90
Industrial
Basement 12300 . 77 .81
First Story 18300 .81 .84
Upper Stories 14700 . 79 . 82
Amusement
Basement 7500 .74 .79
First Story 9300 . 88 . 92
Upper Stories 5200 .80 .86
Trans:gortation
Basement 1604 .74 . 84
First Story 7100 .89 .94
Upper Stories 12500 .94 .98
Miscellaneous
Basement
First Story 1900 .91 1.00
Upper Stories

A-1
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

Appendix B
(
Zonal Ventilation Requirements by County

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION I REGION ll (Cont•ar- REGION IV (Cont'd~

•Connecticut 10 •Puerto Rico 30 AJabama(Cont'd)


Jackson 15
•Maine 8 *Virgin Islands 30 Madison 15
Marshall 15
• Massachusetts 10 Mobile 25
REGION DI All Others 20
New Hampshire
Coos 8 *Delaware 1.5 Florida
AU Others 10 Alachua 25
*Dist. of Columbia 1.5 Baker 25
*Rhode Island 10 Bradford 2.5
Maryland Brevard 2.5
Vermont AUegany 10 Broward 30
Bennington 10 Garrett 10 Charlotte 30
Orange 10 Washington 10 Citrus 2.5
Rutland 10 All Others 1.5 Clay 25
Windham 10 comer 30
Windsor 10 Pennsylvania Columbia 2.5
( AU Others 8 Adams 1.5 Dade 30
Berks 1.5 De Sota 30
Bucks 1' Dixie 2.5
REGION II Chester 1.5 Duval 2.5
Delaware 1.5 Flagler 25
New Jersey Lancaster 1.5 Gilchrist 25
Atlantic 1.5 Montgomery 1.5 Glades 30
Burlington 1.5 Philadelphia 1.5 Hardee 25
Camden 1.5 York 1.5 Hendry 30
Cape May 1' All Others 10 Hernando 25
Cumberland 1.5 Highlands 30
Gloucester 1.5 *Virginia 1.5 HilJsborough 25
Mercer 1.5 Indian River 30
Ocean 1.5 •west Virginia JO Lafayette 25
Salem 1.5 Lake 2.5
AU Others 10 Lee 30
REGION IV Levy 25
New York Manatee 25
Clinton g Alabama Marion 25
Essex g Baldwin 2.5 Martin 30
Franklin 8 Cherokee 1.5 Monroe 30
St. Lawrence 8 De Kalb 1.5 Nassau 25
AU Others 10 Etowah 1.5 Okeechobee 30
•All counties have identical CFM.

B-1
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

Zonal Ventilation Requirements by County (


AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM
REGION IV (Contrar- REGION IV (Cont~ REGION IV (Cont'd~

Florida (Cont'd) Georgia (Cont'd) Georgia (Cont'd)


Orange 25 Clinch 20 Marion 20
Osceola 25 Coffee 20 Meriwether 20
Palm Beach 30 Colquitt 20 Miller 20
Pasco 25 Columbia 20 Mitchell 20
Pinellas 25 Cook 20 Monroe 20
Polk 25 Coweta 20 Montgomery 20
Putnam 25 Crawford 20 *Muscogee 20
St. Johns 25 Crisp 20 Peach 20
St. Lucie 30 Decatur 20 Pierce 20
Sarasota 25 Dodge 20 Pike 20
Seminole 25 Dooly 20 Pulaski 20
Sumter 2.5 Dougherty 20 Putnam 20
Suwannee 2.5 Early 20 Quitman 20
Union 2.5 Echols 20 Randolph 20
Volusia 2.5 Effingham 20 Richmond 20
AU Others 30 Evans 20 Schl~y 20
Glascock 20 Screven 20
Georgia Glynn 20 Seminole 20
Appling 20 Grady 20 Spalding 20
Atkinson
Bacon
20
20
Hancock
Harris
20
20
Stewart
Sumter
20
20
(
Baker 20 Heard 20 Talbot 20
Baldwin 20 Houston 20 Taliaferro 20
Ben Hill 20 Irwin 20 Tattnall 20
Berrien 20 Jasper 20 Taylor 20
Bibb 20 Jeff Davis 20 Telfair 20
Bleckley 20 Jefferson 20 Terrell 20
Brantley 20 Jenkins 20 Thomas 20
Brooks 20 Johnson 20 Tift 20
Bryan 20 Jones 20 Toombs 20
Bulloch 20 Lamar 20 Treutlen 20
Burke 20 Lanier 20 Troup 20
Butts 20 Laurens 20 Turner 20
Calhoun 20 Lee 20 Twiggs 20
Camden 20 Liberty 20 Upson 20
Candler 20 Long 20 Ware 20
Charlton 20 Lowndes 20 Warren 20
Chatham 20 Macon 20 Washington 20
Chattahoochee 20 McDuffie 20 Wayne 20
Clay 20 McIntosh 20 Webster 20

*Changed to Columbus County.

B-2
October 24, 1990 ,. FEMA Manual 9620.1

(
Zonal Ventilation Requirements by County

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION IV (Contrar- REGION IV (Cont~ REGION IV (Cont 1di

Ceorgia(Cont'd) North Carolina(Cont'd) Tennessee (Cont'd)


Wheeler 20 Columbus 20 Hardeman 20
Wilcox 20 Cumberland 20 Hardin 20
Wilkinson 20 Hoke 20 Haywood 20
Worth 20 New Hanover 20 Henderson 20
All Others 1.5 Onslow 20 Henry 20
Pender 20 Hickman 20
Kentucky Robeson 20 Houston 20
Boyd 10 Sampson 20 Humphreys 20
Carter 10 Scotland 20 Lake 20
Elliott 10 All Others 1, Lauderdale 20
Fulton 20 Lawrence 20
Graves 20 South Carolina Lewis 20
Greenup 10 Abbeville 1, McNairy 20
Hickman 20 Anderson 1.5 Madison 20
Johnson 10 Cherokee 1.5 Maury 20
(
Lawrence 10 Chester 1.5 Obion 20
Lewis 10 Greenville 1, Perry 20
Martin 10 Greenwood 1, Shelby 20
Pike 10 Lancaster 1, Stewart 20
AU Others 1, Laurens 1, Tipton 20
McCormick 1.5 Wayne 20
Mississippi Newberry 1.5 Weakley 20
Adams 2.5 Oconee 1, All Others 1.5
Amite 2.5 Pickens 1,
Franklin 2.5 Spartanburg 1.5 *Canal Zone 3.5
George 2.5 Union 1,
Hancock 2.5 York 1.5
Harrison 2.5 All Others 20 REGION V
Jackson 2,
Jefferson 2.5 Tennessee Illinois
Pearl River 2.5 Benton 20 Boone 10
Pike 2.5 Carroll 20 Bureau 10
Stone 2, Chester 20 Carroll 10
Walthall 2.5 Crockett 20 Cook 10
WiJkir.son 2.5 Decatur 20 De Kalb 10
All Others 20 Dickson 20 Du Page 10
Dyer 20 Ford 10
North Carolina Fayette 20 Grundy 10
Bladen 20 Gibson 20 Henry 10
Brunswick 20 Giles 20 Iroquois 10

*All counties have identical CFM.


B-3
FEMA Manual 9620.1 October 24, 1990

(
Zonal Ventilation R~uirements bl'. Count2:

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REG IO N V (Cont'd) REGION V (Cont'~ REGION V (Conti'ci>

Illinois (Cont'd) Indiana (Cont'd) Michigan (Cont'd)

J o Daviess 10 Harrison 1.5 Antrim g


Kane 10 Hendricks 1.5 Arenac g
Kankakee 10 Jackson 1.5 Baraga g
Kendall 10 Jefferson 1.5 Benzie 8
Knox 10 Jennings 1.5 Charlevoix g
L ake 10 Johnson 1.5 Cheboygan 8
La Salle 10 Knox 1.5 Chippewa 8
Lee 10 Lawrence 1.5 Clare 8
McHenry 10 Marion 1.5 Clinton 8
Marshall 10 Martin 1.5 Crawford 8
Mercer 10 Monroe 1.5 Delta 8
Ogle 10 Montgomery 1' Dickinson 8
Peoria 10 Morgan 1.5 Emmet 8
Putnam 10 Ohio 1.5 Gladwin 8
Rock Island 10 Orange 1.5 Gogebic 8
Stark 10 Owen 1.5 Grand Traverse 8
Stephenson 10 Parke 1.5 Houghton 8
Whiteside
Will
10
10
Perry
Pike
1.5
1.5
Huron
Iosco
8
8
(
Winnebago 10 Posey 1.5 Iron 8
Woodford 10 Putnam 1.5 Isabella 8
AU Others 1.5 Ripley 1.5 Kalkaska 8
Rush 1.5 Ken-t 8
Indiana Scott 1.5 Keweenaw 8
Bartholomew 1.5 Shelby 1.5 Lake 8
Boone 1.5 Spencer 1.5 Leelanau 8
Brown 1.5 Sullivan 1.5 Luce g
Clark 1.5 Switzerland 1.5 Mackinac 8
Clay 1.5 Vanderburgh 1.5 Manistee 8
Crawford 1.5 Vermillion 1.5 Marquette 8
Daviess 1.5 Vigo 1.5 Mason 8
Dear born 1.5 Warren 1.5 Mecosta 8
Decatur 1.5 Warrick 1.5 Menominee 8
Dubois 1.5 Washington 1.5 Midland 8
Floyd 1.5 All Others 10 Missaukee 8
Fountain 1.5 Montcalm 8
Franklin 1.5 Michigan Montmorency 8
Gibson 1.5 AJcona g Muskegon 8
Greene 1.5 Alger 8 Newaygo 8
Hancock 1.5 Alpena g Oceana 8

B-4
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

(
Zonal Ventilation Requiremenu bI Count?

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION V (Cont•ar- REGION V (Cont•ar- REGION V (Cont'd,-

Michigan (Cont'd) Minnesota (Cont'd) Wisconsin (Cont'd)


Ogenaw g Norman 8 Waukesha 10
Ontonagon 8 Otter Tail 8 All Others 8
Osceola g Pennington 8
Oscoda 8 Pine 8
Otsego 8 Polk 8 REGION VI
Ottawa g Pope 8
Presque Isle 8 Red Lake 8 Arkansas
Roscommon g Roseau 8 Ashley 2.5
Schoolcraft g St. Louis g Baxter 1.5
Wexford g Sherburne g Benton 1.5
All Others 10 ~tearns 8 Boone 1.5
Stevens 8 Bradley 2.5
Minnesota Swift 8 Calhoun 2.5
Aitkin g Todd g Carroll 1.5
Anoka 8 Traverse 8 Chicot 2.5
Becker 8 Wadena 8 Cleveland 2.5
Beltrami g Wilkin g Columbia 2.5
Benton 8 All Others 10 Drew 2.5
Big Stone g Fulton 1.5
Carlton g *Ohio 10 Marion 1.5
Cass 8 Oachita 2.5
Chisago 8 Wisconsin Union 2.5
Clay 8 Buffalo 10 All Others 20
Clearwater 8 Crawford 10
Cook g Dane 10 Louisiana
Crow Wing 8 Grant 10 Avoyelles 2.5
Douglas g Green 10 Beauregard 40
Grant g Iowa 10 Bienville 2.5
Hubbard 8 Jefferson 10 Bossier 2.5
Isanti 8 Kenosha 10 Caddo 25
Itasca 8 Lafayette 10 Calcasieu 40
Kanabec 8 Milwaukee 10 Caldwell 25
Kittson 8 Pepin 10 Cameron 40
Koochiching 8 Pierce 10 Catahoula 25
Lake 8 Racine _ 10 Claiborne 2.5
Lake of the Woods 8 Richland 10 Concordia 25
Mahnomen g Rock 10 De Sota 25
Marshall 8 Trempealeau 10 East Baton Rouge 25
Mille Lacs g Vernon 10 East Carroll 25
Morrison 8 Walworth 10 East Feliciana 2.5

• All counties have identical CF M.

B-5
FEMA Manual 9620.1
October 24, 1990

(
Zonal Ventilation R~uirements bl Countr:

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION VI (Contra,.- REGION VI (Cont~ REGION VI (Cont'd~

Louisiana(Cont'd) Oklahoma(Cont'd) Texas(Cont'd)


Franklin 2.5 Beckham 1.5 Baylor 20
Grant 2.5 Bryan 2.5 Bee 40
Jackson 2.5 Carter 25 BeU 25
La Salle 2.5 Choctaw 2.5 Bexar 25
Lincoln 25 Cimarron 10 Blanco 20
Livingston 2.5 Coal 2.5 Borden 1.5
Madison 2.5 Creek 15 Bosque 25
Morehouse 25 Custer 1.5 Bowie 30
Natchitoches 2.5 Dewey 1.5 Brazoria 40
Ouachita 2.5 Ellis 1.5 Brazos 30
Pointe Coupee 2.5 Grant 1.5 Brewster 1.5
Rapides 2.5 Greer 1.5 Brooks 50
Red River 2.5 Harmon 1.5 Brown 20
Richland 2.5 Harper 1.5 Burleson 30
St. Helena 2.5 Jackson 1.5 Burnet 2.5
St. Tammany 2.5 Jefferson 2.5 Caldwell 2.5
Tensas 2.5 Johnston 2.5 Calhoun 40
Union 2.5 Love 2.5 Callahan 20
Washington 2.5 Major 1.5 Cameron .50
Webster 2.5 Marshall 2.5 Camp 30
West Baton Rouge 2.5 Murray 2.5 Carson 10
West Carroll 2.5 Roger Mills 1.5 Cass 30
West Feliciana 2.5 Texas 10 Castro 10
Winn 2.5 Woods 1.5 Chambers 40
All Others 30 Woodward 1.5 Cherokee 40
All Others 20 Childress 1.5
New Mexico Clay 25
Bernalillo g Texas Cochran 10
Los Alamos g Anderson 40 Coke 1.5
Rio Arriba 8 Andrews 1.5 Coleman 20
Sandoval g Angelina 40 Collin 30
Sante Fe 8 Aransas .50 Collingsworth 15
Taos 8 Archer 20 Colorado 30
All Others 10 Armstrong 1.5 Comal 25
Atascosa 30 Comanche 20
Oklahoma Austin 30 Concho 20
Alfalfa 1.5 Bailey 10 Cooke 25
Atoka 2.5 Bandera 20 Coryell 2.5
Beaver 10 Bastrop 2.5 Cottle 1.5

B-6
October 24, 1990
FEMA Manual 9620.1

(
Zonal Ventilation Reguirements bl CountI

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION VI(Cont•ar- REGION Vl(Cont•r- REGION VI~Cont'dJ

Texas (Cont'd) Texas (Cont'd) Texas (Cont'd)


Crane 1.5 Grayson 30 Kendall 20
Crockett 1.5 Gregg 30 Kenedy .50
Crosby 1.5 Grimes 30 Kent 1.5
Culberson 1.5 Guadall.4)e 2.5 Kerr 20
Dallam 10 Hale 1.5 Kimble 20
Dallas 40 Hall 1.5 King 1.5
Dawson 1.5 Hamilton 2.5 Kinney 20
Deaf Smith 10 Hansford 10 Kleberg .50
Delta 30 Hardeman 20 Knox 20
Denton 30 Hardin 40 Lamar 30
De Witt 30 Harris · 40 Lamb 10
Dickens 1.5 Harrison 30 Lampasas 2.5
Dimmit 30 Hardey 10 La Salle 40
Donley 1.5 Haskell 20 Lavaca 30
Duval .50 Hays 2.5 Lee 2.5
Eastland 20 Hemphill 1.5 Leon 40
( Ector 1.5 Henderson 40 Liberty 40
Edwards 20 Hidalgo .50 Limestone 30
Ellis 40 Hill 30 Lipscomb 1.5
El Paso 10 Hockley 1.5 Live Oak 40
Erath 2.5 Hood 2.5 Llano 20
Falls .30 Hopkins .30 Loving 1.5
Fannin 30 Houston 40 Lubbock 1.5
Fayette 2.5 Howard 1.5 .Lynn 1.5
Fisher 1.5 Hudspeth 1.5 McCulloch 20
Floyd 1.5 Hunt 30 McLennan 30
Foard 20 Hutchinson 10 McMullen 40
Fort Bend 30 Irion 1.5 Madison 30
Franklin 30 Jack 2.5 Marion 30
Freestone 40 Jackson 40 Martin 1.5
Frio 30 Jasper 40 Mason 20
Gaines 1.5 Jeff Davis 1.5 Matagorda 40
Galveston 40 Jefferson 40 Maverick 2.5
Garza 1.5 Jim Hogg .50 Medina 2.5
Gillespie 20 Jim VleUs .50 Menard 20
Glasscock 1.5 John.son 30 Midland 1.5
Goliad 40 Jones 20 Milam 30
Gonzales 30 Karnes 30 Mills 20
Gray 1.5 Kaufman 40 MitcheU 1.5

l B-7
FEMA Manual 9620.1
October 24, 1990

Zonal Ventilation Requirements b:r Count:r (


AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM
R EGION Vl(Cont•ar- REGION VI(Cont'd) REGION VIlCont'd~

Texas (Cont'd) Texas (Cont'd) Texas (Cont'd)


Montague 2.5 Scurry 1.5 Wilson 30
Montgomery 30 Shackelford 20 Winkler 1.5
Moore 10 Shelby 30 Wise 30
Morris 30 Sherman 10 Wood 30
Motley 1.5 Smith 40 Yoakum 15
Nacogdoches 40 Somervell 2.5 Young 20
Navarro 40 Starr .50 Zapata 50
Newton 40 Stephens 20 Zavala 25
Nolan 15 Sterling 1.5
Nueces }() Stonewall 1.5
Ochiltree 1.5 Sutton 20 REGION VD
Oldham 10 Swisher 10
Orange 40 Tarrant .30 . Iowa
Palo Pinto 2.5 Taylor 20 Adair 15
Panela .30 Terrell 1.5 Adams 1.5
Parker 25 Terry 1.5 Appanoose 1.5
Parmer 10 Throckmorton 20 Audubon 1.5
Pecos 1.5 Titus 30 Cass 1.5
Polk 40 Tom Green 1.5 Clarke u
Potter 10 Travis 2.5 Davis 1.5 (
Presidio 1.5 Trinity 40 Decatur 1.5
Rains 30 Tyler 40 Des Moines 1.5
Randall 10 Upshur 30 Fremont 1.5
Reagan 1.5 Upton 1.5 Harrison 15
Real 20 Uvalde 2.5 Henry 1.5
Red River 30 Val Verde 20 Jefferson 1.5
Reeves 1.5 Van Zandt 40 Lee 1.5
Refugio 40 Victoria 40 Lucas 1.5
Roberts 1.5 Walker 40 Madison 1.5
Robertson 30 Waller .30 Mills 15
Rockwall lfO Ward 15 Monroe 1.5
Runnels 20 Washington .30 Montgomery 1.5
Rusk 40 Webb }() Par~ 1.5
Sabine 30 Wharton 30 Pottawattamie 1.5
San Augustine lfO Wheeler 1.5 Ringgold 15
San Jacinta 40 Wichita 20 Shelby 1.5
San Patricio .50 Wilbarger 20 Taylor 1.5
San Saba 20 Willacy .50 Union 1.5
Schleicher 20 Williamson 2.5 Van Buren 1.5

B-8
October 24, 1990
FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Zonal Ventilation Requirements by CO\fflty

AREA CFM AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION V!l(Contiar- REGION Vll(Cont'd) - REGION Vll(Cont'dJ

Iowa (Cont'd) Missouri (Cont'd) Nebraska (Cont'd)


Wapello 1.5 New Madrid 20 Keith 10
Warren ts Pemiscot 20 Keya Paha 10
Wayne 1.5 All Others 1' Kimball g
All Others 10 Knox 10
Nebraska Lincoln 10
Kansas Antelope 10 Logan 10
Cheyenne 10 Arthur 10 Loup 10
Decatur 10 Banner g McPherson 10
Finney 10 Blaine 10 Madison 10
Gove. 10 Boone 10 Morrill g
Graham 10 Box Butte g Perkins 10
Grant 10 Boyd 10 Phelps 10
Gray 10 Brown 10 Pierce 10
Greeley 10 Buffalo 10 Red Willow 10
Hamilton 10 Cedar 10 Rock 10
Haskell 10 Chase 10 Scotts Bluff g
Hodgeman 10 Cherry 10 Sheridan 8
Kearny 10 Cheyenne g Sherman 10
Lane 10 Custer 10 Sioux 8
Logan 10 Dakota 10 Stanton 10
Morton 10 Dawes g Thomas 10
Ness 10 Dawson 10 Thurston 10
Norton 10 Deuel g Valley 10
Phillips 10 Dixon 10 Wayne 10
Scott 10 Dundy 10 Wheeler 10
Seward 10 Frontier 10 All Others 1.5
Sheridan 10 Furnas 10
Sherman 10 Garden g
Stanton 10 Garfield 10 REGION vm
Stevens 10 Gosper 10
Thomas 10 Grant 10 Colorado
Trego 10 Greeley 10 Baca 10
Wallace 10 Harlan 10 Bent 10
Wichita 10 Hayes 10 Cheyenne 10
All Others 1.5 Hitchcock 10 Kiowa 10
Holt 10 Kit Carson 10
Missouri Hooker 10 Las Animas 10
Dunklin 20 Howard 10 PhiJiips 10
Mississippi 20 Kearney 10 Prowers 10

B-9
Fema Manual 9620.1
October 24, 1990

(
Zonal Ventilation Reguirements by County

AREA CFM AREA CFM


REGION Vlll (Cont'd) REGION IX (Cont'd)
Colorado (Cont'd) California
Yuma 10 Fresno 10
All Others 8 lrtl)erial 1.5
Inyo 10
•Montana 8 Kern 10
Kings 10
•North Dakota 8 Los Angeles 10
Madera 10
South Dakota Mariposa 10
Bon Homme 10 Merced 10
Charles Mix 10 Orange 10
Clay 10 Riverside 1.5
Douglas 10 San Bernardino 1.5
Gregory 10 San Diego 10
Hanson 10 Tulare 10
Hutchison 10 All Others 8
Lincoln 10
McCook 10 •Hawaii 20
Minnehaha 10
Moody 10 Nevada
Turner 10 Clark 1'
Union 10 ·Esmeralda 10
Yankton 10 Lincoln 10
All Others 8 Nye 10
All Others 8
*Utah g
•American Somoa 40
•Wyoming 8
*Guam 3.5
REGION IX
REGION X
Arizona
Apache 10 •Alaska .5
Coconino 10
Greenlee 10 *Idaho 8
Maricopa 20
Navajo 10 *Oregon 8
Yuma 20
All Others 1.5 •Washington 8

*All counties have identical CFM.

B-10
*U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1990 • 517-754/20886
October 24, 1990 FEMA Manual 9620.1

( Appendix C

Shelter Ventilation Estimator

Instructions:

1. Cut along the outer circle of the upper section including the tab .

2. Center the upper section directly on the base section and insert a pin
through both centers. Area where pin is inserted should be reinforced with
tape. The upper section should rotate freely above the base section.

Upper Section

0
N

SHELTER Base Section

VENTILATION
·. ,o·
( 8-) INDEX .
1 100 ·
ESTIMATOR

Tab

C-1