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Bridging the Gap

in Chemical
Education
Teaching High School Chemistry
with Forward Thinking

Perkins, Megan N.
Technology Use in the Chemists Classroom
Suggested Freeware

US Army Stars Elements (iPad, iPhone, Google Play, Web Player)

***Sample Lesson Plan Available on their website; or see what I’m doing on my Website. See iPad
Learning à Smashbond***

https://www.usarmystars.com/

Potential Topics to cover in US Arm Stars Elements


• Ionic Bonding
• Covalent Bonding
• Atom Building – the subatomic world
• Nomenclature of Ionic & Covalent Structures
• Lewis Dot Structures
• Pattern Inference (Groups that bond to form Ionic & Covalent Structures)
• Periodicity
• Trivia Fun

Collisions: Play Chemistry (iPad, iPhone)

***Sample Lesson Plan Available on my website: scienceoftheimagination.weebly.com


Potential Topics to cover in Collisions: Play Chemistry (free w/o in app purchase additions)
• Build Neutral Atoms (sandbox feature allows unlimited amounts of sub. Parts. To build)
• Students must follow the addition of electrons by theoretical order (Hund’s Rule)
• Radii Matters – Order Radii from smallest to largest
Particles all
Counted here

• Periodicity Trends – Atomic Radii increases across periods


Subatomic

• Group Trends – Atomic Radii increases down within groups


• Radii Inference Activity – Level 10
• Atom Building Less Assistance (students count out electrons now w/o assistance)
• Unlocking Orbitals (More on Hund’s Rule) many more levels of depth here

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 1


Practical Ways to Game in Chemistry
For the ‘Non-techy’ Folk & Others

Musical Chairs Nomenclature

This game is applicable to all forms of nomenclature, acids, stock convention, ionic, and covalent
naming practices:

Materials Prep:
• Index cards with formulas of a given nomenclature subject written to be distributed to a 1:1
student ratio.
• Smartboard & Smartboard Marker/Whiteboard & Whiteboard Marker
• Some sort of music playing device to start & stop

1) Separate the kids into 5 per group in a manner that is fitting for your classroom
environment.
2) Each student should be given an index card with a formula which is suitable for the
nomenclature practices you have been developing.
a. OPTIONAL – I let my kids use their guided notes, because this is normally
something I use as a Higher Order Blooms – Analyzing activity. Anything that has
the kids up and moving will count higher order because of the brain activation taking
place in various regions that require coordination.
3) Students which miss their seat when the music turns off must name the formula correctly to
earn their groups points.
4) Group with the most points by the end of the exercise wins.
a. OPTIONAL – I let my kids earn a punchout for their ChemCard; sort of like a
rewards card commonly seen in coffee shops. After so many punchouts (buy a
unique single hole puncher that isn’t easy to duplicate), they earn 10 points towards
an assignment of their choice or a draw from the Chemistry Treasure box. (I use
stylus’ and mini Rubik’s cubes in my treasure box; the kids use iPads for learning, so
I thought these are both practical & having a puzzle cube is a great way to cultivate
stereochemical thoughts; 12 pack stylus – can be found amazon for ~$1/piece; 24-
pack mini Rubik’s is like $13. ChemCard punches required to get anything is 12)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 2


Who wants to be a Chemist?
This is a great game which can be used as a trivia in-class exercise. I recommend breaking this up
into 5-person groups. Just Copy/Print out the board on the next page and use different colored
pompoms to represent a group member. Pompoms are inexpensive, available @ your local Dollar
store (usually) and easy to replace, no tears if lost. Build question cards in a word document as you
go throughout the unit for questions the kids are struggling with. This worksheet download can be
found online; on my website: scienceoftheimagination.weebly.com The benefit of making your own
cards here, (also not handwriting them), is that you can easily print off a set when you want or go
back and edit as needed.

Material Prep:
• Pom-Poms on hand

• Group Organization Planned & Easily Implemented


• Easily Reproducible Board on next Page
• 1 die per group
• 5 sets of ‘Life-Line’ cards per group. (Assuming max cap. is 5 students per group)
• 1 stack of 50 card questions per group; fill these out from test questions or prep-test
questions. Use identical questions to testing format or format questions with just small
changes of atoms or whatever is fitting. (download from my website so you can fill-in as you
go.)
• Winning student from each group gets a ChemCard Punchout (12 unique punchouts earns
10 points on a given assignment of choice by student, or a draw from the Chemistry
Treasure Chest.)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 3


Poll the Audience Phone a Friend Lifeline Banker Eliminates
Half of Options

Poll the Audience Phone a Friend Lifeline Banker Eliminates


Half of Options

Poll the Audience Phone a Friend Lifeline Banker Eliminates


Half of Options

Poll the Audience Phone a Friend Lifeline Banker Eliminates


Half of Options

Poll the Audience Phone a Friend Lifeline Banker Eliminates


Half of Options

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 4


NASA Project Coordinator

$149, 018
NASA Consultant

$125,000
NASA Gruntworker

$92,000
• First student to reach the
Top-Earning Chemist
Professor @ Post-Secondary Level - Ph.D. level wins.

$81,460 • Select a Life Line Banker


(LLB) to collect &
distribute the
Industrial Chemist cards.

$62,000 • The active LLB is also


responsible for
eliminating 50% of
Adjunct Professor in Chemistry - Masters Degree
the answers by sneak
peaking the correct
$48,896 answer for a
given card.

• Each student can select


Adjunct Professor in Chemistry - Bachelors Degree the pom-pom color of
choice provided by the
$46,896 teacher as their game
piece.

HS Chemistry Teacher - Masters in Chemistry • As correct answers are


$45,960 given, students can move
up on the Top-Earning
Chemist Level. (1 correct
answer per level. 10
correct answers win if
HS Chemistry Teacher - Bachelors in Chemistry
first arriving to the top.)

$42,960 • Dollar amounts included


are average local
economic benefits (pay)
High School Chemist (Only a High School Diploma) of each positioned
earned.
$12,000

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 5


Question Answer
Why was the game ‘Who Wants to be a Chemist?’
used today during review?

a.
b.
c.
Because the teacher said so.
To make learning fun.
To make learning fun because the teacher said
D.
so.
d. To give me an opportunity to engage with my
peers & enjoy review day.

Question Answer

Question Answer

Question Answer

Question Answer

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 6


Family Feud Chemistry

I personally like to think of my students as ‘my’ kids. I care about their futures, I want them to
succeed in all they dare dream. As class periods tend towards ‘mock’ families (when positive
classroom culture is within healthy limits), I like to do “Family Feud Chemistry” as the first stage to
implement Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI).

Quick ADI Overview:


Argument driven inquiry is a way for students to formulate a hypothesis (argument) to explain
natural phenomena concluding in a paper. It’s an 8-stage process in which the kids initially break out
into groups, are given a data subset with a short article on something related to the unit being
studied. The article is used for Justification of the data recorded & data analysis presented by the
group. The data recording & methods of analysis are completely free for the kids to design &
implement.

Would you like more information about ADI?


Visit: https://argumentdriveninquiry.com/

Materials:
• Current article (within 2 years of publication date) that examines a principle being taught
within the unit that provokes a disagreement between two identifiable parties of one of the
following: scientists1, government agencies2, American/Global public3, and/or corporations4.
• Question Cards created for the topic at hand. The questions formulated should have facts
only, no opinion questions.
• Buzzer or metal dinger for each group.
o Buzzer sets can be purchased on Amazon for a reasonable price.
• Whiteboard & whiteboard marker/Smart Board & Smart Board marker.
• iPads or electronic device to be used for quick research needed.
• Worksheet included with this packet; Argument Driven Inquiry (fact check - worksheet)

Rules:
• Group the kids into 6 members or less per group. Try to group them as evenly as possible.
• Set up the board & marker being used for an appropriate tally system:
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5
Tallies will go in
the larger
boxes. Generic
idea: really up
to you.

• Group to get the most tally per correct answer gets their ChemCard hole-punched, for
future use.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 7


Name Date

Argument Driven Inquiry


Family Feud – Fact Check Worksheet
Directions for BLOOMS – Higher Order – ANALYZING:
Students will indicate facts researched and correctly answered using their tablet or laptop device to
the questions posed in the Family Feud Chemistry Game. This information will later be used in your
‘Justification’ Section that your group will design for their dry-erase whiteboards.

Notable facts from Family Feud Chemistry:

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 8


Family Feud Chemistry
Question

Make an inference based off of the reading


evidence siting the paragraph & sentence
in the article.

Family Feud Chemistry


Question
Give experimental evidence to support the
authors claim.

Family Feud Chemistry


Question
Give a comparison of a chemical concept
related to the research article which was
learned in class.

Family Feud Chemistry


Question

Explain the chemistry line of evidence-


based reasoning to support the research
article.

Family Feud Chemistry


Question

Give an alternative means of


experimentation to provide evidence
which supports the theory or concept
being shown in the article

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 9


Planning Effective Instruction
Font & Picture Use for Individual Education Plans (IEP) & English Learner Students

Part I – Font Choice Matters


Many students with IEP’s have visual acuity issues. Often times the diagnosis of dyslexia is difficult
to pin down because the term has received complaints over the years about being a complexity of
cognitive concerns, and so to give students the diagnosis of ‘dyslexia’ diminished the accuracy of
what the student is struggling to utilize in their brain function to learn. Students on IEP’s more
often than not, also come from families who are in lower income brackets & cannot afford to have
the proper accommodations met for these students. Getting guardians to come & agree to academic
intervention can be challenging. Many parents have a hard time making ends meet; taking off from a
check-by-check job to meet in school to discuss academic concerns just isn’t the top priority of
astounding numbers of parents.

It is our job as teachers to not just implement a safe learning environment, one where the student
feels safe & comfortable being oneself, but it is also our job as teachers to make sure the material we
are giving to students give them the best opportunity to have quality education, so the next
generation of Young Americans feel confident enough to pursue post-secondary education.

Although it is a considered reasonable that students who may need IEP intervention usually receive
the IEP & assistance needed, this is not always the case. There is a large population of IEP student
needs not being met because of financial fear by guardians to ‘take off’ of work. They simple can’t
afford to come in for a school educational team prep meeting, or don’t know how to afford to come
in to a school & have their child’s needs met.

There are some general practices we can use in the day-to-day learning environment that will help to
bridge the gaps not being met in the classroom of diverse learners. One of these simple practices is
to develop your own unique word documents to print that are specific to the PowerPoints you are
using to teach the students in your classroom. Below is a table of appropriate text choices that will
assist students to clearly read & track without having to ‘line-repeat’ as often. When selecting fonts
to use in your PowerPoint Presentations or for your Unique Corresponding Guided Notes & Higher
Order Worksheet, select fonts that contain both Hats & Feet (lines on each letter to signify the
beginning & ending of a letter).

American Typewriter – 12 pt. (g)


Garamond – 14 pt. (g)

Footlight MT – 14 pt. (g) Courier – 12 pt. (g)


High Tower Text – 14 pt. (g) Courier New – 12 pt.(g)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 10


Part II – Font Spacing Matters

When writing on the PowerPoint or the Corresponding Guided Notes (fill in the
blanks sheets taken directly from PowerPoint – Blooms Lower Order –

1.5 spacing
UNDERSTANDING), it’s important that you also allow for spacing between the
rows in the documents & PowerPoints you are creating. This paragraph is spaced @
1.5. (Use for the average learner to the tracking-issue learner.)

When writing on the PowerPoint or the Corresponding Guided Notes (fill in the

blanks sheets taken directly from PowerPoint – Blooms Lower Order –

2.0 spacing
UNDERSTANDING), it’s important that you also allow for spacing between the

rows in the documents & PowerPoints you are creating. This paragraph is spaced @

2.0. (Use for severe visual impairments.)

***It can be necessary to sometimes label in documents in a way that is longitude-oriented as indicated on the first two paragraphs.
When labeling becomes necessary in a way that may be visually difficult for even the average learner, we need to consider alternatives
or supplemental ways to reduce the eye strain. If a physical strain is occurring during learning practices, the learner is much more likely
to disengage from the material.

[WHITE SPACE MATTERS – Unique note space should be anticipated and

implemented near new information sites on the page & near new vocabulary

introductions. The clutter on this page can be frustrating for a learner. Usually this

‘WHITE SPACE MATTERS’ would be where I would have note space for students.

Lots of new information has been presented on this page. If you would have liked

note space here, your children probably would have too.]

1) Option 1 as indicated above and to the right identifying paragraph spacing.


a. Enlarge the font. Font shown is the increased from the 12.0 pt. written in the
paragraph to a 14.0 used for drawing greater attention.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 11


2) Option 2 as indicated below and to the right shows that I had simply moved the bottom
white paragraph restrictor found in the Word Width Ruler (WWR) over further than in
the original paragraph, and then oriented the labeling so that the text box was fluent with
the rest of the page; however, the font increase remained 14.0 from the 12.0 of the
typical font format utilized in the paragraphs.
Before:

After:

When writing on the PowerPoint or the Corresponding


Guided Notes (fill in the blanks sheets taken directly from
PowerPoint – Blooms Lower Order –
UNDERSTANDING), it’s important that you also allow 1.5 spacing
for spacing between the rows in the documents &
PowerPoints you are creating. This paragraph is spaced @
1.5. (Use for the average learner to the tracking-issue learner.)

When writing on the PowerPoint or the Corresponding

Guided Notes (fill in the blanks sheets taken directly from

PowerPoint – Blooms Lower Order –

UNDERSTANDING), it’s important that you also allow for 2.0 spacing
spacing between the rows in the documents & PowerPoints

you are creating. This paragraph is spaced @ 2.0. (Use for

severe visual impairments.)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 12


Part III – The ‘White Bookmark Method’

Another simple & effective tool to help the larger variety of IEP students is to train them on how to
utilize what my grandmother used to call the ‘White Bookmark Method’. You are probably
wondering by now, why this ‘know-it-all’ Secondary Chemistry Undergraduate is trying to teach you
what to do? You’ve been teaching longer than this 30-year-old has been teaching. You don’t need
my help for anything. You’ve gotten along just fine in your own teaching ways.

Well, something I had chosen to reserve for this point in time with you is that I am a dyslexic
teacher. My kids, my students, God Love Them, they are so smart. In the past 2 lessons I have
given, my children (students) have completed 10 pages of activity, both Blooms Higher Order &
Blooms Lower order Activities. (And when I say ‘lesson’, I mean ‘1 day’ worth of classwork. I
needed to clarify this to those who consider 1 unit 1 lesson as noticed amongst colleagues; I don’t
consider 1 entire Unit, 1 Lesson. In my world 1 Lesson = 1 Days’ worth of activity Per class & Per
period.)

These students are children which have been considered the outcasts. They had previously been
considered the lower-classmen, 90-something kids considered not worth the time spent in
preparation. I love them & I want them to succeed in their academic pursuits. I don’t believe my
students, my children, to be oxygen-wasters. I am not…an oxygen-waster.

My grandmother was born in the year 1919, and she was a fantastic depression-era survivor. She
taught more than 30 years inside Inner-City Washington, D.C. during the civil rights era. Verna
Perkins endured and persisted to love and affectionately bridge the gap between white & black
Americans by being the minority white-teacher in dominantly black-neighborhoods. There is no
room for racism here. She would be considered an elementary school teacher of today’s standards,
but she taught Kindergarten through the Second Grade underprivileged American Students, again,
many of whom would be considered on Individual Education Plans today due to the point in our
Nation’s History & lack of Parental Opportunity to have an American Dream Education for the
previous 6 generations.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 13


One of the things my grandmother did with her school-children, and one of the things she used to
do with me when she noticed I was having tacking issues, is that she would take a piece of
typewriter/computer paper, and she would fold it down in a hot-dog style to be about the size of a
bookmark. In her 50-something years of practice, she would just use the tips of her nails and draw
the crease sharply down the hotdog fold. Grandma would lay the piece of paper down on the table
and gingerly pull the newly creased, white paper bookmark away from the larger side of the page,
pulling them apart as if it were perforated as in store-bought notebooks.

“Here Megan.” Grandma smiled a sweet smile.


“What am I supposed to do with that?” I asked begrudgingly. I had already
felt frustrated & overwhelmed by looking at the pages on the Dick &
Jane book she was trying to teach me to read.
“Just you take that bookmark and lay it down along the word line there, and
you get to read bit-by-bit. You know, it’s something I used to do
when I was a girl so that I didn’t lose track of where I was on the
page.” Grandma matter-of-factly laid the strip of solid white paper
down on the page and asked me to begin again.

An added benefit of this tool, the White Bookmark Method, which grandma showed me all those
years ago, was that in utilizing something so simple, so elementary in methods, is that if I had a
question in class, or needed to run to the restroom, I could literally stop where I was, I’d slide a
paperclip to keep the white bookmark in place, and do what I needed to do before I returned to my
reading.

Teaching IEP students does not have to be complicated, but it does need to be met with
intentionality and humility. We need to be humble, thoughtful, and purposeful about what we are
presenting to students, and sometimes just a simple tool such as the ‘White Bookmark’ & a paper
clip, can be all a student needs to soar.

¯ This is an appropriate size for a ‘White Bookmark Method’ tool. You should consider including these on the guided note
worksheets & the Blooms Higher Order Activity Worksheets you create in Microsoft Word. Doing so will increase the probability of
wide-student use and will give hands-on learners an opportunity to do something constructive for their accomplishment needs, even if
they weren’t able to complete a lesson’s worth of activities for the day.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 14


Part IV – Choosing Graphics & Images for IEP Students

When choosing activities in Chemistry or any field of education really, pictures can often do more
than words. So, the question remains:

‘How do we as teachers choose effective images, create effective graphics, or choose effective
graphics for the PowerPoints, Guided Notes, and Higher-Level Blooms Activities we use in our
daily instruction materials?’

Proximity of lines & shapes matter.


When choosing images which need to illustrate a concept in chemistry, I generally look for
something funny, something simple, something relatable across languages. Complexity needs to be
avoided as much as possible, and if complexity needs to increase on a given topic, consider showing
a simple figure, and follow that up with piece-wise explanations, by ‘zooming in’ on one feature, and
giving a supplemental box that shows additional complexities. Always first do a web search and see
if what you are looking for is available in the Insert tab; Pictures Drop Down Menu, Online Pictures
tab. This is because all of the pictures that come from here in Microsoft Word have citations that
will be automatically implemented with sources, and so copyright issues don’t occur as often. Don’t
be afraid to use online resources for your images. When you get more advanced in your individual
lesson planning, then you can think about creating images in Adobe Illustrator.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 15


Search Term Examples:

(Neat graphic for


interest grabbing, Title
Slide – not for
instruction.)
under CC BY-ND

(Useful for instruction; Guided Notes.)


under CC BY-SA

As there are
many topics to
cover today, this
is all we will be
able to look at in
this particular
section, but feel
free to reach out
to me on my
website
or check out
ChemEd X
where I am a
This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA
frequent reader.
I will be sharing more information as I update my website or on the ChemEd X website as a develop more
practical tools for the Effective HS Chemistry Teacher.
http://scienceoftheimagination.weebly.com/
https://www.chemedx.org/page/article

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 16


Indiana State Standards Backwards Design
Utilizing State Standards in Cooperative Classroom Activities to Bridge the Gap in
Secondary to Post-Secondary Chemical Education
Student performance is not necessarily a reflection on the character of your teaching but can be an
indicator for needed change in the classroom environment. I do not claim to have all the answers
for teaching, but I do lay claim to the practical advice that will help you cover all the topics needed
in High School Chemistry as mandated by the 2016 Indiana Chemistry Standards. If you can set
yourself a track to follow and prepare your own material, perhaps you can revive your own interest
in a subject you formerly felt worthy of your time.

It has been my unfortunate experience to see the dwindled hope of teachers increase as if science
has become an obtuse & under-appreciated subject. However, I would like to propose that we have
become the obtuse. Where has the passion & love gone for teaching? We have allowed ourselves to
take less pride in our work and said ‘there is no way to cover all of that material with these kids’!
Frustrations of belittlement from guardians who cannot teach the subjects to the children
themselves have gotten in the way of our motivation. Classic emotional displacement from
guardians who need someone to lash out on has worn away at the luster many bright minds sitting
here once illuminated.

Years have been spent to earn a degree in a teaching field, but once beyond the mountain of
attaining the degree, we have found ourselves another daily hill to climb…and it ends in 7th period. I
would like to remind you that you are the few, the rare gems, more precious than gold…because you
are of a supernatural occurrence. You gave years of your life to produce a degree for mediocre pay
so you could serve children of many disgruntled citizens. You are a gift to society, and I would like
to encourage you to continue sharing your rare gifts worthy of royal standing. You deserve the best
this life has to offer, and you can impact the entire trajectory of this state’s future by simply offering
your students a quality education. You cannot change the will or desire of others nor can you
control their judgements, but you can change how you respond and how you represent yourself to
the world. Continue to hold the line. Stand strong. Show the United States that Indiana has the best
science teachers our nation has to offer.

Although there is a debate amongst Chemistry teachers about the order of importance for teaching
practices in High School Chemistry, I would like to introduce a backwards design particular to
Hoosier Teachers that seems both practical & reasonable. As far as Indiana Academic Standards are
concerned, it is nearly impossible to make sure to cover all the standards & subsequent sub-
standards without first setting up a plan of approach.

I propose that the most important tactic to perform which will bridge the gap from secondary to
post-secondary chemical education is to offer the kids a Lower Order Blooms Taxonomy processing
activity, then offer a Higher Order Blooms Taxonomy skill-based activity. How can we as Chemistry
teachers prepare kids over 8 standards for a total of 40 topics for proficiency in a single year of
Chemistry in the High School environment? Simply follow the layout of the Indiana Academic
Standards, and you will be sure to cover all of the content.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 17


Decoding the 2016 Indiana Chemistry Standards

The first thing you must do in learning to backwards design from Indiana Chemistry Standards is to
look at the setup:

C.1.1 Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and chemical
Standard 1: Properties and States of Matter

properties.
C.1.2 Use chemical properties, extensive, and intensive physical properties to identify
substances.
C.1.3 Recognize observable macroscopic indicators of chemical changes.

C.1.4 Describe physical and chemical changes at the particle level.

C.1.5 Describe the characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases and changes in state at the
macroscopic and microscopic levels.
C.1.6 Demonstrate an understanding of the law of conservation of mass through the use of
particle diagrams and mathematical models.
C.1.7 Perform calculations involving density and distinguish among materials based on
densities.

1) The Indiana Department of Education really designed the Standards as Units.


2) Standard 1 is a Unit by itself.
o To that end, lets replace the word Standard with Unit.

C.1.1 Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and chemical
properties.
C.1.2 Use chemical properties, extensive, and intensive physical properties to identify
substances.
Properties and States of Matter

C.1.3 Recognize observable macroscopic indicators of chemical changes.

C.1.4 Describe physical and chemical changes at the particle level.

C.1.5 Describe the characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases and changes in state at the
macroscopic and microscopic levels.
C.1.6 Demonstrate an understanding of the law of conservation of mass through the use of
particle diagrams and mathematical models.
Unit 1:

C.1.7 Perform calculations involving density and distinguish among materials based on
densities.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 18


3) Is it logical that Properties & States of Matter are considered the first in the Indiana
Academic standards?
o Yes – the definition of Chemistry is the study of matter in the universe in its
particulate nature.

4) Wait a minute: I saw nowhere listed where matter is defined on the Unit.
o You are right – that’s where your expertise come in handy as a Chemistry Teaching
professional.

Let’s begin by looking at the first substandard of Standard 1 (Unit 1):

C.1.1 Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and
chemical properties.
5) C.#.# - C is for Chemistry
6) #.1.# - the middle ‘1’ is for Standard 1 (Unit 1 )
7) #.#.1 – the second number, ‘1’, indicates the first subject of the Standard 1(Unit 1)

***As of right now we know how to organize our Units.


****You should begin to know how to understand the coding process of the Standard Based Units.

For a parallel comparison let’s begin by looking at the first substandard of Standard 2 (Unit 2):

C.2.1 Using available experimental data, explain how and why models of atomic
structure have changed over time.
8) C.#.# - C is for Chemistry
9) #.2.# - the middle ‘2’ is for Standard 2 (Unit 2 )
10) #.#.1 – the second number, ‘1’, indicates the first subject of Standard 2 (Unit 2)

***As of right now we know how to organize our Units.


****You should now know how to understand the coding process of the Indiana-State-Standard-
Based-Units.
*****It is worthy to note here that two examples were required for you to see the numerical pattern
and so keep this in mind when reviewing examples with the kids in class.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 19


Let’s go back to the first substandard of Standard 1 (Unit 1):

C.1.1 (Unit 1 – Lesson 1) Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based
on physical and chemical properties.

11) Hey lady: My students cannot understand how to differentiate between pure substances &
mixtures. They aren’t ready yet. They don’t even know how to differentiate between satire &
reality.
o Sure. Your Segway to get these students where they need to be is the underpinning
of this first standard. If there is something that is critical for the students to know
before differentiation between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and
chemical properties, then it is our job to bring them up to speed.

12) How can we do that?

1st step – Pull out the nouns & their qualifiers (adjectives). Another way I like to say this is
‘pull out the nouns and their ‘coefficients’.

***NOUN – person, place, or thing (idea/concept).

Unit 1 – Lesson 1: Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on


physical and chemical properties.

Nouns:
1) Substances
2) Mixtures
3) Properties

Adjectives/Coefficients/Qualifiers:
1) Pure
2) Physical
3) Chemical

2nd step – Make a fluent list of these terms with their respective partners.

1) Pure substances
2) Mixtures
3) Physical properties
4) Chemical properties

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 20


Let’s again go back to the first substandard of Standard 1 (Unit 1):

Unit 1 – Lesson 1: Differentiate between pure substances1 and mixtures2 based on


physical3 and chemical properties4.
13) Okay, that’s all well & good, but my kids still aren’t ready. They don’t even know what
matter means to chemistry.
o The overall Unit 1 title for Standard 1 is: Properties & States of Matter. The nouns &
adjectives covered in the title of the Standard should be introduced for the first
lesson, Lesson 0. This sets the stage for the unit.

o Think about the surface of the Earth for a minute:

o Notice that the graph represents the zero-level elevation


point.

o Without first having the reference point of the ground


beneath our feet, we would not be able to establish an
elevation.

o I love Einstein – so I must say “It’s all relative”.

o We must first establish Ground Zero before we can even


think of counting to the increment of +/- ‘1’. Right?

When I was CC BY-NC-ND first looking at the standards myself, and was trying to make
sense of them, my first inclination was to look at each of the substandard first. After all, I’m dyslexic
that the darn standard title is written sideways. (Now that’s some serious humor for you! You are
allowed to laugh.)

My first thought: These guys missed something somewhere. They should have written this
differently. How can they just jump into Chemistry headfirst like this? My students are beginners.

LIGHTBULB! My second thought: It’s the title. It’s in the Unit Title.

AND IT WAS…

****Biologists might fashion this thought to Photosystem I & Photosystem II…PSII is utilized in
metabolic processing before PSI because of the order of which they were discovered. Ha. Terrible
naming system we all must suffer! The funny quirks of scientific discoveries.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 21


Enter Lesson ‘0’
Priming the canvas of student minds:

The truer beginning of fulfilling Unit needs for Indiana Academic Standards is for the important
terms in the Unit Heading – which is the Standard heading – to first be identified and used as
‘ground zero’ for priming the canvas of the student minds for the unit.

Unit 1 - Properties and States of Matter


(Indiana Chemistry Standard 1 – 2016)

1) Matter
2) States
3) Properties

Sub categories need to be considered, only as a briefing:

1) Matter
a. Definition of chemistry
2) States
a. Physical states: solid, liquid, gas, plasma
3) Properties
a. Physical & Chemical
b. Intensive vs. Extensive

Lesson 0 - Readying for the Journey


On Belay?

14) If you emphasize the definition of chemistry as the study of matter, identify matter as having
different physical forms, states of solids, liquids, gasses, and plasmas. These states of matter
are also dependent on their properties. Properties can be physical (give practical example),
chemical such as taste, intensive (give practical example), or extensive (give practical
example).
o This is enough information for you to personalize and put into 5 or 6 slides. This
would be your very first lesson 0 for the school year.
o Keeping lesson time simple; 4-5 slides – fill in the blanks guided notes (blooms
lower); and spend most of the time of a higher-level activity (analyzing, evaluating, or
creating [perfect modeling time]) should simplify the learning/teaching experience.
o Plenty of room for personalization & activity design.

15) After setting the stage, priming the canvas, establishing ground ‘0’, your students are ready to
get into Lesson 1 of Unit 1. (C.1.1)
Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 21
Lesson 1 - Starting the Climb (Day 1 - C.1.1)
Belay On.
1) Pure substances
2) Mixtures
3) Physical properties
4) Chemical properties

***Now that you have an essential list of terms to cover, you can break this down however you
want, potentially 4 content slides, one slide as an introduction, and one conclusion slide. Six slides
are all that is necessary to get the kids ready for a higher order activity. If you have guided notes with
fill in the blanks to match the slides, then you have already covered the Blooms Lower Order. Now:
all you need to do is get creative and organize a higher order activity: analyze, create, or evaluate.
There are limitless possibilities.

Anticipate Clarification:

You finished your first Lesson 1. It was a good introduction. Now you realize the kids may need 5
slides of each of the first 4 slides. Make this a week-long lesson continuation project:

Lesson 2 (Day 2 - C.1.1)


5-6 slides; fill in guided notes; higher order activity (analyze, create, or evaluate)

1) Pure Substances

Lesson 3 (Day 3 – C.1.1)


5-6 slides; fill in guided notes; higher order activity (analyze, create, or evaluate)
1) Mixtures

Lesson 4 (Day 4 – C.1.1)


5-6 slides; fill in guided notes; higher order activity (analyze, create, or evaluate)

1) Physical Properties

Lesson 5 (Day 5 – C.1.1)


5-6 slides; fill in guided notes; higher order activity (analyze, create, or evaluate)

1) Chemical Properties

Congratulations!
You have all you need to take care of your first substandard for Standard 1.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 23


All you have to remember to be successful & cover all the information you need in the Indiana
Academic Standards are a few simple steps:

1) Set Ground Zero – Lesson ‘0’ of the unit should effectively get the students ready to
anticipate what the unit will be about. Lesson ‘0’ is the time to set the context for which the
entire unit will fold out, and this can be literally derived using the nouns and adjectives from
the Standard Title.
2) Introduction to the substandard – This is where ‘Lesson 1’ of the entire unit will take
place. This lesson will set the stage for the entire substandard.
3) Elaborate with ‘Day 1 – C.1.1’ or ‘Day 2 – C.2.2’ where needed. Usually, if a substandard
contains more than 2 domain specific subject terms (noun phrase or noun), then you will
want to bring in ‘Day #’ as a prefix to the title because it establishes to the kids that you will
take a slow pace with a subject. This helps relieve anxiety in the kids that you will allow them
to understand something completely without rushing through the subject.
4) Guided Notes to Follow PowerPoint per Lesson – Ensuring Blooms Taxonomy Lower
Order thinking skills are used here, it’s an easy way to give accountability that the kids are
following along with your short 4-6 (sometimes 6-8) PowerPoint presentation.
5) Create/Borrow a Higher Order Blooms Activity per Lesson – When you have the kids
follow along with a guided-notes section & follow that up with an activity that requires
creation, evaluation, or analyzation of the subject you just introduced; you are making their
brains ‘work it out’ by interacting with the knowledge you gave them. Remember Blooms
Lower Order is Passive Engagement whereas Blooms Higher Order is Active Engagement.

It really is that simple.


You can cover all of the content.

You can even borrow Higher Order Activities! The key is personalization of teaching by giving the
kids effective notes from class that they filled in, and then engaging them with the material you
created, or from the internet.

Lots of resources & teaching material can be found for free on my website:
https://scienceoftheimagination.weebly.com/

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 24


For Your Benefit
(1 Lesson = 1 Day unless otherwise stated; 133 days of planning with ‘wiggle’ room up to 18 days)

Because I am a High School Chemistry Teacher, I have included all you need to include for each
lesson per unit as key points based on the Indiana Academic Standards of 2016. Hopefully these will
help you pace yourself as an effective educator & you can see the trajectory for the school year
through the eyes of the Indiana Department of Education. I hope these materials have been helpful
to you, and feel free to reach out to me with any questions:

scienceoftheimagination@gmail.com

***Lower Order guided Notes to follow PowerPoint (5-8 slides)


***Higher Order Activity (Argument Driven Inquiry, Station Learning, Lab Activities, Game
Based Activities, Kinesthetic Activities that require movement)

Indiana State Standards


Backwards Design Unit Plans – Topics to Cover

C.1.1 Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and chemical
properties.
C.1.2 Use chemical properties, extensive, and intensive physical properties to identify
substances.
Properties and States of Matter

C.1.3 Recognize observable macroscopic indicators of chemical changes.

C.1.4 Describe physical and chemical changes at the particle level.

C.1.5 Describe the characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases and changes in state at the
macroscopic and microscopic levels.
C.1.6 Demonstrate an understanding of the law of conservation of mass through the use of
particle diagrams and mathematical models.
Unit 1:

C.1.7 Perform calculations involving density and distinguish among materials based on
densities.

Unit 1: Lesson 0: Properties & States of Matter Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Matter
a. Definition of chemistry
2) States
a. Physical states: solid, liquid, gas, plasma
3) Properties
a. Physical & Chemical
b. Intensive vs. Extensive

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 25


Unit 1: Lesson 1: Day 1: C.1.1 Intro

1) Pure substances
2) Mixtures
3) Physical properties
4) Chemical properties
Unit 1: Lesson 2: Day 2: C.1.1 Pure Substances
Unit 1: Lesson 3: Day 3: C.1.1 Mixtures
Unit 1: Lesson 4: Day 4: C.1.1 Physical Properties
Unit 1: Lesson 5: Day 5: C.1.1 Chemical Properties

Unit 1: Lesson 6: Day 1: C.2.1 Intro.


1) Chemical Properties
2) Extensive Physical Properties
3) Intensive Physical Properties
Unit 1: Lesson 7: Day 2: C.1.2 Chemical Properties
Unit 1: Lesson 8: Day 3: C.1.2 Extensive Physical Properties
Unit 1: Lesson 9: Day 4: C.1.2 Intensive Physical Properties

Unit 1: Lesson 10: C.1.3 Macroscopic Indicators of Chemical Changes

Unit 1: Lesson 11: Day 1: C.1.4 Intro.


1) Particulate Physical Changes
2) Particulate Chemical Changes
Unit 1: Lesson 12: Day 2: C.1.4 Particulate Physical Changes
Unit 1: Lesson 13: Day 3: C.1.4 Particulate Chemical Changes

Unit 1: Lesson 14: Day 1: C.1.5 Intro.


1) Macroscopic Characteristics of State Changes: Solids, Liquids, and Gases
2) Microscopic Characteristics of State Changes: Solids, Liquids, and Gases
Unit 1: Lesson 15: Day 2: C.1.5 Macroscopic Characteristics of State Changes – SLG
Unit 1: Lesson 16: Day 3: C.1.5 Microscopic Characteristics of State Changes – SLG

Unit 1: Lesson 17: Day 1: C.1.6 Intro.


1) Law of the Conservation of Mass
2) Particle Diagrams w/ Mathematical Models
Unit 1: Lesson 18: Day 2: C.1.6 Law of the Conservation of Mass
Unit 1: Lesson 19: Day 3: C.1.6 Particle Diagrams w/ Mathematical Models

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 26


Unit 1: Lesson 20: Day 1: C.1.7 Intro.
1) Density Calculations
2) Ordering Densities – Least Dense to Most Dense or Most Dense to Least Dense
Unit 1: Lesson 21: Day 2: C.1.7 Density Calculations & Sorting Densities
Same Material – alternative perspective – more calculations & sorting for mathematical
clarification/check

Unit 1: Post Quiz & then Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2, First
Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game Day5,
Final Draft Corrections & Submisison6.)
Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web research paper into real world application of Unit
1 in modern technology (how chemicals are use in the manufacturing process or
development of computers & technologies.)

LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the


research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 27


C.2.1 Using available experimental data, explain how and why models of atomic structure
Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table

have changed over time.


C.2.2 Determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in isotopes and calculate
the average atomic mass from isotopic abundance data.
C.2.3 Write the full and noble gas electron configuration of an element, determine its
valence electrons, and relate this to its position on the periodic table.
C.2.4 Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based
on the pattern of valence electrons and periodic trends.
C.2.5 Compare and contrast nuclear reactions with chemical reactions.
C.2.6 Describe nuclear changes in matter, including fission, fusion, transmutations, and
decays.
Unit 2:

C.2.7 Perform half-life calculations when given the appropriate information about the
isotope.

Unit 2: Lesson 0: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Atomic Structure
a. Atoms – smallest building blocks of the universe
***Suggestion – Simple atom coloring sheet

2) Periodic Table
a. Elements – monatomic & diatomic
b. Simple Periodic table (no color, black/white, mass, atomic numbers only)
***Suggestion – Elemental Battleship (learning groups & periods)

Unit 2: Lesson 1: Day 1: C.2.1 Intro


1) 1803 John Dalton Series of Experiments – Theory Solid Sphere Model
2) 1904 J. J. Thompson Experimentation – Plum Pudding Model
3) 1911 Earnest Rutherford Experimentation – Nuclear Model
4) 1913 Niels Bohr Experimentation – Planetary Model
5) 1926 Erwin Schrödinger Experimentation – Quantum Model
Unit 2: Lesson 2: Day 2: C.2.1 Dalton Experimentation/Solid Sphere Model
Unit 2: Lesson 3: Day 3: C.2.1 Thompson Experimentation/Plum Pudding Model
Unit 2: Lesson 4: Day 4: C.2.1 Rutherford Experimentation/Nuclear Model
Unit 2: Lesson 5: Day 5: C.2.1 Bohr Experimentation/Planetary Model
Unit 2: Lesson 6: Day 6: C.2.1 Schrödinger Experimentation/Quantum Model

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 28


Unit 2: Lesson 7: Day 1: C.2.2 Intro
1) Nucleons
a. Protons
b. Neutrons
2) Electrons
3) Isotopes
a. Define
4) Averages – How to Calculate (Algebra Application)
a. Calculate AMUs from Isotopic Abundance Data
Unit 2: Lesson 8: Day 2: C.2.2 Nucleons; protons/neutrons
Unit 2: Lesson 9: Day 3: C.2.2 Electrons; Isotopes
Unit 2: Lesson 10: Day 4: C.2.2 Isotopic abundance calculations – averages (AMUs)

Unit 2: Lesson 11: Day 1: C.2.3 Intro


1) Electron Configurations
2) Valence Electrons
3) Positional Importance of Groups for Valence Electrons
Unit 2: Lesson 12: Day 3: C.2.3 Electrons & Protons (Negatives & Positives)
Unit 2: Lesson 13: Day 2: C.2.3 Neutrons & Isotopes (redefine only)
Unit 2: Lesson 14: Day 4: C.2.3 Isotopic abundance calculations – averages (AMUs)

****Suggestion – have Nucleons & Nucleus next to one another on some sort of graphic in the guided
notes. If you have the kids write poems to describe the charges & masses importance’s of atomic
structure, they might remember the subatomic particles better.
LST.5: WRITING GENRES (WRITING) Write for different purposes and to
specific audiences or people GRADES 11-12

11-12.LST.5.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.


WRITING
GENRES

11-12.LST.5.2: Write informative texts, including scientific procedures/experiments or


technical processes that include precise descriptions and conclusions drawn from data and
research.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 29


Unit 2: Lesson 15: Day 1: C.2.4 Intro
1) Valence Electrons in the Periodic Table
2) Periodic Trends
a. Masses
b. Radii
c. Metallic Character
d. Electronegativity, Electron Affinity, and Ionization Energy (all same directions)
3) Properties of Elements from prior knowledge given within C.2.4
a. Elements belonging to periods will have these type of properties… (ADI)
b. Elements belonging to groups will have these types of properties… (ADI)
Unit 2: Lesson 16: Day 2: C.2.4 Valence Electrons in the Periodic Table
Unit 2: Lesson 17: Day 3: C.2.4 Periodic Trends; Masses & Radii
Unit 2: Lesson 18: Day 4: C.2.4 Electronegativity, Electron Affinity, and Ionization Energy
(all same direction on Periodic Table)
Unit 2: Lesson 16: Day 5: C.2.4 ADI – Elements belonging to period # will have these types
of properties…
Unit 2: Lesson 17: Day 6: C.2.4 ADI – Elements belonging to group # will have these types
of properties…

***Suggestion – have the students do an Argument Driven Inquiry (ADI) exercise where they have
to explain why the alkali earth metals, why the earth metals, why the transition metals,
halogens…etc. are grouped together as they are on the periodic table. Have this assigned as group
work and use peer review online. Have the kids showcase their work somewhere in the school or
have the administration visit the class and see the kids presenting to one another as they rotate
around the classroom. Admins will enjoy these kinds of activities. It’s nice to come to a class when it
doesn’t involve discipline issues, but the fruits of student accomplishments.

LST.4: SYNTHESIS AND CONNECTION OF IDEAS (READING) Build


understanding of science and technical texts by synthesizing and connecting ideas
SYNTHESIS AND CONNECTION

and evaluating specific claims GRADES 11-12

11-12.LST.4.1: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse


formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or
solve a problem.
11-12.LST.4.2: Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or
technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging
conclusions with other sources of information.
OF IDEAS

11-12.LST.4.3: Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments,


simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving
conflicting information when possible.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 30


Unit 2: Lesson 18: Day 1: C.2.5 Nuclear Reactions
1) Nuclear Reactions
o Protons & Neutrons react inside the Nucleus
o Elements transmute into other elements
o Isotopes react differently
o Independent of Chemical Combination
o Energy Changes equal to 108 kJ
o Mass Changes are detectable
Unit 2: Lesson 18: Day 2: C.2.5 Chemical Reactions
2) Chemical Reactions
o Changes occur outside the Nucleus
o The same number of each kind of atom appears in the reactants and products
o Isotopes react the same
o Dependent on Chemical Combination
o Energy Changes equal to 10-103 kJ/mol
o Mass Reactants = Mass Products
Unit 2: Lesson 19: Day 3: C.2.5 Enrichment
****Students can draw a mechanism of Nuclear Reaction or a Chemical reaction using appropriate
balance of matter, and stereochemical electron or nucleon interactions. SEPS.1-SEPS.4

Unit 2: Lesson 20: Day 1: C.2.6: Intro.

1) Nuclear Changes in Matter


a. Fission
b. Fusion
c. Transmutations
d. Decays
Unit 2: Lesson 21: Day 2: C.2.6: Fission & Fusion
Unit 2: Lesson 22: Transmutations & Decays

Unit 2: Lesson 23: Day 1: C.2.7: Intro.


1) Algebra Review
o Fractions
o Isolating Unknown Variables
o Exponents
Unit 2: Lesson 24: Day 2: C.2.7 Fractions & Isolating Unknown Variables
Unit 2: Lesson 25: Day 3: C.2.7 Exponents
Unit 2: Lesson 26: Day 4: Apply half-life calculations to known Chemistry Isotope (SEPS.5
& SEPS.6)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 31


Unit 2: Post Quiz & then an Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2,
First Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game
Day5, Final Draft Corrections & Submisison6.) Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web
research paper into real world application of Unit 2 in chemical industry (business & economics).

LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the


research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

C.3.1 Investigate the observable characteristics of elements, ionic, and covalent compounds.
Standard 3: Bonding and Molecular

C.3.2 Compare and contrast how ionic and covalent compounds form.
C.3.3 Draw structural formulas for simple molecules and determine their molecular shape.
C.3.4 Write chemical formulas for ionic compounds and covalent compounds given their
names and vice versa.
C.3.5 Use laboratory observations and data to compare and contrast ionic, covalent, network,
metallic, polar, and non-polar substances with respect to constituent particles, strength of
bonds, melting, and boiling points and conductivity; provide examples of each type.
Structure

C.3.6 Use structural formulas of hydrocarbons to illustrate carbon's ability to form single and
multiple bonds within a molecule.

Unit 3: Lesson 0: Bonding & Molecular Structure Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Bonding
a. Ionic (ions) & Covalent (atoms)
2) Molecular Structure
a. Molecular Shape (stereochemistry) vs. Chemical Formulas (empirical & structural)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 32


Unit 3: Lesson 1: C.3.1: Elements, Ions, and Covalent Compounds

Unit 3: Lesson 2: C.3.2: Formations of Ionic & Covalent Compounds (similarities & differences)

Unit 3: Lesson 3: Day 1: C.3.3: Octet Rule, Lewis Structures, & the Periodic Table
Unit 3: Lesson 4: Day 2: C.3.3: Structural Formulas & Molecular Shapes

Unit 3: Lesson 5: Day 1: C.3.4: Valence Practice & Ions: Cations & Anions
Unit 3: Lesson 6: Day 2: C.3.4: Binary Covalent Nomenclature
Unit 3: Lesson 7: Day 3: C.3.4: Binary Ionic Nomenclature
Unit 3: Lesson 8: Day 4: C.3.4: Binary Ionic Transition Metal Nomenclature (Stock Convention)
Unit 3: Lesson 9: Day 5: C.3.4: Polyatomic Ions & Polyatomic Compound Nomenclature
Unit 3: Lesson 10: Day 6: C.3.4: Acid Nomenclature
Unit 3: Lesson 11: Day 7: C.3.4: Hydrate Nomenclature & Review of all Nomenclature

Unit 3: Lesson 12: Day 1: C.3.5: Different Types of Substances


1) Polar Ionic
2) Ionic Metallic
3) Polar Covalent
4) Nonpolar Covalent
5) Covalent Network Molecules
Unit 3: Lesson 13: Day 2: C.3.5: Strengths of Bonds, Melting & Boiling Points
Unit 3: Lesson 14: Day 3: C.3.5: Conductivity & Nonpolar/Polar Solubility of Substances
Unit 3: Lesson 15: Day 4: C.3.5: Summary Experiment for C.3.5 Concepts

Unit 3: Lesson 16: C.3.6: Hydrocarbons, Basic Nomenclature & Structural Illustrations

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 33


Unit 3: Post Quiz & then an Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2, First
Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game Day5, Final
Draft Corrections & Submisison6.) Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web research paper into real
world application of Unit 3 in analytical chemistry.

LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the


research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

C.4.1 Describe, classify, and give examples of various kinds of reactions: synthesis (i.e.,
Standard 4: Reactions and Stoichiometry

combination), decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, acid/base, and


combustion.
C.4.2 Predict products of simple reactions as listed in C.4.1.
C.4.3 Balance chemical equations and use the law of conservation of mass to explain why this
must be true.
C.4.4 Apply the mole concept to determine the mass, moles, number of particles, or volume
of a gas at STP, in any given sample, for an element or compound.
C.4.5 Use a balanced chemical equation to calculate the quantities of reactants needed and
products made in a chemical reaction that goes to completion.
C.4.6 Perform calculations to determine the composition of a compound or mixture when
given the necessary information.
C.4.7 Apply lab data to determine the empirical and molecular formula of a compound.

Unit 4: Lesson 0: Reactions & Stoichiometry Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Reactions
a. Conservation of Mass Preview
2) Stoichiometry
a. Gluing matter together, breaking it apart, and switching it around (leading to C.4.1)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 34


Unit 4: Lesson 1: Day 1: C.4.1: Various Types of Reactions
1) Synthesis
2) Decomposition
Unit 4: Lesson 1: Day 2: C.4.1: Various Types of Reactions
3) Single Replacement
4) Double Replacement
Unit 4: Lesson 1: Day 3: C.4.1: Various Types of Reactions
5) Acid/base
6) Combustion
Unit 4: Lesson 2: Day 4: C.4.1: Le Chatelier & Equilibrium
Unit 4: Lesson 3: Day 5: C.4.1: Le Chatelier Emphasis

Unit 4: Lesson 4: C.4.2: Predict Products of Simple Reactions (SEPS.5-6)

Unit 4: Lesson 5: C.4.3: Balance Given Equations & Use Conservation of Mass to Support
Answers (SEPS.1-SEPS.6)

Unit 4: Lesson 6: Day 1: C.4.4: Dimensional Analysis


1) Grams to Moles & back again given an element or compound quantity
Unit 4: Lesson 7: Day 2: C.4.4: Dimensional Analysis
2) Avogadro’s Number given an element or compound quantity of grams OR moles
Unit 4: Lesson 8: Day 3: C.4.4: Volume of a gas at Standard Temperature & Pressure

Unit 4: Lesson 9: Day 1: C.4.5: Use a balanced chemical equation to determine limiting
reagents & quantities needed, made, and excess remaining

Unit 4: Lesson 10: Day 2: C.4.5: Use a balanced chemical equation to determine limiting
reagents & quantities needed, made, and excess remaining

Unit 4: Lesson 11: Day 1: C.4.6 Determine the composition of unknown compounds or
mixtures with given (grams/mole) & grams data. (SEPS.5-6)
1) i.e. - What is the equation, weight, & formula of the unknown product if 4 grams of 12.01
(grams/mole) element was added to 4 moles of a diatomic element weighing 32. Perform
calculations to determine the composition of the resultant compound or mixture and
identify & write a balanced chemical equation for the elemental reactants used.
Unit 4: Lesson 11: Day 2: C.4.6 Determine the composition of unknown compounds or
mixtures with given (grams/mole) & grams data. (SEPS.5-6)

Unit 4: Lesson 12: C.4.7: Stoichiometric Determinations & Calculations Lab (SEPS.1-8)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 35


Unit 4: Post Quiz & then an Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2,
First Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game
Day5, Final Draft Corrections & Submisison6.) Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web
research paper into real world application of Unit 4 in chemical engineering.
LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the
research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 36


C.5.1 Use the kinetic molecular theory with the combined and ideal gas laws to explain
Standard 5: Behavior of
changes in volume, pressure, moles, and temperature of a gas.

C.5.2 Apply the ideal gas equation (PV = nRT) to calculate the change in one variable when
another variable is changed, and the others are held constant.

C.5.3 Use lab data and a balanced chemical equation to calculate volume of a gas at STP and
non STP conditions, assuming that the reaction goes to completion and the ideal gas law
Gases

holds.

C.6.1 Explain that atoms and molecules are in constant motion and that this motion increases
as thermal energy increases.

C.6.2 Distinguish between the concepts of temperature and heat flow in macroscopic and
microscopic terms.
Thermochemistry

C.6.3 Classify chemical reactions and phase changes as exothermic or endothermic based on
Standard 6:

enthalpy values. Use a graphical representation to illustrate the energy changes involved.

C.6.4 Perform calculations involving heat flow, temperature changes, and phase changes by
using known values of specific heat, phase change constants, or both.

Unit 5: Lesson 0: Behavior of Gases & Thermochemistry Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Behavior of Gases
a. Kinetic Molecular Theory Preview
2) Thermochemistry
a. The movement of matter is directly proportionate to thermal energy

Unit 5: Lesson 1: Day 1: C.5.1: History of Kinetic Molecular Theory (KMT)


Unit 5: Lesson 2: Day 2: C.5.1: History of the Ideal Gas Law (IGL)
Unit 5: Lesson 3: Day 3: C.5.1: Use KMT & IGL to explain changes in volume, pressure,
moles, and temperature of a gas.

Unit 5: Lesson 4: C.5.2: Solve for P, V, n, R, and T given other variables

Unit 5: Lesson 5: C.5.3: Online Lab for Gas Law Simulator of Standard & Nonstandard
Conditions given a balanced chemical equation to calculate volume
of a gas

Unit 5: Lesson 6: C.6.1: Kinetic Molecular Theory recall – increase in energy causes increase
in particle movements

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 37


Unit 5: Lesson 7: C.6.2: Contrast Temperature to Heat-flow in Both Macroscopic &
Microscopic realities

Unit 5: Lesson 8: Day 1: C.6.3: Use Enthalpy values to Classify Phase Changes as
exothermic or endothermic in chemical reactions
Unit 5: Lesson 9: Day 2: C.6.3: Have students illustrate the ‘Day 1’ work with graphic
representations based off of how to interpret enthalpy graphs today

Unit 5: Lesson 10: C.6.4: Thermochemical Calculations (SEPS.5 & SEPS.6)


1) Calculate Heat Flow given known values: specific heat, phase change constants, or both.
2) Calculate Temperature Changes given known values: specific heat, phase change constants,
or both.
Unit 5: Post Quiz & then an Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2,
First Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game
Day5, Final Draft Corrections & Submisison6.) Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web
research paper into real world application of Unit 5 in environmental chemistry.
LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the
research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 38


C.7.1 Describe the composition and properties of solutions.

C.7.2 Explain how temperature, pressure, and polarity of the solvent affect the solubility of a
solute.
Standard 7:
Solutions

C.7.3 Describe the concentration of solutes in a solution in terms of molarity. Perform


calculations using molarity, mass, and volume. Prepare a sample of given molarity provided a
known solute.

C.8.1 Classify solutions as acids or bases and describe their characteristic properties.
Standard 8: Acids

C.8.2 Compare and contrast the strength of acids and bases in solutions.
and Bases

C.8.3 Given the hydronium ion and/or the hydroxide ion concentration, calculate the pH
and/or the pOH of a solution. Explain the meanings of these values.

Unit 6: Lesson 0: Solutions & Acids/Bases Intro. & Pre-quiz (identical to post quiz ?’s)

1) Solutions
a. Aqueous solutions as water with additives
2) Acids/Bases
a. Brønsted-Lowry Recall

Unit 6: Lesson 1: C.7.1: Composition & Properties of Solutions

Unit 6: Lesson 2: Day 1: C.7.2: Temperature, Pressure, & Polarity affect the solubility of a
solute
Unit 6: Lesson 3: Day 2: C.7.2: Solubility Lab

Unit 6: Lesson 4: Day 1: C.7.3: Quantitative Solutions


1) Calculate: [Solutes] in a solution in terms of M (molarity)
Unit 6: Lesson 4: Day 2: C.7.3: Quantitative Solutions
2) Calculate: Molarity (M), mass (g), and volume (cm3 or mL)
Unit 6: Lesson 4: Day 2: C.7.3: Solutions Lab Part 1
3) Prepare a solution to a directed Molarity (M).

Unit 6: Lesson 5: C.8.1: Solutions Lab Part 2


4) Acid/Base Classification of Strengths using Litmus Paper for Unknowns & Knowns
(prepared from Lab Part 1)

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 39


Unit 6: Lesson 6: Day 1: C.8.2: Acid/Base Calculations
1) Given [OH-] or [H-] in a solution, calculate pH and/or pOH
2) Explain the meanings of the values of the pH and/or pOH for each respective problem

Unit 6: Post Quiz & then an Exam Research Paper (6 days – Outline1, Outline Approval2,
First Draft3, Peer Review4, Teacher Review of Second Draft & Cooperative Chemistry Game
Day5, Final Draft Corrections & Submisison6.) Open Notes, Open Book, World Wide Web
research paper into real world application of Unit 6 for biochemistry.

LST.7: THE RESEARCH PROCESS (WRITING) Build knowledge about the


research process and the topic under study by conducting short or more sustained
research
GRADES 11-12
11-12.LST.7.1: Conduct short as well as more sustained research assignments and tasks to
THE RESEARCH PROCESS

answer a question (including a self-generated question), test a hypothesis, or solve a


problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on
the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
11-12.LST.7.2: Gather relevant information from multiple types of authoritative sources,
using advanced searches effectively; annotate sources; assess the strengths and limitations
of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; synthesize and
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding
plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation
(e.g., APA or CSE).
11-12.LST.7.3: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 40


Indiana State Standard 3: Bonding & Molecular Structure
CONTENTS PAGE
DOCUMENT Lesson # Page #
C.3.1 – Lower Order & Higher Order 1 1-5

C.3.2 – Lower Order & Higher Order 2 6-10

C.3.3 – Lower Order & Higher Order 3 11-14

C.3.4 – Day 1 – Lower Order 4 15-17

C.3.4 – Day 1 – Higher Order 4 18-19

C.3.4 – Day 2 – Lower Order & Higher Order 5 20-21

C.3.4 – Day 3 – Lower Order & Higher Order 5 22-23

C.3.4 – Day 4 – Lower Order 6 24-25

C.3.4 – Day 4 – Higher Order 6 26

C.3.4 – Day 5 – Lower Order 7 27-28

C.3.4 – Day 5 – Higher Order 7 29

C.3.4 – Day 5 – Extra Credit Crossword 7 30

C.3.4 – Day 6 – Lower Order 8 31-32

C.3.4 – Day 6 – Higher Order 8 33

C.3.4 – Day 7 – Lower Order 9 34-35

C.3.4 – Day 7 – Higher Order 9 36

C.3.5 – Lower Order 10 37-40

C.3.5 – Higher Order Lab Day 10 41-46

C.3.6 – Lower Order 11 47-49

C.3.6 – Higher Order 11 50-52

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 41


Effective Teaching Strategies
Keep It Simple Scientists (KISS) Lesson Planning Outline (LPO)

Being able to write a lesson plan is one of those critical components of teaching. For me, lesson
planning always tended on the side of legal requirement to show I knew how to teach, but as a
teacher, as a website developer, as a mother, student, as someone who literally writes her own guided
notes & interactive games for the Chemistry Classroom…. I’ve always found the tediousness of
writing lesson plan super…annoying.

I hate to start of like that; but it’s necessary that you know how much alike we are. No one really
wants to write a lesson plan. At least no teacher I know wants to write lesson plans. And the other
problem with plans: As all parents & teachers know…plans are tentative. Nearly nothing ever goes
according to plan, and if you are so rigorous in your classroom that you allow for no wiggle room;
your students in many cases aren’t allowed to ask questions that require deeper ponderance. They
are therefore not able to be propelled further in the learning process as their unique questions are
being formed and then answered.

All that to say: you already know this. Here is an overview of my Kiss LPO:

Unit Class Period Date


STANDARD: (Substandard of unit. i.e. – one sentence from the entire standard.)
UNIT GOAL: (Entire series of state standards for one standard.)
OBJECTIVE: (Bloom’s Taxonomy, 1 higher order, 1 lower order & student expectations.)
MOTIVATION: [Why (do/are) the students (find this fun/motivated to learn?]
PROCEDURES: (Assuming 8 minutes of teaching time.)
CLOSURE: (What was the exit slip?)
MATERIALS: For Teacher? For Students?
EVALUATION: [ (1) Grading procedures (2) How did the lesson go?]
INCLUSION STRATEGIES:

English Language Learners (ELL) – (1) What kind of language learning activity was
involved? (vocab. words count here – make sure to include key vocabs in natural languages –
this can be done in Microsoft Word Translate: English & Native Language for all vocabs.)

Individual Education Plans (IEP) – (1) 50% less work – i.e.; half of coloring, half of fill in
the blank, some answers provided…. (2) work provided with additional picture explanations
(3) All font included has feet/hats to increase tracking & is 14/16 point instead of the
traditional 11/12.

Gifted Students (Elevated Education Plans) – (Less guidance on what? How is


independent study being utilized?)

The page following contains the Kiss LPO. Feel free to download it off my website & edit it as
needed in a word format.

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 42


Keep it Simple Scientists Lesson Plan Outline
Kiss LPO

Unit Class Period Date

STANDARD: (Substandard of unit. i.e. – one sentence from the entire standard.)

UNIT GOAL: (Entire series of state standards for one standard.)

OBJECTIVE: (Bloom’s Taxonomy, 1 higher order, 1 lower order & student expectations.)

MOTIVATION: [Why (do/are) the students (find this fun/motivated to learn?]

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 43


PROCEDURES: (Assuming 8 minutes of teaching time.)

CLOSURE: (What was the exit slip?)

MATERIALS:

For Teacher:

For Students:

EVALUATION: [(1) Grading procedures (2) How did the lesson go?]

INCLUSION STRATEGIES:

English Language Learners (ELL) –

Individual Education Plans (IEP) –

Gifted Students (Elevated Education Plans) –

Megan Perkins Indiana University Southeast 44


Brainstorm
The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain
By: Daniel J. Siegel, M.D.

Creating a Safe Harbor and Launching Pad for Adolescents


(Excerpt from pp. 197-199)

The mind is shaped by changes in our relationships and in our brains throughout the life
span. As adolescence involves so much exploration and change – of different interests,
compatibilities and types of relationships – it is an extremely and formative time of life. If we add to
these changes and challenges the attachment models that are non-secure, we can see how what could
have just been rock waters sometimes turns into overwhelming tempests.
Working on the impact of attachment during the adolescent period, for both adolescent and
adult, is essential. Navigating the shifting needs for attunement and attachment as adolescence
unfolds, riding the changing tides of the relationships between parent and adolescent and peer with
peer can be a tricky challenge. Ideally, the adult will have the presence of mind to create the mental
space so that he or she can continue to serve as a secure home base, a refuge in the storm that can
be life, so that the adolescent knows that a safe harbor always exists. It is essential for both the adult
and adolescent to “always keep the channels of communication open” – a statement that can apply
as much to your relationship with others as it does to your relationship with yourself.
As I watched my eighteen-year-old daughter getting ready to leave for college, I felt the
echoes of my own childhood-the attachment models I formed base on the manner in which I was
raise and how these models have evolved as I strove to become a secure attachment figure for my
son and daughter. Letting the transitions unfold as my children got older has somehow required that
I care for a younger part of me, that collection of states of mind of all the various attachment
models I have had from my own youth, so that I can feel clear in having her, our last child, leave
home. The mind works to help us assimilate the many brain states, our states of mind, that we have
developed in various ways and at various stages as we grow and go through life. The challenge is to
find a way to connect with those brain states and take care of their various needs. That’s a form of
“state integration,” which is a healthy part of living. And right now, I need to differentiate that
younger state of mind, that younger me, and weave that inner aspect of myself more fully into my
life, to prepare to no longer be the father with a child at home, and yet continue to care for my own
inner needs for nurturance and connection.
I have had to take the meanings of parenting from the inside out on two levels. I have had to
makes sense of my own childhood, so I can provide the kinds of connections needed to create
secure attachments for my children. And I have had to parent myself from the inside out, meaning I
have had to acknowledge that a younger part of me with states of mind that needed to be seen, safe,
soothed, and secure in my own childhood is still alive and well inside me. Taking care of the needs
of that part of me came naturally while caring for my son and daughter as they grew up in our home.
That part of me somehow felt comforted by an older part of me caring for my own kids. But to get
ready to see each of them go, to serve not just as a safe harbor but as a launching pad, I have had to
be sure to directly nurture that inner place of my own attachment needs that is my birthright as a
human being. We all have needs for connection. And as we move through life, we have the
opportunity to both receive that care in our youth and to receive and give that care as we move
through adolescence and adulthood.

Book Excerpt Brainstorm; The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain 45
Watching our adolescents get ready to leave home brings up all these issues of nurturance
and care, of attachment and connection. This is the “empty nest” period that we as parents hear so
much about. I like to think of it as “flexibility phase,” but I have to admit that when our daughter
first left for college, it felt sad, overwhelming, and exhilarating all at once. I try to simply be present
with all of this life, aware and accepting of all these layers of experience, letting these days unfold
while taking in the majesty of it all.

Book Excerpt Brainstorm; The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain 46