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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Annotated Bibliography and Annotations


Sergio Fernando Navarro Lopez

ENGL 5010: Introduction to Graduate Study – TESL

Dr. Christina Kitson

10/30/2018
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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Annotated Bibliography

References

Alinte, C. (2013). teaching grammar through music.

The Journal of Linguistic and Intercultural Education, 6, 7.

Aguirre, D., Bustinza, D., & Garvich, M. (2016, 01). Influence of Songs in Primary School

Students' Motivation for Learning English in Lima, Peru. English Language Teaching,

9(2), 178. doi:10.5539/elt.v9n2p178

Alisaari, J., & Heikkola, L. M. (2016, 06). Increasing fluency in L2 writing with singing. Studies

in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 6(2), 271. doi:10.14746/ssllt.2016.6.2.5

Arellano, S. I., & Draper, J. E. (1972, 03). Relations between Musical Aptitudes and Second-

Language Learning. Hispania, 55(1), 111. doi:10.2307/338257

Beasley, R., Chuang, Y., & Liao, C. (2008). American music immersion: Influencing factors and

its impact on taiwanese EFL learners engaged in web-based, multimedia music study.

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 17(1), 27-42.

Chen, A. H. (2016). Perspectives upon Integrating Music into Freshman English Pronunciation

Training Classroom. Asian Journal of Education and Training, 2(1), 16-22.

Gordon, R. L., Shivers, C. M., Wieland, E. A., Kotz, S. A., Yoder, P. J., & Mcauley, J. D. (2014,

09). Musical rhythm discrimination explains individual differences in grammar skills in

children. Developmental Science, 18(4), 635-644. doi:10.1111/desc.12230

Huertas, I. A., & Parra, L. J. (2014, 04). The Role of Songs in First-Graders’ Oral

Communication Development in English. PROFILE Issues in Teachers' Professional

Development, 16(1), 11-28. doi:10.15446/profile.v16n1.37178


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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Li, X. (2009). Effectiveness of music on vocabulary acquisition, language usage, and meaning

for mainland chinese ESL learners. Contributions to Music Education, 36(1), 73-84.

Schunk, H. A. (1999, 06). The Effect of Singing Paired with Signing on Receptive Vocabulary

Skills of Elementary ESL Students. Journal of Music Therapy, 36(2), 110-124.

doi:10.1093/jmt/36.2.110

Slevc, L. R., & Miyake, A. (2006, 08). Individual Differences in Second-Language Proficiency.

Psychological Science, 17(8), 675-681. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01765.x

Rukholm, V. N. (2015). Singing to speak: An examination of adult L2 learners and vocabulary

learning through song. Italica, 92(1), 171-192.


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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Annotations

Alinte, C. (2013). teaching grammar through music.

The Journal of Linguistic and Intercultural Education, 6, 7.

This article investigates the effectiveness of using songs in teaching grammar to second

language students. Also, as a second objective, the author wanted to explore the effect of song-

based grammar instruction on students and teachers’ motivation and classroom atmosphere. The

experiment was carried out over in a school with students in seventh grade. There were two

groups, the experimental and the traditional one. Both groups had the same content but with

different methods. The experimental one received based-song grammar instruction. The data

showed that the experimental one was favored to get better grades than the traditional one. Also,

the author discovered that both the students and teachers experimented a better classroom

atmosphere. The research offers a beneficial insight into the study of music along with grammar

because based on the data, it showed that music increases the students’ understanding of L2

grammar.
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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Li, X. (2009). Effectiveness of music on vocabulary acquisition, language usage, and meaning

for mainland chinese ESL learners. Contributions to Music Education, 36(1), 73-84.

This article examined the effectiveness of music to acquire new vocabulary, language

usage and the good use of the meaning of new words. The recipients of the experiment were

Chinese college students. Their target language was English. By doing the experiment the author

was also attempting to establish a good base for future work in the field of music and for the

acquisition of a second language. The research was performed on College students. The research

counted with three groups, one group was the one with only based-music instruction, a second

group received a mixed instruction, this means that they had traditional lessons and other lessons

with music-based instruction. The third one was receiving traditional instruction. The students

who were exposed to music the most obtained higher scores than the other two groups. The

second highest was the traditional group, and interestingly, the lowest group was the one with the

mix instruction. The data benefits music-based instruction in the L2 classroom only if the based-

music instruction is on a daily base.


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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Arellano, S. I., & Draper, J. E. (1972, 03). Relations between Musical Aptitudes and Second-

Language Learning. Hispania, 55(1), 111. doi:10.2307/338257

The objective of this article is about to seek the relationship between music and second-

language learning. The research attempts to discover how related are the discriminatory skills

that one uses to learn a second language to the ones that one uses for musical sounds. When

students start learning a second language they need to discriminate sounds to be able to

understand the new vocabulary. The author attempted to find out if the discriminatory abilities in

the area of pitch, intensity, rhythm, timbre, and tonal memory share a relationship with the

capacity of pronunciation and comprehension of a second language. The study was conducted

with 28 students in the fifth and sixth grades in an elementary school. These students were

selected randomly and they received their L2 instruction from the same teacher. Students also

had musical instruction on the next areas: pitch, intensity, rhythm, timbre, and tonal memory. The

study showed that there is a strong relationship between the musical capabilities of students with

the language target. The data favor the instruction of music skills in the ESL classroom.
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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Beasley, R., Chuang, Y., & Liao, C. (2008). American music immersion: Influencing factors and

its impact on taiwanese EFL learners engaged in web-based, multimedia music study.

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 17(1), 27-42.

This article focuses on the acquisition of a second language if there is a total immersion

in the culture of the L2, it can be either watching movies, having interaction in the web, and the

listening of the music of L2. The target students were part of a university in Taiwan. The author’s

assumptions were that if students had more attachments to the culture of the L2, they were going

to be faster learners in the L2. Based on the data, the recipients showed that the more they listen

to music in the L2, the better the achievement they have in the L2. Actually, since the research

was not only focused on music as an easier way to learn the L2; it was also focused on other

components of the culture of the L2, music favored students to learn faster and more accurate.

The more the students knew a song in the L2, the easier they learned vocabulary. Also, it is

important to point that if students were immersed musically in the L2, they more enjoyment they

experienced in the process of acquiring the L2.


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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Slevc, L. R., & Miyake, A. (2006, 08). Individual Differences in Second-Language Proficiency.

Psychological Science, 17(8), 675-681. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01765.x

This article examined the relationship between musical ability and second language

proficiency. Recipients were assessed in four domains: receptive phonology, productive

phonology, syntax, and lexical knowledge. The assumption of the author that music and language

share the same functions of the brain, it is based on past researches that affirmed the author’s

beliefs. The aim of the study was to test recipients’ musical ability in a more rigorous way. The

recipients also were tested in potential factors related to L2 proficiency to discover an

explanation of the variance associated with the L2 four domains. The results showed that

recipients who had a higher score in musical abilities, specifically in the remembering of musical

notes, were able to perceive and produce sounds better in the L2. Also, the author argues that the

acquisition of L2 syntax is related to the ability in musical tasks focusing on musical syntactic

processes.
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Annotated Bibliography and Annotations

Rukholm, V. N. (2015). Singing to speak: An examination of adult L2 learners and vocabulary

learning through song. Italica, 92(1), 171-192.

The author presents a study of the impact of songs on the acquisition of L2 incidental

vocabulary. The study tested sixty-six participants who were beginners at learning L2. The

experiment was divided into five groups. All groups received a pre-test and a post-test based on

the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (VKS). Out of the five groups, there was only one controlled

group. Four groups were exposed to lexical items either by a song or by a poem. There were two

poem groups, which meant that they were learning the new vocabulary only with lyrics. The

other two groups with songs learned the new vocabulary by listening and singing songs. The

results of the experiment showed that groups with songs had the highest score identifying the

new lexical elements. This article then asserts that music and singing favor the acquisition of

new vocabulary in the L2. Also, it is corroborated that songs are better than a rhythmical reading

of a poem in facilitating new lexical elements.