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Issue #764 Harrisburg, PA Feb.

18, 2019

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​ Facebook Page

Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action

On February 11, the ​Growing


Greener Coalition​ sent an ​open letter
to the Senate, House and Gov. Wolf
opposing the Governor's proposal to
transfer monies from the
Environmental Stewardship
(Growing Greener) and Keystone
Recreation, Park and Conservation
funds used to fund local
environmental improvement projects
to instead pay operating costs for DEP and DCNR.
The Coalition opposes what it called an "ill-considered notion" because these Funds were
established to finance “projects that make a lasting improvement to communities;” the proposed
transfers take money from 2 Funds it says are already "starving" for money; and the group notes
the monies in the Funds are already committed to specific projects.
The open letter concludes by saying, "The Governor’s budget proposal threatens to upend
decades of bipartisan consensus on the need to maintain the dedication of the Keystone Fund and
ESF so that they may consistently invest in projects that deliver today and will continue
delivering for future generations.
"The Growing Greener Coalition asks the Governor to rethink the Administration’s
strategy and for the General Assembly to reject this proposal. Coalition partners are ready and
willing to meet with the Governor and legislators to resolve the gaping disconnect between the
budget proposal and the reality of gross shortages in available project funding."
Call Your Legislators/Governor
On Wednesday the Growing Greener Coalition issued a call to action asking
Pennsylvania to contact your legislators and the Governor’s Office to “stop this disaster in the
making.”
Click Here to find your legislator​. Call the Governor’s Office at 717-787-2500.

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The text of the open letter follows--

Open Letter to Governor Wolf and Members Of the General Assembly, 2/11/2019

The Growing Greener Coalition opposes Governor Wolf’s budget proposal to strip tens of
millions of dollars away from tangible project investments in order to fund general government
operations.
It’s been suggested that money can be taken from the Keystone Recreation, Park and
Conservation Fund (Keystone) and the Environmental Stewardship Fund (ESF) because no harm
will be done to project investments, and the proposed budget action would only tap unneeded
money that’s just sitting around.
This ill-considered notion misses fundamental issues:
-- Keystone and ESF were established to fund projects that make lasting improvements in
communities; redirecting their funds to support government operations would seriously damage
the reliability of these workhorses for achieving community and environmental improvements
across the Commonwealth.
-- Keystone and ESF are starving for funds. Even without this budget proposal, they can’t meet
the demands for project investments or the needs driving the demands (as described in the
sections below)—not even close.
-- The Keystone and ESF monies in state accounts are committed to projects; capital projects by
their nature can take a few years to complete. If the state were to redirect any of these committed
monies into operations, the state would in fact be un-committing to the projects. Under future
budgets, the state could recommit funds to those projects, but, in the meantime, communities
would be placed in the difficult position of making major expenditures with hopes but no
guarantees that the state will come through with money in the end. (Note that if Harrisburg
decides communities must take on this risk, the monies to be freed of commitment should at least
be redirected to funding the large backlog of unfunded and underfunded Keystone and ESF
projects.)
Helping Communities Help Themselves; Leveraging Private and Local Resources
The Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund and Environmental Stewardship
Fund owe their success and longevity to their direct support of community-driven projects. The
dedicated funds empower local people and the private sector to address problems at their source,
not from afar in Harrisburg.
Every dollar in state grants typically leverages at least $1 in other investments and
usually the multiplier is much larger. The Keystone Fund alone has leveraged more than $1
billion in public/private partnerships to complete nearly 5,000 projects.
Unmet Demand
Keystone and ESF come nowhere near to meeting present demand. Roughly half of all
project investment proposals must be turned away. In the case of DCNR Keystone investments,
46% of projects are rejected for lack of sufficient state funds.
And these rejections only represent a portion of unmet demand because grant applicants
greatly self-limit their submissions knowing that competition for scarce dollars is fierce. Further,
even for those projects funded, DCNR is only able to fund 85% on average of each request (and
those requests already are generally limited to 50% of total project costs).
The Need

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Pennsylvania’s environmental funding needs are huge. Pressing water issues—from
water quality investments needed for the Susquehanna and Chesapeake and Pennsylvania’s other
water basins to municipal stormwater management and flood reduction measures—hundreds of
millions if not billions of dollars are needed in the coming years.
The proposed budget diversion would worsen the needs as it would effectively take
money away from communities as they work to address stormwater, flooding, water treatment,
and other environmental issues.
The Keystone Fund delivers $7 in flood control and prevention, water treatment, and
other natural services for every dollar invested. (See Pennsylvania’s Return on Investment in the
Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund and other studies in ​the Economic Benefits
section of​ https://conservationtools.org​.)
Now is the time to strengthen Pennsylvania’s dedicated environmental funds, so that they
can deliver more, not less, in project investments.
Looking beyond water issues, our parks, trails, and other outdoor recreational spaces all
have pressing needs. A ​new report identifies a billion dollars in deferred maintenance​ in our state
parks and forests.
Workhorses for Lasting Improvements
The Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund and Environmental Stewardship
Fund are the state’s workhorses for investing in projects that bring lasting benefits to
communities across the Commonwealth.
Among their many accomplishments, they’ve effectively and efficiently improved water
quality, conserved lands important to local communities, and created outdoor recreation
opportunities for visitors and tourists alike.
Their exemplary track records and the needs they address are described at length at
Keystone Fund​ and ​Growing Greener Coalition​ websites.
Operations Should Be Funded Through General Fund
The Growing Greener Coalition respects that DCNR and DEP need money to operate and
that environmental staffing has plummeted in the new millennium. However, the answer to
agency needs lays with the General Fund-- the appropriate source for general government
operations-- not in special funds dedicated to investing in projects and to leveraging the
incredible energy and resources existing in our communities.
Conclusion
A portion of the realty transfer tax was dedicated to the Keystone Recreation, Park and
Conservation Fund in 1993 and landfill tipping fees were enacted to fund the Environmental
Stewardship Fund in 1999 (and expanded in 2002) in order to reinvest in our communities,
redress the environmental damage of the past, and respect our generations yet to come.
Both funds were established with extraordinary bipartisan support in the General
Assembly as well as in public referenda.
The public’s enthusiasm continues to be overwhelming: 75% of Republican voters, 82%
of Democrats, and 87% of independents support taxing themselves more to expand conservation
funding. (​See survey results​.)
The Governor’s budget proposal threatens to upend decades of bipartisan consensus on
the need to maintain the dedication of the Keystone Fund and ESF so that they may consistently
invest in projects that deliver today and will continue delivering for future generations.
The Growing Greener Coalition asks the Governor to rethink the Administration’s

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strategy and for the General Assembly to reject this proposal. Coalition partners are ready and
willing to meet with the Governor and legislators to resolve the gaping disconnect between the
budget proposal and the reality of gross shortages in available project funding.
For more information, please don’t hesitate to reach out to the people and organizations
of the Coalition including:
-- Conservation Voters of PA, Joshua McNeil, Executive Director
-- Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds, R. John Dawes, Executive Director
-- Lancaster Farmland Trust, Jeffrey Swinehart, Chief Operating Officer
-- Natural Lands, Oliver P. Bass, President
-- PennFuture (Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future), Jacquelyn Bonomo, President & CEO
-- Pennsylvania Environmental Council, John Walliser, Senior Vice President
-- Pennsylvania Land Trust Association, Andrew M. Loza, Executive Director
-- Pennsylvania Park and Forest Foundation, Marci Mowery, President
-- Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society, Tim Herd, CEO
-- Sierra Club PA Chapter, Joanne Kilgour, Chapter Director
-- The Nature Conservancy, PA Chapter, Ronald L. Ramsey, Senior Policy Advisor
-- Trout Unlimited, David Kinney, Eastern Policy Director
-- Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, Cynthia Carrow, Vice President
Click Here​ for a copy of the letter.
Questions should be directed to Andy Loza, Executive Director, PA Land Trust
Association by calling 717-230-8560 or send email to: ​aloza@conserveland.org​.
For more information, visit the ​Growing Greener Coalition​ website.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

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PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local
Recreation Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses; Issues Call To Action

On February 12, the ​PA Recreation and Park Society


sent out this ​Action Alert to its members​ and the public
urging them to oppose Gov. Wolf’s diversion of tens of
millions of dollars of dedicated recreation project
funding to pay agency expenses.
The text of the alert follows--
The Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society (PRPS)
opposes Governor Wolf's proposal to divert tens of
millions of dollars of dedicated state funding for park
and recreation projects in order to fund general
governmental operations.
General government operations have been
traditionally-and properly-paid for out of the General
Fund budget.
PRPS is the principal statewide association providing professional development,
leadership, advocacy and resources for those working and volunteering in the parks and
recreation field.
We are an active and longstanding member of the Pennsylvania Growing Greener
Coalition that has advocated for and defended dedicated funding for park and recreation projects.
Polling has shown that this dedicated funding is consistently and overwhelmingly popular
with the citizens of the Commonwealth.
The General Assembly created the Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund
(Keystone Fund) and the Environmental Stewardship Fund to provide a consistent, dedicated
stream of income for a wide range of conservation and environmental purposes.
The General Assembly and previous governors also supported dedicated revenue streams
for these projects, so that project funding was long-term, consistent, and not held hostage to the
whims of the annual debate over the General Fund budget.
The Keystone Fund and Environmental Stewardship Fund monies are often used to fund
multi-year projects such as the construction of park and trail projects. These projects generally
have matching funds from local governments and a wide range of partners in the local
community.
Every dollar in state grants leverages at least one dollar in local matching investments,
and often more.
By diverting funds from these programs and multiyear projects, the Commonwealth
would be retreating from its commitment to our communities and setting a dangerous precedent.
Budget proposals reflect many things, but they are fundamentally about priorities. We
urge the General Assembly to maintain its previous commitment to dedicated funding for these
important park and recreation projects, and to properly fund government operations out of the
General Fund budget.
Call to Action
1. Call or email your Representative and Senator NOW to urge them to OPPOSE the
proposal to transfer funds from the dedicated funds for governmental operations. ​Click Here to

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find your legislator​.
2. Take to your social media channels to spread the message that these funds must remain
protected for their dedicated purposes. Tag your legislators; use the hashtag #PABudget.
Click Here ​for a copy of the Action Alert.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming events and training
opportunities, visit the ​PA Recreation and Park Society​ website. Like them ​on Facebook​,
Follow them ​on Twitter​, visit their ​YouTube Channel​, and find them ​on Instagram​. ​Click Here
to support their work.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf To Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates
And Fiscal Resources

In a special report​ to Gov. Wolf called Vision 2022,


DEP’s ​Citizens Advisory Council​ urged the Governor to
make rebalancing DEP’s legal mandates and its fiscal
resources a priority in his second term.
“The budgetary picture is much the same today as it
was four years ago. DEP remains strained for funding
and lacks the resources to pursue effective
environmental planning activities.
“While … fee increases will help cover the costs of
implementing current programs, increased resources are

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needed to address coming environmental challenges.
“The current agency executives and staff have worked hard at improving the efficiency of
the agency, including several e-permitting and other digital initiatives….but it is important to
recognize that the legal mandates and fiscal resources of DEP remain unbalanced.
“The administration should prioritize restoring that balance over the next four years.”
In 2017, the Citizens Advisory Council ​wrote to Senate and House Appropriations
Committee Chairs​ expressing serious concerns about funding levels at the Department of
Environmental Protection saying, in part, “consistent cuts to DEP over the last 2 decades has
reached an unsustainable level.”
Among the other issues the Council recommended Gov. Wolf address are--
-- Consensus Building: ​The report recommended DEP should increase its efforts to bring people
together from all political perspectives and sectors of the Commonwealth to debate, critically
analyze and offer solutions to common understandings of specific environmental issues.
“We all have a stake in sound environmental policy and effective, common sense
regulatory programs that both protect the common good and provide a predictable pathway for
economic investment and prosperity.”
Pointing to successful consensus building efforts in developing the ​Phase III Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Implementation Plan​ and the Act 101 Recycling Program Work Group of the
Solid Waste Advisory Committee​, the CAC said it will work on drafting a document to help the
Administration implement the use of these techniques in other areas.
-- Professional Development:​ Noting 28 percent of DEP staff will be eligible to retire over the
next 4 years, the report said it was vital to provide training, mentoring and investment in
professional development for younger technical and administrative staff to ensure programs
operate consistently during the transition.
-- Climate Change:​ The Council said it was encouraged by the recent actions taken by the
Governor on climate change, including ​Gov. Wolf’s Executive Order​ establishing greenhouse
gas emission reduction targets and the “robust” list of recommendations in the latest ​updated to
DEP’s Climate Change Action Plan​ [to be finalized in the very near future]. The Council noted
there is a real opportunity to employ consensus-building techniques to begin the process of
implementing the recommendations in the Climate Action Plan.
--State Resources Needed To Replace Pull Back Of Federal Government: ​Given the current
federal administrative goal to minimize federal regulation of streams and wetlands, DEP is likely
to be faced with increased responsibility for aquatic resource identification and assessment.
The existing shortage of technical staff capabilities in the [DEP] regional offices will be
exacerbated and require additional financial support as the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers
withdraws from making jurisdictional Determinations if aquatic resources in the Commonwealth
are to be protected.
-- State-Federal Issues-Chesapeake Bay, PFAS Other Water Obligations: ​The Council noted
the challenges Pennsylvania faces in meeting its Chesapeake Bay Watershed cleanup obligations,
warnings the Safe Drinking Water has received from the federal government on adequacy of its
resources, recent proposals to reduce federal support for programs DEP administers for the
federal government and on emerging issues like PFAS contamination.
The Council encourages the Administration to assure open and candid community both
inside DEP in raising potential federal compliance issues and in discussing possible alternative
approaches that make sense for Pennsylvania and EPA.

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It also recommended the Wolf Administration work with other states to develop and
share solutions in order to “strengthen our hand in negotiations with EPa and other the federal
partners.”
-- Environmental Remediation And Offsets:​ The Council pointed to the opportunities
presented by environmental protection programs that require the mitigation and replacement of
wetlands and other water-related functions and their potential to address the development of
wetland, stream restoration and mine drainage treatment and reclamation projects that can help
the Commonwealth met its general water quality restoration obligations.
The Council discussed the opportunities private, third-party mitigation banks, in-lieu of
mitigation fee programs and permittee responsible mitigation programs provide for not only
effective restoration, but for simplifying permit processing.
The Council said, “Development of robust private mitigation markets can help address
the funding challenges that Pennsylvania (and all states) face with improving water quality and
natural environments.”
-- Preparing For An Evolving Energy Future: ​“Since the first Marcellus Shale Lateral Well
came online in 2007, Pennsylvania’s energy capabilities have changed the energy markets in a
drastic way for all Pennsylvanians. Coupled with an increase in ‘alternative’ fuels such as solar
and wind power generation, the Commonwealth is now experiencing the cleanest air quality
since the height of our industry revolution.
“The move away from mainly coal and nuclear to natural gas has resulted in the most
economical fuel source Pennsylvanians have ever experienced, down from the 2008 high of
$13/MMBTU to less than $3/MMBTW, a decrease of 77 percent, enabling vast savings for
households, manufacturers and consumers.
“As the second most productive state in natural gas extraction, it would be foolish to
ignore the economics and vast availability of natural gas and even more foolish not to encourage
the upscaling of wind and solar sources of energy.
“However, with climate change at the forefront worldwide, the demand for renewables
will continue to rise.
“The nuclear industry is also feeling the impacts of natural gas and may see further
declines in the total shares of Pennsylvania fuel sources in the future. The nuclear industry,
however, is working hard to ensure that they are not phased out quickly, as was the experience of
coal-fired electrical plants.
“All told, Pennsylvania, with its complex electrical grid, will continue to need all sources
of energy as more homes and businesses demand additional power. It is important to understand
that renewable energy is only about 10 percent of the total, with goals to make it higher.
“In reality, renewables and the infrastructure needed to make it viable are quite a few
years into the future.
“For the long term, the Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering in September
2018, submitted a report to DEP titled, CHP-Enabled Renewable Energy Microgrids In
Pennsylvania: A Guidance Document for Conceiving Feasible Systems.
“The report stresses smaller energy system that use natural gas and renewables as
opposed to the multi-billion dollar nuclear projects that have ben prevalent since the 1970’s.
“Overall we foresee a nice mix of natural gas and renewables for the future of
Pennsylvania’s energy demands. Yet Pennsylvania still lags well behind neighboring states in its
support for renewables.”

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-- Sewage Facilities Planning:​ The Council recommended DEP examine its regulations to
facilitate the use of well-tested and proven alternative technologies in the on-lot sewage planning
phase of development and the effectiveness and direction of the entire Act 537 sewage facilities
program. It also viewed this issue as a opportunity for consensus building.
Click Here​ for a copy of the report.
The Citizens Advisory Council is an independent 18-member advisory group appointed
by the Senate President Pro Temporary, Speaker of the House and the Governor. The Council
advises the Secretary, Governor and General Assembly about issues affecting all parts of DEP’s
operation.
The next meeting of the ​Council will be February 19​ in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson
Building in Harrisburg starting at 10:00. ​Click Here for more​ on the meeting agenda.
For more information, visit DEP’s ​Citizens Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions
should be directed to Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
DEP Citizens Advisory Council: The Consistent Cuts To DEP’s Budget Are Unsustainable
House Appropriations Committee Holds DEP, DCNR Budget Hearings Feb. 14
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects

In his written testimony​ and in response to questions about the need

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for more funding to address critical watershed restoration, hazardous substance cleanup,
stormwater and flooding issues, DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell pointed to the need for the
proposed $4.5 billion ​Restore Pennsylvania Bond Initiative​ as a way of getting those resources in
his appearance before the House Appropriations Committee Thursday.
“DEP welcomes the opportunity to add resources which will help us better achieve our
mission to protect public health and the environment, and Restore Pennsylvania is the only
option available to provide much--needed resources for many of the department’s priority areas,”
said McDonnell.
McDonnell also addressed concerns expressed by several members of the Committee
about the transfer of monies from the Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) and
Recycling funds to pay agency operating expenses by saying they are going to manage those
funds to keep the same level of effort in funding local environmental and recycling projects.
He also said that while these transfers were proposed for several years, they would be
evaluated each year to ensure DEP is meeting its project funding obligations.
Here’s a quick summary of some of the key issues raised at the hearing--
-- Use of Special Funds For Operating Costs: ​ Rep. Seth Grove (R-York) asked what has
changed the Administration’s mind on using special funds this year for administrative costs
when 2 years ago the Administration was strongly opposed to the idea. McDonnell said this
proposal would maintain the same level of support for local projects and would be evaluated
each year to see that it is meeting that goal.
Rep. Matt Bradford (D-Montgomery), Minority Chair of the House Appropriations
Committee, said members of his Caucus have concerns about the use of special fund monies to
pay agency operating costs at DEP and DCNR. McDonnell said DEP is going to manage the
Environmental Stewardship and Recycling funds to assure they same level of effort to support
projects that it supports now. And although the transfers were proposed to be multi-year, DEP
will be evaluated every year to make sure the funds are there to support the projects. He added
the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ would provide funding to address many of these same issues
and would be welcomed by his agency.
Rep. Leanne Krueger (D-Delaware) also asked about the transfers saying what assurances
can be given the money will be there to fund projects. McDonnell noted again the transfers were
proposed to be multiyear, but it will be evaluated every year to make sure the funds are there.
He added the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ would provide funding to address many of these
same issues.
-- Current DEP Staffing Level:​ Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware), Minority Chair of the House
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, expressed concerns about current staffing
levels at DEP-- about 2,300 filled, 2,400 total positions now. He noted the federal government
was concerned about the ability of DEP to meet minimum standards needed to run programs it
administers for the feds, for example, the resources needed to achieve the Chesapeake Bay
Watershed cleanup goals and many other water quality cleanup obligations across the state, the
Air Quality and other programs. McDonnell said there is no doubt DEP needs more resources to
achieve the water quality cleanup obligations and fee increases proposed in Air Quality and Oil
and Gas address some of the staffing issues in programs. He added ​Restore Pennsylvania​ can
also be a real benefit in funding needed projects.
-- Restore Pennsylvania:​ Rep. Bradford (D-Montgomery) later asked a more specific questions
about the role ​Restore Pennsylvania​ proposal has in helping to backfill some of the monies

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transferred to pay administrative costs. McDonnell said, even if the Environmental Stewardship
Fund wasn’t touched, it would not be able to handle funding for the projects needed to deal with
the scale of flooding and stormwater pollution we saw last summer and ​Restore Pennsylvania
can be an answer to the shortfall of resources.
Rep. Elizabeth Fiedler (D-Philadelphia) said she is troubled by the fact ​Restore
Pennsylvania​ funding is based on the continuance and growth of natural gas drilling in the state
and that it would be monetized to support a bond that will not be paid off for decades. She also
asked about support for other clean energy alternatives. McDonnell said some other
environmental programs like recycling are supported by fees on municipal waste for example,
and Restore Pennsylvania would also provide funding for clean energy and energy efficiency
initiatives.
Rep. Peter Schweyer (D-Lehigh) asked what DEP’s priority list is for funding capital
projects to improve the environment and deal with issues like flooding and stormwater.
McDonnell said ​Restore Pennsylvania​ does cover the things they would be concerned with,
adding “green infrastructure” like floodplain restoration are particularly important because they
take the water’s energy away to reduce flooding and reduce stormwater pollution. Farm
conservation best management practices funded by Restore Pennsylvania would also carry
multiple benefits of reducing nutrient runoff and help with stormwater and flooding issues.
Rep. Stephen McCarter (D-Montgomery) asked about the commitment in the ​Restore
Pennsylvania Initiative​ to implement programs related to address changes caused by climate
change like increased flooding and stormwater issues. McDonnell said flexibility is needed for
communities to deal with stormwater issues, pointing to the model in the ​Phase III Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Implementation Plan​ where counties have been developing their own plans for
meeting the pollution reduction goals. He added, DEP needs to support those plans
Rep. McCarter followed up asking what the existing resources were available to deal with
the flooding issues. McDonnell said “hardscape” flood projects are handled in the Capital
Budget process and DEP has a small Stream Improvement Program with about $250,000 in
funding-- no where near what is needed.
-- Flooding, Stormwater:​ Rep. James Struzzi (R-Indiana) said people all across the state are
dealing with flooding and stormwater problems and have really suffered from these problems
and asked about support from DEP. McDonnell said DEP has been quickly turning around
emergency permits to cover immediate responses to these problems. DEP has also been funding
green infrastructure projects that restore streams, reduce flooding and improve water quality to
address these issues, adding the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ is really needed to fund projects
that deal with these problems.
-- Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations: ​Rep. Maria Donatucci (D-Delaware) asked about
how Pennsylvania plans to meet its Chesapeake Bay Watershed cleanup obligations by 2025.
McDonnell said Pennsylvania has a major task to reduce 34 million pounds of nitrogen and
375,000 pounds of phosphorus pollution coming from our part of the watershed. He then
summarized the update ​provided in his written testimony​. Nutrient pollution, he added, first has
a major impact in Pennsylvania’s own watersheds and streams before it ever gets to the Bay. He
said everyone acknowledges it will take more resources and initiatives like ​Restore Pennsylvania
Initiative​ to provide those resources.
Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York), Majority Chair of the House Appropriations Committee,
asked if the city in New York that dumped millions of gallons of wastewater into the

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Susquehanna River has been penalized in any way [​Binghamton, New York during August
flooding​.]. He said he thought Pennsylvania has been held to a higher standard on reducing
pollution than other states. He also noted volunteers can play a bigger role in reducing pollution
and addressing watershed issues and that should be encouraged. Rep. Saylor added nothing is
being done about fertilizing residential lawns and we need to pay attention to that. McDonnell
said he was not aware if they were fined or not, but the issue Pennsylvania has is scale--
Lancaster County alone has to reduce nitrogen by 9 million pounds and Maryland has reduce
nitrogen by 4 million pounds.
-- Waste Coal Power Plants:​ Rep. Doyle Heffley (R-Carbon) thanked DEP for its role in
putting out of the ​Jeansville Mine Fire​ and asked about the environmental improvement and
reclamation opportunities presented by waste coal-fired power plants and what the state can do to
promote them. Asked specifically about ​proposed Air Quality Fee increase​ and the impact it
would have on these plants. McDonnell said it is an industry they are trying to be supportive of
in several ways, most recently through comments to EPA on ozone standards pointing to the
importance of waste coal power plants to reclamation. There is also an existing ​Coal Refuse
Energy Tax Credit​ through DCED that benefits these plants. He noted there are concerns about
the Air Quality fee proposal, but DEP has obligations to the federal government for this program,
in particular deficiencies that must be addressed.
-- Permit Review Process Improvements/Fees: ​ Rep. Greg Rothman (R-Cumberland) asked
about the status of changes to make permit review process more efficient and timely. McDonnell
briefly summarized the information included in his ​written budget testimony​ involving
epermitting, electronic inspection reports and other changes DEP has made
Rep. Rothman also asked about DEP’s position on third party permit reviews.
McDonnell said there are a number of issues, in particular in programs DEP administers for the
federal government and there would be problems related to handling permit appeals.
Rep. James Struzzi (R-Indiana) asked what other other steps DEP has taken to improve
the permit process. McDonnell pointed to encouraging more use of the ​pre-application tool​ on
DEP’s website and pre-application conferences with applicants so they know what the
requirements are upfront from the permit process
Rep. Lee James (R-Venango) asked how DEP arrives at the amount set for permit review
fee increases. McDonnell said there are program by program workload evaluations of costs and
other issues like concerns the federal government has about whether DEP has the resources to
meet minimum federal standards. McDonnell said when he started with DEP in 1998, DEP
budget was funded by roughly one-third by state funding, one-third from the federal government
and one-third from permit fees, fines and penalties. Now it’s less than 20 percent state General
Fund monies, 30 percent federal and 50 percent permit fees, fines and penalties.
Rep. Struzzi (R-Indiana) expressed concerned about the size of the ​proposed permit fee
increases on gas drilling permits​ and with the talk of a natural gas severance tax. McDonnell
said DEP is losing $800,000 every month in fee income to support the Oil and Gas Management
Program and the fee increases are needed to support the existing level of effort. He also outlined
the improvements in efficiency and cost reductions in administration of the program ​as noted in
the written testimony​.
Rep. Doyle Heffley (R-Carbon) expressed a concern about a bog turtle review delaying
highway projects in his area. McDonnell said there are processes around protecting endangered
species and urged the Representative to get him the specific information.

12
-- ​Cost Of Environmental Lawsuits Against DEP:​ Rep. Jason Ortitay (R-Allegheny)
referenced a letter sent to DEP recently asking about how much money was spent by DEP to
reimburse environmental groups for legal fees when they win permit appeals. Rep. Stan Saylor
(R-York), Majority Chair of the House Appropriations Committee, (who sent the letter)
interjected saying he believes these environmental groups “are destroying your budget” and
costing taxpayers money. McDonnell said DEP is putting the information together, but noted
statutes allow for the reimbursement of legal fees. Rep. Ortaty followed up to ask if DEP is
doing something wrong that so many permits are being appealed. McDonnell said only a small
percentage of permits are appealed.
Rep. Leanne Krueger (D-Delaware) later asked how much staff time and money was
being spent by DEP to fight the oil and gas industry in court when they challenge DEP’s
regulations. McDonnell said he would have to get members that information.
-- ​Climate Change:​ Rep. Jason Ortitay (R-Allegheny) asked about the recommendations
included in the ​Climate Action Plan​ and if the plan include an evaluation of the economic impact
the changes in the AEPS will have. McDonnell said the Plan is being finalized and due out next
month, but it will call for increasing the renewable energy percentages in the AEPS and that it
does look at cost and he would provide members more information.
Rep. Jonathan Fritz (R-Wayne) noted the shift to using natural gas has caused significant
improvements in air pollution and greenhouse gas reductions and wondered if the Secretary
could quantify that. McDonnell said because of this shift to natural gas in electric generation
Pennsylvania has ​already met the original Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan
greenhouse gas reduction goals-- about a 30 percent reduction in emissions from the power
generation sector-- as well as reductions in air pollution. But, he said, there is also a big
opportunity in the transportation space to convert to natural gas ​and electric vehicles​.
McDonnell added there are still new natural gas power plants being developed and in the permit
process in the state.
In a follow-up, Rep. Fritz (R-Monroe) asked if gas drilling can be done safety, in
particular in the Delaware River Watershed. McDonnell said it can be done safety and DEP has
been setting tough standards to regulate drilling. But within the context of the Delaware River
Basin there are concerns being expressed.
Rep. Matt Gabler (R-Clearfield) asked how much say Pennsylvanians will have in the
regional plan to cap ​greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector​. McDonnell said
there will be a robust public engagement plan to engage stakeholders in the process and DEP will
be transparent about what any specific proposals will include.
Rep. Stephen McCarter (D-Delaware) asked what role does DEP have in monitoring
methane emissions from the oil and gas industry. McDonnell said it has updated its permitting
requirements for new oil and gas operations through its ​General Permit 5 update​ and is now
developing ​new regulations to cover existing facilities​. He said he will provide more follow up
information to the Committee.
Rep. Peter Schweyer (D-Lehigh) said a bipartisan group of legislators will be introducing
a bill to authorize community solar projects next week and asked DEP’s position on the issue.
McDonnell said the ​Pennsylvania Solar Future Plan​ does recommend authorizing community
solar projects.
-- Pipeline Issues: ​Rep. James Struzzi (R-Indiana) asked how much time it has been taking to
review permits infrastructure projects like pipelines. McDonnell said pipeline projects do take a

13
lot of staff time, but DEP has recently opened a new Regional Permit Coordination office to
more easily handle projects that cross regional boundaries
Rep. Christopher Quinn (R-Delaware) applauded DEP for ​Mariner East Pipeline permit
hold,​ but asked if DEP has the necessary staff to deal with their violations suggesting more staff
is needed. McDonnell said between DEP and county conservation districts there has been a
“robust” response in dealing with these serious issues. To add staff to deal with these issues,
McDonnell said, DEP would need additional funding and noted DEP has ​proposed increases in
water quality permit fees​ to cover more of its administrative costs.
Rep. Leanne Krueger (D-Delaware) also applauded DEP’s acton on Mariner East
Pipeline permits and asked what specific legislative initiatives DEP would support to fill gaps in
regulating pipelines. McDonnell said the ​Governor’s announcement last week​ outlined the
legislative initiatives the Administration would support covering intra-state pipeline routing
approval, additional measures related to school safety requirements and other issues.
-- PFAS & DEP Staffing:​ Rep. Benjamin Sanchez (D-Montgomery) expressed a concern about
whether DEP will have the resources to deal with PFAS-related drinking water contamination
issues. McDonnell said the Safe Drinking Water Program has been adding staff thanks to a fee
increase. He said DEP is looking to expand the sampling program for water suppliers across the
state to get a better idea of what the scope of this problem is. He noted the ​U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency today announced​ they are proceeding with a determination to adopt a
Maximum Contaminant Level for PFAS in drinking water and taking other actions. He said,
however, the ​PA PFAS Action Team​ wants to move more aggressively, adding DEP’s lab has
purchased specialized testing equipment to conduct PFAS testing. He said they are prepared to
act if EPA does not.
Rep. Martina White (R-Philadelphia) asked if DEP is monitoring PFAS contamination
around the Willow Grove site. McDonnell said DEP’s Safe Drinking Water, Stormwater
Discharges and Hazardous Sites Cleanup Programs have been involved with the site. DEP is
holding the responsible parties-- U.S. Department of Defense-- responsible to deal with and pay
for the cleanup and working with EPA on the issues there.
-- Susquehanna River Basin Commission: ​Rep. Keith Greiner (R-Lancaster) asked about the
audit of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission ​done by the Auditor General​ who found the
Commission had spent funds on lobster dinners. McDonnell noted he’s not one for extravagance
and they are paying attention to the audit findings. He added they are following through with an
Auditor General recommendation the state update the agreements with SRBC and DRBC to
make sure there is a good process for understanding what their responsibilities are and what DEP
and the Commissions do.
Rep. George Dunbar (R-Westmoreland) and Rep. Fred Keller (R-Snyder) both asked if
we rewarding bad behavior at SRBC by proposing an increasing funding for the Commission.
McDonnell said no and he supported the increase because Pennsylvania has not been paying its
“dues” to the Commission. He said when you are the one in the room not paying their dues it
does color the discussions.
-- Environmental Justice:​ Rep. Donna Bullock (D-Philadelphia) asked about DEP’s
Environmental Justice Program​ and how any environmental justice areas are in the state noting
they aren’t just in urban areas. McDonnell said both an income and minority population criteria
are used in defining these areas and that DEP is in the process of redoing its environmental
justice public participation policy. McDonnell said he ​personally held listening sessions​ around

14
the state on environmental justice issues and plans to do several more.
-- ​Illegal Dumping:​ Rep. Donna Bullock (D-Philadelphia) asked what can be done to combat
illegal dumping which is becoming a growing problem in Philadelphia. McDonnell DEP has
worked with ​Keep PA Beautiful​ on a statewide litter survey to get an idea of the problem we face
as well as asking the ​Solid Waste Advisory Committee to look at changes​ to Act 101 Recycling
Law that would address some these and other issues.
-- Workforce Diversity:​ Rep. Donna Bullock (D-Philadelphia) asked about the composition of
DEP’s workforce. McDonnell said 30 percent of DEP’s employees are female and 7.5 percent
minority. He added DEP is doing more direct recruitment efforts at colleges seeking minority
candidates and promoting the idea environmental jobs as a possibility.
-- Workforce Development:​ Rep. Morgan Cephas (D-Philadelphia) asked how DEP is involved
in workforce development programs outside the agency. McDonnell said workforce
development has been a focus of most cabinet secretaries. In particular, DEP has been
developing relationships with workforce programs and the Department of Corrections on
promoting water plant operator certification training.
Rep. Austin Davis (D-Allegheny) asked how DEP is engaging with workforce programs
for incarcerated individuals. McDonnell expanded on his earlier comments on the involvement
with the Department of Corrections noting that agency has its own wastewater plants where
individuals could get some hands on training as part of its operator certification initiative.
Click Here​ for a copy of McDonnell’s written testimony. ​Click Here​ for House hearing
videos (bottom of page). ​Click Here​ for written testimony.
The Senate Appropriations Committee hearing on DEP’s budget is scheduled for
February 28 at 3:00. ​Click Here​ to watch the Senate hearing online and for hearing summaries.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental

15
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

Budget Testimony Submitted By The Department Of Environmental Protection

This is the text of the ​written budget testimony​ submitted to the


House and Senate Appropriations Committees by the
Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick
McDonnell.

Thank you for the opportunity to present Governor Wolf's


proposed Fiscal Year 2019-20 budget for the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP).
I want to begin by acknowledging the almost 2,500
public servants who work every day to achieve the
department’s mission. Every one of us commits daily to
“protect Pennsylvania’s air, land and water from pollution, and
to provide for the health and safety of our citizens.”
This year, ​DEP’s budget request​ includes $135.186
million from the General Fund and a total spending
authorization of $783.820 million. The proposal includes $271.705 million of special fund
authorizations as well as $251.680 million in Federal spending authority.
For reference, in 2018-19, DEP’s total enacted General Fund budget was $156,049,000
which included a $9,602,000 increase. The current budget further increases this budget by
another $4,617,000 to a total of $160,666,0001, a two-year increase of $14,219,000. This is an
increase of $21,433,000 from the last year budget of the prior administration.
Recognizing that agencies across Commonwealth government have been tasked with
finding efficiencies in order to achieve a high level of service with limited budgetary increases,
DEP is working to meet our obligations to the best of our abilities at our current staffing level of
2,497.
To achieve the proposed savings in the general fund budget, the Chesapeake Bay
Agricultural Source Abatement Fund, Transfer to Conservation District Fund, and funding for
several commissions will be appropriated from the Environmental Stewardship Fund in the
amount of $8.031 million.
Another $7.449 million from the Environmental Stewardship Fund and $10 million from
the Recycling Fund is proposed to be utilized to augment department operations.
The Governor's Budget also proposes to fully fund Pennsylvania’s commitments to
interstate compacts, commissions and partners including the Susquehanna River Basin
Commission, Delaware River Basin Commission, Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation
Commission, and Chesapeake Bay Commission.
Through this testimony, I’d like to update you on several core initiatives DEP has
undertaken that are directly related to our mission and our fiscal accountability--
-- Improving our permit review process;
-- Preparing for the future of clean-up of hazardous sites throughout the Commonwealth as that
funding stream ends;

16
-- Reducing runoff pollution through improved stormwater management statewide;
-- Continuing our partnership with conservation districts;
-- Making unprecedented progress on our federal obligations to improve local water quality in
the Chesapeake Bay Watershed; and
-- Continuing toward a clean energy economy.
Before I begin, I would like to note that ​Governor Wolf’s Restore Pennsylvania​ initiative,
while separate from this proposed budget, would have a strong positive impact on each of these
essential environmental programs.
DEP welcomes the opportunity to add resources which will help us better achieve our
mission to protect public health and the environment, and Restore Pennsylvania is the only
option available to provide much--needed resources for many of the department’s priority areas.
Improving Our Permit Review Process
DEP receives more than 31,000 permit applications a year, and each of these permits is
important to a project somewhere in the commonwealth.
Broadly speaking, permits are required for certain types of construction projects that
require control of erosion or air emissions, cross waterbodies, result in industrial wastewater or
stormwater discharges, or are drinking water and sewerage construction.
DEP permitting is often a critical step for community growth and redevelopment.
Both permitting and inspections cover almost every industry in our state, and are often a
requirement to maintain primacy of certain federal programs, where DEP is delegated federal
authority by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to enforce both state and federal
laws and regulations, such as Safe Drinking Water, Air Quality, and Mining.
One year ago, I was honored to stand with Governor Tom Wolf to announce plans to
modernize the permit process, reduce the backlog, and improve our already exemplary oversight.
To help us deal with long-standing reductions to the agency’s budget, we sought a $2.5
million budget allocation to facilitate the strategy.
This funding enabled DEP to fill 33 mission-critical positions, seventeen in our Regional
Offices, sixteen for our Central Office operations, and funded two Human Resource Delivery
Center positions to process DEP hiring requests more quickly and efficiently.
Staff throughout DEP have focused our efforts on increased responsiveness, improved
customer service, and working smarter with the help of technology to enhance operations and
give applicants tools to provide complete applications at the outset.
In brief, DEP has:
-- Opened the Regional Permit Coordination Office​ (RPCO), a centralized permitting office
to assist with construction permitting and coordination related to erosion and sediment control
(Chapter 102) and water obstruction and encroachment (Chapter 105) for large scale,
multi-county or multi-regional infrastructure projects, such as pipelines and highways.
-- Developed electronic permitting applications for well drilling​ and erosion and
sedimentation control at oil and gas sites (ESCGP), surface coal mining, air emissions from
certain natural gas activities (GP-5 and GP-5A), Chapter 105 water obstruction and
encroachment general permits, storage tank renewals, and radiation protection x-ray registration
renewals.
-- Increased the efficiency of inspection for oil and gas sites​, erosion and sedimentation,
waterways encroachment, waste management, spill cleanup, and emergency response through
the development and implementation of electronic tools.

17
-- Begun to digitize files while also requesting electronic submissions​ to improve Right to
Know and informal file review processes, reinforcing DEP’s commitment to transparency.
-- Significantly improved permitting efficiency ​by meeting with and clearly communicating
permitting and regulatory requirements to the regulated community and consultants.
As a result of these and other staff-designed modernization efforts, collaborations, and
innovations, we have reduced permit review times substantially (in some cases by more than 220
days) while maintaining our commitment to our mission of protecting public health and our
environment.
Preparing For The Future Of Clean-up Of Hazardous Sites
As Governor Wolf addressed last week as part of the ​Restore Pennsylvania​ initiative,
former industrial and commercial sites sit waiting for cleanup as a catalyst for new economic
opportunity.
One of the most important tools Pennsylvania has to provide these opportunities is the
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Fund under the Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (HSCA).
This special fund supports investigation, cleanup and monitoring at contaminated sites,
implementation of Pennsylvania’s Land Recycling Program, and participation in the federal
Hazardous Waste Program and in the Federal Superfund Program (coordinated with the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency).
Over the 22-year history of the Land Recycling Program, DEP has approved more than
6,687 actions.
As a result of voluntary actions by developers and landowners and DEP enforcement and
cleanup responses, contaminated and abandoned sites have been cleaned, put back into service,
and regained productive value to the residents of adjacent communities and the commonwealth
overall.
Under this fund, DEP has performed investigations of groundwater and soil
contamination, replaced contaminated water supplies, removed and disposed of toxic wastes,
implemented groundwater treatment actions, and addressed threats posed by toxic chlorinated
solvents, toxic heavy metals, flammable materials, corrosive substances and radiological
materials.
Now, the future of this program is in jeopardy. The funding of $40 million per year was
generated by the Capital Stock and Franchise Tax. With the phase-out of that tax, DEP will be
unable to sustain these valuable programs without a new source of $30 million annually to
support the projects required by the act.
Outside of finding an extra $30 million in General Fund dollars, Restore Pennsylvania
could be the answer to finding new additional revenue to fund this critical program.
Reducing Runoff Pollution Through Improved Stormwater Management
Just about every Pennsylvanian noticed the record-breaking storms that hit the state in
2018.
Flooding was so dangerous that some residents lost their lives, roads were destroyed, and
homes and businesses were severely damaged. In addition to causing flooding-related disaster,
stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces is one of the biggest sources of flooding and water
pollution and one of the thorniest problems to solve.
As the negative impacts of storms have increased, the EPA has required about 950
Pennsylvania municipalities with urbanized areas (commonly referred to as MS4s, or municipal
separate storm sewer systems) to meet new, more stringent stormwater management

18
requirements, including developing stormwater management ordinances and practices that
control stormwater runoff from development to reduce flooding and pollution.
DEP has worked shoulder to shoulder with municipal leaders around the state to help
them understand and work through these new federal requirements.
Through extensive assistance in the application process, new mapping tools, and training
events, we’ve ensured that most municipalities have met their permit application deadlines,
despite the complexity of this new approach.
Restore Pennsylvania could provide municipalities with funding required to meet these
federal requirements.
Restore Pennsylvania could also provide financial assistance to flood mitigation
programs such as DEP’s Stream Improvement Program, and help fund high hazard dam
rehabilitation projects, and the operation and maintenance of Commonwealth built flood
protection projects sponsored by municipalities.
Continuing Our Strong Partnership With Conservation Districts
Pennsylvania’s County Conservation Districts provide invaluable regulatory support to
DEP and the communities they serve.
DEP, through agreements with these Conservation Districts, delegates the
implementation of erosion and sediment control program, and the authorization of activities
eligible for coverage under the Chapter 105 General Permits relating to water obstructions and
encroachments.
The Conservation Districts also review and approve nutrient management plans, and
assist with flood response and stream improvement projects. The Conservation Districts provide
these services at the local level which maximizes accessibility of these programs to the public.
Making unprecedented progress on improving local water quality DEP, along with the
Departments of Agriculture and Conservation and Natural Resources, has achieved an
unprecedented degree of momentum and partnership with county leaders, as well as those in
agricultural, business, and community organizations, in ​developing Phase 3 of the state
Watershed Implementation Plan​ to reduce nutrient and sediment pollutants in local streams and
rivers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
This strong partnership, along with a ground-up framework, has created an innovative
new tool for county-level planning that enables local leaders to plan projects strategically, where
they can serve local priorities and have the greatest pollutant-reducing impact.
Both ​Lancaster and York Counties have completed​ their local plans using the new tool,
meaning that Pennsylvania now has a plan for 25 percent of its part of the watershed.
Franklin and Adams Counties are finishing up their local plans, with the process to be
rolled out to the remaining counties in early spring.
What’s more, we’re bringing the same degree of fresh momentum as we look beyond
plan development this spring to plan implementation starting in late summer.
Continuing Toward A Clean Energy Economy
All Pennsylvanians -- government leaders, business owners, organizations, and residents
-- must understand how they can help keep global temperature increases below 2 degrees
Celsius, to ensure that human-caused climate change is not catastrophic.
DEP continues to make advances on Pennsylvania’s clean energy economy, with a goal
to reduce energy bills, create opportunities for businesses, and enhance public health through a
cleaner environment.

19
Our “​Finding Pennsylvania’s Solar Future Project​” outlines a path for achieving 10
percent solar electricity generation by 2030. As noted in the plan, the investment potential in
solar is estimated to be at least $2.9 billion in significant economic benefits and additional jobs.
Our plan guides the Commonwealth to capitalize on those benefits.
To help transition our transportation sector to cleaner options, DEP has issued several
rounds of grants and rebates to cleaner vehicles and infrastructure from Pennsylvania’s share of a
national settlement with Volkswagen Group of America after that automaker cheated on U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency emission tests.
Pennsylvania received ​$118 million in the settlement for projects​ in Pennsylvania that
reduce emissions of nitrous oxides.
In January, ​Governor Wolf issued an Executive Order​ setting a statewide goal to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions 26 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050. The Executive Order also
sets energy reduction performance goals for state government.
As part of the newly established Green Government Council, DEP will partner with the
Department of General Services and Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to
develop strategies to ensure state government meets these goals.
We anticipate that current DEP technical assistance and funding programs for building
and vehicle energy efficiency and conservation will play a role.
Next month, DEP will issue its ​Climate Action Plan update,​ a set of recommendations
that can prepare Pennsylvania for the impacts of climate change and outline ways to mitigate it,
as required by the Legislature.
The plan analyzes 19 strategies that may enable Pennsylvania to achieve these emission
reduction goals and enable us to better adapt to impacts of climate change we're already seeing.
Over one hundred actions in nine sectors are outlined, with a key focus on energy, as 88
percent of state greenhouse gas emissions come from electricity generation, and energy use such
as the heating and cooling of buildings, and transportation.
DEP stands ready to work with the General Assembly to implement the recommended
strategies, many of which will require legislative action.
We look forward to working with the legislature on the challenges and opportunities that
lie ahead this fiscal year. Thank you for your consideration.
Click Here​ for a copy of the testimony.
Click Here​ for a summary Secretary McDonnell’s appearance before the House
Appropriations Committee.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
​Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address

20
State’s Infrastructure Needs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary


Cindy Adams Dunn ​said in written testimony​ and in comments
before the House Appropriations Committee Thursday Gov. Wolf’s
$4.5 billion Restore Pennsylvania infrastructure plan is important to
meeting the needs for recreation and land conservation project
funding across the state.
“While separate and apart from the budget, we also look forward to
Governor Wolf’s Restore Pennsylvania infrastructure plan​, which
will provide significant funding to enable environmental projects
and new recreational opportunities across the state.
“Restore Pennsylvania will include infrastructure and maintenance
projects in state parks and forests, creation and revitalization of new
local parks, and funding for hiking, biking, and ATV trail projects.
“Restore Pennsylvania is the only plan that can truly address the
Commonwealth’s infrastructure needs, including key
environmental priorities.”
She also addressed concerns raised by several members of the Committee about Gov.
Wolf’s proposed transfer of monies from the Keystone Recreation, Parks and Conservation and
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) funds to pay for agency operating expense.
Dunn noted funds from the Oil and Gas Lease Fund have been used to pay for operating
costs of the agency for several years and the proposed transfers would allow for a complete
operating budget for DCNR.
At the same time, she said DCNR is committed to having the same level of effort to
support projects funded through the Keystone and Environmental Stewardship funds they have
had in the past.
Here is a quick summary of some of the key issues raised at the hearing--
-- Use Of Special Funds For Operating Costs:​ Rep. Seth Grove (R-York) asked what has

21
changed the Administration’s mind on using special funds this year for administrative costs
when 2 years ago the Administration was strongly opposed to the idea. Dunn said it is a common
thing to have the Oil and Gas Lease Fund to pay for operating costs of the agency and the
proposed transfer from the Keystone Recreation, Parks and Conservation Fund to pay operating
costs will allow DCNR to have a complete budget. DCNR, she said, is committed to having the
same level of effort to support projects funded by the Keystone Fund. Dunn also said the
Keystone Fund revenue came in from the Real Estate Tax “very healthy” this year.
Rep. Matt Bradford (D-Montgomery), Minority Chair of the House Appropriations
Committee, said members of his Caucus have concerns about the use of special fund monies to
pay agency operating costs at DEP and DCNR. He said he is specifically concerned about the
sustainability of these transfers. He also noted the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ could fill gaps
in DCNR’s project funding. Dunn said she supported what he said about Restore Pennsylvania
filling gaps. She, as an example, noted 32 of the dams DCNR owns are high hazard dams which
would be included in the Restore Pennsylvania Initiative.
Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York), Majority Chair of the House Appropriations Committee,
asked about how DCNR is dealing with it high hazard dam issue. Dunn said they identify a dam
or two a year as they can with the resources to deal with them. She noted the number of projects
they have to do is way beyond the capacity of the Keystone Fund and Environmental
Stewardship Fund to support.
Rep. Rosemary Brown (R-Monroe) asked whether using a 100 year floodplain is a
reasonable regulation to follow in judging how hazardous a dam is and the damage it could cause
if it fails, adding she was concerned about compliance costs. Dunn said DEP handles the
regulation of dam safety and DCNR follows those regulations. She added standards like that
need to be looked at in terms of whether they are adequate in light of climate change increasing
the frequency of storms.
Rep. Christopher Quinn (R-Delaware) also expressed concerns about the transfer of
money coming out of the Keystone and Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) funds
and asked if DCNR has enough money to compete local projects. Dunn said the demand for
projects is very high and a proposal like ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ would help with
recreation and flooding projects.
Rep. Leanne Krueger (D-Delaware) said there is one positive in the proposed budget--
shifting the debt service for the Growing Greener 2 bond issue from the Environmental
Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund to the General Fund, but she also expressed concerns
about the transfers paying for operating costs. Dunn said they work with communities who want
funding support, but DCNR has only been able to fund 50 to 60 percent of the project
applications each year. That’s where the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ would be helpful.
Rep. Doyle Heffley (R-Carbon) expressed a concern about the money transfers and the
possibility of replacing that funding with bond funding through the ​Restore Pennsylvania
Initiative​. Dunn said the scale of the infrastructure needs in the recreation network is huge.
Without the forest products industry generating major economic activity for the state, she said
Agriculture would not be the number one industry in the state. And tourism would not be what it
is now in Pennsylvania without our recreational infrastructure
Rep. Heffley said an entrance fee to parks could be a source of revenue for DCNR.
Rep. James Struzzi (R-Indiana) said constituents are emailing and calling his office
expressing concern about funding for their community projects. Relying on parks and recreation

22
facilities for tourism is the only thing some areas have. Dunn said, again, funding will be
provided at the historic levels, but at the same time there is a bigger need for funding for these
kinds of projects that the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​.
-- ​Oil & Gas Lease Fund: ​Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware), Minority Chair of the House
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, expressed concerns about taking $20 million
more from the Oil and Gas Lease Fund to pay DCNR operating expenses in the face of the ​June
2017 PA Supreme Court decision​ in a case brought by the ​Environmental Defense Foundation
saying it was unconstitutional to use monies from the Fund for non-conservation purposes.
Dunn said the decision established a firm principal of holding these resources as a trustee for
public resources and that’s good, but it’s a legal question that’s for the courts to sort out.
Rep. Keith Greiner (R-Lancaster) asked how much revenue gas drilling brings to DCNR.
Dunn this year it will be about $81 million from oil and gas royalties and rents. DCNR Deputy
Secretary for State Parks and Forestry John Norbeck noted only about 30-35 percent of those
lands already leased for drilling have been developed. He added there will only be about 3 gas
drilling rigs working on State Forest land this year.
Rep. Greiner followed up by asking how is DCNR sure it is getting what it deserves.
Nortbeck said there is an upfront and back end audits of leases and production that has so far
recovered $3.1 million in funds due to DCNR.
Rep. Fritz (R-Wayne) said there are a number of partnership like the one with Seneca
Resources in the ​Elk State Forest​ planting trees and making other improvements and asked what
other partnerships DCNR has with drilling companies. Dunn said there are several types of
partnerships with oil and gas drilling lease holders and that DCNR has challenged them to do
more to do local conservation projects. She said Seneca has been working on public lands for a
long time and DCNR has a good relationship with them.
-- Infrastructure Needs:​ Rep. Stephen McCarter (D-Montgomery) shares the concern about the
long term impact of the transfer of special fund monies to pay for operating costs. He asked
specifically about what the need is for ​infrastructure replacement and repairs​ in State Parks and
State Forests and whether DCNR could fund local floodplain buyouts for homeowner who want
to relocate. Dunn said DCNR has major infrastructure needs and the ​Restore Pennsylvania
Initiative​ would help with that. She noted they are not prevented from matching local funds for
floodplain buyouts involving recreational projects.
Rep. Patty Kim (D-Dauphin) asked for more specific information on infrastructure needs
in State Parks. Dunn and DCNR Deputy Secretary for State Parks and Forestry John Norbeck
noted DCNR has about $4 billion in infrastructure and much of that is over 50 years old. The
coming year about $15 million in Capital Budget funding, $30 Keystone Recreation, Parks and
Conservation Fund and $15 million out of Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
will be used for DCNR infrastructure projects. Dunn said infrastructure funding by a bond issue
like through the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ would make sense to address these needs.
Rep. Lynda Culver (R-Northumberland) also asked for more on infrastructure needs and
amounts and how projects are prioritized. Dunn said there is a backlog of infrastructure projects
of about $1 billion in DCNR. These are projects ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ could address.
Public safety projects are priorities for funding and dealing with immediate issues like flood and
other damage to facilities. In response to a follow-up question, Dunn said she will provide a list
of infrastructure projects in State Parks and Forests.
Rep. Lee James (R-Venango) asked how DCNR justifies buying more land when there

23
are so many infrastructure needs. He said he was concerned about competing with private
industry. Dunn said land conservation has been a big part of DCNR’s mission for quite a while
using monies from the Environmental Stewardship and Keystone funds. She noted improvements
on State Parks and Forests lands are completed by local contractors and the tourism these
facilities generate support local businesses. These lands are typically not lands eyed for any
industrial uses.
Rep. James Struzzi (R-Indiana) asked about steps DCNR takes in marketing State Parks
and Forests recreation opportunities. Dunn said they rely on the Department of Community and
Economic Development’s major tourist marketing program, but use social media and other
outlets to promote recreation opportunities all year round.
-- Climate Change: ​ Rep. Elizabeth Fiedler (D-Philadelphia) asked what steps DCNR is taking
to deal with climate change impacts. Dunn said DCNR has ​identified 124 individual actions​ it is
taking to address climate change issues. She said DCNR has a variety of ​other sustainable
practices​ they have adopted, including developing modern green buildings, installing electric
vehicle charging stations and more. ​Gov. Wolf’s Executive Order on reducing greenhouse gas
emissions set goals for reductions that all agencies are committed to implement.
Rep. Fiedler also asked how DCNR it is dealing with increased flooding caused by
climate change. Dunn said they are installing forest buffers and green infrastructure to address
many of these problems on its lands as they have resources to do them. DCNR is also looking at
how local recreation projects can incorporate features to address stormwater and flooding issues.
She said the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​ can help support many of these kinds of projects.
Rep. Doyle Heffley (R-Carbon) asked if DCNR is following the Game Commission in
putting a moratorium on wind energy projects. He said there is a lot of local concern in his area
about the impact these projects could have. Dunn said DCNR’s legislation does not authorize
wind energy projects on its lands. She said public lands offer natural vistas for the public to
enjoy and wind energy projects may get in the way of that enjoyment. She said DCNR ​supports
renewable energy by doing projects​ like solar energy in the built environment of its parks.
-- Purchase Of New State Lands:​ Rep. Matt Gabler (R-Clearfield) asked how DCNR makes its
decisions about purchasing additional lands. He noted some local governments in his area have
half or more of their land area in public ownership. He also expressed concern about how the
agency was calculating its in-lieu of tax payments for state forest and park lands. Dunn said
there are regional difference in the appetite for land conservation and they take their cues on
purchases from county commissioners. She said she would get back to him on the in-lieu of tax
issue.
-- Lyme Timber Sale:​ Rep. John Lawrence (R-Chester) asked about the status of the ​$50
million PennVEST loan to Lyme Timber​ to purchase 60,103 acres of privately owned timber
land for its water quality and forest management benefits while still allowing sustainable
timbering and some public access. He specifically asked about the public access provisions of
the loan and related easements. DCNR Deputy Secretary for State Parks and Forestry John
Norbeck said the public access plan is available to the public and they would share it with him.
In response to a follow-up question, Dunn said they are satisfied with the public access
provisions in the agreement. Dunn clarified the specific agreements involved in this case are for
a working forest easement, it is not in DCNR or state ownership, it remains in private hands.
-- Invasive Species: ​Rep. Marcia Hahn (R-Northampton) asked about any increased threats from
invasive species that would affect DCNR’s budget this year. Dunn said DCNR is working with

24
the Department of Agriculture and the forest industry to address problems like ​spotted lanternfly,
woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer​. She said it seems like it’s a constant battle with climate
change and the weather. She said one brighter spot is gypsy moths where the wet weather last
year knocked down the populations somewhat, at least for this year/
-- Lyme Disease:​ Rep. Rosemary Brown (R-Monroe) asked what DCNR is doing on educating
the public about lyme disease given its high incidence in Pennsylvania. Dunn said DCNR views
lyme disease as a threat to workers and to the people recreating in the outdoors and undertakes a
major effort to educate the public ​on how to prevent Lyme Disease.
Click Here​ for a copy of Secretary Dunn’s written testimony. ​Click Here​ for House
hearing videos (bottom of page). ​Click Here​ for written testimony.
The Senate Appropriations Committee hearing on DCNR’s budget is scheduled for
March 4 at 3:00. ​Click Here​ to watch the Senate hearing online and for hearing summaries.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

DCNR Budget Testimony Submitted To House, Senate Appropriations Committee

This is the text of the ​written budget testimony​ submitted to the House
and Senate Appropriations Committees by Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn.

Good afternoon Chairman Saylor, Chairman Bradford, and members of


the House Appropriations Committee. Thank you for this opportunity to
discuss the budget for the Department of Conservation and Natural

25
Resources.
Governor Wolf’s vision is to make Pennsylvania a leader in workforce development --
providing opportunities for citizens and creating the talented workers that draw businesses to our
communities.
In our Commonwealth, those workers can expect to find walkable cities with green
spaces and nearby trails; small towns along rivers with parks close to home; breathtaking forests
and landscapes for exploring in all four seasons-- a blend of economic development and quality
of life.
These are the amenities that DCNR and its partners provide to Pennsylvanians. Our work
both supports our recreational and tourism economy, and ensures that development of
recreational trails -- are all important to a government that works, and to ensuring a vital and
healthy Pennsylvania for future generations.
DCNR’s proposed budget includes an increase of 2.4 percent over current levels and will
allow the agency to continue its programs and services. The governor’s budget also proposes an
increase of 12 positions, primarily within the state park system, to help us manage pressing
resource needs.
This will be an exciting year for DCNR as we build upon our core work and expand upon
accomplishments from the past four years, including:
-- Growing our efforts around youth engagement through DCNR’s ​Pennsylvania Outdoor Corps​.
This program offers work experience, job training, and educational opportunities to young
people who complete recreation and conservation projects, mostly on Pennsylvania’s lands. It
helps them get real world experience on active work projects, and helps them gain skills that will
make them more attractive and productive job candidates;
-- Engaging partners in putting acres of trees in the ground along streams to improve the quality
of our water and prevent flooding;
-- Implementing practices that are responding to and ​lessening the impacts of climate change​;
-- Continuing leadership on efficiency and green practices, including ​installing chargers for
electric vehicles​ in state parks.
While separate and apart from the budget, we also look forward to ​Governor Wolf’s
Restore Pennsylvania infrastructure plan​, which will provide significant funding to enable
environmental projects and new recreational opportunities across the state.
Restore Pennsylvania will include infrastructure and maintenance projects in state parks
and forests, creation and revitalization of new local parks, and funding for hiking, biking, and
ATV trail projects.
Restore Pennsylvania is the only plan that can truly address the Commonwealth’s
infrastructure needs, including key environmental priorities.
The men and women of DCNR strive every day to welcome millions of visitors to
Pennsylvania’s public lands, enhance local communities, and provide critical protections for and
improvements to our natural resources.
I’m proud to work with them.
We look forward to working with you over the coming year to make Pennsylvania a great
place to live, work, and play.
Click Here​ for a copy of the testimony.
Click Here​ for a summary of Secretary Dunn’s appearance before the House
Appropriations Committee.

26
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants

The Department of Environmental Protection


awarded a total of ​over $28.7 million in 2018
Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
funded by the​ Environmental Stewardship Fund,
EPA’s 319 Nonpoint Source Program and federal
Surface Mining Reclamation Set-Aside and bond
forfeiture funds.
Grants were awarded for projects in 48
counties, plus 14 other projects will benefit
multiple counties.
In December 2017, DEP awarded ​just over
$20.7 million in Growing Greener Grants​ in 45
counties.
Projects funded included a wide variety of on-farm conservation practices, forested
stream buffers, floodplain restoration, stormwater pollution reduction, treatment of abandoned
mine drainage, dam removals, bioswales, rain gardens, manure storage, wetlands enhancement,
stormwater management education for contractors, farm grazing plans and much more.

27
Of special note are projects designed to provide support to local watershed projects and
programs in multiple counties--
-- $1,730,610 to ​PA Association of Conservation Districts​ for the Engineering Technical
Assistance Program;
-- $553,976 to ​Northcentral PA Conservancy​ BMP implementation and verification;
-- $400,000 to ​Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay​ for ​Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership​;
-- $250,000 to ​PA Horticultural Society​ for TreeVitalize Watersheds Program;
-- $225,000 to ​Trout Unlimited​ to provide acid mine drainage treatment technical assistance;
-- $229,594 to ​Stream Restoration, Inc​. (nonprofit) to provide passive mine drainage treatment
system O&M technical assistance;
-- $200,000 to Northwest PA Eminent Community Institute for ​Northwest PA Greenways
Implementation Block Grants​;
-- $160,784 to ​Western PA Conservancy​ for Upper West Branch Susquehanna agricultural
BMPs;
-- $111,038 to Penn State Extension for County-based ​Master Watershed Steward Programs​;
-- $105,219 to ​Chesapeake Conservancy​ for precision conservation for buffer restoration;
-- $70,000 to Penn State U. for workforce development for BMP implementation in the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed; and
-- $57,315 to ​PA Organization for Watersheds & Rivers​ for promoting watershed restoration
through local watershed associations.
Click Here​ for a complete list of Growing Greener grants awarded in the 2018 round.
For more information on is grant program, visit DEP’s ​Growing Greener Grants
webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up to be notified when the next application period opens.
Apply Now For These Grants
These watershed restoration, recreation and flood reduction grants programs are now
accepting applications until these deadline--
-- March 7: ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
-- March 15​: ​Western PA Conservancy TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree
Planting Grants
-- March 29:​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
-- April 10:​ ​DCNR Community Conservation, Recreation, Trail, Riparian Buffer Grants​.
-- May 31:​ ​Commonwealth Financing Authority Grants​ for: Watershed Restoration, Abandoned
Mine Drainage, Well Plugging, Water Quality Monitoring, Sewage Facility, Flood Mitigation,
Greenways, Trails and Recreation funded by the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
Click Here​ for a list of other environmental and energy grants and awards you can apply
for to support your projects.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For

28
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 16, 2019]

New PA Farm Bill Proposal Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims
To Make PA Leading Organic State

On February 14, Gov.Tom Wolf joined


Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding to
unveil the ​PA Farm Bill​, a proposal to provide
support for and continued investments in the
state’s agriculture industry.
Among other provisions, the plan
includes an additional $6 million to support
on-farm conservation practices and would
help make Pennsylvania a leader in organic
agriculture.
“Pennsylvania has a long, proud
history of agriculture, and this comprehensive
package of funding opportunities and resources will help expand this important industry,” said
Gov. Wolf. “The PA Farm Bill allocates $24 million in additional funding to chart a real path for
a dynamic and prosperous farming economy in Pennsylvania. It’s about providing more
opportunities to our farmers by creating more jobs, more income, and more hope.”
The PA Farm Bill will provide for business development and succession planning, create
accommodations for a growing animal agriculture sector, remove regulatory burdens, strengthen
the ag workforce, protect infrastructure, and make Pennsylvania the nation’s leading organic
state.
“Pennsylvania’s story can’t be told without agriculture, and the PA Farm Bill will help
inspire all of the chapters yet to come,” said Secretary Redding. “By further supporting the
agriculture industry and investing in business operations, infrastructure, education and the
workforce, we are setting the course for a future filled with increased opportunities and
prosperity.”
The provisions related to farm conservation include--
-- Conservation Excellence Grant Program,​ funded at $2.5 million, to provide financial and
technical assistance to farmers to install and implement best management practices.
-- Agriculture Linked Investment Program​, funded at $500,000, to re-establish this

29
low-interest loan program for the implementation of best management practices.
-- Resource Enhancement and Protection Tax Credits​, expanded by $3 million to a total of
$13 million annually, to increase the lifetime cap and increase availability.
-- PA Preferred Organic Initiative​ -- $1.6 million-- to enhance the growth of the organic
industry by creating state-specific guidelines for marketing Pennsylvania's products to a global
marketplace.
-- Support for urban agriculture initiatives,​ and a newly created $500,000 state-level specialty
crop block grant program to support growing industries like hemp, hops, and hardwoods.
-- ​Proposes to amend the Ag Area Security Act to allow for subdivision​ of preserved farms
-- Creates a $5 million PA Rapid Response Disaster Readiness Account ​to allow for a quick
response to agricultural disasters, including the spotted lanternfly, utilizing animal or plant health
officials to contain an outbreak; or providing an immediate response to a foodborne illness.
“Investing in agriculture means investing in small business, investing in our workforce,
and investing in future generations of farmers,” said Rep. Martin Causer (R-Cameron), Majority
Chair of the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee. “I look forward to working with
farmers across the Commonwealth, Gov. Wolf, and fellow lawmakers to address the challenges
facing this industry that puts food on our tables and contributes so much to our economy.”
"Agriculture is vital to Pennsylvania’s economy and this investment proves that the
administration recognizes that fact,” Sen. Judy Schwank (D-Berks), Minority Chair of the Senate
Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee. “This is the leadership we need for the future for
agriculture in the Commonwealth.”
"I want to thank Gov. Wolf and his staff for working to increase support for Agriculture,
Pennsylvania's largest industry, and offer my appreciation to the governor for addressing the
concerns of the Ag community,” said Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski (D-Luzerne), Minority Chair of
the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee. “These dollars will help ensure
Pennsylvania maintains the highest standards and best practices in safety and quality for the
people of PA while protecting the future of agriculture in our Commonwealth."
Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Butler), Majority Chair of the Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs
Committee, released this statement on the proposal, along with other Senate Republican leaders--
“We are encouraged by Gov. Wolf’s willingness to have a discussion about the best ways
to support Pennsylvania’s agriculture community, and we thank the governor for his efforts on
this front. Many of these proposals could potentially build on the progress we have already made
through the creation of a new grant program to support dairy farmers – an initiative led by Senate
Republicans during last year’s budget negotiations.
“In addition to the plans the governor is proposing, we continue to be supportive of the
idea of hosting a dairy summit. The summit would bring together all agencies and stakeholders
for a discussion on the future of agriculture. A similar approach in New York has yielded
positive reviews, and we believe this summit could serve as a valuable outlet for the entire
industry at a minimal cost to taxpayers.
“After the governor proposed to cut nearly $4 million in agriculture funding from the
state budget last week, the biggest question that remains is how the approximately $24 million in
new spending would be funded. As we take a closer look at the governor’s budget and his new
plans for supporting farmers, our priority will be working with all parties to determine how we
can incorporate some or all of these ideas in a fiscally responsible way. We look forward to a
careful review of all of these ideas leading up to our budget hearing with the Department of

30
Agriculture on March 6 and a joint hearing with the Senate and House Agriculture committees
on March 20.”
Click Here for a summary​. ​Click Here ​for the full announcement.
NewsClips:
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets Feb. 20

The ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation


Plan Steering Committee​ is scheduled to meet on
February 20 to hear presentations from Adams and
Franklin counties on the plans they developed to meet
their nutrient pollution reduction targets.
Adams, Franklin, Lancaster and York counties were
selected to ​pilot the county clean water planning process
developed by the Steering Committee for the
development of county-level clean water plans.

31
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg from
1:00 to 4:00. ​Click Here ​to register to attend the meeting via webinar. Participants will also
need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE: 640 189 982.
For more information and copies of available handouts, visit the ​PA Chesapeake Bay
Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee​ webpage.
NewsClips:
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects​:
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DCNR Accepting Applications For Parks, Recreation, Trail, Buffer, Conservation Grants
EPA Accepting Grant Applications For Help To Develop Plan To Offset Lack Of Sediment
Trapping Capacity At Conowingo Dam
Funding Available For Chesapeake Bay Watershed Communities To Reduce Polluted
Stormwater Runoff
Op-Ed: Polluted Runoff Fees Support Community Solutions To Local Pollution And Flooding
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

New Study Estimates Annual Economic Value Of Northampton-Lehigh Master Watershed


Steward Program At Over $140,000

By Thomas H. Bruggink, PhD, Lafayette College

Volunteer environmental groups play an important role in


improving water quality in Pennsylvania streams. A new
participant in this effort is the Master Watershed Steward

32
Program, which initiated in 2013 in ​Northampton and Lehigh Counties​.
This is a government-funded effort to train and manage volunteers in a variety of
environmental and natural resource activities, such as tree planting for riparian buffers,
on-the-ground remediation projects, educational events, etc.
The Penn State Extension Service runs the program in partnership with the local
Conservation District watershed specialists.
Measuring the monetary value of these conservation efforts is useful to the public and
lawmakers, as they want a return to justify the expenses of this program.
Measuring the benefits of environmental volunteer organizations is a challenge. Several
techniques are possible, but the one that receives focus here is the direct measurement of the
value of the environmental activities (output approach).
This relies heavily on information that is not normally available, and it requires local
expertise to select necessary parameters. Nonetheless the Lehigh Valley does offer a unique
opportunity to do this.
Conceptually, ​measuring the annual benefits of the MWS program​ is a matter of
monetizing the value the public receives from preserving and improving watershed services, and
then assigning the proportion that is attributable to the MWS volunteers.
The former can be done for a given watershed but it is hugely expensive and time
consuming. The latter is nearly impossible to determine objectively, but reasonable divisions
can prove informative.
Recently the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission (LVPC) completed a major study on
the ​value of environment goods in the Lehigh Valley​ (Lehigh and Northampton counties).
Specifically to this topic the $117.5 million annual value (in 2018 dollars) assigned to the
stream infrastructure highlights the importance of protecting watershed health and integrity.
This represents the annual cost that taxpayers would otherwise have to pay for these
environmental goods.
This is the starting point for assessing the value of watershed conservation efforts. It is
proposed here that the monetary value of watershed conservation is the prevention of lost
benefits due to the degradation that would occur in the absence of conservation.
The cessation of conservation activities includes no monitoring and law enforcement of
point and non-point pollution in the streamways, no building and repairing of riparian buffers, no
monitoring of new development adjacent to streamways, etc.
The consequential environmental degradation and higher water treatment costs would be
gradual, and the consequences may last for more than a year even if this were only a one-year
cessation.
Monetizing the benefits of conservation efforts for the MWS involves confronting two
measurement problems.
The first is assigning the appropriate fraction of the $117.5 million to the various
conservation activities. This monetizes the benefit of the government agency and voluntary
efforts needed to preserve the $117.5 million annual environmental value.
For example, if conservation efforts cease for a year and the environmental value of the
streamway infrastructure eventually falls from $117.5 million to $111.625 million (a 5 percent
drop), then the conservation efforts are worth $5.875 million that year.
The benefits are the prevention of loss.
Let D represent the percent degradation that would occur if conservation ceased for one

33
year. At best we can only assign a range of values for D that would seem reasonable.
Applying this range to the $117.5 million will give us a range of economic values for the
degradation. This monetizes the environmental benefits of conservation.
Using a range from D= 0.01 through D = .05 will give us conservation benefits ranging
from $1.175 million to $5.88 million.
The second measurement problem is determining the fraction of the conservation value to
assign to the various conservation activities.
For example what portion of the $5.88 million in the example used above can be assigned
to MWS? Let A represent the allocation of all conservation efforts that can be credited to MWS.
If A is 3 percent, then the economic benefits of the MWS are $176,625.
If A is 4 percent then the MWS’s value is $235,000.
All this suggests that if values for the parameters D and A can be determined, at least
within a range, then a range of economic values for the Master Watershed Steward program can
be presented.
Let the range of values considered for D be from 0.03 to 0.05, and the range of values
considered for A be from 0.02 to 0.04. This gives a benefit range from $47,000 to $235,000.
By taking the midpoints of both ranges (D = 0.04, A = 0.03), the result is $141,000. If
placed in this context, this number can represent the MWS benefit.
It is important to assess the value of the MSW group because taxpayers fund this and
deserve a good return on their investment.
The 2018 operating cost of running this program, according to the Northampton/Lehigh
MWS coordinator Erin Frederick, is $27,000.
By working the values for D and A it can be determined that this program more than pays
for itself as long as D and A equal to or exceed 0.02.
Therefore under reasonable judgments for avoidable environmental degradation (D) and
volunteer contribution (A), the Master Watershed Steward organization provides a good return
on the government costs of running this program.
This would support proposals for expansion to other counties in Pennsylvania.
Click Here​ for a copy of the full study.
[For more information on the program, visit the ​Northampton & Lehigh Master
Watershed Steward Program​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Brad Kunsman, Penn
State Extension, at 610-813-6612 or send email to: ​bkunsman@psu.edu​.
[Master Watershed Steward Programs can be found working in 13 counties so far. ​Click
Here​ to learn how you can volunteer in an existing county or start in a new one. Questions
should be direct to Erin Frederick at 610-391-9840 or send email to: ​elf145@psu.edu​. ]

Thomas H. Bruggink, Ph.D.​ is Professor Emeritus, Lafayette College and a Master Watershed
Steward of Northampton/Lehigh Counties and can be contacted by sending email to:
thome7@aol.com​.
Related Story:
The Economic Value Of Green Infrastructure: Calculating A Return On Investments In Park
Watershed Restoration, Farmland BMPs, Open Spaces​ - PA Township News
NewsClip:
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

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Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Petition Complete, Will Be On Next EQB Meeting
Agenda

The Department of Environmental Protection has notified the


over 60 groups and individuals their petition asking the
Environmental Quality Board to establish a greenhouse gas
cap-and-trade program to address climate change is complete.
The ​December 26 letter to the petitioners​ was provided to
EQB members for their information February 15.
The next step in the process is for the Board to consider
whether to accept the petition for study at its next meeting, either
on ​March 19 or April 16​.
On November 27,​ Robert B. McKinstry, Jr.,​ the ​Clean Air
Council​, ​Widener University Environmental Law and
Sustainability Center​, eco(n)law LLC and ​61​ other individuals,
groups​, businesses​ and local governments submitted an over 400 page ​rulemaking petition
setting up a market-based program that would eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from major
sources in Pennsylvania by 2052.
The petitioners say Pennsylvania already has statutory authority under the state Air
Pollution Control Act to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, greenhouse gas
emissions are a pollutant required to be regulated under the federal Clean Air Act.
In addition, the petitioners also say Article I, Section 27 of the state’s constitution-- the
Environmental Rights Amendment guaranteeing Pennsylvanians the right to clean air, pure water
and the preservation of the environment-- imposes a duty on the Environmental Quality Board
and the Commonwealth to act as a public trustee for common natural resources like clean air to
reduce pollutants that adversely affect that resource.
Click Here​ for a copy of the letter to petitioners. ​Click Here​ for a copy of the petition.
2nd Petition
This is the second petition the EQB has received asking DEP to set up a greenhouse gas
reduction program.
In ​2014 the Environmental Quality Board rejected​ a ​petition submitted in 2013​ by
19-year-old Ashley Funk from Allegheny County asking for a 6 percent reduction in carbon
dioxide emissions in Pennsylvania by 2050 using a 2012 baseline.
In rejecting the petition, DEP said a national approach to greenhouse gas emissions is
needed like EPA’s now defunct Clean Power Plan because climate change is a national and
global issue and should cover all sources of carbon dioxide emissions, not just power plants.
The 20-member ​Environmental Quality Board​ adopts all of DEP’s regulations. ​Click
Here​ for more information on the rulemaking petition process. Questions should be directed to
Laura Edinger by calling 717-772-3277 or sending email to: ​ledinger@pa.gov​.
Related Stories:
Clean Air Council, Widener Law & Sustainability Center, 61 Others Petition EQB To Set Up A
Cap-And-Trade Program To Reduce PA Greenhouse Gas Emissions
DEP Climate Advisory Committee Meets Feb. 26 For Update On Action Plan, Impacts
Assessment, Inventory

35
NewsClips:
Study: In 60 Years Allentown Could Feel More Like Arkansas
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Sisk: Some Say Key To Combat Climate Change Lies In Sending Carbon Dioxide Underground
Letter: Spend Money On Climate Crisis (Controlling Gas Wells), Not Risky Schemes
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
Op-Ed: Getting Mad About Methane Emissions
Op-Ed: May Patients’ Health Depends On Addressing Climate Change
National Lawsuit On Climate Change Has PA Connections
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
PaEN: ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
March 6 Pittsburgh
U.S. EIA: Emissions From Electric Power Sector To Remain Mostly Flat Thru 2050
Republicans Pounce After Congressional Dems Flub A Green New Deal Summary
McConnell Plans To Bring Green New Deal To U.S. Senate Vote
Bucks County Republican Congressman Joins Dems To Snub Trump On Climate Change
Plummeting Insect Numbers Threaten Collapse Of Nature
EPA Greenhouse Gas Estimates Show Increase In Methane
Dominion Plans To Reduce Methane Emissions 50 Percent By 2029
Dominion Energy Reducing Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Infrastructure
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

DEP Climate Advisory Committee Meets Feb. 26 For Update On Action Plan, Impacts
Assessment, Inventory

The ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ is scheduled to meet on February 26 to hear the
latest from DEP on the 2018 update to Pennsylvania’s Climate Action Plan.
Also on the agenda​ is a discussion of Climate Action Plan Implementation and Outreach,
a 2018 Climate Impacts Assessment Update (the last one ​was done in 2015​) and a revised 2018
Greenhouse Gas Inventory.
The Committee is also scheduled to discuss ​Gov. Wolf’s Executive Order setting an
overall greenhouse gas reduction goal​ for Pennsylvania.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building starting at 10:00.
For more information and available handouts, visit the ​DEP Climate Change Advisory
Committee​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Lindsay Byron by calling 717-772-8951
or sending email to: ​lbyron@pa.gov​.
Related Stories:
DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee Meets Dec. 4 To Review Draft Recommendations
For Climate Plan Update
Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Petition Complete, Will Be On Next EQB Meeting Agenda
NewsClips:
Study: In 60 Years Allentown Could Feel More Like Arkansas
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained

36
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Sisk: Some Say Key To Combat Climate Change Lies In Sending Carbon Dioxide Underground
Letter: Spend Money On Climate Crisis (Controlling Gas Wells), Not Risky Schemes
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
Op-Ed: Getting Mad About Methane Emissions
Op-Ed: May Patients’ Health Depends On Addressing Climate Change
National Lawsuit On Climate Change Has PA Connections
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
PaEN: ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
March 6 Pittsburgh
U.S. EIA: Emissions From Electric Power Sector To Remain Mostly Flat Thru 2050
Republicans Pounce After Congressional Dems Flub A Green New Deal Summary
McConnell Plans To Bring Green New Deal To U.S. Senate Vote
Bucks County Republican Congressman Joins Dems To Snub Trump On Climate Change
Plummeting Insect Numbers Threaten Collapse Of Nature
EPA Greenhouse Gas Estimates Show Increase In Methane
Dominion Plans To Reduce Methane Emissions 50 Percent By 2029
Dominion Energy Reducing Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Infrastructure
[Posted: Feb. 16, 2019]

DEP Invites Comments On Water Quality Certification, Permits For PennEast Pipeline
Project

The Department of Environmental Protection published


notices in the February 16 PA Bulletin inviting comments
on the proposed Section 401 Water Quality Certification of
the ​PennEast Pipeline Project​ through Luzerne, Carbon,
Monroe, Northampton and Bucks Counties. ​(p​ ages
777-778​)
The project proposes to build a 77.3 mile long, 36-inch
pipeline and related facilities for the purpose of transporting
natural gas from Marcellus Shale production areas in
Pennsylvania to an existing pipeline in Mercer County, NJ.
The project consists of four Water Obstruction and
Encroachment Permits and one Chapter 102 Erosion and
Sediment Control Permit.
The deadline for comments is March 18. Questions should be directed to Domenic
Rocco, DEP’s Regional permit Coordination Office, at 717-7772-5987 or send email to:
drocco@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Gov. Wolf: Mariner East Pipeline Owner Has Not Respected Pennsylvania’s Law
Hurdle: Wolf’s Support For Pipeline-Safety Bills Boosts Bipartisan Advocates
Delaware RiverKeeper Defeats Court Motion To Dismiss Mariner East 2 Pipeline Complaint

37
Crable: Lancaster, PA Businesses Still Waiting To Be Paid For Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Work
AP: EQM Mountain Valley Pipeline Subject Of Criminal Probe In Virginia For Continuing
Construction After Permits Were Suspended
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Conventional Gas Drillers Ask PA Supreme Court To Reconsider Stripper Well Impact
Fee Decision

The ​PA Independent Oil and Gas Association​ has asked the ​PA
Supreme Court to reconsider the December 28 decision​ in favor of
the Public Utility Commission in two cases involving the definition
of a stripper well for the purposes of the Act 13 unconventional
well impact fee..
On January 11, the Association filed an application for
reconsideration in Snyder Brothers, Inc. v. PUC and PIOGA v.
PUC.
Under Act 13, stripper wells are not required to pay the annual
impact fee. The act defines a stripper well as an “unconventional
gas well incapable of producing more than 90 Mcf/d during any
calendar month.”
Snyder Brothers and PIOGA have argued that the law plainly
means a well is exempt if it was incapable of exceeding the 90
Mcf/d threshold in any one month during the reporting period, while the PUC contended that a
well must not exceed the threshold volume during each and every month of the year to qualify as
an exempt stripper well.
Or, in the words of the PUC: “[E]ven if a vertical gas well produces natural gas in
quantities greater than that of a stripper well in only one month of a calendar year, that vertical
well will be subject to the fee for that year.”
In March 2017, the Commonwealth Court decided in favor of PIOGA and member
company Snyder Brothers that the stripper well definition and, in particular, the meaning of the
word “any,” were not ambiguous.
The PUC subsequently appealed to the state Supreme Court.
The high court agreed with the PUC’s interpretation that the word “any” means “each” or
“every” and also put considerable weight on the commission’s unfounded notion that producers
could manipulate production in a given month to avoid paying the impact fee.
The Court majority ruled that an unconventional well is “subject to assessment of an
impact fee for a calendar year whenever that well’s natural gas production exceeds 90,000 cubic
feet per day in at least one calendar month of that year.”
PIOGA makes these points in its request for reconsideration:
-- The majority improperly viewed the statutory construction issue from the perspective of the
“vertical gas well” definition, in which the word “any” does not appear, instead of from the
perspective of the “stripper well” definition, in which the word “any” does appear and which
applies beyond the vertical gas well definition.
-- The majority ignored undisputed evidence that in its four “implementation” orders, the PUC
applied a “plain language” analysis and paired the word “one” with “any” whenever it discussed

38
the two definitions.
-- The majority ignored undisputed evidence that in its four “implementation” orders, the PUC
never determined the stripper well definition or the word “any” to be ambiguous.
-- The majority ignored undisputed evidence that in its four “implementation” orders, the PUC
reversed many of its prior impact fee interpretations based on the producers’ arguments and,
again, based again on a “plain language” analysis rather than an “ambiguity” analysis.
-- The majority failed to apply the fundamental rule of statutory interpretation that every word is
to be given meaning in mistakenly concluding that the term “incapable” in the stripper well
definition is not relevant in this case, when in fact it is highly relevant because it refutes the
PUC’s “manipulation of production” argument.
Legislators and staff involved in drafting the Act 13 impact fee provisions have
confirmed to PIOGA General Counsel Kevin Moody that one of the purposes of the “incapable”
requirement was to prevent the very type of “manipulation of production” shenanigans the PUC
and Supreme Court relied upon to support their interpretations of the stripper well definition to
raise more revenue.
Unfortunately, this information was not available while the case was being litigated
before the PUC and, even if it had been, would likely have been ignored by the PUC.
During oral argument the justices questioned what the production levels of the Snyder
Brothers’ vertical wells involved in the case were, and Moody pointed the justices to the record
pages showing that the production levels were “all over the place”―haphazardly above and
below 90 Mcf/day during all 12 calendar months.
Discussions with legislators and staff confirmed that this these varying production levels
were known when the impact fee provisions were being drafted and were the levels intended to
qualify wells as stripper wells because their production was “marginal.”
Snyder Brothers too has made application for reconsideration, arguing that the Supreme
Court failed to address the lawfulness of the penalties and interest the PUC imposed. Act 13 does
not provide a mechanism for refunding improperly paid impact fees and so Snyder Brothers had
withheld payment while the dispute was ongoing.
The PUC assessed the company nearly $500,000 for unpaid impact fees and
administrative costs, including a $50,000 penalty.
Snyder Brothers requested a remand to the Commonwealth Court if the court denies
PIOGA’s reconsideration request.
Because the Commonwealth Court ruled the impact fees were not owed, that court did
not address whether the PUC’s imposition of penalties and interest for unpaid impact fees was
lawful.
The company is asking the Supreme Court to correct its oversight in not addressing the
company’s arguments.
(​Photo: ​Conventional well, PIOGA.)

(Reprinted from the ​PIOGA February newsletter​.)


Related Story:
PA Supreme Court Overturns Decision Allowing Drillers To Avoid Act 13 Impact Fees
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Community Groups Large & Small Can Participate In The Keep PA Beautiful 15th

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Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA

Cleaning up your neighborhood is one of the best


investments you can make and the 15th Annual
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful ​Great American
Cleanup of PA​ can help get you started.
Whether you have vacant lots plagued with debris,
natural areas that are illegally dumped on or litter
scattered and blown from other sources, any
neighborhood can be lifted up by the positive action
of cleaning up.
From March 1 through May 31, thousands of
Pennsylvania families and friends will join in litter
and illegal dump cleanups, beautification projects,
such as tree and flower plantings, recycling collections and education programs all geared
towards the vision of a cleaner and more beautiful Pennsylvania.
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​ partners with PennDOT, the Department of Environmental
Protection and Keep America Beautiful to provide free trash bags, gloves and safety vests to
registered participants, as supplies last.
During Let’s Pick It Up PA – Everyday from April 13th through May 6th, cleanups
registered with the Great American Cleanup of PA are eligible to take their trash to participating
landfills free of charge or for a reduced rate.
During the 2018 Great American Cleanup 108,638 volunteers were instrumental in
cleaning up over 6.6 million pounds of trash.
Join thousands of Pennsylvanians keeping neighborhoods clean and beautiful and ​register
your event​. Questions can be answered by Michelle Dunn, Great American Cleanup of PA
Program Coordinator, at 1-877-772-3673 ext. 113 or send email to:
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org​.
Video Contest
Anyone participating in Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful’s Great American Cleanup of PA
can earn cash for their nonprofit or charity of choice by entering the ​Great American Cleanup of
PA Video Contest​.
To participate, send Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful a 60-second video of your Great
American Cleanup of PA event showing how YOU keep Pennsylvania beautiful.
Click Here ​for all the details on entering.
Supporters
Current 2019 supporters of the Great American Cleanup of PA include: ​PA Waste
Industries Association​, ​Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania​, ​PA Food Merchants Association​,
Mahantango Enterprises, Inc.​, ​Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority​ and
Republic Services.
If you are interested in becoming a supporter of the 2019 Great American Cleanup of PA
contact Shannon Reiter at 724-836-4121 or send email to: ​sreiter@keeppabeautiful.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on

40
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
NewsClip:
Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
Related Stories:
Litter? Not In Philly! Campaign Expands To Southwest Philadelphia, Volunteers Needed
PA Resources Council: 10 Backyard Composting Workshops Scheduled In Allegheny County
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (February 19): ​House Bill 60​ (Cox-R-Berks) to prohibit new employees of the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission from being part of the PA State Employees Retirement
System (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 9​ (Yaw-R-Lycoming) designating the Eastern
Hellbender as the state amphibian and clean water ambassador (​sponsor summary​).​ ​ <> ​Click
Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (March 19): ​Senate Bill 147​ (Laughlin-R-Erie) authorizing the Game Commission to
allow Sunday hunting. ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meetings This Week

House:​ the ​Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ holds 2 informational meeting-
one on DEP’s budget request and a second on the Forge The Future Plan developed by business
groups; the ​Transportation Committee​ meets to consider ​House Bill 374
(Everett-R-Lycoming) establishing the Keystone Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by
the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (​sponsor summary​); the ​Consumer
Affairs Committee​ holds an informational meeting with Public Utility Commission, Acting
Consumer Advocate and Small Business Advocate on legislative priorities. <> ​Click Here​ for
full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ the Senate begins budget hearings. <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

House and Senate Co-Sponsorship Memos


41
House: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Senate: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
Budget Hearings: Feb. 19 to March 8
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House
February 19, 20, 21
Budget Hearings: Feb. 11 to March 7
March 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

DEP Budget Topic Of Feb. 19 House Environmental Committee Meeting

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ is


scheduled to meet February 19 to hold an informational meeting on the
Department of Environmental Protection’s budget.
The meeting will give DEP the opportunity to discuss different
funding mechanisms for the many programs the Department oversees as
well as what the funding is used for.
The meeting will be held in Room G-50 of the Irvis Building
starting at 10:00. Committee meetings are typically webcast through the
PA House Republican website​.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the
House Environmental Committee​ and can be contacted by calling
42
717-783-1707 or sending email to: ​dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware)
serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to:
gvitali@pahouse.net​.
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic Development
Report
House Appropriations Committee Holds DEP, DCNR Budget Hearings Feb. 14
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
DEP Citizens Advisory Council: The Consistent Cuts To DEP’s Budget Are Unsustainable
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic


Development Report

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ is


scheduled to meet on February 20 to hear a presentation on the Forge
the Future plan by the PA Chamber of Business and Industry and PA
Manufacturers’ Association.
Forge The Future​ is an initiative of Pennsylvania businesses
across the state calling for a new era of economic growth in
Pennsylvania.
The plan includes ​Ideas for Action​, a report that highlights
specific actions the Commonwealth can and should implement to
capitalize on its world-class energy assets and grow its way to more
revenue, population and job growth.
Among the recommendations​ are--
-- Cabinet-Level Energy Executive:​Pennsylvania should create a
cabinet-level leadership position (Energy Secretary, Executive, or “Czar”) with exclusive
responsibility for driving energy-enabled economic development in the state. This would give

43
appropriate status to the energy economy and its potential to create significant GDP, jobs, wages
and population growth impact.
-- Pennsylvania Energy Investment Office​: Create a new Pennsylvania Energy Investment
Office, led by a cabinet-level executive, to be the Commonwealth’s one-stop resource for
helping streamline the process of doing energy business in PA – serving as an ombudsman to
coordinate regulatory, permitting and other needs. The office should be staffed and funded
appropriately, with the goal of leveraging economic growth, which, as this and other
studies/reports have estimated, could be more than $60 billion.
-- Create Statewide Energy Investment Strategy:​ This new office would be charged with
creating and leading a well-defined statewide energy business and investment strategy. This
could include an energy-focused business attraction/investment resource kit for local and
regional economic development agencies, and regular interaction to coordinate and collaborate
on energy-related economic development.
-- Streamline Pipeline Permitting Process:​ Developing Natural gas transmission and
distribution is vital to utilizing the abundant resource across the state, and delivering NGLs and
LNG to export terminals, including a potential Penn America LNG facility in Chester County.
Many regulatory hurdles exist, including oversight at both the state and federal level for natural
gas infrastructure projects.
-- Expand Pipeline Investment Program: ​which currently provides grants to construct the last
few miles of natural gas distribution lines to business parks and existing manufacturing and
industrial enterprises, to include residential uses.
-- Natural Gas Micro-Grids: ​Create partnerships with organizations and institutions that
operate large physical plants (government, universities, health care institutions) to build
gas-fueled micro-grids for power generation
-- New Distributed Energy Technology: ​Develop partnerships between industries and STEM-
focused colleges and universities to explore new technologies in distributed energy
-- Encourage CHP, Fuel Cells:​ Leverage utility ratemaking policy to facilitate adoption of
natural gas as a heating and power source (such as CHP and fuel cells)
-- Convert Transit Fleets To Gas, Support Fueling Infrastructure:​ Seek federal and state
assistance to convert all major transit fleets to gas powered buses; Support installation of natural
gas fueling stations at all PA Turnpike service plazas; Develop port infrastructure for natural gas
fueling on cargo ships in Philadelphia to take advantage of the eventual move from high-sulfur
diesel.
-- District Energy Zones: ​where long-term Power Purchase Agreements would incent use of
natural gas-fueled micro-grids for manufacturing facilities and support the work of the CHP
working group within the Public Utility Commission to identify additional ways to help
manufacturers adopt CHP solutions for their facilities.
Click Here ​for more information.
The meeting will be held in Room B-31 of the Main Capitol starting at 10:00.
Committee meetings are typically webcast through the ​PA House Republican website​.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
Related Story:

44
DEP Budget Topic Of Feb. 19 House Environmental Committee Meeting
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Keystone Tree Fund To Be Considered Feb. 19 By House Transportation Committee

The ​House Transportation Committee​ is scheduled to consider


House Bill 374 ​(Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing the Keystone
Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources on February 19.
The bill authorizes a voluntary $1 checkoff on drivers and
vehicle license applications to support a new Keystone Tree Fund to
provide funding to DCNR’s ​TreeVitalize Program​ (40 percent) and
for ​Riparian Forest Buffer Grants ​(60 percent).
The new Fund is intended to supplement the existing capacity
of these programs (​sponsor summary​).
A companion bill is pending in the Senate--​ ​Senate Bill 108
(Yaw-R-Lycoming).
The meeting will be held in Room B-31 of the Main Capitol
starting at 12:15. Committee meetings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican
website​.
Rep. Tim Hennessey (R-Chester) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-3431 or by sending email to: ​henness@pahousegop.com​. Rep.
Mike Carroll (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by calling
717-787-3589 or by sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
(​Photo:​ ​Rep. Garth Everett​, prime sponsor.)
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Joint Conservation Committee To Hold March 19 Meeting On Promoting PA Route 6 For


Biking, Local Tourism

The ​Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution


Control and Conservation Committee​ will hold
an informational meeting on steps being taken
to promote ​PA Route 6​ for biking and local
tourism March 19.
The meeting is being held at the request
of Rep. Parks Gentling (R-Mercer.
Last year PA Route 6 was designated as

45
part of the U.S. Bike Route System. It spans 427 miles across the northern part of Pennsylvania.
Route 6 traverses a diverse landscape that includes a variety of heritage museums and
wineries. It connects communities and enriches lives through enhanced recreation, healthy
living, economic prosperity and environmental stewardship.
National Geographic named PA Route 6 one of America's most scenic drivers.
During the meeting, members will hear from the ​Route 6 Alliance​ and other stakeholders
on the economic impact that bike tourism has on the growth of communities and businesses
across Pennsylvania.
The meeting will be held in Room 108 of the Irvis Building starting at 10:00.
For more information on biking in Pennsylvania, visit ​PennDOT’s Ride A Bike​ webpage.
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Conservation
Committee.
For more information, visit the ​Joint Conservation Committee​ website, ​Like them on
Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
Related Story:
PennDOT Outlines Biking Improvements For 150 Miles Of Route 6
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

The Feds

EPA Announces Nationwide PFAS Action Plan; State Plans To Move Ahead With Its Own
MCL

On February 14, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler
announced EPA’s ​Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Action Plan​.
This Action Plan responds to extensive public interest and input the agency has received
over the past year and represents the first time EPA has built a multi-media, multi-program,
national communication and research plan to address an emerging environmental challenge like
PFAS.
On February 15,​ StateImpact PA reported​ the Department of Environmental Protection
will begin the process of setting its own health limits for 2 PFAS chemicals because it was
unclear when the federal government would set a standard.
Specifically, DEP said it will be moving forward with an RFP to hire a consulting
toxicologist to evaluate existing health studies with the goal of establishing a Maximum
Contaminant Level in drinking water.
The Environmental Quality Board, the body that adopts regulations for DEP, accepted a
rulemaking petition to set an MCL for PFOA​ chemicals from the Delaware RiverKeeper in
August of 2017 and the state has been trying to ​hire a toxicologist​ to support the effort of setting
an MCL since then.
EPA Action Plan
EPA’s Action Plan identifies both short-term solutions for addressing these chemicals
and long-term strategies that will help provide the tools and technologies states, tribes, and local
communities need to provide clean and safe drinking water to their residents and to address
PFAS at the source—even before it gets into the water.
46
“The PFAS Action Plan is the most comprehensive cross-agency plan to address an
emerging chemical of concern ever undertaken by EPA,” said EPA Acting Administrator
Andrew Wheeler. “For the first time in Agency history, we utilized all of our program offices to
construct an all-encompassing plan to help states and local communities address PFAS and
protect our nation’s drinking water. We are moving forward with several important actions,
including the maximum contaminant level process, that will help affected communities better
monitor, detect, and address PFAS.”
The Action Plan describes long- and short-term actions that the EPA is taking including:
-- Drinking water: ​EPA is moving forward with the maximum contaminant level (MCL)
process outlined in the Safe Drinking Water Act for PFOA and PFOS—two of the most
well-known and prevalent PFAS chemicals. By the end of this year, EPA will propose a
regulatory determination, which is the next step in the Safe Drinking Water Act process for
establishing an MCL.
-- Clean up:​ EPA has already begun the regulatory development process for listing PFOA and
PFOS as hazardous substances and will issue interim groundwater cleanup recommendations for
sites contaminated with PFOA and PFOS. This important work will provide additional tools to
help states and communities address existing contamination and enhance the ability to hold
responsible parties accountable.
-- Enforcement:​ EPA will use available enforcement tools to address PFAS exposure in the
environment and assist states in enforcement activities.
-- Monitoring: ​EPA will propose to include PFAS in nationwide drinking water monitoring
under the next Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Program. The agency will also consider
PFAS chemicals for listing in the Toxics Release Inventory to help the agency identify where
these chemicals are being released.
-- Research:​ EPA will develop new analytical methods so that more PFAS chemicals can be
detected in drinking water, in soil, and in groundwater. These efforts will improve our ability to
monitor and assess potential risks. EPA’s research efforts also include developing new
technologies and treatment options to remove PFAS from drinking water at contaminated sites.
-- Risk Communications:​ EPA will work across the agency—and the federal government—to
develop a PFAS risk communication toolbox that includes materials that states, tribes, and local
partners can use to effectively communicate with the public.
Together, these efforts will help EPA and its partners identify and better understand
PFAS contaminants generally, clean up current PFAS contamination, prevent future
contamination, and effectively communicate risk with the public.
To implement the Action Plan, EPA will continue to work in close coordination with
multiple entities, including other federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, water
utilities, industry, and the public.
For more information, visit EPA’s ​PFAS Action Plan​ webpage. ​Click Here​ for the
complete announcement.
NewsClips:
Hurdle/Phillips: PA To Begin Its Own Process Of Setting Health Limit For 2 PFAS Chemicals
Bagenstose: DEP Says It Will Create PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Bagenstose: EPA Moving Forward With PFAS MCL Process
EPA Announces Action Plan to Address Water Contamination Near Bucks Montco Military
Bases

47
AP: EPA Too Slow On Limiting PFAS Chemicals, Critics Say
EPA Announces PFAS Action Plan To Address Water Contamination
AP: EPA Sets PFAS Response Plan Amid Criticism From Lawmakers
Bagenstose: EPA To Kick The Can On PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Hurdle: EPA To Unveil Long-Awaited Action Plan On Curbing PFAS Chemicals
Temple, Local Group Awarded Grant To Support PFAS Research, Community Work In Bucks
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

Feds Provide Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million
For 2019

On February 15, the ​Delaware River Basin


Restoration Program​ received $6 million in
federal funding as part of the fiscal year 2019
Interior Appropriations bill approved by
Congress and signed by the President, a $1
million increase from last year.
The DRBRP will provide much-needed
technical assistance and grant funds to address
the Delaware River Basin’s environmental
challenges.
This funding will support local governments,
state governments, and nonprofits in NY, NJ,
PA, and DE that are implementing on-the-ground restoration and conservation projects that
combat critical issues like habitat degradation, invasive species, and climate change.
“The Delaware River Basin Restoration Program represents a critical investment in the
future of our region. The Program provides funding required to restore habitat for fish and
wildlife species, keep our watershed clean and healthy, expand recreational access, and provide
job opportunities,” said Sandra Meola, Director at New Jersey Audubon and the ​Coalition for the
Delaware River Watershed​. “We are immensely grateful to Congressional champions for
securing six million dollars in Delaware Basin funding for fiscal year 2019. The Program is off
to a strong beginning and we look forward to seeing the second round of on-the-ground projects
move forward.”
The Delaware River Basin faces threats such as overdevelopment, stormwater runoff,
flooding, stream erosion, and loss of wildlife habitat. With increased federal funding, more
conservation and restoration projects can begin to address these and other concerns within the
basin.
The Delaware River Basin must also be protected as it provides habitat to over 400 types
of birds, over 90 fish species, and many other animals. Several threatened or endangered species
rely on the Delaware River Basin, such as the Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon, American kestrel,
and the Pine Barrens tree frog.
The Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed worked with Congressional allies on the
2016 passage of the Delaware River Basin Conservation Act, which created the Delaware River
Basin Restoration Program.
The Program was first funded in fiscal year 2018 in the amount of $5 million and the first

48
Delaware Watershed Conservation Fund was launched in August 2018 as a result.
"The Upper Delaware River's clean water and prime outdoor recreational opportunities
support a growing and increasingly important river-based regional economy in New York State.
The Delaware River Basin Restoration Program will invest funds into improving the Upper
Delaware, which will safeguard the area's jobs, boost tourism, and ensure this essential resource
stays healthy," said Jeff Skelding, Executive Director, ​Friends of the Upper Delaware River​.
The Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed also worked with the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service on a framework for the DRBRP to ensure it focused on supporting projects that:
conserve and restore fish and wildlife habitat, improve and maintain water quality, sustain and
enhance water management and reduce flood damage, and improve recreational opportunities
and public access in the Delaware River Basin.
“From the Poconos down to Philadelphia - nonprofits, state, and local governments will
be able to apply for fiscal year 2019 Delaware River Basin Restoration Program funding for
site-specific projects that result in cleaner water, more green space, and restored wildlife
habitat,” stated Jacquelyn Bonomo, President and CEO, ​PennFuture​. “Restoring and conserving
the basin is crucial for the Keystone state, as the Delaware River and its tributaries, such as the
Schuylkill and Lehigh Rivers, encompass forty-three percent of the state’s population.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and how you can get involved, visit the
Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed​ website.
NewsClip:
Delaware RiverKeeper Feb. 15 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Stories:
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: CBF: EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congress
PaEN: U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must Act
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

CBF: EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congress

On February 15, Lisa Feldt, ​Chesapeake Bay


Foundation​ Vice President for Environmental
Protection and Restoration, issued the following
statement regarding the final budget approved by
Congress and signed by the President--
“The legislation fully funds EPA's Chesapeake
Bay Program, NOAA's BWET program (funding
environmental education), as well as speaking to
the importance of continuing USGS efforts in
support of Bay restoration.
"This is a great day for the Chesapeake Bay. Once
again, the Chesapeake attracts strong bipartisan
support—a demonstration that clean water is important to all of us! CBF is particularly grateful
to all the Bay state Congressional members whose support was critical in securing this funding.
“The Bay is making progress and our members of Congress know how important it is to

49
continue investing in science-based solutions to save the Bay."
"The Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint - a federal/state partnership - is working. We
are seeing measurable progress in reducing pollution. Crabs, fish, and Bay grasses are coming
back. And we are stimulating the economy!
The funding provided in this bill will build on that success and, as we look ahead to the
next fiscal year, we hope to see significant support for Bay restoration efforts to continue. Now
is the time to do more to ensure clean water for our children and grandchildren."
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
(​Photo:​ Susquehanna River at ​Chickies Rock Park,​ Lancaster County.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets Feb. 20
Feds Award Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million For
2019
U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must Act
[Posted: Feb. 16, 2019]

U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must Act

On February 12, the U.S. Senate passed a sweeping


package of public lands bills, including a measure to
permanently reauthorize the Land and Water
Conservation Fund, which expired last September.
The U.S. House must still approve the measure
before it goes to the President for his action. The
House is due back in session the week of February 25.
The package also includes many other wins for the
conservation of our natural resources, including
provisions to protect thousands of acres of wilderness
and support endangered species’ recovery in the Colorado River.
The following is a statement by Kameran Onley, director of U.S. Government Relations
at ​The Nature Conservancy​:
“Today’s vote is a big step toward ending the cycle of uncertainty that has plagued
America’s best conservation program. The overwhelming vote in favor of reauthorization
reflects the Land and Water Conservation Fund’s long track record of success and broad support
from lawmakers, landowners, conservation organizations and state and local officials.
“For more than half a century, LWCF has balanced the use of one public resource, oil and
gas drilling revenues, by conserving others. At no cost to the taxpayer, LWCF has helped expand
national parks, preserve pristine landscapes, and create trails and athletic fields across the
country. But the program has faced significant challenges from the instability that comes with
expiring twice in three years, making it harder to carry out the long-term planning landowners
depend on to conserve their lands and waters.
“Thanks to the incredible effort by LWCF’s champions both in this Congress and the last,
the Senate made reauthorization and the broader public lands package one of its top priorities for

50
the year.
“We hope the House of Representatives will continue that momentum and move quickly
to approve this package so we can continue to conserve our country’s most valued places.”
“This Public Lands package is an incredible victory for the sporting community,” said
Aaron Kindle, senior manager of western sporting campaigns for the ​National Wildlife
Federation​. “It conserves both programs and lands we love and ensures sporting opportunities for
years to come. We really need to see this package cross the finish and put a bow on many years
of hard work.”
In addition to permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the
bill includes--
-- ​WILD Act​ to conserve endangered species, combat invasive species (including Asian carp)
and fight poaching;
-- Reauthorizes Neotropical Migratory Bird Act;
-- Allows the transport bows through national parks;
-- Adopts the policy that federal public lands will be open hunting, fishing, and recreational
shooting unless deemed otherwise closed for specific reasons;
-- Requires studying and identifying federal lands that could be opened to hunting, fishing and
recreation activities;
-- Facilitates the construction and expansion of public target ranges, including ranges on Federal
land managed by the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management; and
-- Designates new wilderness, wild and scenic river, steelhead management area, and desert
conservation areas.
Click Here​ for more information on the package from the National Wildlife Federation.
For the latest on reauthorization, visit the ​Save the Land & Water Conservation Fund
website.
For more on the impact of the Land and Water Conservation Fund in Pennsylvania, visit
the ​PA Environmental Council​ ​website.
Visit ​The Nature Conservancy-PA​ webpage to learn more about programs, initiatives and
events in Pennsylvania.
NewsClips:
U.S. Senate Just Passed The Decade’s Biggest Public Lands Package, Here’s What’s In It
Senate Action On Land & Water Conservation Fund Overdue Victory For Parks, Wildlife
Federal Public Lands Bill Includes Help For Pittsburgh’s Steel Heritage Area
Op-Ed: Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund - DCNR Secretary Dunn
Editorial: Public Lands Bill, Governance In Public Interest Isn’t Dead Yet
Related Stories:
Feds Award Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million For
2019
CBF: EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congress
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Hunters, Anglers To Push Back


Against New EPA Plan That Ignores Wildlife Habitat

On February 15, the ​Theodore Roosevelt

51
Conservation Partnership​ urged individual sportsmen and women to urge EPA not to overlook
critical fish and waterfowl habitat ​in a proposed rule rolling back federal Clean Water Act
protections​ for 50 percent of wetlands and 18 percent of stream miles in the United States.
The deadline for comments is April 15. ​Click Here to send your comments​.
“Clean water is vital to our hunting and fishing traditions and the booming outdoor
recreation economy,” said Whit Fosburgh, the TRCP’s president and CEO. “This proposal
disregards the importance of smaller streams and isolated wetlands and the Clean Water Act’s
40-year track record of improving America’s waterways. A rollback of this magnitude puts fish
and wildlife at serious risk. The EPA must listen to the millions of sportsmen and women who
rely on clean water.”
Before finalizing the 2015 clean water rule, the EPA held a 120-day comment period and
ultimately allowed the public a total of 200 days to respond to the proposal. The EPA is now
only giving the public just 60 days to submit feedback on the replacement rule.
“The agencies need to give sportsmen and women sufficient time to speak out, given the
gravity of this rule,” said Fosburgh. “Sixty days is not enough.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and how you can become involved, visit
the ​Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership​ website. Questions should be directed to
Derek Eberly, Pennsylvania Field Representative, by sending email to: ​deberly@trcp.org​.
Related Story:
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For PA
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

News From Around The State

PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals Accepting Nominations For 2019 Karl Mason &
Walter Lyon Awards

The ​PA Association of Environmental


Professionals​ is now accepting nominations
for the 2019 ​Karl Mason and Walter Lyon
Awards​. Nominations are due March 29.
The awards are presented to Pennsylvanians
who made a unique and creative contribution
to the field of environmental management in
Pennsylvania with preference given to the
fields of administration, law, regulation and
community organization.
One nominee will be chosen for the two
awards--
-- Karl Mason:​ An individual who
demonstrated exemplary leadership in the field of environmental management.
-- Walter Lyon:​ An organization, project or program that made a unique, creative, or significant
contribution toward maintenance or restoration of Pennsylvania’s environmental quality or to the
field of environmental management.
52
The Karl Mason and Walter Lyon Award presentations will take place at the ​PAEP
Annual Statewide Conference,​ May 8-10 at the Wyndham Garden Hotel, State College. PAEP is
now celebrating 34 Years of Advancing Pennsylvania’s Environmental Professionals.
Click Here​ for all the details.
Karl Mason
Karl Mason served as Pennsylvania’s first State Environmental Administrator from 1952
to 1966. Karl’s holistic vision of environmental management embraced essential, but
conflicting, needs associated with waste disposal and community environmental protection.
The general framework established by Karl serves as the foundation for Pennsylvania’s
environmental protection programs to this day.
Karl believed and put into practice the notion that environmental protection is primarily
the business of professionals who have the skills, by virtue of their scientific training, to manage
the technical and scientific complexities of maintaining a safe, healthy and clean environment.
He was committed to the belief that continuing education was an essential part of the
career of every environmental professional.
Walter Lyon
Walter Lyon began his professional career as a sanitary engineer at the U.S. Public
Health Service in Washington D.C. serving as Assistant Chief of the Planning and Development
Branch, Division of Engineering Resources from 1950-1954.
He then served for three-years as the Assistant Chief of the Environmental Health
Section, Philadelphia Department of Public Health. From 1983 to 2013, Walter went on to teach
and consult in the areas of environmental engineering and water policy.
For many years, Walter participated in the PA Association of Environmental
Professionals conferences and special events and generously shared his knowledge and
experience.
He was a strong advocate for employing highly educated, qualified, and experienced
environmental professionals in the public and private sectors and serves as a role model for the
environmental professionals of today and tomorrow.
For more information on programs, initiatives, workshops and other special events, visit
the ​PA Association of Environmental Professionals​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular
updates on PAEP activities or ​Like them on Facebook​. ​ Click Here​ to become a member.
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure


Funding Programs

The ​PA Infrastructure Investment Authority​ is holding a


series of 11 information sessions​ across the state for
municipal officials, conservation districts, private
landowners, authority board members and staff,
regulators, engineers, and others interesting in learning
about how PennVEST funding can help improve water
quality in your community.
PennVEST provides funding for wastewater,
drinking water, stormwater, septic system and nonpoint

53
source water pollution control and treatment projects. ​Click Here​ for a list of PennVEST
funding programs.
The sessions will be held--
-- March 11 - Clearfield County, Clearfield;
-- March 12 - Tioga County, Mansfield;
-- March 13 - Chester County, Berwyn;
-- April 2 - Cambria County, Ebensburg;
-- April 8 - Westmoreland County, New Stanton;
-- April 9 - Crawford County, Meadville;
-- April 11 - Lehigh County, Allentown;
-- April 22 - Dauphin County, Harrisburg;
-- April 29 - Lackawanna County, Jessup;
-- April 30 - Bedford County, Bedford; and
-- May 16 - Luzerne County, Hazle Township.
Click Here​ for more information and to register.
Questions about the information sessions should be directed to PennVEST’s regional
project specialists: Northeast Region: Rebecca Kennedy 717-574-8454, ​rebkennedy@pa.gov​;
Southwest Region: Dan Mikesic 717-574-8452, ​dmikesic@pa.gov​; Northwest and Northcentral
Regions: David Henning 717-574-8451, ​dahenning@pa.gov​; and Southeast and South Central
Regions: Tesra Schlupp 717-574- 8453, ​tschlupp@pa.gov​.
For more information on available funding programs, visit the ​PA Infrastructure
Investment Authority​ website.
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art
Contest

On February 12, ​PA American Water​ announced entries are


now being accepted for its 17th Annual ​Protect Our
Watersheds Student Art Contest​. The deadline for entries is
April 12.
All fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade students in schools served
by Pennsylvania American Water are eligible, as well as
individual students who live in the company’s service area.
The contest encourages students to tap into their artistic talents
to express the importance of protecting Pennsylvania’s water
resources.
Contest information and applications were recently sent to
teachers in nearly 500 schools in PA American Water’s
service territory. Winners will be selected based on creative
vision, artistic talent, understanding of watershed protection and the ability to communicate that
understanding.
As part of their entry, students must write a brief narrative on the personal impact of
watershed protection.
“These students are the future stewards of our natural resources and they recognize the

54
importance of protecting the environment,” said PA American Water President Jeffrey McIntyre.
“Our annual art contest provides a creative outlet for sharing what they have learned about our
watersheds and how they can have positive impacts on our drinking water sources.”
In 2018, the company received more than 800 entries from students across the state. The
grand prize winner was Benjamin Bischoff, a sixth-grade student from the Pittsburgh Creative
and Performing Arts School.
In total, six students will be recognized with a first-, second- and third-place winner
selected from eastern and western Pennsylvania.
First-place winners will be rewarded with a $100 gift card to Barnes & Noble. Two
second- and third-place winners will be awarded a $50 and $25 gift card, respectively.
In addition, the overall grand prize winner will have her/his artwork featured on
“Bloomer” cards distributed by Pennsylvania American Water. Bloomer cards are seed-filled
packets that, when planted and tended, produce a variety of wildflowers.
All entrants will receive a Watershed Champion certificate. Awards will be presented in
May as part of National Drinking Water Week activities.
For more information on the contest, visit the ​Protect Our Watersheds Student Art
Contest​ webpage and questions should be directed to: ​Pa.communityrelations@amwater.com​.
Information on other community programs is available on the PA American Water
Community Involvement​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ ​2018 Grand Prize Winner,​ 6th Grader Benjamin Bischoff from Pittsburgh.)
Related Stories:
Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA American
Water
Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant Program
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA


American Water

On February 12, ​PA American Water


announced applications are being accepted for
its ​2019 Stream of Learning Scholarship
Program​ to provide financial assistance to
high school seniors who are planning to
pursue careers in the water and wastewater
industry.
The deadline for applications is March 22.
The program is designed to support
outstanding students living in Pennsylvania
American Water’s service territories who are
charting a course of study in specific fields, ranging from engineering to environmental science.
The company will award scholarships of $1,000 each to 10 students who are selected
through the program’s application process. Applicants must meet the following criteria:
-- Students must currently live in Pennsylvania American Water service area. (Students can
attend a learning institution outside of the company’s service territory.)

55
-- Students must plan to attend a two- or four-year college or technical school, and must plan to
study environmental science, engineering, biology or chemistry.
-- Students must be high school seniors. (Current college students are not eligible.)
Winners will be selected by a panel of judges and will receive their awards in May.
Family members of Pennsylvania American Water employees are not eligible.
This month, the company sent scholarship brochures and applications to high school
guidance counselors throughout its service territory.
For more information, visit the ​Stream of Learning Scholarship Program​ webpage and
questions should be directed to: ​Pa.communityrelations@amwater.com​.
Information on other community programs is available on the PA American Water
Community Involvement​ webpage.
Related Stories:
Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant Program
PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant Program

On February 12, ​PA American Water


Tuesday announced applications are now
being accepted for the company's ​2019
Environmental Grant Program​. The deadline
for applications is March 29.
The grant awards will be available in
PA American Water service areas in
Pennsylvania.
Established in 2005, American
Water's Environmental Grant Program offers
funds for innovative, community-based
environmental projects that improve, restore
or protect the watersheds, surface water and/or groundwater supplies through partnerships.
PA American Water is committed to ensuring water quality through testing and
treatment, as well as through consumer education and community source protection programs.
The company believes everyone is an environmental steward in protecting the nation's
water supplies, and this program is one way to help communities play an active role in this
important effort.
To qualify, proposed projects must:
-- Address a source water or watershed protection need in the community;
-- Be completed between May 1, 2019 and November 30, 2019;
-- Be a new or innovative program for the community, or serve as a significant expansion to an
existing program;
-- Be carried out by a formal or informal partnership between two or more organizations;
-- Provide evidence of sustainability (continued existence after the American Water grant monies
are utilized); and
-- Be located within one of American Water's service areas.

56
For more information, visit the ​Environmental Grant Program​ webpage and questions
should be directed to: ​Pa.communityrelations@amwater.com​.
Information on other community programs is available on the PA American Water
Community Involvement​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Norristown High School student native plantings.)
Related Stories:
Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA American
Water
PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe


County?

On February 12, the ​Brodhead Watershed


Association​ announced it will hold training
sessions for volunteers interested in becoming
"watershed warriors" in its popular
Streamwatchers​ Program.
Streamwatch volunteer training sessions
will be held in March in two convenient locations.
You need attend only one session: either 7 p.m.
March 21, at ​Northampton Community College’s
Tannersville campus​, Room 104 in Kapp Hall; or
at 10 a.m. March 23, at ​Barrett Paradise Friendly
Library​, Route 191, Cresco.
For 28 years, BWA Streamwatch volunteers have been checking local streams on a
monthly basis. Now, with more than 70 volunteers in seven sub-watershed regions of Monroe
County, new volunteers are always welcome to join the efforts to ensure water quality.
This program is also a good refresher course for veteran Streamwatchers.
“These citizen scientists not only test for indicators of pollution, they also provide
observations on the health of our streams,” said Bob Heil, BWA executive director. “With
budget cuts at regulatory agencies, these volunteers are even more valuable.”
If problems are discovered, BWA alerts regulatory agencies, such as the Department of
Environmental Protection.
At the training, volunteers will meet other Streamwatchers from the local watershed,
learn what the program is all about, and get hands-on training with the equipment. At that time,
you can decide if Streamwatch is right for you.
To register for either training session or if you have questions, contact the BWA office at
570-839-1120 or send email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​. Walk-ins are welcome, but
registration is preferred.
For more about the program, visit the BWA’s ​Streamwatchers​ webpage.
More information about programs, initiatives and other upcoming events is available at
the ​Brodhead Watershed Association​ website.
Related Story:

57
Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called One
Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing​ - Brodhead Watershed
Related Stories This Week:
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities Workshop March 16 In Gettysburg

The ​South Mountain Partnership​ and the


Capital Resource Conservation &
Development Area Council​ are hosting a
Watershed Groups Working With
Municipalities For Greater Impact Workshop
on March 16 at the Adams County
Conservation District Office, 670 Old
Harrisburg Road in Gettysburg from 9:00
a.m. to Noon.
Watershed groups across the South Mountain
region of Adams, Cumberland, Franklin, and
York counties have made great strides in
protecting and improving water quality,
keeping riparian areas as green space, and
raising awareness about the importance of our rivers and streams.
When these groups work collaboratively with their local municipalities, the impact of
these partnerships magnifies the results and ensures longevity of the projects.
This FREE workshop is open to members of all area watershed groups with a focus on
those in Adams, Cumberland, Franklin, and York counties, as well as staff from municipalities in
those counties.
Attendees will hear from several watershed groups in the region about how they work
effectively with their local municipalities on watershed protection efforts, including Municipal
Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) requirements, stream bank restoration, recreation projects
along streams, volunteer stream water quality monitoring, and more.
Workshop presenters include--
-- Dr. Elizabeth George, ​Johnston Run Revitalization Project​;
-- Brook Lenker, ​Yellow Breeches Watershed Association​;
-- Bill Ferris, ​Big Spring Watershed Association​;
-- Pat Naugle, ​Watershed Alliance of Adams County​; and

58
-- Staff from Capital RC&D and the South Mountain Partnership to learn about potential
funding opportunities being offered by the Partnership.
Funding for this project comes from a grant via the ​Chesapeake Bay Funders Network​,
Chesapeake Bay Trust​, ​National Fish and Wildlife Foundation​, U..S. Environmental Protection
Agency, and the ​Chesapeake Bay Program.
Thanks also to the ​Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds​, which awarded Capital
RC&D a Convening Grant for this workshop.
The workshop is free and includes breakfast and plenty of time for networking. Tickets
are limited to 3 per organization to maximize the number of groups that can participate.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Please register before March 10.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​South
Mountain Partnership​ and the ​Capital Resource Conservation & Development Area Council
websites.
Apply Now For These Grants
These watershed restoration, recreation and flood reduction grants programs are now
accepting applications until these deadline--
-- March 7: ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
-- March 15​: ​Western PA Conservancy TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree
Planting Grants
-- March 29:​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
-- April 10:​ ​DCNR Community Conservation, Recreation, Trail, Riparian Buffer Grants​.
-- May 31:​ ​Commonwealth Financing Authority Grants​ for: Watershed Restoration, Abandoned
Mine Drainage, Well Plugging, Water Quality Monitoring, Sewage Facility, Flood Mitigation,
Greenways, Trails and Recreation funded by the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
Click Here​ for a list of other environmental and energy grants and awards you can apply
for to support your projects.
NewsClip:
Western PA Conservancy: Patty Renwick, TreeVitalize Pittsburgh Volunteer
Related Stories:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting


Applications

59
The ​Rodale Institute​ is now accepting applications for its ​Veterans Organic Farming Training
Program​ based on its certified organic farm in Kutztown, Berks County.
Learn through personalized, hands-on experiences and get access to Rodale Institute’s
deep network of industry professionals and experts.
Through field trips, workshops, speaking engagements, and more, you’ll learn the
fundamentals of organic farming.
The program lasts from 2 to 4 months depending on the education tracks selected by the
participants who also receive pay along with housing or a stipend.
For more information, visit Rodale’s ​Veterans Training Program​ webpage or send email
to: ​Veterans@RodaleInstitute.org​ or call 610-683-1442. In addition to completing an application,
interested students will be required to submit a resume along with a copy of their DD 214
Member 4 stating discharge status.
To learn more about organic farming, programs and local and world-wide initiatives, visit
the ​Rodale Institute​ website.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26

On February 14, the ​Berks County Conservation


District​ announced it will hold a Forested Riparian
Buffer Showcase on April 26 starting at Noon at the
Berks County 4H Center, 1206 County Welfare Road
in Leesport.
Please join them for a presentation on how
landowners can prevent pollution from going into
nearby rivers and streams, a self-guided tour and
refreshments.
The ​Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program
(CREP) program​ pays farmers and other landowners to conserve and enhance their land. Over
12,500 landowners in Pennsylvania have received payments since the program began.
A one-half acre demonstration Forested Riparian Buffer was established near the Berks
County 4-H Center in partnership with ​Berks County Master Watershed Stewards​, ​Berks County
4H​, ​County of Berks​, Natural Resources Conservation Service and ​Stroud Water Research
Center​.
The buffer was planted 65 trees and 10 shrubs in a 50-foot-wide strip next to the stream.

60
The species planted include: Silver Maple, Allegheny Serviceberry, River Birch, Redbud,
Persimmon, Eastern Red Cedar, Common Ninebark, Sycamore, White Oak, Pin Oak, Red Oak,
Black Locust, and Black Willow.
This planting will filter nutrients from runoff, trap sediment, cool water temperatures and
stabilize the stream bank.
The Conservation District was awarded a $3,000 mini-grant through the CREP Program
Outreach Program Office administered by the ​PA Association of Conservation Districts​ to
support this project.
BCCD is using these grant funds and demonstration Forested Riparian Buffer to promote
the CREP Program and its environmental benefits.
“With this funding, anyone who owns land next to a waterway will be invited to find out
if they are a candidate to get paid to conserve and enhance their land,” said Dean Druckenmiller,
Berks County Conservation District Manager. “Over the next three months, we plan to educate
landowners on the CREP Program and to help those already enrolled in the program with
maintenance issues.”
Financial and other support for the CREP Outreach Program Office Mini-grant Program
is provided to the PA Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. through a Growing Greener
Watershed Protection grant from the Department of Environmental Protection and with
additional support from USDA-NRCS.
For more information, visit the ​Berks County Conservation District​ webpage or call
610-372-4657.
Apply Now For These Grants
These watershed restoration, recreation and flood reduction grants programs are now
accepting applications until these deadline--
-- March 7: ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
-- March 15​: ​Western PA Conservancy TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree
Planting Grants
-- March 29:​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
-- April 10:​ ​DCNR Community Conservation, Recreation, Trail, Riparian Buffer Grants​.
-- May 31:​ ​Commonwealth Financing Authority Grants​ for: Watershed Restoration, Abandoned
Mine Drainage, Well Plugging, Water Quality Monitoring, Sewage Facility, Flood Mitigation,
Greenways, Trails and Recreation funded by the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
Click Here​ for a list of other environmental and energy grants and awards you can apply
for to support your projects.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20

61
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water


Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20

The ​Westmoreland County Conservation


District​ will host public meetings on a ​draft
Integrated Water Resources Plan​ for the
County on February 19 and 20.
The Plan will serve as a blueprint for
managing the county’s streams, rivers,
drinking water, stormwater, and other water
resources.
Westmoreland County Commissioners signed
a resolution to begin the IWRP planning
process in December 2015 to start a process
that looked deeply into the ways water is used throughout Westmoreland County...the impacts of
those uses...and some of the things that can be done to ensure that this important resource is
responsibly managed.
The following year saw the creation of the Watershed Plan Advisory Committee led by
the District to guide the development of the plan.
An engineering consultant, Ethos Collaborative LLC, was hired to model 10 priority
watershed areas of interest within the county identified in Phase 1 of the County’s Act 167 Plan
completed by L. Robert Kimball and Associates in 2010.
As the IWRP progressed, the District, its partners, and the WPAC, completed the
inventory, analysis, and creation of the plan, the watershed modeling, development of the model
stormwater ordinance, and the online decision making tool for anyone seeking to develop land
within the county related to our water resources.
The Westmoreland County IWRP will be adopted by the County and will be updated as
needed to meet future needs to sustain our water resources.
Public Meetings
The meetings will be held at the J. Roy Houston Conservation Center, 218 Donohoe
Road, in Greensburg--
-- February 19:​ 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.
-- February 20:​ 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Questions about the meetings should be directed the Andrea by sending email to:
andrea@wcdpa.com​ or calling 724-837-5271.
For more information on the plan, visit the ​Westmoreland Integrated Water Resources
Plan​ website.
Apply Now For These Grants
These watershed restoration, recreation and flood reduction grants programs are now
accepting applications until these deadline--
-- March 7: ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
-- March 15​: ​Western PA Conservancy TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree
Planting Grants

62
-- March 29:​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
-- April 10:​ ​DCNR Community Conservation, Recreation, Trail, Riparian Buffer Grants​.
-- May 31:​ ​Commonwealth Financing Authority Grants​ for: Watershed Restoration, Abandoned
Mine Drainage, Well Plugging, Water Quality Monitoring, Sewage Facility, Flood Mitigation,
Greenways, Trails and Recreation funded by the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
Click Here​ for a list of other environmental and energy grants and awards you can apply
for to support your projects.
[Posted: Feb. 16, 2019]

Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution

The Philadelphia ​Green City, Clean Waters


Program​, ​PA Horticultural Society​, ​Philadelphia
Area Sustainable Business Network​ are inviting
residents to one of 7 upcoming ​Rain Check
Workshops​ from February 19 to March 29 to learn
how they can help reduce stormwater pollution
through some simple changes around your home.
Are you interested in replacing an empty front yard
with a garden? Need to fix a cracked rear patio?
Trying to save water to use on your parched potted
plants?
Rain Check can provide funding for these home improvement projects and more.
Through Rain Check, you can save money, improve your landscaping and help protect
Philadelphia’s rivers and streams.
Participate in the program and Philadelphia residents will join more than 5,000
Philadelphia residents who have installed stormwater management tools on their properties to
stop pollution from entering our waterways.
Every Philadelphia resident can help to improve the health of rivers in Philadelphia.
Flowers in rain gardens, new permeable paver patios and rain barrels can all spruce up a
property, but these tools do more than look nice.
Each of these landscaping amenities plays an important role in capturing stormwater that
would otherwise contribute to sewer overflows that hurt Philly’s rivers.
As you plan your improvements, Rain Check can help you pay for and install certain
stormwater reduction tools​.
Click Here to register​ for a workshop or to learn more. Questions should be directed to
215-988-8767 or send email to: ​RainCheck@pennhort.org​.
(​Photo:​ ​City rain garden.​ )
Related Stories:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications

63
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Audubon Of Western PA Hosts Feb. 27 Meeting On Buffalo Creek Watershed Plan


10-Year Update In Armstrong County

The ​Audubon Society of Western PA​ will host a


February 27 community meeting to discuss
priorities, opportunities and challenges in the
Buffalo Creek Watershed​ in Butler and
Armstrong counties.
Audubon and ​GAI Consultants, Inc​. are working
with local residents and partners to conduct a
10-year update to the watershed conservation
plan. The plan will be used to help prioritize
investments and obtain additional funds for projects.
Buffalo Creek watershed is a high-quality watershed and an Audubon-designated
Important Bird Area (IBA).
The meeting will be held at the Worthington Community Center, 214 East Main Street,
Worthington, Armstrong County starting from 6:30 to 8:00.
If you can't make it to the meeting but want to provide feedback? ​Please fill out the plan
update online survey.
Click Here ​for more information on the Buffalo Creek Watershed.
This effort has been supported by the ​Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds​.
To register or if you have questions, contact Sarah Koenig by sending email to:
skoenig@aswp.org​ or call 412-963-6100.
Apply Now For These Grants
These watershed restoration, recreation and flood reduction grants programs are now
accepting applications until these deadline--
-- March 7: ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
-- March 15​: ​Western PA Conservancy TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree
Planting Grants
-- March 29:​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
-- April 10:​ ​DCNR Community Conservation, Recreation, Trail, Riparian Buffer Grants​.
-- May 31:​ ​Commonwealth Financing Authority Grants​ for: Watershed Restoration, Abandoned
Mine Drainage, Well Plugging, Water Quality Monitoring, Sewage Facility, Flood Mitigation,
Greenways, Trails and Recreation funded by the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
Click Here​ for a list of other environmental and energy grants and awards you can apply
for to support your projects.
[Posted: Feb. 11 2019]

Opportunity To Bid On A DEP Mine Reclamation Project In Butler County

64
The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the February 16 PA Bulletin
about an opportunity to bid on a mine reclamation project in Butler County.
The ​Department of Environmental Protection​ has available a current list of
Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Acid Mine Drainage, Surface Mine Reclamation, Cleaning Out
and Plugging Oil and Gas Wells, Waterways Engineering (Concrete Dams/Concrete Lined
Channels, Walls and Box Culverts, etc.), Hazardous Site Remediation, Removal and Disposal of
Underground Storage Tanks, and Wetland Restoration projects available for bidding. ​Click Here
for the list.
The ​Department of Conservation and Natural Resources ​has a current list of bid
proposals for construction projects in State Parks and State Forests available online. ​Click Here
for the list.
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia Feb.


16

The ​Schuylkill Center for Environmental


Education​ will hold its annual ​Toad Detour
Training Program​ February 16 in Philadelphia.
Each spring, the Center gather volunteers
to help shepherd thousands of toads safely across
Port Royal Avenue in Philadelphia as they travel to
and from their breeding grounds at the ​Upper
Roxborough Reservoir Preserve​.
If you'd like to help out with this year's
"Toad Detour," then please join the Center for a volunteer orientation. Volunteers can help for an
evening, bring a Girl or Boy Scout Troop, or become shift managers to help manage the many
volunteers who help these toads.
You'll learn all about toads, toad-handling, and shift sign-ups.
Click Here for all the details​ and to RSVP. The program will be held at the Center, 8480
Hagy’s Mill Road, Philadelphia from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education​ website.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20

65
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Chesapeake Bay Journal: Middle Susquehanna RiverKeeper’s Sewage-Sniffing Dog

By Donna Morelli, ​Chesapeake Bay Journal

Carol Parenzan became the ​Middle Susquehanna


Riverkeeper​ in July 2015 and was charged with protecting
and improving the health of the river’s watershed between
its north and west branches.
Shortly afterward, her first staff member came on
board: a rusty-colored fluff ball of energy named “Little
Keeper” Susquehanna, or Sussey for short.
Parenzan said that the dog is a great mascot for her
work. “It’s a connecting point. He draws more people to
me when I’m out.” But Sussey has work to do, too.
The Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever is 3 years
old and is in training to sniff out leaking septic systems, illegal discharges into waterways and
broken sewer pipes — all of which can contaminate local streams and the Susquehanna River.
To train Sussey, Parenzen makes a weekly trip to the wastewater treatment plant to get a
small vial of effluent, then dips a cotton swab into the vial and places the swab into a small tin
with a punctured lid.
She places the tin among identical tins with a different scent or no scent at all. Sussey’s
job is to find the effluent — and he usually succeeds in 20–40 seconds.
In the next step, Parenzan plans on moving the practice indoors and making the task
harder by using buckets of water containing small amounts of effluent.
Sussey should be offering his services to local governments or environmental groups in
the near future.
“I have a pretty good feel for what is under our feet,” said Parenzan, who is trained in
subsurface utility and environmental engineering. “Together, we’ll make a powerful consulting
team.”
The contamination of surface waters with raw sewage from septic or sewage systems can
be a serious problem. Pathogens from fecal material contain bacteria, viruses and protozoa that
can cause anything from a brief stomachache to parasitic infestations and fevers that require
more care.
The problem is more common than many realize. Pathogens impair 159,425 river and
stream miles in the nation, according to the ​Center for Watershed Protection​. The U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, which oversees drinking and surface water quality, has
developed more management plans for pathogens than any other pollutant.
The source of contamination, whether from a point source like a pipe or nonpoint source
runoff from land, is often difficult to find and control.
Traditionally, field staff go out with their maps and human eyes and can only detect
contamination after sample after sample of water is pulled from stormwater drains, outlet pipes
and streams suspected of contamination and sent to a lab.
If a positive result comes back, there is still the work of tracing it back to its source,

66
which could be as close as an adjacent pipe or miles away. Waiting for results can be as
expensive and time-consuming as the field work.
Enter the dog.
A trained dog can visit the same spots and use its 300 olfactory receptors to quickly
detect the presence of sewage, narrowing down where samples should be pulled. A dog can also
sense sewage in places where it would be difficult or impossible to take a sample, like an outlet
pipe or catch basin that is dry or has very low flow.
A sewage-sniffing dog can even determine whether the fecal matter is from humans or
animals. Local governments, waste authorities and others who survey an area for sewage leaks
are usually looking for human material, because that is the source of pathogens most likely to be
transmitted to people.
The canine ability to sniff out even minute concentrations of substances has served
humans for centuries — they’ve been trained to detect bombs and to search for lost humans,
cadavers, drugs, bedbugs and cancer.
While turning that talent toward sewage leaks is fairly new, Sussey is not the only one to
be enlisted by a riverkeeper: The Savanna Riverkeeper in Georgia is training a canine for a
career like Sussey’s.
Environmental Canine Services​, a company based in Maine, has sewage-sniffing dogs
and handler teams located across the country.
In 2015, the Center for Watershed Protection and the state of Vermont hired the company
to see if the dogs would improve the results of the state’s illicit discharge detection and
elimination program.
“The dogs make the field work a lot faster,” said Laurel Williamson, a stormwater and
watershed planner with the center who would like to see more dogs available for such work. “It’s
a presence or absence situation. They get an idea at each catch basin and either bark or lay down.
We record the results and use that information to prioritize the next move.”
While Sussey continues his sewage sniffer training, he still fulfills his role as a mascot of
the Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper, a role for which he needs no training.
His bright expressions and a downy, red-hued coat that begs to be stroked are all he needs
to lure new followers to him and his mission.
[For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Middle
Susquehanna Riverkeeper​ website.]

(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Journal​. ​Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal​.)
NewsClip:
The Nose Knows: RiverKeeper Trains Retriever To Detect Sewage
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg

East Stroudsburg University​ ​Madelon Powers


Art Gallery and Fine And Performing Arts
Center​ will host a panel discussion on water
quality issues facing the Monroe County region

67
on February 27 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in East Stroudsburg, Monroe County.
Members of the panel will include:
-- Bob Heil​, executive director of the ​Brodhead Watershed Association
-- Dr. Jay Hunt,​ oceanographer and director of ​ESU’s Marine Science Program
-- Abigail Jones​, staff attorney for ​PennFuture​, Northeast PA Region
-- Emily Rinaldi​, outreach campaign manager for ​PennFuture​, Northeast PA Region
-- Jennifer Shukaitis​, Monroe County environmental advocate, an officer of the ​Brodhead
Watershed Association
This interactive panel-focused program is intended for members of the artistic and
environmental communities
With artist Margaret ​Cogswell’s Installation “River Fugues”​ at the Art Gallery serving as
a take-off point, the Art + Design Department and the Madelon Powers Art Gallery at East
Stroudsburg University will offer a program designed to offer valuable insights into the powerful
interaction between art and the development of environmentally protective attitudes and actions
toward water.
In this program, Art will be considered in its broadest sense as covering a diverse range
of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts/artworks intended to be
appreciated for not only for their beauty and emotional power, but also for their capacity to
explain complex ideas in understandable ways.
Ms. Cogswell will give a presentation on her River Fugues themed work—art
installations using video, sound and sculpture to call attention to various communities’
relationships with their water sources around the country and China.
Her exhibit in the art gallery includes a video and recorded narratives with Monroe
County water activists.
Prefacing her talk will be a performance by Dr. Brian Hodge, band director at ESU who
will perform a selection of Bach fugues.
From the perspective that Art has long been recognized as a catalyst for social change,
retired ESU communication professor Dr. Pat Kennedy, a lawyer with a lifelong commitment to
protecting clean water, will moderate a panel of local professionals with different water-related
experiences and specialties.
Panelists will provide anecdotal examples of ways that themes explored in Cogswell’s
work-- such as displacement of populations in order to create/divert/build/change water
resources; access or lack of, to clean water and local and “ubiquitous" water rights/use, including
concerns with the extraction industries – impact their lives and work.
Audience members can expect to hear and may be invited to participate in discussions
that explore not only powerful roles that water has played in people’s lives, but also ways that art
has influenced their lives and work, how they select forms from a variety of artistic fields in their
efforts to reach and persuade different audiences to move towards environmental stewardship.
Panelists and audience members will be asked to consider:
-- How art influenced their own environmentally friendly attitudes and behaviors;
-- Specific examples of ways artifacts from various branches of artistic endeavor have been used
to persuade and/or educate specific audiences about water-related issues; and
-- Perspectives on the effectiveness of those efforts.
The River Fugues mixed media exhibit is comprised of components from three of
Cogswell’s earlier River Fugues projects: Ashokan Fugues (2014-19), Wyoming River Fugues

68
(2012) and Zhujiajiao River Poems (2014), and includes audio recordings of narratives
addressing regional water-related issues collected from residents in the East Stroudsburg area.
Cogswell explained that the recordings “link regional issues of displacement, water
quality and access to clean water with those explored in River Fugues elsewhere.”
The exhibit will be on display through March 8.
This event will take place at ​East Stroudsburg University​’s ​Madelon Powers Art Gallery
and Fine And Performing Arts Center​ in East Stroudsburg, Monroe County. ​Click Here​ for
directions. ​Click Here​ for a campus map (building #38 in Northwest corner of campus).
Questions should be directed to Joni Oye-Benintende, Chair Art+Design Department,
East Stroudsburg University, by sending email to: ​jbenintende@esu.edu​ or calling
570-422-3216.
Related Stories:
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County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Aquatic Invaders! Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment & Teacher
Curriculum Guide

The latest issue of ​Connect With Your Environment​ in


the Erie Times-News is now available. This edition
focuses on aquatic invasive species​.
A companion ​Aquatic Invasive Species Curriculum And
Activity Guide​ is also available for teachers.
Click Here​ for dozens of past issues and their related
curriculum guides.
Connection With Your Environment is supported by the
Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ and ​DEP’s Coastal
Resources Management Program​.
Click Here​ for more educational resources on aquatic invasive species.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other educational opportunities, visit
the ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ website.
NewsClip:
AP: Sportsmen’s Groups Back Plan For Keeping Carp Out Of Great Lakes
Related Story:
New PA Sea Grant Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack Educational Tool Now Available
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

69
New PA Sea Grant Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack Educational Tool Now Available

Pennsylvania Sea Grant​ has “Aquatic Invaders


Attack Packs” available to lend to teachers and
others involved in educational programs about
aquatic invasive species.
The “Attack Pack” includes various educational
materials; a classroom guide; a sea lamprey model;
giant posters of the Silver and Bighead Asian Carp;
acrylic block specimens with zebra mussels; rusty
crayfish; a round goby; and a Eurasian ruffe; and
“Pennsylvania’s Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive
Species.”
To request an “Attack Pack,” contact Sara Stahlman, extension leader, by sending email
to: ​sng121@psu.edu​ or call 814-217-9011, ext.109.
Click Here​ for more educational resources on aquatic invasive species.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other educational opportunities, visit
the ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ website.
NewsClip:
AP: Sportsmen’s Groups Back Plan For Keeping Carp Out Of Great Lakes
Related Story:
Aquatic Invaders! Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment & Teacher Curriculum
Guide
[Posted: Feb. 14, 2019]

Litter? Not In Philly! Campaign Expands To Southwest Philadelphia, Volunteers Needed

The ​PA Resource Council’s​ ​Litter? Not in Philly!


project is expanding to Southwest Philadelphia under
the local banner of “Litter? Not in Southwest!”
In partnership with the Southwest Community
Development Corporation, PRC is bringing its online
anti-litter block adoption program to this diverse
region of Philadelphia.
Volunteers in Southwest Philadelphia neighborhoods
are needed to join 1,300+ Philadelphia residents who have already committed to weekly litter
cleanups on blocks across the city.
The kickoff presentation to the Southwest CDC Neighborhood Advisory Committee was
enthusiastically received, connecting PRC with residents in Southwest Philadelphia who are
passionate about their community.
They want a clean, healthy environment for their families and recognize the connection
between well maintained blocks and economic sustainability.
“Feedback is very encouraging,” according to Mark Harrell, NAC coordinator at
Southwest CDC. “Our intention is to engage block captains, students, churches, businesses and
residents in a community-wide process where we all take responsibility and pride in making sure

70
that Southwest Philadelphia stays litter-free.”
“Litter? Not in Southwest!” joins several other local initiatives to combat litter and short
dumping in this section of the city. Residents are eager to match their effort with resources
available in order to create a more beautiful environment in which to live, work and play.
For more information, visit PRC’s ​Litter? Not in Philly!​ website.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClip:
Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council: 10 Backyard Composting Workshops Scheduled In Allegheny County
PaEN: ​Community Groups Large & Small Can Participate In The Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful
15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

PA Resources Council: 10 Backyard Composting Workshops Scheduled In Allegheny


County

The ​PA Resources Council


and its partners will host ​10
Backyard Composting
Workshops​ in Allegheny
County starting March 2 and
ending June 13.
Not sure what to do with your
kitchen, garden and yard
scraps? Would you like
natural, homemade compost
for your lawns and gardens in
the spring?
Then expand your recycling efforts to include kitchen scraps and yard debris by signing
up for a Backyard Composting Workshop and turn your yard waste and food scraps into a
valuable resource for your garden.
The workshops will be held March 2, 5, 7, 15, 20, April 13, May 18, 21 and June 13.
The workshops are made possible with the support of the Giant Eagle Foundation.
Click Here​ for all the details and to register. Questions should be directed to
412-488-7490 ext. 226 or send email to: ​compost@prc.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClip:
Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
Related Stories:
Litter? Not In Philly! Campaign Expands To Southwest Philadelphia, Volunteers Needed

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PaEN: ​Community Groups Large & Small Can Participate In The Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful
15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20

Sustainable Pittsburgh​ is inviting


participants to be part of the ​I Am
Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge​ from
February 27 through March 20.
I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh is a
bi-annual competition designed to
encourage and reward participants for
taking sustainable actions that benefit the
health and greater good of the Pittsburgh
community and beyond.
The Challenge enables individuals to
achieve big things, together. Individuals
can choose their own path by picking
from a large list of actions, which range
from signing a petition, to reducing
showers to five minutes, to using reusable
shopping bags.
Challenges include several categories: Waste, Food, Health, Transportation, Energy,
Community, Nature, Water, Simplicity and Create Your Own.
Over the course of the 3 week competition, Sustainable Pittsburgh will host multiple
opportunities to win prizes donated by several local businesses and cultural institutions.
Participating is easy and fun.
Join us in making a difference! Participating individuals can be part of teams at
campuses, communities, or workplaces, or they can do it on their own.
To register or for more information, visit the ​I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates. ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow
them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
Related Story:
10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era March
6 Pittsburgh​:
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting

72
Applications
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing
Monroe County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
March 6 Pittsburgh

The ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference -


Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
will be held March 6 in Pittsburgh at the ​August
Wilson Center​, 980 Liberty Avenue in Pittsburgh
from 8:00 a.m to 3:00 p.m.
Exponentially increased computing power has
played an astounding role in driving urban growth
in the 21st century. This powerful dynamic
presents an opportunity to consider conscious
urban planning in a new and “smarter,” data-driven
way.
Across the globe, public and private industries are advancing new cutting-edge smart
technology to more efficiently manage resources, thereby promoting sustainable development for
improved environmental and social outcomes.
These technologies span many applications, including energy grids, transportation, water
utility systems, waste management, air quality, and public safety.
The featured Keynote speaker will be Dr. Donald Carter, Director of Remaking Cities
Institute, Carnegie Mellon University. Additional featured speakers include--
-- Grant Ervin​ – Chief Resilience Officer, City of Pittsburgh
-- Thomas Guentner ​– Program Manager, Landforce
-- Karen Lightman ​– Executive Director, Metro21: Smart Cities Institute, Carnegie Mellon
University
-- Christine Mondor​ – Principal, evolveEA
-- Anna Siefken​ – Executive Director, Scott Institute for Energy Innovation, Carnegie Mellon
University.
The Conference is presented by ​The American Society of Civil Engineers-Pittsburgh
Section​; ​The Environmental and Water Resources Institute-Pittsburgh Chapter​; ​Metro21: Smart
Cities Institute​, Carnegie Mellon University; and ​Sustainable Pittsburgh’s Champions for
Sustainability Network​.
To register or for more information, visit the ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference
webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates. ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow
them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.

73
Related Story:
Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

DEP Invites Comments On Interstate NOx Pollution Reduction Limits For Nonelectric
Generating Units

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the February 16 PA Bulletin​ of


the opportunity to comment on proposed nitrogen oxide emission limits included in its Interstate
Pollution Transport Reduction Plan.
Specifically, the proposals establishes a non-EGU NOx Trading Program budget of 3,619
tons of NOx, less a specified adjustment amount, to serve as a Statewide Ozone Season NOx
emissions cap for new and existing non-EGUs.
The deadline for comments is March 4. Comments are being accepted through ​DEP’s
eComment​ webpage.
Questions should be directed to Randy Bordner, DEP, at 717-772-3921 or send email to:
ranbordner@pa.gov​.
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice​ for all the details.
NewsClips:
Hopey: Environmental Groups Plan To Sue U.S. Steel Over Air Pollution
Environmental Groups To Sue U.S. Steel Over Clairton Pollution
Steelworkers Heckle Black State Rep At Air Quality Crisis Hearing In Pittsburgh
Lt. Gov. Fetterman: Clairton Coke (Coal) Works Needs To Be Rebuilt To High Standards
Bay Journal: Lawsuit Takes Aim At Interstate Air Pollution
EPA Greenhouse Gas Estimates Show Increase In Methane
Dominion Plans To Reduce Methane Emissions 50 Percent By 2029
Dominion Energy Reducing Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Infrastructure
Related Stories:
PaEN: Environmental Groups To Sue Over Federal Clean Air Act Violations At Clairton Coke
(Coal) Works, Other Facilities In Western PA
PaEN: GASP Submits Petition To Allegheny County Health Dept. Asking To Deny Eastman
Chemical Permits
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Environmental Groups To Sue Over Federal Clean Air Act Violations At Clairton Coke
(Coal) Works, Other Facilities In Western PA

On February 13, ​PennEnvironment​ and ​Clean Air


Council​ announced ​in a letter to the company​ they
plan to sue U.S. Steel Corporation over continuing
noncompliance with the federal Clean Air Act at
the company’s Pittsburgh-area facilities -- Clairton
Coke Works, Irvin Steel Mill and Edgar Thomson
Plant.
The facilities are part of U.S. Steel’s Mon

74
Valley Works integrated steel making operation.
Under the Clean Air Act, private individuals and organizations can sue violators in
federal court after providing 60 days’ notice. The letter alleges that the facilities are producing
and using coke oven gas without filtering it through necessary pollution controls, in violation of
Clean Air Act permits.
“For far too long, the Mon Valley Works has put residents’ health at risk,” said Ashleigh
Deemer, PennEnvironment’s Western Pennsylvania Director. “We’re sending a clear message to
U.S. Steel and all other polluters: We won’t let you run roughshod over cornerstone
environmental laws and put our communities at risk.”
Following a fire at the Clairton Coke Works on December 24, the plant continued to
operate without key pollution controls, causing air pollution levels around the facility to rise past
federal and state safety thresholds on thirteen occasions. Since the fire, asthma symptoms in
children from the area have increased 36 percent, ​according to one study​.
“Allegheny County Health Department’s lack of oversight on U.S. Steel’s recent and
ongoing Clean Air Act violations show that they are asleep at the wheel when it comes to
protecting residents’ health from polluters,” said Christopher Ahlers, Clean Air Council Staff
Attorney. “Since the Allegheny County Health Department has failed to take action and civil
penalties are just the cost of doing business for U. S. Steel, Clean Air Council and
PennEnvironment are suing U.S. Steel for its continuing noncompliance with the Clean Air Act.”
The Clairton Coke Works -- the largest plant of its kind in North America-- ​placed third
on PennEnvironment’s Toxic Ten rankings​ of the worst industrial polluters in Allegheny County.
The facility produces coking coal, an ingredient of steel. The process generates harmful
air pollution, including respiratory irritants like sulfur dioxide and known carcinogens like
benzene. The plant has an extensive history of violating the Clean Air Act, according to the
groups.
The Edgar Thomson Plant in Braddock produces steel by using coke from the Clairton
plant. The Irvin Plant in West Mifflin rolls and treats the steel. Based on public information, the
environmental groups believe that since the fire, the Edgar Thompson and Irvin Plants have been
burning uncleaned coke oven gas, resulting in pollution above those plants’ permitted levels.
“Living near the plants, we can tell air quality has gotten worse since the fire,” said
Clairton resident Johnie Perryman. “We don't want to be told to stay inside, we want the
pollution to stop. We need strong action to clean up the air we breathe every day.”
Allegheny County has chronic air pollution problems, ​ranking in the top 2 percent of all
U.S. counties for cancer risk​ from air pollution. According to ​PennEnvironment’s Trouble in the
Air report​, the Pittsburgh region had 121 unhealthy air days in 2016.
If the violations in the notice letter are not adequately addressed within 60 days, the
groups can file a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania. The
groups would seek a court order requiring U.S. Steel to comply with its Clean Air Act permits,
and civil penalties against U.S. Steel to punish the company for past violations and to deter
future violations.
“Congress provided a means for citizens to protect themselves from illegal air pollution
when government enforcement has failed to do the job,” said Josh Kratka, Senior Attorney with
the National Environmental Law Center, which is representing the groups. “Initiating this
enforcement action is intended to get U.S. Steel to take its obligations to comply with the law
and to protect the health of its neighbors more seriously than it has thus far.”

75
Click Here​ for a copy of the letter.
[​Note:​ The Allegheny County Health Department runs the air quality permitting program in the
County, not DEP.]
NewsClips:
Hopey: Environmental Groups Plan To Sue U.S. Steel Over Air Pollution
Environmental Groups To Sue U.S. Steel Over Clairton Pollution
Steelworkers Heckle Black State Rep At Air Quality Crisis Hearing In Pittsburgh
Lt. Gov. Fetterman: Clairton Coke (Coal) Works Needs To Be Rebuilt To High Standards
Related Stories:
Senate, House Democratic Policy Committees Hear Testimony On Improving Air Quality In
Allegheny County
PaEN: GASP Submits Petition To Allegheny County Health Dept. Asking To Deny Eastman
Chemical Permits
PaEN: DEP Invites Comments On Interstate NOx Pollution Reduction Limits For Nonelectric
Generating Units
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

GASP Submits Petition To Allegheny County Health Dept. Asking To Deny Eastman
Chemical Permits

On February 14, the ​Group Against Smog and Pollution​ submitted a ​petition with the signatures
of 250 people​ asking the ​Allegheny County Health Department​ to deny installation permits
sought by Knoxville, TN-based plastics company Eastman Chemical Resins Inc., which operates
a facility in Jefferson Hills.
GASP said Eastman’s plant is a major source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).
VOCs are a type of pollution regulated by the Clean Air Act. The federal Clean Air Act requires
Eastman and other major sources of air pollution to have what’s known as a Title V Operating
Permit.
“Eastman and ACHD need to prioritize Eastman’s compliance with the requirements of a
seven-year-old federal consent order over authorizing increased production limits, which carry
with them increased pollution,” said GASP’s Senior Attorney, John Baillie.
By way of background, these Title V Operating Permits – which are issued by the
Allegheny County Health Department for major sources in Allegheny County - are an important
tool for ensuring major sources of air pollution comply with clean air law requirements.
These permits must include all local, state, and federal air pollution requirements that
apply to a particular source, and mandates that these sources of pollution submit annual reports
about its compliance with those requirements.
But, Eastman was never issued a Title V Operating Permit, even though the Allegheny
County Health Department’s own regulations purportedly required the plant have one by 2004.
Eastman was the subject of a federal enforcement action that was filed and resolved in
December 2011. This action came in the wake of numerous alleged violations of operating
limitations, as well as monitoring and recordkeeping requirements.
Specifically, it was alleged that Eastman failed to both monitor and control the
temperature of the coolant in condensers and related equipment. That is significant because that
equipment is what controls emissions from various processes and tanks at the plant.

76
The claims against Eastman were resolved by a Consent Order filed simultaneously with
the federal complaint.
This Consent Order required the company, among other things, to develop emission
testing protocols for certain pieces of equipment. It also required the company to submit those
plans to the EPA for approval.
Then, following each protocol’s approval, Eastman was to perform emissions testing and
report back to the EPA for approval before ultimately submitting permit applications to ACHD.
Together, the permit applications should provide ACHD with the information it needs to
issue (or deny) a Title V Operating Permit to Eastman.
However, the implementation of this consent order has been neither smooth nor
expeditious. It was not until 2017 that Eastman began submitting permit applications for at least
some of its process units.
While Eastman is still working to meet the requirements of the Consent Order, it has in
the meantime requested new installation permits to allow it to increase the production rate and
allowable emissions of particulate matter from one of its process units.
This requested production increase is not required by the Consent Order.
It’s been more than seven years since the entry of the Consent Order, and Eastman has
yet to submit permit applications for at least three of its Process Units.
GASP believes it is well past time for Eastman to comply with the terms of the Consent
Order approved all the way back in December of 2011 before ACHD greenlights increases in its
production rate and particulate matter emissions.
ACHD’s air pollution regulations allow it to deny Eastman’s installation permit
applications, and GASP’s petition calls on them to do just that.
In addition to submitting the petition, GASP also submitted formal comments on
Eastman’s installation permit applications.
Click Here​ to read the full petition.
For more information on programs and initiatives, visit the ​Group Against Smog and
Pollution​ website.
[​Note:​ The Allegheny County Health Department runs the air quality permitting program in the
County, not DEP.]
Related Stories:
PaEN: Environmental Groups To Sue Over Federal Clean Air Act Violations At Clairton Coke
(Coal) Works, Other Facilities In Western PA
PaEN: DEP Invites Comments On Interstate NOx Pollution Reduction Limits For Nonelectric
Generating Units
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Tribune Review: Environmental Groups Set Feb. 28 Public Meeting On Shale Gas Well
Failure In Westmoreland County

On February 12, ​Joe Napsha of Triblive.com


reported ​Protect PT​ and the ​Mountain Watershed
Association​ will host a public meeting on
February 28 to discuss the recent CNX shale gas
well failure in Washington Township,

77
Westmoreland County near the Beaver Run Reservoir.
On January 26, CNX experienced drilling complications at one of their deep Utica gas
wells which resulted in pressure spiking at nearby shallow wells. Nine shallow wells nearby the
Reservoir were continuously flared for days to relieve pressure.
There are 47 Marcellus wells and 3 Utica wells drilled around the Reservoir - the water
supply that over 130,000 households depend upon.
The groups have invited officials from the Municipal Authority of Westmoreland County
and the Department of Environmental Protection as well as John Stolz, the Director of the
Center for Environmental Research and Education at Duquesne University.
The Triblive.com article said a spokesperson from DEP said the agency was not
participating in the meeting because of its ongoing investigation into the cause and impact of the
gas well problem.
John Stolz, director of the Center for Environmental Research and Education at
Duquesne University, said he intends to get as much information as possible about the incident
from the meeting.
“There are a lot of people potentially being affected by this. We are already getting phone
calls from a few people with private wells about testing,” because of concern about the quality of
their water, Stolz said.
The meeting will be held at the ​Delmont Fire Hall​, 2360 PA66, Delmont, PA 15626
starting at 6:30 p.m.
(​Photo:​ One of the 9 conventional wells being flared to relieve gas pressure near Beaver Run
Reservoir, ​Protect PT Facebook page​.)
NewsClips:
Feb. 28 Meeting Set By Environmental Group Near Gas Well Failure In Westmoreland County
Litvak: CNX Reports Well Casing Issue Likely Cause Of Out Of Control Utica Gas Well In
Westmoreland
Westmoreland Water Authority Will Seek Repayment From CNX For Additional Water Tests
Related Story:
PaEN: After 10 Days, Pressure Problem From Fracking Utica Gas Well In Westmoreland
County Said To Be Under Control
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania

On February 13, the


Department of Environmental
Protection ​released a plan to
increase the use of electric
vehicles​ in Pennsylvania that
would result in almost $2.8
billion in benefits from lower
greenhouse gas emissions,
help reduce respiratory
disease, increase consumer
savings, and create jobs.

78
“Interest in electric vehicles is increasing, but until now there’s been no statewide plan to
foster a cohesive approach,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “We developed
research-based strategies for government and private planning and policy decisions to help
increase the opportunities and benefits of electric vehicles across the state.”
Led by DEP, a coalition of public and private partners called ​Drive Electric PA​ analyzed
barriers to electric vehicle use. They developed ​Pennsylvania’s Electric Vehicle Roadmap​,
recommending 13 strategies to increase use of these zero-emission vehicles.
Partners include PennDOT; the state departments of General Services and Conservation
and Natural Resources; the Public Utility Commission, Turnpike Commission; and about 100
industry, business, community, and academic partners.
Transportation generates 20 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in Pennsylvania,
according to DEP’s ​draft 2018 Greenhouse Gas Inventory​. ​Gov. Wolf’s Executive Order​ on
climate change requires that 25 percent of state government passenger cars be replaced with
electric vehicles by 2025.
A few cities, such as Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, and organizations are working to
expand electric vehicle use locally. Increasing numbers of residents, businesses, and
organizations are applying to DEP rebate programs for electric vehicles or charging stations.
For example, in the past two years, Pennsylvania residents have received more than $3.3
million in rebates for 2,135 electric vehicles.
Still, there are only about 15,000 electric vehicles in the state, a fraction of the
approximately eight million passenger cars registered.
By 2023, an electric vehicle will emit 50 percent less greenhouse gas than a
gasoline-powered car, according to Pennsylvania’s Electric Vehicle Roadmap.
The plan projects that if three in 10 cars and light-duty trucks were electric by 2033,
Pennsylvania could enjoy almost $2.8 billion in benefits.
Asthma and other respiratory disease related to air pollution would be lower. Jobs in
electric vehicle manufacturing and infrastructure would be created. Consumers would save
money through fuel efficiency and less maintenance. Utility ratepayers would have lower costs
from improved efficiency in the electric grid.
But public knowledge of the benefits of electric vehicles is low. People are uncertain
about the availability of charging stations and mileage range. Up-front cost may be high. There’s
currently no statewide policy to increase adoption.
The Electric Vehicle Roadmap identifies seven strategies to start to overcome these
barriers in just two years:
-- Develop policy or legislation to encourage utilities to invest in transportation electrification
and leverage their expertise and consumer relationships to improve the electric market in a way
that maximizes benefits to ratepayers and society.
-- Establish statewide electric sales goals.
-- Expand DEP’s Alternative Fuel Investment Grants program for municipalities, businesses, and
organizations.
-- Increase investment in charging stations and public awareness of them.
-- Create an education program and a cooperative program to support fleet purchases.
-- Develop a consumer education campaign.
-- Develop an outreach program to raise awareness of electric vehicles among car dealerships.
The plan recommends six other strategies for five years and beyond. Coalition members

79
are now collaborating on potential ways to put the strategies in place.
Pennsylvania’s Electric Vehicle Roadmap​ was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy,
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, under State Energy Program Award
Number DE EE0006994 through contract with the Department of Environmental Protection.
Click Here​ for a copy of the plan.
The ​Drive Electric PA Coalition​ meets on March 12 at the Duquesne Light Company,
411 7th Avenue in Pittsburgh from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Questions should be directed to
Mark Hand, Energy Program Specialist, by sending email to: ​mhand@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
Harley-Davidson Embraces A New Sound As It Enters The Electric Era
Pennsylvania’s Rabbittransit Welcomes Pair Of CNG Buses
Related Stories:
Plans Now Due From Electric Utilities For 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Services
PUC Approves PECO Rate Settlement With Pilot Program For Fast-Charging Stations For
Electric Vehicles
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Carnegie Mellon U. Energy Week 2019 Set For March 25-29

Carnegie Mellon University ​4th Annual Energy


Week​ will be held March 25-59 to convene
energy experts, CEOs and corporate executives,
government officials, nonprofits, key influencers,
students, and entrepreneurs for a facilitated
dialogue on how to advance energy technologies
and innovations around the world.
Hosted by Carnegie Mellon University’s ​Wilton
E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation​, CMU
welcomes thought leaders from all energy and
cleantech sectors to engage and collaborate on research, trends, insights, and opportunities that
are making a significant and disruptive impact.
The four-day symposium, which is free and open to the public, includes:
-- More than 100 nationally-recognized thought leaders as keynote speakers and panelists
-- A VIP Reception with Distinguished Forum and Panel
-- The 2nd annual “CMU Energy + Cleantech Investors Forum”
-- A celebration of the Tepper Quad’s LEED Gold Recognition with tours
-- Two new events:
-- The inaugural CMU VentureWell Energy Hackathon
-- The launch of Southwestern PA region's Cleantech Open competition at CMU
To register or for more information, visit CMU’s ​4th Annual Energy Week​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?

80
Pennsylvania Is Newest Nuclear Subsidy Battleground
Oil, Gas Industry Urges U.S. Supreme Court To Rule Against State Nuclear Subsidies
Op-Ed: Coal Enters A New Era In 2019 Well Positioned To Continue Role In Baseload
Generation
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
PJM Advances Own Energy Price Formation Plan
TVA Proposes To Close 2 Coal-Fired Power Plants Despite Trump Tweet
Republicans Pounce After Congressional Dems Flub A Green New Deal Summary
McConnell Plans To Bring Green New Deal To U.S. Senate Vote
Cusick: Solar Jobs Grow In PA While Declining Nationally
Pennsylvania Solar Jobs Increased Amid National Decline
Report: Solar Energy Sector Lost 8,000 Jobs In U.S., But Future Looks Bright
Column: Why PA Needs To Ditch Fracking And Get Green New Deal Of Its Own
Exelon Threatens Closure Of 3 More Nuclear Power Plants In Illinois
AP: Trump-Dominated TVA Board To Close Coal Plant Despite His Plea
Related Stories:
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic
Development Report
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

PA Wilds Buyers Market Wholesale & Retail Show Featuring Regionally Made Products
March 2 In Clarion

The ​Pennsylvania Wilds Center For Entrepreneurship


will host the ​3rd Annual PA Wilds Conservation
Shop Buyer's Market​ from 9:00 to Noon for
wholesale buyers and the public from 1:00 to 4:00
p.m. on March 2 at the Gemmell Student Complex
Multi-Purpose Room at ​Clarion University.
"This one-day trade show provides the perfect
opportunity to find quality wares, gifts, foods and
beverages that were crafted in the Pennsylvania
Wilds," said Libby Bloomquist, who oversees the PA
Wilds Conservation Shop. "This event allows the
public to shop for products from artisans who may be
from more remote locations in the Wilds that they may not normally have access to."
The trade show format brings a variety of products together in one location and allows
buyers to browse products and make selections on the spot.
A separate wholesale showcase will be available to registered retailers from 9 a.m. to
noon. Retailers who register by February 18 will be admitted for free.
Hosted by the PA Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship and the Wilds Cooperative of
Pennsylvania, in partnership with the Clarion University Small Business Development Center,
the Buyer's Market is a "made local, sell local" themed event.
Exhibitors at the event are juried artisans who participate in the Wilds Cooperative of

81
Pennsylvania, a network of creative makers and entrepreneurs living and making products in the
12.5-county Pennsylvania Wilds region.
The PA Wilds includes Warren, Forest, Elk, Potter, McKean, Tioga, Clinton, Lycoming,
Clearfield, Jefferson, Cameron, Clarion and Northern Centre counties.
Visit the ​PA Wilds Conservation Shop Buyer's Market​ webpage for more information
and for wholesale buyer registration.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Pennsylvania Wilds Center For Entrepreneurship​ website.
[Posted: Feb. 16, 2019]

Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit April 4-6 In Philadelphia

The inaugural ​Mid-Atlantic Greenways and Trails


Summit​ will be held April 4-6 in Philadelphia
bringing together leaders and advocates of active
transportation and greenway and trail development
to advance bicycling and walking innovations
across the region.
The Summit will celebrate the region's
progress in developing the ​East Coast Greenway
and other greenway and trail networks while
looking at strategies for further advances
throughout Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania,
New Jersey, New York, and Washington D.C.
Pennsylvania featured speakers at the Summit include--
-- Cindy Adams Dunn,​ DCNR Secretary
-- Leslie Richards,​ PennDOT Secretary
-- Patty Elkis,​ Planning Director, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
-- Sarah Clark Stuart,​ Executive Director, Bicycle Coalition Of Greater Philadelphia
-- Joseph Syrnick,​ President & CEO, Schuylkill River Development Corp.
To register, or for more information, visit the ​Mid-Atlantic Greenways and Trails Summit
webpage. Early bird registration rates end February 15.
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Family Woods In Erie
County

A 144-acre forest in Erie County's Wayne Township has


been donated to the ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests​ to
be conserved in perpetuity as a sustainable working
woodland.
Under the stewardship of the FSF, the land will remain a
part of the local community by staying on the tax rolls,
providing jobs through active forest management, and
providing an educational setting for schools and other

82
groups.
The property, to be known as the "Ewing Family Woods," was donated by Millcreek
Twp. resident Dr. Jane Ewing Woods. She acquired the property in 1990 from her father, Orlo
Ewing, who purchased this parcel in 1949.
The property has been integral to three generations of the Ewings for 70 years of
cherished family gatherings, horseback riding, hiking and exploring, winter sports, tree planting,
and sharing with friends.
As the owner of the woodland, Dr. Ewing adamantly viewed herself as a "temporary
guardian" of the land.
"It really belongs to God. It's my privilege to be charged with its protection and
conservation for the future," she said.
Even before she assumed ownership of the property, Dr. Woods attended seminars and
field workshops to learn more about forest stewardship. This included touring her woods with
foresters for further perspective and education.
In 2000, she began consulting with Troy Firth, founder of the Foundation for Sustainable
Forests, to help manage her woods. Mr. Firth consistently applied his "worst-first" approach to
tree selection for harvest, a conservation-minded technique that seeks to improve the condition of
the forest.
He also began managing understory vegetation to control the spread of invasive species
and to cultivate regeneration and seedling diversity.
On her decision to donate the property to the Foundation, Dr. Woods stated: "My time
here began before rural properties were being subdivided and their farming fields and woods so
fragmented. But I've also had enough years now in working with Troy Firth and the FSF to see
their astute observations and forest management work with nature to benefit and protect the
whole ecosystem."
Based in Spartansburg, Crawford County, the ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests​ is a
nonprofit land trust working throughout northwestern Pennsylvania, western New York and
northeastern Ohio.
This donation supports its mission to protect forested lands, promote healthy ecosystems,
support rural communities through working forests, and highlight sustainable forestry practices
in the region.
(​Photo: ​Guy Dunkle, FSF Forester is on the left, and donor Dr. Jane Ewing Woods is on the
right.)
Related Stories:
PaEN: Heritage Conservancy Preserves 114-Acre Bonk Farm Near Quakertown Swamp In
Bucks County
PaEN: Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called
One Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Heritage Conservancy Preserves 114-Acre Bonk Farm Near Quakertown Swamp In Bucks
County

The ​Heritage Conservancy​ recently preserved


the 114-acre Bonk Farm near the important

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Quakertown Swamp​ area in Richland Township, Bucks County.
Ever since the Richland Township Land Preservation Board made a wish list 15 years
ago of the properties it would like to see preserved, two properties remained at the top of the list:
the Herrmann property and Bonk Farm.
Heritage Conservancy preserved the Herrmann Property in late 2018, and is now happy
to announce the Bonk Farm is now also protected in perpetuity.
The 114-acre Bonk Farm is located in the heart of the largest area of contiguous
preserved lands in Richland Township. With its sprawling road frontage, it will forever serve as
a reminder of the township’s agricultural history.
Since the property consists of flat, quality soil, it could easily have been developed,
irreparably altering the beautiful landscape.
“There aren’t that many large properties in Richland Township that can still be protected,
so these recent successes mean so much to the community. Visitors and residents alike are going
to be able to drive by and appreciate these viewscapes forever,” said Kathy Fedorocsko,
Chairwoman of the land preservation board. “We’re appreciative of all of the work that Heritage
Conservancy has done to facilitate these conservation easements. The Conservancy lends
credibility to what Richland Township is trying to accomplish.”
“The ​Quakertown Swamp​ is a vitally important wetland in our community. We are
pleased and proud to have worked with the owners and the township in protecting this special
place forever,” said Jeff Marshall, President of Heritage Conservancy. “A special thanks goes to
Laura Baird of our staff who has worked on this project on and off for over a decade, never
giving up because she recognized the importance of these properties.”
The Bonk preservation success was made possible thanks in part to funding from the
Richland Township Open Space Earned Income Tax and Bucks County Agricultural Land
Preservation Program.
The Calvin Ruth Memorial Fund, a legacy gift left for Heritage Conservancy by a
dedicated supporter, contributed gap funding that was needed to help make this preservation
happen.
For more information on programs, initiative and upcoming events, visit the ​Heritage
Conservancy​ website.

(Reprinted from ​People & Project News​ by the P


​ A Land Trust Association.​ )
Related Stories:
PaEN: Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Family Woods In Erie
County
PaEN: Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called
One Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called
One Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing

On February 12, ​Natural Lands​ and ​Pocono Heritage


Land Trust​ announced the preservation of two nearby,
but separately owned parcels totaling 340 acres of land

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near the Brodhead Creek, a stream running through the Pocono Mountains known for its clear,
cool water and healthy trout population.
The properties are now under conservation easement, ensuring they will never be
developed.
The easements are supported by generous charitable contributions of the landowners,
Alego ‘Bart’ Bartolacci and the Ferenbach family, and through the ​Open Space Institute’s
Delaware River Watershed Protection Fund​.
The Fund is made possible with support from the William Penn Foundation through its
Delaware River Watershed Initiative​, which seeks to protect water quality in the Delaware River
Basin.
The 40-acre Bartolacci property is bordered on one side by Stony Run, a tributary of the
Brodhead Creek. Both waterways are designated as “High Quality-Cold Water Fisheries” by the
Department of Environmental Protection, and represent some of the state’s best wild trout
waters.
“Vivian loved this land. She was an accomplished fly fisherman and enjoyed being in
nature,” said Bart Bartolacci of his late wife, Vivian. “It was always her dream to see it
protected. To me, Viv and what she believed in is a great example of how individuals can make a
difference.”
Though she passed away five months before the conservation easement was finalized,
Bart says Vivian’s presence is very strong and he knows she’d be pleased at this outcome.
The nearby 300-acre Ferenbach property, owned by a family-held corporation, is a
densely wooded tract that includes 3,500-feet of the Brodhead Creek.
“My great, great grandfather was a Scottish immigrant who brought his fly rod with him
when he came to America in the1850s,” said Greg Ferenbach, who represented his family in the
easement process. “Over the past century, four generations of Ferenbachs have managed this
land in a manner that protects the water quality of the stream. I’m delighted that we could
preserve this special place and I hope future generations will enjoy fly-fishing there, or just enjoy
the sound of the frogs singing on a warm spring night.”
Named for Englishman Daniel Brodhead who in 1737 purchased 600 acres of streamside
land, the Brodhead Creek originates in Monroe County, one of the birthplaces of trout fishing in
America.
It flows for 22 miles until it empties into the Delaware River. By the mid-1800s, the
Brodhead and surrounding streams had developed a loyal following of visiting anglers.
Nineteenth-century demand for tanned leather, turpentine, and timber led to a dramatic
increase in logging operations. The banks of the Brodhead were stripped of trees, which had
shaded the water and reduced erosion.
By the turn of the 20th century, as the Brodhead became too warm and silty for wild
brown trout, fly fishermen traveled farther north to the cold, clear streams of the Catskill
Mountains.
“Today, trout are thriving in the Brodhead Creek. But without permanent protection, this
land and the creek it buffers remain vulnerable,” said Oliver Bass, president of Natural Lands.
“By combining Natural Lands’ expertise at navigating complicated land transactions with
PHLT’s local knowledge and connections, we were able to celebrate this successful outcome. I
hope this is just the beginning of the positive impact we can make together along the Brodhead.”
“The Bartolacci and Ferenbach families were dedicated to protecting the water quality of

85
Brodhead Creek. Pocono Heritage Land Trust is honored to continue their legacy as we become
stewards of these two properties,” said Louise Troutman, executive director of PHLT. “For 35
years, PHLT has preserved lands in and around Monroe County. Natural Lands’ expertise
enhanced our efforts, and we look forward to continuing our partnership with them for the
long-term safeguarding of our vital Pocono land and water resources.”
The two projects were supported with grants from OSI’s Delaware River Watershed
Protection Fund.
The Fund is made possible with funding from the Delaware River Watershed Initiative,
which seeks to protect water in the Delaware River Basin—the source of drinking water for the
cities of Philadelphia; Trenton, NJ; and Wilmington, DE.
“The protection of these lands is a milestone for the Delaware River, and for the 15
million people who depend upon the Delaware for their drinking water,” said Peter Howell,
OSI’s executive vice president. “We applaud the conservation ethic of the landowners, and the
teamwork of Natural Lands and Pocono Heritage Land Trust that brought these projects to
fruition.”
A conservation easement is a voluntary but legally binding agreement between a
landowner and a qualified conservation organization that permanently limits a property’s use and
binds all present and future owners of the land.
As with all conservation easements, the Bartolacci and Ferenbach lands remain privately
owned.
These projects were also made possible with funding support from the William Penn
Foundation and the Bartolacci and Ferenbach families.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Natural
Lands​ and ​Pocono Heritage Land Trust​ websites.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Family Woods In Erie
County
Heritage Conservancy Preserves 114-Acre Bonk Farm Near Quakertown Swamp In Bucks
County
[Posted: Feb. 12, 2019]

Game Commission Continues To Capture, Tag Deer For Chronic Wasting Disease
Research In Bedford, Blair Counties

On February 13, the Game Commission announced


that despite the cancellation of activities to reduce
deer numbers in parts of Bedford and Blair counties,
Game Commission deer research continues in the
area related to ​Chronic Wasting Disease​.
The public will continue to see large nets in fields
and small traps in wooded areas. These nets and
traps are used to capture, not kill, deer for an
ongoing research project.
Since 2018, the Game Commission has been
capturing, marking, releasing, and tracking deer in the Bedford and Blair counties area. To date,

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more than 100 deer have been captured.
Many of these deer are equipped with GPS units that record detailed movements. In
2018, nearly 300,000 deer locations were recorded.
Initial findings from the first year indicate substantial movement of deer within this area.
Two 12- to 18 month-old bucks dispersed about 12 miles. Both deer crossed over Evitts
Mountain.
One of the young bucks followed the northern edge of the mountain onto Dunning
Mountain while the other crossed over to Tussey Mountain. This buck followed the bottom of
Tussey Mountain before heading to State Game Lands 41. An adult doe on Dunning Mountain
traveled back and forth along a 5-mile stretch of the mountain.
In addition to tracking deer movements and the potential for CWD spread, marked deer
also provide information on survival rates, harvest rates, and population abundance. These
marked deer will be used to intensively monitor the effects of hunter-related CWD management
efforts.
The 2019 field season to capture, mark, and track deer has been underway for over a
month. This research program will continue as the Game Commission maintains its commitment
to learn about the effects of CWD and implements CWD management actions.
“Since 2000, the Game Commission has employed recent college graduates from across
the country to capture and mark deer each winter,” said Bret Wallingford, Game Commission
deer biologist. “These young wildlife professionals have been critical to the Game Commission’s
success in capturing nearly 6,000 deer for our research program.”
This type of research requires trained personnel, but also public cooperation.
“The Game Commission’s deer research program has received tremendous support from
hunters and landowners in all areas of Pennsylvania over the last two decades,” said Christopher
Rosenberry, supervisor of the Game Commission’s Deer and Elk section. “The willingness of
landowners to allow our capture crews onto their lands is important to learning more about our
deer populations and effects of CWD.”
More information on capture methods can be found on the Game Commission’s
White-tailed Deer​ webpage.
With deer capture activities still underway, sightings of large nets in fields, metal framed
traps, and small bait piles will continue within the CWD study area. Tampering or interfering
with these traps or nets puts the safety of deer and crews at risk and is against the law.
“It is understandable that the public may have questions about seeing large nets, traps,
and small bait piles in this area,” said Roy Bucher, acting Southcentral Region Director.
“However, interfering with these activities and increasing risk of injury to captured deer and
crew members handling the deer will not be tolerated.”
Any questions or concerns should be directed to Game Commission deer biologists by
sending email to: ​pgcdeerquestions@pa.gov​.
CWD is an always-fatal, incurable disease affecting deer and elk. In recent years in
Bedford and Blair counties, the disease has been detected with increasing regularity.
For more information, visit the Game Commission’s ​Chronic Wasting Disease​ webpage.
(​Photo: ​Deer with chronic wasting disease, E ​ xploreClarion.com.​ )
NewsClips:
Blair County Hunters Demand Answers On Chronic Wasting Disease
Cong. Joyce Calls For Study Of Chronic Wasting Disease

87
Editorial: Deer Culling Delay Only Temporary In Blair
Crable: Could We Be Wrong About What Causes Chronic Wasting Disease In Deer?
Chronic Wasting Disease Now In 24 States, Could Spread To Humans Expert Warns
Scientists Warn Chronic Wasting Disease Could Spread To Humans
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Interns Wanted: Trout Unlimited- Eastern Conservation Biological Field Interns

Trout Unlimited​ is seeking qualified applicants for several ​Biological Field Intern positions​ to be
based in Lock Haven, Clinton County.
The biological field intern will report directly to the PA Field and Research Manager and
will be responsible for assisting TU’s field staff with data collection, data entry, and other
day-to-day tasks.
TU’s Pennsylvania Coldwater Habitat Restoration Program​ targets the improvement of
coldwater habitat viability and availability for native brook trout across the Commonwealth.
Click Here for all the details.​ The deadline for applications is March 8.
[Posted: Feb. 13, 2019]

Help Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Volunteer Adult Mentors For Summer
Student Field Schools

The Union County-based ​Wildlife Leadership


Academy​ is seek adult volunteers to be mentors
for their student summer field schools running
from June 10 to July 29.
Adult mentors learn alongside Academy students,
serving as the primary mentors for the
participating youth throughout the 5-day
residential summer field schools. Positions are
available at each of the 2019 field schools, which
will focus on white-tailed deer, bass, brook trout,
ruffed grouse, and turkey.
Volunteers will be provided food and lodging during field school and an opportunity to
receive 40 Act 48 credit hours and/or 3 graduate level college credits through Cedar Crest
College.
Click Here​ to apply and for more information.
For more information on student educational opportunities and other programs, visit the
Wildlife Leadership Academy​ website.
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Help Wanted: Trout Unlimited Stream Restoration Technician

Trout Unlimited’s PA Coldwater Habitat Program​ is seeking qualified candidates to fill a ​Stream
Restoration Technician​ seasonal employment position based in Lock Haven, Clinton County.
The person in this position will collaborate with a multitude of federal, state, and NGO

88
partners across Pennsylvania to restore aquatic connectivity, develop instream habitat, and
promote the long-term values associated with aquatic restoration.
Projects will include road crossing assessments, restoration designs, large wood
installations, construction oversight and monitoring of restoration projects on both public and
private lands.
Click Here​ for all the details.
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Help Wanted: Brandywine Conservancy - Conservation & Stewardship Program Assistant

The Delaware County-based ​Brandywine Conservancy​ is seeking qualified candidates to fill a


part-time Conservation and Stewardship Program Assistant​ position.
The person filling this position provides a broad range of administrative support to the
Conservancy’s Land Stewardship and Land Conservation Programs.
Click Here for all the details​. Send resume and cover letter to Connie Scholz by email to:
cscholz@brandywine.org​.
[Posted: Feb. 11, 2019]

Help Wanted: Conservation Voters Of PA - Political Director

Conservation Voters Of PA​ are seeking candidates for a Political Director


position to be based in Harrisburg.
Conservation Voters of PA works to pass sound conservation policies,
promotes pro-environment candidates for office, and holds elected officials
accountable for the decisions they make.
CVPA seeks a Political Director to advocate for conservation policies at the
state and local levels and to win elections that put environmental leaders into
office.
​ lick Here for all the details​.
C
[Posted: Feb. 15, 2019]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​ and ​Twitter Feed​.

Politics
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
PaEN: Environmental Groups To Sue Over Federal Clean Air Act Violations At Clairton Coke
(Coal) Works, Other Facilities In Western PA
Hopey: Environmental Groups Plan To Sue U.S. Steel Over Air Pollution
89
Environmental Groups To Sue U.S. Steel Over Clairton Pollution
Steelworkers Heckle Black State Rep At Air Quality Crisis Hearing In Pittsburgh
Lt. Gov. Fetterman: Clairton Coke (Coal) Works Needs To Be Rebuilt To High Standards
PaEN: GASP Submits Petition To Allegheny County Health Dept. Asking To Deny Eastman
Chemical Permits
PaEN: DEP Invites Comments On Interstate NOx Pollution Reduction Limits For Nonelectric
Generating Units
Bay Journal: Lawsuit Takes Aim At Interstate Air Pollution
EPA Greenhouse Gas Estimates Show Increase In Methane
Dominion Plans To Reduce Methane Emissions 50 Percent By 2029
Dominion Energy Reducing Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Infrastructure
Alternative Fuels
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
Harley-Davidson Embraces A New Sound As It Enters The Electric Era
Pennsylvania’s Rabbittransit Welcomes Pair Of CNG Buses
Awards & Recognition
PaEN: PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals Accepting Nominations For 2019 Karl Mason
& Walter Lyon Awards
Clarion PennDOT Crews Recognized For Green Management Of Salt Stockpiles
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
AP: Sportsmen’s Groups Back Plan For Keeping Carp Out Of Great Lakes
PaEN: Aquatic Invaders! Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment & Teacher
Curriculum Guide
PaEN: New PA Sea Grant Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack Educational Tool Now Available
Budget
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
Lawmakers Question Special Fund Transfers To Fund DEP, DCNR
Caruso: Lawmakers Question Wolf Administration Plan To Fund Environmental Agencies
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issue Call To Action
PaEN: ​PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local
Recreation Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
PaEN: DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf To Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates
And Fiscal Resources
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments

90
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: DEP Budget Topic Of Feb. 19 House Environmental Committee Meeting
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund To Be Considered Feb. 19 By House Transportation Committee
Cong. Meuser Asks DEP To Suspend Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
DCNR: It Will Cost $1.5 Million To Repair Slate Run Road In Lycoming County
PaEN: Feds Award Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million
For 2019
PaEN: CBF: EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congres
PaEN: TNC: U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must
Act
U.S. Senate Just Passed The Decade’s Biggest Public Lands Package, Here’s What’s In It
Senate Action On Land & Water Conservation Fund Overdue Victory For Parks, Wildlife
Federal Public Lands Bill Includes Help For Pittsburgh’s Steel Heritage Area
Op-Ed: Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund - DCNR Secretary Dunn
Editorial: Public Lands Bill, Governance In Public Interest Isn’t Dead Yet
Chesapeake Bay
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Green Projects Key In Lancaster’s Task Of Meeting EPA Stormwater Mandates
Candidate For Lycoming County Commissioner Pledges To Continue Work On Chesapeake Bay
Initiative
Centre Conservation District Receives Growing Greener Grant For Stream Restoration
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund To Be Considered Feb. 19 By House Transportation Committee
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
PaEN: PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs
PaEN: ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets Feb. 20
PaEN: CBF: EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congres
PaEN: Chesapeake Bay Journal: Middle Susquehanna Dog Mascot Noses Around When
Pollution Is Suspected
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Citizen Action
PaEN: ​Community Groups Large & Small Can Participate In The Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful
15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA
Annual PRC Hard-To-Recycle Event At Pittsburgh Mills Mall Coming This Spring
PaEN: PA Resources Council: 10 Backyard Composting Workshops Scheduled In Allegheny
County

91
PaEN: Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities Workshop March 16 In Gettysburg
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
Western PA Conservancy: Patty Renwick, TreeVitalize Pittsburgh Volunteer
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
Climate
PaEN: Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Petition Complete, Will Be Next EQB Meeting Agenda
PaEN: DEP Climate Advisory Committee Meets Feb. 26 For Update On Action Plan, Impacts
Assessment, Inventory
Study: In 60 Years Allentown Could Feel More Like Arkansas
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Sisk: Some Say Key To Combat Climate Change Lies In Sending Carbon Dioxide Underground
Letter: Spend Money On Climate Crisis (Controlling Gas Wells), Not Risky Schemes
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
Op-Ed: Getting Mad About Methane Emissions
Op-Ed: May Patients’ Health Depends On Addressing Climate Change
National Lawsuit On Climate Change Has PA Connections
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
PaEN: ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
March 6 Pittsburgh
U.S. EIA: Emissions From Electric Power Sector To Remain Mostly Flat Thru 2050
Republicans Pounce After Congressional Dems Flub A Green New Deal Summary
McConnell Plans To Bring Green New Deal To U.S. Senate Vote
Bucks County Republican Congressman Joins Dems To Snub Trump On Climate Change
Plummeting Insect Numbers Threaten Collapse Of Nature
EPA Greenhouse Gas Estimates Show Increase In Methane
Dominion Plans To Reduce Methane Emissions 50 Percent By 2029
Dominion Energy Reducing Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Infrastructure
Coal Mining
TVA Proposes To Close 2 Coal-Fired Power Plants Despite Trump Tweet
Op-Ed: Coal Enters A New Era In 2019 Well Positioned To Continue Role In Baseload
Generation
Podcast: The Black Lung Disease Epidemic That Shouldn’t Have Happened To Coal Miners
AP: Trump-Dominated TVA Board To Close Coal Plant Despite His Plea
Delaware River
PaEN: Feds Award Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million
For 2019
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
Delaware RiverKeeper Feb. 15 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
PaEN: EPA Announces Nationwide PFAS Action Plan, State Plans To Move Ahead With Its
Own MCL

92
Hurdle/Phillips: PA To Begin Its Own Process Of Setting Health Limit For 2 PFAS Chemicals
Bagenstose: DEP Says It Will Create PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Bagenstose: EPA Moving Forward With PFAS MCL Process
EPA Announces Action Plan to Address Water Contamination Near Bucks Montco Military
Bases
AP: EPA Too Slow On Limiting PFAS Chemicals, Critics Say
EPA Announces PFAS Action Plan To Address Water Contamination
AP: EPA Sets PFAS Response Plan Amid Criticism From Lawmakers
Bagenstose: EPA To Kick The Can On PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Hurdle: EPA To Unveil Long-Awaited Action Plan On Curbing PFAS Chemicals
Temple, Local Group Awarded Grant To Support PFAS Research, Community Work In Bucks
PaEN: PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs
PaEN: Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant
Program
PaEN: Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA
American Water
PaEN: PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art
Contest
Westmoreland Water Authority Will Seek Repayment From CNX For Additional Water Tests
Westmoreland Authority To Test Chlorine Alternative In McKeesport
Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Charleroi Area Of Washington County
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
Op-Ed: Setting Record Straight On Veolia’s Pittsburgh Water Authority Work
Editorial: Thoughts On Infrastructure, Sunday Hunting, Lead Testing In Schools
Free Well, Spring Water Testing Available Thru Duquesne U. Study In Western PA
Mon Valley Waterline Breaks Again, Water Buffaloes Set Up In Affected Area
Economic Development
Cusick: Solar Jobs Grow In PA While Declining Nationally
Pennsylvania Solar Jobs Increased Amid National Decline
Report: Solar Energy Sector Lost 8,000 Jobs In U.S., But Future Looks Bright
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic
Development Report
PaEN: PA Wilds Buyers Market Wholesale & Retail Show Featuring Regionally Made Products
March 2 In Clarion
PaEN: ​Help Wanted: Trout Unlimited Stream Restoration Technician
Education
Hayes: Kids, Teach Your Teachers Well About Environmental Awareness
PaEN: Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA
American Water
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Trout Unlimited Easter Conservation Biological Field Interns
PaEN: PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art
Contest
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia

93
PaEN: Help Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Volunteer Adult Mentors for Summer
Student Field Schools
Editorial: Measles Outbreak Another Grim Reminder We Need To Trust Science
Emergency Response
Proposals Call For More Resources For Emergency Responders In PA
Energy
PaEN: Carnegie Mellon U. Energy Week 2019 Set For March 25-29
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic
Development Report
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Pennsylvania Is Newest Nuclear Subsidy Battleground
Oil, Gas Industry Urges U.S. Supreme Court To Rule Against State Nuclear Subsidies
Op-Ed: Coal Enters A New Era In 2019 Well Positioned To Continue Role In Baseload
Generation
PaEN: DEP Unveils Plan To Increase Electric Vehicle Use In Pennsylvania
Roadmap Puts DEP Squarely Behind Greater Use Of Electric Vehicles
PJM Advances Own Energy Price Formation Plan
TVA Proposes To Close 2 Coal-Fired Power Plants Despite Trump Tweet
Republicans Pounce After Congressional Dems Flub A Green New Deal Summary
McConnell Plans To Bring Green New Deal To U.S. Senate Vote
Cusick: Solar Jobs Grow In PA While Declining Nationally
Pennsylvania Solar Jobs Increased Amid National Decline
Report: Solar Energy Sector Lost 8,000 Jobs In U.S., But Future Looks Bright
Column: Why PA Needs To Ditch Fracking And Get Green New Deal Of Its Own
Exelon Threatens Closure Of 3 More Nuclear Power Plants In Illinois
AP: Trump-Dominated TVA Board To Close Coal Plant Despite His Plea
Energy Conservation
PaEN: Carnegie Mellon U. Energy Week 2019 Set For March 25-29
Environmental Heritage
The 1936 Flood That Built Williamsport Levee
Farming
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: Rodale Institute Veterans Organic Farming Training Program Now Accepting
Applications
Centre Conservation District Receives Growing Greener Grant For Stream Restoration
Lower Nazareth Twp To Ask Voters: Would You Pay Tax to Preserve Open Space?
PaEN: Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Woods In Erie County
PaEN: Heritage Conservancy Preserves 144-Acre Bonk Farm Near Quakertown Swamp In
Bucks County
Flooding

94
Ice Jams Clear In Allegheny River, But Rain Prompts Flood Warnings
At Least 1 Loose Barge Shuts Down McKeesport-Duquesne Bridge
Susquehanna River Ice Poses Flooding Risk - Photos
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Mahoning Supervisors Say State Ignoring Need For Funding To Deal With Local Flooding
Flood-Ravaged Businesses In Bridgeville Commit To Stay In Place
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
Landslide-Damaged Prospect Road In Baldwin Reopens To Traffic
Sinkhole Closes Route 117 In Lebanon County
The 1936 Flood That Built Williamsport Levee
Forests
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
DCNR: It Will Cost $1.5 Million To Repair Slate Run Road In Lycoming County
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund To Be Considered Feb. 19 By House Transportation Committee
Artificial Intelligence Used To Create Forest Management Plan In Perry County
Western PA Conservancy: Patty Renwick, TreeVitalize Pittsburgh Volunteer
PaEN: Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Woods In Erie County
Forests - Wildfires
Storm Creates Chaos In California With Flooding, Mudslides
AP: 100 Days After Paradise Burned, The Stories Of Victims
Geologic Hazards
Landslide-Damaged Prospect Road In Baldwin Reopens To Traffic
Sinkhole Closes Route 117 In Lebanon County
Grants/Funding
PaEN: Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant
Program
Green Infrastructure
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
Mahoning Supervisors Say State Ignoring Need For Funding To Deal With Local Flooding
Green Projects Key In Lancaster’s Task Of Meeting EPA Stormwater Mandates
Cong. Meuser Asks DEP To Suspend Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26

95
Newtown Square Receives Growing Greener Grant For Rain Gardens
Letter: Managing Stormwater In Pittsburgh Is Important​ - Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy
Candidate For Lycoming County Commissioner Pledges To Continue Work On Chesapeake Bay
Initiative
Centre Conservation District Receives Growing Greener Grant For Stream Restoration
PaEN: PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs
Hazardous Substances
PaEN: EPA Announces Nationwide PFAS Action Plan, State Plans To Move Ahead With Its
Own MCL
Hurdle/Phillips: PA To Begin Its Own Process Of Setting Health Limit For 2 PFAS Chemicals
Bagenstose: DEP Says It Will Create PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Bagenstose: EPA Moving Forward With PFAS MCL Process
EPA Announces Action Plan to Address Water Contamination Near Bucks Montco Military
Bases
AP: EPA Too Slow On Limiting PFAS Chemicals, Critics Say
EPA Announces PFAS Action Plan To Address Water Contamination
AP: EPA Sets PFAS Response Plan Amid Criticism From Lawmakers
Bagenstose: EPA To Kick The Can On PFAS Drinking Water Standard
Hurdle: EPA To Unveil Long-Awaited Action Plan On Curbing PFAS Chemicals
Temple, Local Group Awarded Grant To Support PFAS Research, Community Work In Bucks
Crable: Plain Sect Family In Lancaster Poisoned By Lead Paint, Officials Worry How
Widespread The Problem Is
Hazardous Waste
Editorial: DEP Must Be Clear On Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility​ [Bucks County]
Land Conservation
PaEN: Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called
One Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing
PaEN: Foundation For Sustainable Forests Protects 144-Acre Ewing Woods In Erie County
PaEN: Heritage Conservancy Preserves 144-Acre Bonk Farm Near Quakertown Swamp In
Bucks County
Lower Nazareth Twp To Ask Voters: Would You Pay Tax to Preserve Open Space?
PaEN: TNC: U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must
Act
U.S. Senate Just Passed The Decade’s Biggest Public Lands Package, Here’s What’s In It
Senate Action On Land & Water Conservation Fund Overdue Victory For Parks, Wildlife
Federal Public Lands Bill Includes Help For Pittsburgh’s Steel Heritage Area
Op-Ed: Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund - DCNR Secretary Dunn
Editorial: Public Lands Bill, Governance In Public Interest Isn’t Dead Yet
PaEN: Help Wanted: Brandywine Conservancy - Conservation & Stewardship Program
Assistant
Littering/Illegal Dumping
PaEN: ​Community Groups Large & Small Can Participate In The Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful
15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA
PaEN: Litter? Not In Philly! Campaign Expands To Southwest Philadelphia, Volunteers Needed

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Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
Mine Reclamation
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Underground Coal Mine Fire In East Deer Getting Smaller, Officials Say
Few Things Grow Well On Coal Wastes, Hemp Is One Of Them
Editorial: Hemp Project On Mined Lands Affirms Policy
PaEN: Opportunity To Bid On A DEP Mine Reclamation Project In Butler County
Oil & Gas
Litvak: CNX Reports Well Casing Issue Likely Cause Of Out Of Control Utica Gas Well In
Westmoreland
PaEN: Tribune Review: Environmental Groups Set Feb. 28 Public Meeting On Shale Gas Well
Failure In Westmoreland County
Feb. 28 Meeting Set By Environmental Group Near Gas Well Failure In Westmoreland County
Westmoreland Water Authority Will Seek Repayment From CNX For Additional Water Tests
PaEN: Conventional Gas Drillers Ask PA Supreme Court To Reconsider Stripper Well Impact
Fee Decision
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Op-Ed: Getting Mad About Methane Emissions
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meets Feb. 20 On Forge The Future Economic
Development Report
Letter: Develop Policies That Encourage Natural Gas Development
Column: Why PA Needs To Ditch Fracking And Get Green New Deal Of Its Own
Letter: Spend Money On Climate Crisis (Controlling Gas Wells), Not Risky Schemes
AP: EQT Gas Company To Pay $53M To Settle Lawsuit Over Royalties
Litvak: EQT Posts $2.2 Billion Loss In 2018, But Company Is Strong CEO Says
Op-Ed: Coal Enters A New Era In 2019 Well Positioned To Continue Role In Baseload
Generation
Pennsylvania’s Rabbittransit Welcomes Pair Of CNG Buses
Natural Gas Leak Prompts Evacuation Of 50 In Elizabethtown
Pittsburgh Gasoline Prices Stay Steady Ahead Of Summer Fuel Switch
Worley & Obetz Buyer Balks At Paying Bill For Newly Found Fuel
Permitting
PaEN: DEP Posts 69 Pages Of Permit-Related Notices In Feb. 16 PA Bulletin
Pipelines
PaEN: DEP Invites Comments On Water Quality Certification Applications For PennEast
Pipeline Project
Gov. Wolf: Mariner East Pipeline Owner Has Not Respected Pennsylvania’s Law
Hurdle: Wolf’s Support For Pipeline-Safety Bills Boosts Bipartisan Advocates
Delaware RiverKeeper Defeats Court Motion To Dismiss Mariner East 2 Pipeline Complaint
Crable: Lancaster, PA Businesses Still Waiting To Be Paid For Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Work
AP: EQM Mountain Valley Pipeline Subject Of Criminal Probe In Virginia For Continuing
Construction After Permits Were Suspended
Radiation Protection
Should Lawmakers Prop Up PA’s Struggling Nuclear Power Industry? The Debate Explained
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?

97
NRDC: Nuclear Power And PA’s Electric Competition Act
Oil, Gas Industry Urges U.S. Supreme Court To Rule Against State Nuclear Subsidies
Exelon Threatens Closure Of 3 More Nuclear Power Plants In Illinois
Recreation
Keystone State Park Vistas Inspire Award-Winning Westmoreland Photographer
South Mountain Group Holds Power Of Partnership Breakfast On South Mountain Landscape
Initiatives
Feb. 15 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: PA Wilds Buyers Market Wholesale & Retail Show Featuring Regionally Made Products
March 2 In Clarion
Pittsburgh Bike Survey: Bicyclists Trust Self-Driving Vehicles, Human Drivers Not So Much
PaEN: Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit April 4-6 In Philadelphia
PaEN: Joint Conservation Committee To Hold March 19 Meeting On Promoting PA Route 6 For
Biking, Local Tourism
Push For Playgrounds In Philadelphia Brings People Together
Vandals Create Big Problems At Scenic Upper Mount Bethel Overlook
PaEN: TNC: U.S. Senate Passes Land & Water Conservation Fund Reauthorization, House Must
Act
U.S. Senate Just Passed The Decade’s Biggest Public Lands Package, Here’s What’s In It
Senate Action On Land & Water Conservation Fund Overdue Victory For Parks, Wildlife
Federal Public Lands Bill Includes Help For Pittsburgh’s Steel Heritage Area
Op-Ed: Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund - DCNR Secretary Dunn
Editorial: Public Lands Bill, Governance In Public Interest Isn’t Dead Yet
Kids Who Spend Time Outdoors In Natural Light At Least 2 Hours A Day Are 3 Times LESS
LIKELY To Become Nearsighted: ​The Pulse - What Keeps Kids Healthy​ (31 minutes in).
Recycling/Waste
Bad Recycling Market Driving Western PA Surge In Garbage Rates
Reduce, Reuse, Incinerate: Why Half Of Philly’s Recyclables Aren’t Recycled
Market Decline, Glut Of Unusable Products Threaten Recycling Programs ​[Wilkes-Barre]
From Recycling Bin To Landfill?​ [Wilkes-Barre]
What Happened To Pittsburgh’s Glass Recycling?
Pittsburgh May Use DEP Funding To Distribute Free Recycling Bins
Letter: Recycling Is About Saving The Planet, Not Making A Profit​ [Erie]
Editorial: Retrain Recyclers​ [Scranton]
Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
PaEN: PA Resources Council: 10 Backyard Composting Workshops Scheduled In Allegheny
County
Annual PRC Hard-To-Recycle Event At Pittsburgh Mills Mall Coming This Spring
Latrobe Rejects Outsourcing Garbage Hauling From Transfer Station
Renewable Energy
PaEN: Carnegie Mellon U. Energy Week 2019 Set For March 25-29
Is It Still Possible To Save The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant?
Op-Ed: Coal Enters A New Era In 2019 Well Positioned To Continue Role In Baseload
Generation
Report: Solar Energy Sector Lost 8,000 Jobs In U.S., But Future Looks Bright

98
Column: Why PA Needs To Ditch Fracking And Get Green New Deal Of Its Own
Stormwater
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs: Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Mahoning Supervisors Say State Ignoring Need For Funding To Deal With Local Flooding
Green Projects Key In Lancaster’s Task Of Meeting EPA Stormwater Mandates
PaEN: Philadelphia Residents Invited To Rain Check Workshops To Learn How They Can Help
Reduce Stormwater Pollution
Newtown Square Receives Growing Greener Grant For Rain Gardens
Cong. Meuser Asks DEP To Suspend Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Letter: Managing Stormwater In Pittsburgh Is Important​ - Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
PaEN: PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs
Candidate For Lycoming County Commissioner Pledges To Continue Work On Chesapeake Bay
Initiative
Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River Ice Poses Flooding Risk - Photos
House Bill Would Bar Future Employees Of SRBC From State Retirement System
Sustainability
PaEN: Join I Am Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge Running From Feb. 27 To March 20
PaEN: ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New Era
March 6 Pittsburgh
Clarion PennDOT Crews Recognized For Green Management Of Salt Stockpiles
Wastewater Facilities
PaEN: PennVEST To Hold 11 Information Sessions On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
Watershed Protection
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs: Issues Call To Action
DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
PaEN: New PA Farm Bill Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To Make
PA Leading Organic State
Crable: Wolf Reveals $24 Million Package To Aid, Protect Agriculture
Murphy: Wolf Proposes Tax Breaks, Loans In New PA Farm Bill
Mahoning Supervisors Say State Ignoring Need For Funding To Deal With Local Flooding
Green Projects Key In Lancaster’s Task Of Meeting EPA Stormwater Mandates
Newtown Square Receives Growing Greener Grant For Rain Gardens
Cong. Meuser Asks DEP To Suspend Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Letter: Managing Stormwater In Pittsburgh Is Important​ - Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy

99
Candidate For Lycoming County Commissioner Pledges To Continue Work On Chesapeake Bay
Initiative
Centre Conservation District Receives Growing Greener Grant For Stream Restoration
PaEN: Berks Conservation District Hosts Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Host Public Meetings On Draft Integrated Water
Resources Plan Feb. 19, 20
PaEN: Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant
Program
Groups Put PA Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Mini-Watershed Grants To Good Use
PaEN: Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities Workshop March 16 In Gettysburg
PaEN: Audubon Of Western PA Hosts Feb. 27 Meeting On Buffalo Creek Watershed Plan In
Armstrong County
Jacobs Creek Watershed Plans Busy Year Of Projects
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn.: Would You Like To Be A Watershed Warrior In Monroe
County?
Clarion PennDOT Crews Recognized For Green Management Of Salt Stockpiles
PaEN: Chesapeake Bay Journal: Middle Susquehanna Dog Mascot Noses Around When
Pollution Is Suspected
River Fugues: Catalyst For Action Panel Discussion On Water Quality Issues Facing Monroe
County Region Feb. 27 In East Stroudsburg
Adam Levine, The Sewer Expert, Tracks Philly’s Hidden Streams
Delaware RiverKeeper Feb. 15 RiverWatch Video Report
PaEN: ​Help Wanted: Trout Unlimited Stream Restoration Technician
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Trout Unlimited Easter Conservation Biological Field Interns
PaEN: Feds Award Delaware River Watershed Restoration & Conservation Program $6 Million
For 2019
PaEN: CBF: EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program Fully Funded By Congres
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
2 Legislators Hear Proponents Of Sunday Hunting At Penn State New Kensington Event
Paez: Changes To PA Hunting Laws Could Buck Tradition, But Attract More To The Sport
Editorial: It’s Time To Pass Sunday Hunting
Editorial: Thoughts On Infrastructure, Sunday Hunting, Lead Testing In Schools
PaEN: Game Commission Continues To Capture, Tag Deer For Chronic Wasting Disease
Research In Bedford, Blair Counties
Crable: Could We Be Wrong About What Causes Chronic Wasting Disease In Deer?
Blair County Hunters Demand Answers On Chronic Wasting Disease
Chronic Wasting Disease Now In 24 States, Could Spread To Humans Expert Warns
Scientists Warn Chronic Wasting Disease Could Spread To Humans
Cong. Joyce Calls For Study Of Chronic Wasting Disease
Editorial: Deer Culling Delay Only Temporary In Blair
Raccoon 3rd Animal To Test Positive For Rabies In Allegheny County In 2019

100
Pittsburgh Bald Eagles Deliver 1st Egg In 7th Year Of Nesting
Bald Eagles Of Hays Deliver First Egg Of 2019
Bald Eagles Lay 2nd Egg Of The Season In Pittsburgh
Bald Eagle Nest Viewing Area Created In North Park, Allegheny County, Fines For Anyone
Disturbing The Nest
This Bald Eagle Rescue Story Will Melt Your Heart
Nature Watch: 2 Iceland Gulls Spotted At Presque Isle In Erie
Schneck: How Many Bears Did PA Hunters Kill In 2018?
AP: PA Woman Who Survived Bear Attack Feels Lucky To Be Alive
Injured Hawk Takes To The Sky After Successful Rehab
Crable: You Survived The Polar Vortex, But How Do The Birds Do It?
Schneck: Will Pennsylvania Be A Top Birding State Again In 2019?
Schneck: Rare Scimitar-Horned Oryx, Once Extinct In The Wild, Born At Lehigh Valley Zoo
Susquehanna River Valley Ruffed Grouse Society Talks Future Of Bird Preservation
PaEN: Natural Lands/Pocono Heritage Land Trust Preserve 340 Acres In Monroe County Called
One Of The Birthplaces Of Trout Fishing
PaEN: Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program In Philadelphia
Schneck: 15 PA Animals That Are Looking For Mates Now
AP: Sportsmen’s Groups Back Plan For Keeping Carp Out Of Great Lakes
PaEN: Aquatic Invaders! Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment & Teacher
Curriculum Guide
PaEN: New PA Sea Grant Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack Educational Tool Now Available
Plummeting Insect Numbers Threaten Collapse Of Nature
PaEN: ​Help Wanted: Trout Unlimited Stream Restoration Technician
PaEN: Help Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Volunteer Adult Mentors for Summer
Student Field Schools

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note: ​DEP published the 2019 schedules of its advisory committees, councils and board
meetings in the ​Dec. 10 PA Bulletin, page 7708​.

February 16--​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association Get Outdoors Poconos Pasold Farm Hike​.
Barrett Township, Monroe County. 10:00.

February 16--​ ​NEW​. ​Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center Toad Detour Training Program​.
Schuylkill Environmental Ed Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Road, Philadelphia. 1:00 to 3:00.

February 17--​ ​Chester, Delaware Counties Master Watershed Stewards Information Program​.
101
Government Services Center, Suite 370, 601 Westtown Road in West Chester, Chester County..
10:00 to 11:00.

February 19--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10::00- Dept. of


Revenue/Lottery, 1:00- Independent Fiscal Office, 3:00- Public Utility Commission. Hearing
Room 1, North Office Building.

February 19--​ ​NEW​. ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ information
meeting on the Department of Environmental Protection’s budget. Room G-50 Irvis Building.
10:00. ​Committee meetings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican website.​ C
​ lick
Here for more​.

February 19-​- ​NEW​. ​House Transportation Committee​ meets to consider ​House Bill 374
(Everett-R-Lycoming) establishing the Keystone Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by
the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (​sponsor summary​). Room B-31 Main
​ ouse Republican
Capitol. 12:15. ​Committee meetings are typically webcast through the H
website​. ​Click Here​ for more.

February 19-- ​NEW​. ​House Consumer Affairs Committee​ informational meeting with Public
Utility Commission, Acting Consumer Advocate and Small Business Advocate on legislative
priorities. Room G-50 Irvis Building. Noon.

February 19--​ ​CANCELED.​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. The next scheduled
meeting is March 19. Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

February 19--​ ​Agenda Posted.​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send
email to: ​ksalador@pa.gov​. ​Click Here for more on the agenda.

February 19--​ ​NEW​. ​Westmoreland Conservation District Public Meeting On Draft Integrated
Water Resources Plan​. ​J. Roy Houston Conservation Center, 218 Donohoe Road, Greensburg.
6:00 to 7:00.

February 20--​ ​NEW​. ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ meeting to hear a
presentation on the Forge the Future plan by the PA Chamber of Business and Industry and PA
Manufacturers’ Association. Room B-31 Main Capitol. 10:00. ​Committee meetings are
​ ouse Republican website.​ C
typically webcast through the H ​ lick Here for more​.

February 20--​ ​CANCELED​. ​House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ informational
meeting with Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding. Room B-31 Capitol Building. 9:00.

February 20--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Geodesign: Using Data
Transparency And Community Voices For Enhanced Land Use Planning​. Noon to 1:15.

February 20--​ ​NEW​. ​Westmoreland Conservation District Public Meeting On Draft Integrated

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Water Resources Plan​. ​J. Roy Houston Conservation Center, 218 Donohoe Road, Greensburg.
3:00 to 4:00.

February 20--​ ​Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For
Water Infrastructure Projects Workshop​. ​Fisher Hall at Burrell Lake Park, 209 Delberta Road,
Lower Burrell, Westmoreland County. 9:00 to Noon.

February 20-21--​ ​DCNR, Western PA Conservancy. PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​. Best
Western Premier Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive, Harrisburg.

February 21--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- State Police/Homeland
Security, 3:00- PA Emergency Management Agency/Fire Commissioner. Hearing Room 1,
North Office Building.

February 21-- ​PA Resources Council. Zero Waste Pennsylvania. Green Building Alliance. True
Zero Waste Symposium​. ​Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens​, Pittsburgh. 8:00 to 3:00.

February 21--​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff​.
Lebanon County Ag Center​,​ 2120 Cornwall Road, Lebanon. 8:30 to 3:00.

February 21--​ ​Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For
Water Infrastructure Projects Workshop​. ​Findlay Township Activity Center, 310 Main Street in
Imperial, Allegheny County. 9:00 to Noon.

February 21-- ​Manada Conservancy Spotted Lanternfly Program​. Hershey Conservatory at


Hershey Gardens, Dauphin County. 7:00 to 8:00.

February 21-- ​Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership Volunteer Coordinator,


Community Leader Breakfast​. ​Globe Dye Works​, 4500 Worth Street, Philadelphia. 8:30 to
10:00

February 22--​ ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests. French Creek Valley Conservancy. Woods &
Waters Film Series​. ​Erie National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center​, 11296 Wood Duck Lance,
Guys Mills, Crawford County. 6:30.

February 23--​ ​Jennings Environmental Education Center Cherry Pie Hike​. Butler County.

February 24-25--​ Registration Open.​ ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA Organization For
Watersheds & Rivers​. ​Statewide Watershed Connections Conference​. State College. ​PA
Environment Digest is a proud sponsor of this event.

February 25--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- State


Police/Homeland Security, 3:00- Dept. of Health. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
typically webcast through the H

103
February 25--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of
Transportation. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 26--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of


Transportation, 3:00- Dept. of General Services. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
typically webcast through the H

February 26-- ​Agenda Posted.​ ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​. ​Click
Here for more​ on the agenda.

February 27--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the
House Republican Caucus​ website.

February 27--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Health.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 27-- ​House Game and Fisheries Committee​ informational meeting on Game and Fish
& Boat Commission’s Annual Reports. Room 205 Ryan Building. 10:00 and 1:30.

February 27--​ ​DCNR Webinar On Applying For Statewide and Regional Partnership Grants​.
10:00 to 11:30.

February 27- ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Workshop​. Monroeville, Allegheny County.

February 27--​ ​NEW​. ​Audubon Society Of Western PA Buffalo Creek Watershed Plan Meeting
(Butler, Armstrong)​. Worthington Community Center, 214 East Main Street, Worthington,
Armstrong County. 6:30 to 8:00.

February 27-- ​NEW​. ​East Stroudsburg University Madelon Powers Art Gallery River Fugues:
Catalyst For Action On Water Quality Issues Facing Monroe County​. East Stroudsburg, Monroe
County. 7:00 to 9:00.

February 28--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of


Environmental Protection. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 28--​ ​Lehigh Valley Sustainability Network Regional Water We Share Forum​.
Northampton Community College​, Fowler Family Southside Center, 511 E 3rd Street, Room
605, Bethlehem. 6:00 to 8:00.

February 28--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Energy Efficiency For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

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February 28--​ ​NEW​. ​Protect PT & Mountain Watershed Association Public Meeting On CNX
Shale Gas Well Failure In Westmoreland County​. ​Delmont Fire Hall​, 2360 PA66, Delmont.
6:30.

March 1--​ ​York County Conservation District Writing Your Own Manure Management Plan
Workshop​. ​York County Annex Building, 118 Pleasant Acres Road, York. 8:00 to 3:30.

March 2--​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 3--​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association Reflections On A Changing Climate Program​.


Brodhead Creek Heritage Center, 1539 Cherry Lane Road, Analomink, Monroe County. 1:00.

March 4--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Education.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

March 4--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of Conservation &
Natural Resources. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 5--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

March 5--​ ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. Contact: Kris Shiffer, 717-772-5809, ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.

March 5-- ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

March 5-- ​DEP Meeting On Proposed Elcon Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage Facility In
Bucks County​. Sheraton Bucks County Hotel, 400 Oxford Valley Road, Langhorne, Bucks
County. 6:00 to 9:00.

March 5--​ ​Montgomery Master Watershed Stewards Environmental Advisory Councils In


Action Workshop​. Lower Frederick Township Building, 53 Spring Mount Rd., Schwenksville,
Montgomery County. 6:00 to 7:00

March 5 --​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff​.
Susquehanna River Basin Commission Headquarters, 4423 North Front Street, Harrisburg. 9:00
to 3:00.

March 5-6--​ ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​. ​Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy
Efficiency​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College, Centre County.

105
March 6--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Governor’s Budget
​ ouse
Secretary. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H
Republican Caucus​ website.

March 6--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 6--​ ​NEW​. ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For
A New Era​. Pittsburgh.

March 6-7--​ ​PA Lake Management Society Conference​. Ramada Conference Center, State
College.

March 7--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Open. Room 140 Main
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H

March 7--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development, 3:00- Budget Secretary. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 9--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​.
Montgomery County Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 9--​ ​Penn State Extension York County Master Gardeners GardenWise Native Plants,
Ecosystems Gardening Workshop​ ​Central York Middle School​, 1950 N. Hills Road, York. 7:30
to 4:00.

March 11-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Clearfield County.

March 12--​ ​DEP Drive Electric Pennsylvania Coalition​ meeting. Duquesne Light Company, 411
7th Avenue, Pittsburgh. 10:00 to 2:00. DEP Contact: Mark Hand, ​mhand@pa.gov​.

March 12-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Tioga County.

March 13-- ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​.

March 13--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission meeting​. ​Washington Crossing Historic Park
Visitor Center​, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, Bucks County. 10:30. ​ ​(​formal notice​)

March 13 --​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff​. Jane
Schultz Room 1st Floor of the Wertz Student Center at Lycoming College, Williamsport. 8:30 to
3:00.

106
March 13-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Chester County.

March 14--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(formal notice)​

March 15--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Legal Pathways To Zero Greenhouse Gas
Emissions. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30
to 1:00.

March 16--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Creating The Appalachian Trail In
The South​. ​Pine Grove Furnace Ironmasters House​, Gardners, Adams County. Noon.

March 16--​ ​NEW​. ​South Mountain Partnership, Capital Resource Conservation & Development
Area Council Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities For Greater Impact Workshop​.
Adams County Conservation District Office, 670 Old Harrisburg Road, Gettysburg. 9:00 a.m. to
Noon.

March 16--​ DCNR Bureau Of Forestry. ​Making The Most Of Your Piece Of Nature: A
Sustainable Backyard Workshop​. ​Franklin Regional Senior High School, 3200 School Road in
Murrysville, Westmoreland County. 8:30 to 12:30.

March 18--​ ​Penn State Extension 2 Home Water And Septic System Workshops​. Gracedale
Nursing Home Conference Room, 2 Gracedale Ave., Nazareth, Northampton County. 1:30 and
6:00.

March 18-19-- ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators​. ​2019 Cityscapes & Greenscapes
Conference​. Philadelphia.

March 19--​ ​NEW. ​Joint Conservation Committee informational meeting on promoting PA


Route 6 for biking and local tourism​. Room 108 Irvis Building. 10:00.

March 19--​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

March 19--​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.

March 19--​ ​DCNR, Penn State Extension Forest Health, Insect & Disease Briefing​. Penn Stater
Hotel and Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:30.

March 20--​ ​NEW​. Joint ​Senate​ & ​House​ Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees hold joint

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hearing on Gov. Wolf’s proposed PA Farm Bill. Hearing Room 1 North Office Building. 9:00.
Click Here for more​ on PA Farm Bill

March 20--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Options For Meeting MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction Requirements Without Breaking The Budget​. Noon to 1:15.

March 20-21-​- ​Registration Open​. ​Northeast Recycling Council Spring Conference.


Wilmington, DE.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 22-23--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Penn State Center For Private Forests 4th Biennial Forest
Landowners Conference​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

March 23--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Adams County Barn Survey Volunteer
Training​. ​Apple Museum in Biglerville​. 8:30.

March 25-29-​- ​NEW​. ​Carnegie Mellon University Energy Week 2019​. Pittsburgh.

March 27-28--​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

March 28--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

March 29--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Natural Gas In PA: Energy, Innovation And The
Environment. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg.
11:30 to 1:00.

April 2-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 2-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Cambria County.

April 4-6--​ ​NEW​. ​Registration Open​. ​Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit​. Philadelphia.

April 5-- ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​. Nittany Lion Inn,
State College.

April 5--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate Disruption

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& Sustainable Development Series​: Towards A Public Web-Platform For Limiting Methane
Emissions From The Oil & Gas Sector. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326
Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 7-9--​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 8-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Westmoreland County.

April 9-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 9-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Crawford County.

April 11- ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to: ​kdalal@pa.gov​.

April 11-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Lehigh County.

April 16- ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Charcoal Hearths, Collier Huts And
Haul Roads​. Dickinson College in the​ ​Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium​, Carlisle, Cumberland
County. 7:00.

April 16-- ​PA Environmental Council Dinner Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For
Environmental Excellence​. Hilton Harrisburg. 5:00. ​PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor
of this special event.

April 16-18-- ​PA American Water Works Association Annual Conference​. Hershey Lodge and
Convention Center.

April 17--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Making The Most Of Historical And
Heritage Assets​. Noon to 1:15.

April 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Benefits Of Energy Management
Systems Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

April 19--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Using The Latest Digital Innovations To Address
Energy Poverty In Developing Counties. Harrisburg University, Room 1151, 326 Market Street,
Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 20--​ ​Clean Air Council Run For Clean Air​. Philadelphia.

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April 22-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Dauphin County.

April 25--​ ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund 717-772-5636 or ​jbraund@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

April 26-- ​NEW​. ​Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase​. ​Berks County
4H Center, 1206 County Welfare Road, Leesport. Noon.

April 29-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Lackawanna County.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National
Watershed and Stormwater Conference​. South Carolina.

April 30-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure
Funding Programs​. Bedford County.

May 1--​ ​Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium​. State College.

May 4--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Moshannon State Forest Tree Planting, Clearfield
County​.

May 4--​ ​Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale​. Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and
Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.

May 8--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Pollinators And Their Habitat​. ​Messiah
College​, Boyer Hall Room 131, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00.

May 8--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Annual Awards Celebration​. Susquehanna Club, New
Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:00. ​Click Here ​for sponsor information. PA Environment
Digest is a proud sponsor of this special event.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 15--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​The Benefits And Challenges of
Ridesharing On The Transportation System​. Noon to 1:15.

May 16--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Basics Of Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

May 16-- ​NEW​. ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure

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Funding Programs​. Luzerne County.

May 16-18--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​.
Monroe County.

May 18-​- ​Registration Open​. ​Environmental Advisory Council Network Conference​. Held in
conjunction with the ​PA Land Conservation Conference​ in Monroe County

June 3-7--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​American Society of Mining & Reclamation Annual Meeting​.
Montana.

June 6--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(formal notice)​

June 11--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Appreciating The PA Local Craft Brew
Industry​. ​ ​Appalachian Brewing Company in Shippensburg​. 6:30.

June 16-21--​ ​Cumberland Valley TU Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp​. ​Messiah
College​, Grantham, Cumberland County.

July 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Funding & Incentives To Implement
Energy Efficiency Projects Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

July 24-26-- ​Registration Open​.​ ​Professional Recyclers Of PA Annual Recycling & Organics
Conference​. Harrisburg.

August 15--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning For Energy
Efficiency In Downtown Buildings Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

September 8-11--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation and National
Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​. Pittsburgh. PA Environment Digest is a proud
sponsor of this event.

September 11-- ​NEW.​ ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

September 12--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Methods Of Combating Illegal
Dumping And Vandalism In A Forest Setting​. ​Caledonia State Park​ in Fayetteville, Franklin
County. 6:30.

September 19--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Alternative Energy Projects For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

September 22-24--​ ​Pennsylvania Greenways And Trails Summit​. Shippensburg University


Conference Center.

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October 3--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Economy, Energy And Environment
For Food-Related Industries Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

October 8-10--​ ​Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference​. Pittsburgh.

October 16-17--​ ​7th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum​. Allentown.

November 21--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Entrepreneurship Ecosystem At


Penn State Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

February 20--​ ​NOAA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Education & Training Grants
February 21--​ ​PEC/DCNR Laurel Highlands Conservation Mini-Grants
February 22--​ ​Celebrating Women In Conservation Awards
February 26--​ ​POWR PA Sojourn Grants
February 28-- ​Lake Erie Shipboard Science Workshop For Teachers
February 28--​ ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Winter Photo Contest
February 28--​ ​DEP PA State Clean Diesel Grants
March 1--​ ​Lackawanna Heritage Valley Conservation, Preservation Education Grants
March 1--​ ​PHMC Keystone Fund Historic, Archaeological Protection Grants
March 1--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Wilderness Wheels Grants​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 1--​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 4-- ​DCNR PA Outdoor Corps Young Adult Crews​ ​(At The Very Latest!)
March 4-- ​Kroger Food Waste Reduction Grants
March 6-- ​PA Lake Management Society Photo Contest
March 7--​ ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
March 11-- ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Research Grants
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March 15-- ​WPC TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree Planting Grants
March 21--​ ​Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp
March 20--​ ​EPA Conowingo Dam Watershed Implementation Plan Grants
March 22--​ ​NEW​. ​PA American Water Stream Of Learning College Scholarship
March 22-- ​DEP Section 902 Recycling Implementation Grants
March 22--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
March 29-- ​NEW​. ​PA Environmental Professionals Karl Mason, Walter Lyon Awards
March 29--​ ​NEW​. ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
March 31--​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
March 31--​ ​DEP Municipal, Hazardous Waste Host Municipality Inspector Grants
April 10--​ ​DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Recreation, Buffer Grants
April 10--​ ​Appalachian Regional Commission Coal Regions Workforce Grants
April 12--​ ​NEW​. ​PA American Water Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
April 18-- ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
May 3-​- ​Pike Conservation District Environmental Ed Grant
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
May 17--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement and Treatment Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grants
July 1--​ ​PA Wilds Center Champion Of PA Wilds Awards
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
July 19--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get

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financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Fish and Boat Commission published notices on final action on additions to ​list of Class A
Wild Trout Waters​ and additions, revisions and removals from the ​list of Wild Trout Streams​.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - February 16, 2019

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance posted this week.

Permits ------------

The Department of Environmental Protection published notices in the February 16 PA Bulletin


inviting comments on the proposed Section 401 Water Quality Certification of the ​PennEast
Pipeline Project​ through Luzerne, Carbon, Monroe, Northampton and Bucks Counties. ​(p​ ages
777-778​)

DEP ​published notice in the February 16 PA Bulletin​ of the opportunity to comment on proposed
nitrogen oxide emission limits included in its Interstate Pollution Transport Reduction Plan.

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission ​published notice in the February 16 PA Bulletin​ of
actions taken on water withdrawal applications in December.

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission also ​published notice in the February 16 PA Bulletin
of a list of grandfathered water projects from December.

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 69 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the February 16 PA Bulletin -
pages 713 to 782​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

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Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

CLICK HERE To View Or Print Entire PA Environment Digest

CLICK HERE​ to View or Print the entire PA Environment Digest. This Digest is 117 pages
long.

Stories Invited - About PA Environment Digest

Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
programs for publication in the ​PA Environment Digest​ to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com​.

PA Environment Digest​ is a publication of ​PA Environment News LLC​ and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
be contacted by sending email to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com​.

Did you know you can search back issues of ​PA Environment Digest​ since May 28, 2004 on
dozens of topics, by county and on any keyword you choose? ​Just click on the search page​.

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PA Environment Digest​ weekly was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental
Educators' ​2009 Business Partner of the Year Award​.

Also take advantage of these related publications--

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once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. Add your constructive comment
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NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they are posted
updates through your favorite RSS reader. You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting
you to new items posted on this blog.

©2019 PA Environment News LLC, All Rights Reserved

Note: ​Content is gladly shared. For permission, send email to:


DHess@PaEnvironmentNews.com​.

Sponsor: Statewide Watershed Connections Conference

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the ​Statewide Watershed Connections


Conference​ on February 24-25 in State College.

Sponsor: PEC Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence Dinner

PA Environment Digest​ is a proud sponsor of the ​PA Environmental Council Dinner


Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence​ on April 16 in
Harrisburg.

Sponsor: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Awards Celebration

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Annual Awards Celebration​ on May 8 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County.

Sponsor: PA/National Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the ​2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation


and National Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​ to be held in Pittsburgh on September

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8-11.

Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited

PA Environment Digest​ is a supporting member of the ​Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers


Association​, ​Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited​ and the ​Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout
Unlimited​.

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