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A STUDY ON INDENTIFY THAT WHAT MOTIVATE THE STAFF TOWARDS

BETTER PERFORMANCE OF THE EMPLOYEE AT VINAYAGA BOILERS


INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI
ABSTRACT
The project work entitled “A STUDY ON INDENTIFY THAT WHAT MOTIVATE
THE STAFF TOWARDS BETTER PERFORMANCE OF THE EMPLOYEE ” with
special reference to VINAYAGA BOILERS INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT
CHENNAI , is mainly conducted to identify the factors which will motivate the employees
and the organizational functions in VINAYAGA BOILERS INDUSTRY PRIVATE
LIMITED AT CHENNAI.
Management’s basic job is the effective utilization of human resources for
achievements of organizational objectives. The personnel management is concerned with
organizing human resources in such a way to get maximum output to the enterprise and to
develop the talent of people at work to the fullest satisfaction. Motivation implies that one
person, in organization context a manager, includes another, say an employee, to engage in
action by ensuring that a channel to satisfy those needs and aspirations becomes available to
the person. In addition to this, the strong needs in a direction that is satisfying to the latent
needs in employees and harness them in a manner that would be functional for the
organization.
Employee motivation is one of the major issues faced by every organization. It is the
major task of every manager to motivate his subordinates or to create the ‘will to work’
among the subordinates. It should also be remembered that a worker may be immensely
capable of doing some work; nothing can be achieved if he is not willing to work. A manager
has to make appropriate use of motivation to enthuse the employees to follow them. Hence
this studies also focusing on the employee motivation among the employees of Hewitt
Associates.
The data needed for the study has been collected from the employees through
questionnaires and through direct interviews. Analysis and interpretation has been done by
using the statistical tools and data’s are presented through tables and charts.
CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION
Motivation is an effective instrument in the hands of the management in inspiring the
work force .It is the major task of every manager to motivate his subordinate or to create the
will to work among the subordinates .It should also be remembered that the worker may be
immensely capable of doing some work, nothing can be achieved if he is not willing to work
.creation of a will to work is motivation in simple but true sense of term.
Motivation is an important function which very manager performs for actuating the
people to work for accomplishment of objectives of the organization .Issuance of well
conceived instruction sand orders does not mean that they will be followed .A manager has to
make appropriate use of motivation to enthuse the employees to follow them. Effective
motivation succeeds not only in having an order accepted but also in gaining a determination
to see that it is executed efficiently and effectively.
In order to motivate workers to work for the organizational goals, the managers must
determine the motives or needs of the workers and provide an environment in which
appropriate incentives are available for their satisfaction .If the management is successful in
doing so; it will also be successful in increasing the willingness of the workers to work. This
will increase efficiency and effectiveness of the organization .There will be better utilization
of resources and workers abilities and capacities.
THE CONCEPT OF MOTIVATION
The word motivation has been derived from motive which means any idea, need or
emotion that prompts a man in to action. Whatever may be the behavior of man, there is some
stimulus behind it .Stimulus is dependent upon the motive of the person concerned. Motive
can be known by studying his needs and desires.
There is no universal theory that can explain the factors influencing motives which
control mans behaviour at any particular point of time. In general, the different motives
operate at different times among different people and influence their behaviors. The process
of motivation studies the motives of individuals which cause different type of behavior.

DEFINITION OF MOTIVATION.
According to Edwin B Flippo, “Motivation is the process of attempting to influence
others to do their work through the possibility of gain or reward.
SIGNIFICANCE OF MOTIVATION
 The workforce will be better satisfied if the management provides them with
opportunities to fulfil their physiological and psychological needs. The workers will
cooperate voluntarily with the management and will contribute their maximum
towards the goals of the enterprise.
 Workers will tend to be as efficient as possible by improving upon their skills and
knowledge so that they are able to contribute to the progress of the organization. This
will also result in increased productivity.
 The rates of labor’s turnover and absenteeism among the workers will be low.
 There will be good human relations in the organization as friction among the workers
themselves and between the workers and the management will decrease.
 The number of complaints and grievances will come down. Accident will also be low.
 There will be increase in the quantity and quality of products. Wastage and scrap will
be less. Better quality of products will also increase the public image of the business.

OBJECTIVES

1. The purpose of motivation is to create condition in which people are willing to work
with zeal, initiative. Interest, and enthusiasm, with a high personal and group moral
satisfaction with a sense of responsibility.
2. To increase loyalty against company.
3. For improve discipline and with pride and confidence in cohesive manner so that the
goal of an organization are achieved effectively.
4. Motivation techniques utilized to stimulate employee growth.
5. For the motivation you can buy man’s time. Physical presence at a given place.
6. You can even buy a measured number of skilled muscular motions per hour or day.
7. Performance results from the interaction of physical, financial and human resource.
8. For the achieving a desired rate of production.

IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION

 The workforce will be better satisfied if the management provides them with
opportunities to fulfill their physiological and psychological needs. The workers will
cooperate voluntarily with the management and will contribute their maximum
towards the goals of the enterprise.
 Workers will tend to be as efficient as possible by improving upon their skills and
knowledge so that they are able to contribute to the progress of the organization. This
will also result in increased productivity.
 The rates of labour’s turnover and absenteeism among the workers will be low.
 There will be good human relations in the organization as friction among the workers
themselves and between the workers and the management will decrease.
 The number of complaints and grievances will come down. Accident will also be low.
 There will be increase in the quantity and quality of products. Wastage and scrap will
be less. Better quality of products will also increase the public image of the business.
FACTORS THAT MOTIVATES EMPLOYEES

Empowerment:
Feeling trusted and empowered is a tremendous motivator.

Growth:

Feeling that they are growing and developing personally

Inclusion:

‘To belong’ is a fundamental need, whether as a member of a family, peer group, network,
team or company. It’s human nature to want to be on the inside, not the outside.

Purpose:

Today people care more about what happens tomorrow, and want to contribute to ensuring
the future of our children, and the health of our communities and planet.

Trust:

The fabric that holds it all together and makes it real is trust.

MOTIVATION CONCEPTS

Intrinsic motivation

Intrinsic motivation refers to motivation that is driven by an interest or enjoyment in the task
itself, and exists within the individual rather than relying on any external pressure. Intrinsic
Motivation is based on taking pleasure in an activity rather working towards an external
reward.

Extrinsic motivation

Extrinsic motivation refers to the performance of an activity in order to attain an outcome,


which then contradicts intrinsic motivation. Extrinsic motivation comes from outside of the
individual. Common extrinsic motivations are rewards like money and grades, coercion and
threat of punishment. Competition is in general extrinsic because it encourages the performer
to win and beat others, not to enjoy the intrinsic rewards of the activity. A crowd cheering on
the individual and trophies are also extrinsic incentives.

Social psychological research has indicated that extrinsic rewards can lead to over
justification and a subsequent reduction in intrinsic motivation. In one study demonstrating
this effect, children who expected to be (and were) rewarded with a ribbon and a gold star for
drawing pictures spent less time playing with the drawing materials in subsequent
observations than children who were assigned to an unexpected reward condition. For those
children who received no extrinsic reward, Self-determination theory proposes that extrinsic
motivation can be internalized by the individual if the task fits with their values and beliefs
and therefore helps to fulfil their basic psychological needs.
TYPES OF EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION

Understanding employee motivation is necessary to the success of a company. By knowing


what encourages an employee to do his or her job, a company will be able to implement
different policies to increase the performance of the workers.

In order to understand employee motivation, one must realize that people are different. This
means that different things motivate different employees.

Achievement

One type of employee motivation is achievement. In this type of employee motivation, the
worker is driven by the goal itself. This in a sense is like climbing a mountain because the
mountain is there. Employers often make use of this by presenting challenges to the
employees. In making use of this type of employee motivation employers often include
incentives such as a promotion or cash. However, for the employees, the incentive is only a
bonus to the achievement.

Advancement

For some employees, their motivation is the prospect of rising up in the ranks of the
corporation. They work hard in order to catch the eye of the boss and probably get a
promotion. This type of employee motivation is characterized by ambition.

Of course, there are times when this type of employee motivation can be dangerous.
Sometimes, superiors may find their jobs in danger because of an advancement-motivated
employee. However, if handled properly, an employee whose motivation is advancement can
be the best in the business. As such, this type of employee motivation should be handled
carefully.

Pressure

Some employees work harder under pressure. This employee motivation is rarely manifested
consciously in a worker. It is often the case that an employee unknowingly piles pressure on
him or her and this pressure pushes them to work harder.

Sometimes, pressure is used by and employee to see just how far he or she would be able to
go. However, this type of employee motivation can have some very negative results,
considering the fact that every person has a limit. In fact, it often ends up in a breakdown of
some sort.

Fear

This is one of the most commonly used employee motivation techniques. Employees are
often threatened with termination if they fail to meet certain objectives. Of course, if an
employee does not handle pressure very well, this type of employee motivation technique
could be detrimental to his or her work performance.

The key to the best employee motivation technique is balance. You need to understand that
people have different preferences. Since it is virtually impossible to meet every employee’s
motivation needs, you must develop a technique that incorporates all of the elements of
employee motivation. In doing so, you will be able to ensure your company’s continued
growth.
Motivation Process.
1. Identification of need
2. Tension
3. Course of action
4. Result –Positive/Negative
5. Feed back
Theories of Motivation.
Understanding what motivated employees and how they were motivated was the focus of
many researchers following the publication of the Hawthorne study results (Terpstra, 1979).
Six major approaches that have led to our understanding of motivation are Mcclelland’s
Achievement Need Theory, Behaviour Modification theory; Abraham H Mallows need
hierarchy or Deficient theory of motivation. J.S. Adam’s Equity Theory, Vrooms Expectation
Theory, Two factors Theory.
McClelland’s Achievement Need Theory.
According to McClelland’s there are three types of needs;
Need for Achievement (n Ach);
This need is the strongest and lasting motivating factor. Particularly in case of persons who
satisfy the other needs. They are constantly pre occupied with a desire for improvement and
lack for situation in which successful outcomes are directly correlated with their efforts. They
set more difficult but achievable goals for themselves because success with easily achievable
goals hardly provides a sense of achievement.
Need for Power (n Pow)
It is the desire to control the behavior of the other people and to manipulate the surroundings.
Power motivations positive applications results in domestic leadership style, while it negative
application tends autocratic style.
Need for affiliation (n Aff)
It is the related to social needs and creates friendship. This results in formation of informal
groups or social circle.
Behavioural Modification Theory;
According to this theory people behaviour is the outcome of favourable and unfavourable
past circumstances. This theory is based on learning theory. Skinner conducted his researches
among rats and school children. He found that stimulus for desirable behaviour could be
strengthened by rewarding it at the earliest. In the industrial situation, this relevance of this
theory may be found in the installation of financial and non financial incentives.
More immediate is the reward and stimulation or it motivates it. Withdrawal of reward incase
of low standard work may also produce the desired result. However, researches show that it is
generally more effective to reward desired behavior than to punish undesired behavior.
Abraham H Maslow Need Hierarchy or Deficient theory of Motivation.
The intellectual basis for most of motivation thinking has been provided by behavioral
scientists, A.H Maslow and Frederick Heizberg, whose published works are the “Bible of
Motivation”. Although Maslow himself did not apply his theory to industrial situation, it has
wide impact for beyond academic circles. Douglous Mac Gregor has used Maslow’s theory to
interpret specific problems in personnel administration and industrial relations.
The crux o Maslow’s theory is that human needs are arranged in hierarchy composed of five
categories. The lowest level needs are physiological and the highest levels are the self
actualization needs. Maslow starts with the formation that man is a wanting animal with a
hierarchy of needs of which some are lower ins scale and some are in a higher scale or system
of values. As the lower needs are satisfied, higher needs emerge. Higher needs cannot be
satisfied unless lower needs are fulfilled. A satisfied need is not a motivator. This resembles
the standard economic theory of diminishing returns. The hierarchy of needs at work in the
individual is today a routine tool of personnel trade and when these needs are active, they act
as powerful conditioners of behavior- as Motivators.
Hierarchy of needs; the main needs of men are five. They are physiological needs, safety
needs, social needs, ego needs and self actualization needs, as shown in order of their
importance.
Physiological or Body Needs: - The individual move up the ladder responding first to the
physiological needs for nourishment, clothing and shelter. These physical needs must be
equated with pay rate, pay practices and to an extent with physical condition of the job.
Safety: - The next in order of needs is safety needs, the need to be free from danger, either
from other people or from environment. The individual want to assured, once his bodily
needs are satisfied, that they are secure and will continue to be satisfied for foreseeable
feature. The safety needs may take the form of job security, security against disease,
misfortune, old age etc as also against industrial injury. Such needs are generally met by
safety laws, measure of social security, protective labor laws and collective agreements.
Social needs: - Going up the scale of needs the individual feels the desire to work in a
cohesive group and develop a sense of belonging and identification with a group. He feels the
need to love and be loved and the need to belong and be identified with a group. In a large
organization it is not easy to build up social relations. However close relationship can be built
up with at least some fellow workers. Every employee wants too feel that he is wanted or
accepted and that he is not an alien facing a hostile group.
Ego or Esteem Needs: - These needs are reflected in our desire for status and recognition,
respect and prestige in the work group or work place such as is conferred by the recognition
of one’s merit by promotion, by participation in management and by fulfilment of workers
Self realization or Actualization needs: - This upper level need is one which when satisfied
provide insights to support future research regarding strategic guidance for organization that
are both providing and using reward/recognition programs makes the employee give up the
dependence on others or on the environment. He becomes growth oriented, self oriented,
directed, detached and creative. This need reflects a state defined in terms of the extent to
which an individual attains his personnel goal. This is the need which totally lies within
oneself and there is no demand from any external situation or person.
J.S Adams Equity Theory
Employee compares her/his job inputs outcome ratio with that of reference. If the employee
perceives inequity, she/he will act to correct the inequity: lower productivity, reduced quality,
increased absenteeism, voluntary resignation.
Vroom’s Expectation Theory
Vroom’s theory is based on the belief that employee effort will lead to performance and
performance will lead to rewards (Vroom, 1964). Reward may be either positive or negative.
The more positive the reward the more likely the employee will be highly motivated.
Conversely, the more negative the reward the less likely the employee will be motivated.
Two Factor Theory
Douglas McGregor introduced the theory with the help of two views; X assumptions are
conservative in style Assumptions are modern in style.
X Theory
 Individuals inherently dislike work.
 People must be coerced or controlled to do work to achieve the objectives.
 People prefer to be directed

Y Theory
 People view work as being as natural as play and rest
 People will exercise self direction and control towards achieving objectives they are
committed to People learn to accept and seek responsibility.
Types of Motivation.
Intrinsic motivation occurs when people are internally motivated to do something
because it either brings them pleasure, they think it is important, or they feel that what they
are learning is morally significant.
Extrinsic motivation comes into play when a student is compelled to do something or
act a certain way because of factors external to him or her (like money or good grades)
Incentives
An incentive is something which stimulates a person towards some goal. It activates human
needs and creates the desire to work. Thus, an incentive is a means of motivation. In
organizations, increase in incentive leads to better performance and vice versa.
Need for Incentives
Man is a wanting animal. He continues to want something or other. He is never fully
satisfied. If one need is satisfied, the other need need arises. In order to motivate the
employees, the management should try to satisfy their needs. For this purpose, both financial
and non financial incentives may be used by the management to motivate the workers.
Financial incentives or motivators are those which are associated with money. They include
wages and salaries, fringe benefits, bonus, retirement benefits etc. Non financial motivators
are those which are not associated with monetary rewards. They include intangible incentives
like ego-satisfaction, self-actualization and responsibility.
Motivation is the key to performance improvement
There is an old saying you can take a horse to the water but you cannot force it to drink; it
will drink only if it's thirsty - so with people. They will do what they want to do or otherwise
motivated to do. Whether it is to excel on the workshop floor or in the 'ivory tower' they must
be motivated or driven to it, either by themselves or through external stimulus.

Are they born with the self-motivation or drive? Yes and no. If no, they can be motivated, for
motivation is a skill which can and must be learnt. This is essential for any business to
survive and succeed.

Performance is considered to be a function of ability and motivation, thus:

 Job performance =f(ability)(motivation)


Ability in turn depends on education, experience and training and its improvement is a slow
and long process. On the other hand motivation can be improved quickly. There are many
options and an uninitiated manager may not even know where to start. As a guideline, there
are broadly seven strategies for motivation.

There are broadly seven strategies for motivation.

 Positive reinforcement / high expectations


 Effective discipline and punishment
 Treating people fairly
 Satisfying employees needs
 Setting work related goals
 Restructuring jobs
 Base rewards on job performance

Essentially, there is a gap between an individual’s actual state and some desired state and the
manager tries to reduce this gap. Motivation is, in effect, a means to reduce and manipulate
this gap.
NEED FOR THE STUDY
 Motivation is an important tool in the hands of the manager for inspiring the work
force and making them to do work with enthusiasm and willingness.
 If it’s an important function of the management to motivate the people working in the
organization to perform the work assigned to them effectively and efficiently.
 The management has to understand the Human behavior if it has to provide
maximum motivation to the personnel.
 Motivation is something that moves a person into action and continues him in the
course of action enthusiastically.
 The role of Motivation is to develop and intensify the desire in every member of
organization to work effectively and efficiently in his position.
 The main aim of this study is to find out the employee motivation in VINAYAGA
BOILERS INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI
 As motivation is an important factor which increases the desire willingness and
enthusiasm in workers, to apply their great potentialities for the achievement of
common goals.
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:
 To study the motivation level of employees.
SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:
 To study the effectiveness of the techniques adopted by the company in employee
motivation.
 To study about the benefits and facilities provided to the employees.
 To learn the employee’s satisfaction on the interpersonal relationship exists in the
organization.
 To examine the motivation practices used in VINAYAGA BOILERS
INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI
 To examine factors affecting employee performance in VINAYAGA BOILERS
INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI
 To establish the relationship between motivation and employee performance
SCOPE OF THE STUDY
 It is always essential for a concern to access its strategies and reshape its destiny
 It is necessary for every organization to study the different aspects that affects the
organization development.
 Every study has a clear and specific scope.
 The scope of this study is limited to VINAYAGA BOILERS INDUSTRY
PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI In this survey the emphasis is on the
motivation of employees.
 The scope of the study involves the preparation of questionnaire and data of the
company.
COMPANY PROFILE AND INDUSTRY PROFILE

COMPANY PROFILE

ABOUT VINAYAGA BOILERS INDUSTRY PVT LTD:

Vinayaga Boilers Engineering began manufacturing boilers in Establishment 2002. The


company CEO – G. Perumal Managing Director,- P.Anbuselvan, As the demand for
boilers grew, Vinayaga Boilers Industry groups Ltd was soon in need of a larger facility. In
2002. Vinayaga boilers industry ltd broke ground for a new factory just south of Los Angeles
in an area where orange groves once stood. Just down the street was Downey’s North
American Rockwell plant that built many of the Apollo spacecraft and another company that
made Apollo Motor Homes. In 2006, Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd opened a second plant in
Puerto Rico to better serve East Coast customers. A few years later, the finished interstate
highway system made this plant obsolete and it closed.

Much has changed since then. The Apollo factory closed and became a movie studio. The
motor home facility now makes trolley tourist buses. One thing that hasn't changed is that
Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd is still making boilers in Southern California. The reasons for
that can be found in these beliefs that shape our family owned business:

 We believe our boilers and tanks should be built to last.


 We believe boiler maintenance should be simple.
 We believe in treating customers with respect.
 We believe in helping boiler operators and owners understand our products.
 We keep a file on every boiler we've ever built. We may know more about your
Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd than you do.
 We believe in research, development and long term testing.

We recently moved to a new location in nearby Commerce, California. We were


fortunate to find a building twice as large as our former one and yet close enough to retain all
our employees. We have just completed a new R&D lab with full boiler testing and
demonstration capability. We have also added a machine shop to enhance our manufacturing
processes.

From our dependable steam and water boilers to our high efficiency Dura fins,
Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd has boilers for almost every application and budget. Our
dedicated representatives throughout the United States and Canada offer strong local support
while our in-house tech service hot line is ready to answer any questions you might have. We
greatly appreciate your interest in Vinayaga Boilers Industry and look forward to working
together.

MILESTONES:

Year Achievement
2005 Introduced Take-A-Part (Knockdown) Boilers, Weatherproof Boilers, UL
"A" Labeled Boiler - Burner Packages, Hinged Head plates.
Introduced Vinayaga Boilers Industry Blow down Tanks and Condensate
2006 Return Tanks.
Shipped 1,100 Oil Fired Domestic Hot Water Heaters
2008
First Durafin Boilers Ship.
2011

2014 Moved to NEW Location: 5832 Garfield Avenue, Commerce, CA 90040.

Mission

Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd manufactures the world’s largest Scotch marine fire tube
boiler. Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd pioneered the first water backed boiler over 15 years
ago and the first packaged boiler over 10 years ago. Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd is built to
last and carry the only 15-year warranty in the industry. In addition to the quality and
dependability, the conservative design provides excellent fuel to steam efficiency resulting in
the best life cycle costs in the industry.

 Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd also offers a full line of desecrators, surge tanks and
blow down heat recovery systems. These feed water systems are also designed and
built to a quality standard which allows us to offer a 10 year warranty, the only one in
the industry.
 Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd is well aware of the changing environmental
requirements. While our standard Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd burners can attain
less than 30 ppm , we know that some regions of the United States are requiring
emissions as low as 9 PPM.
 High efficiency, availability and low emissions:

Vision:

Vinayaga Boilers Industry Ltd is recognized as one of the most innovative biomass
boiler suppliers in the world. We have a well-known and established reputation for supplying
biomass boilers and combustion systems with exceptionally high efficiencies and
availabilities, high fuel flexibility, and low emission impact.

Moreover, the systems have very low maintenance costs. The company’s boiler and
combustion system concept is based on more than 30 years of hands-on experience with
steam generation and biomass combustion.

INTRODUCTION OF THE ORGANIZATION

INTRODUCTION

Vinayaga Boilers Industry Company, manufacturer of quality hydronic-heating


products, has introduced more new, high efficiency products over the last several years than
any other company at any time in the history of hydroid heating! From new ENERGY STAR
certified, gas-fired residential boilers… to high efficiency oil-fired boilers including
advanced design, three-pass, cast iron boilers… along with the industry’s only, three-pass,
oil-fired, boiler steam boiler… and the only atmospheric gas boiler made in India, , the
expansive lineup of heating products from Vinayaga Boilers Industry Company boasts the
highest average efficiency, exceeding 85%… with maximum efficiencies over 95%.

And it doesn’t stop there! Vinayaga Boilers Industry now offers the broadest line of
condensing boilers available from any manufacturer anywhere. In addition, Vinayaga Boilers
Industry group has developed and introduced exclusive user-friendly boiler control systems
for many of its products. The Vinayaga Boilers Industry IQ and VINAYAGA groups Sage2.2
Control Systems offer unparalleled features and benefits that are unmatched in the boiler
industry.

Truly, the vinayaga boilers brand has set the new standards for hydronic heating
equipment in residential and commercial product for gas-fired and oil-fired application with
water and boiler steam boiler and super high efficiency condensing boilers. To provide this
extensive product lineup, vinayaga boilers has invested in world class manufacturing
facilities and new assembly operations in Lancaster, Pennsylvania with state-of-the art
computer numerical controlled machines providing exacting product tolerances. Quality,
made in India cast iron sections are produced for vinayaga groups by Casting Solutions,.
Along with the best engineering capabilities available anywhere, Vinayaga Boilers Industry
groups with its made in the India, quality product lines delivers world-class marketing,
technical sales, and sales support unmatched in South India.

PROFILE OF VINAYAGA BOILERS LTD:

Vinayaga Boilers Industry private limited is established at thekkalur, 35 kms from


Salem, the Manchester of south side. The company has carved niche of its own in the
competitive yarn market. The promoter’s group of garments embodies the true spirit of
enterprise, a trait the Manchester of south Vinayaga Boilers Industry is well-known for. Our
state-of-art, fully integrated unit is to produce highest quality medium, find and super-fine
count cotton yarn, at par with the best in the world promoted by far sighted visionaries with
technical expertise and impeachable business acumen.

Sales Turnover: 1 million USD


Year Estd : 2005
Main Business Area : Manufacturing and Agent services
Other Area Of Business : Manufacturer of Heat Recovery Boiler steam
Generators (HRSG), Utility Boilers, Water
Tube Boiler and Pressure Vessel.

Share Capital & Number of Employees:

Authorized Capital: 150,000,000


Paid up capital: 9,000,000
Number of Employees: 1800
Vinayaga Boilers Industry. is a highly qualified company in design,
supplying, manufacturing, installation and commissioning of different types of heat recovery
boiler steam generators (HRSGs), package, industrial and power plant boilers as well as
other related equipments and accessories in the field of power, oil, gas, petrochemical
industries, power plants and other industrial in domestic and foreign markets.

Relying on the expert human resources, learning and developing technical


knowledge, utilizing maximum production capacity and cooperating with foreign and
domestic suppliers, while observing the shareholders’ rights and gaining customer’s
satisfaction, this company advances toward the sustainable development of society and aims
to realize Iran’s 20-year perspective. In line with the country is policies and objectives to
developer power plans and related technology, the license agreement of technologies transfer
was concluded.

Under this license agreement, over 70 heat recovery boiler steam generators have
been installed and utilized in the downstream of 160 MW gas turbines up to now. The
significant role of oil, gas and petrochemical industries has lead
Vinayaga Boilers Industry and Equipment Co. in to accomplishes several projects for
supplying boiler steam and utilities in the form of EP and EPC for these industries. These
boilers were mostly manufactured by outsourcing and by using the capacity and skills of
domestic subcontractors in the frame work of cohesive management and supervision on
suppliers up to early 2010.

According to the new perspective of the company since 2010, adjoining a factory to
the company near Tehran, has provided the possibility of manufacturing the main parts of
boiler and other related products. Creating new horizons in fulfilling the customers’ needs
and gaining their satisfaction on quality, cost and time.

Nowadays, regarding the actualization of energy costs, while various industries and
investors need increasing efficiency, Vinayaga Boilers Industry and Equipment Co. has
focused on developing products variety in order to design and supply industrial heat recovery
boilers and boiler steam recovery from the wasted heat in industries and also process
packages particularly in oil, gas and petrochemical industries and in the next years, this
company major activities will be devoted to these plans.
Customers’ requirement regarding after sale services in global level as well as
Vinayaga Boilers Industry and Equipment’s commitment to competitor the product and
service chain, has led us to codifying some particular roles since 2010 in the form of
customer and after sale services.

Management’s and personnel’s commitment to fulfill the actual needs of stakeholders


and environmental conservation as well as benefiting from the modern scientific management
systems ensure a prosperous future in achieving the customers’ satisfaction and expanding
the company’s contribution to the domestic and foreign markets.

INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY

INTRODUCTION:

In many cases, manufacturing facilities provide Boilers are pressure vessels designed
to heat water or produce boiler steam, which can then be used to provide space heating and/or
service water heating to a building. In most commercial building heating applications, the
heating source in the boiler is a natural gas fired burner. Oil fired burners and electric
resistance heaters can be used as well. Boiler steam is preferred over hot water in some
applications, including absorption cooling, kitchens, laundries, sterilizers, and boiler steam
driven equipment.

Boilers have several strengths that have made them a common feature of buildings.
They have a long life, can achieve efficiencies up to 95% or greater, provide an effective
method of heating a building, and in the case of boiler steam systems, require little or no
pumping energy. However, fuel costs can be considerable, regular maintenance is required,
and if maintenance is delayed, repair can be costly.

Guidance for the construction, operation, and maintenance of boilers is provided


primarily by the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), which produces the
following resources:

 Rules for construction of heating boilers, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section
IV-2007
 Recommended rules for the care and operation of heating boilers, Boiler and Pressure
Vessel
Boilers are often one of the largest energy users in a building. For every year a
boiler system goes unattended, boiler costs can increase approximately 10% (1).
Boiler operation and maintenance is therefore a good place to start when looking for
ways to reduce energy use and save money.

MATERIALS FOR BOILER INDUSTRY:

The pressure vessel of a boiler is usually made of steel (or alloy steel), or historically
of wrought iron. Stainless steel, especially of the austenitic types, is not used in wetted parts
of boilers due to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However Vinayaga Boilers Industry
stainless steel is often used in super heater sections that will not be exposed to boiling water,
and electrically-heated stainless steel shell boilers are allowed under the European "Pressure
Equipment Directive" for production of boiler steam for sterilizers and disinfectors.

In live boiler steam models, copper or brass is often used because it is more easily
fabricated in smaller size boilers. Historically, copper was often used for fireboxes
(particularly for boiler steam locomotives), because of its better formability and higher
thermal conductivity; however, in more recent times, the high price of copper often makes
this an uneconomic choice and cheaper substitutes (such as steel) are used instead.

For much of the Victorian "age of boiler steam ", the only material used for boiler
making was the highest grade of wrought iron, with assembly by riveting. This iron was often
obtained from specialist ironworks, such as at Creator Moor, noted for the high quality of
their rolled plate and its suitability for high-reliability use in critical applications, such as
high-pressure boilers.

In the 20th century, design practice instead moved towards the use of steel, which is
stronger and cheaper, with welded construction, which is quicker and requires less labour. It
should be noted, however, that wrought iron boilers corrode far slower than their modern-day
steel counterparts, and are less susceptible to localized pitting and stress-corrosion. This
makes the longevity of older wrought-iron boilers far superior to those of welded steel
boilers.

Cast iron may be used for the heating vessel of domestic water heaters. Although such heaters
are usually termed "boilers" in some countries, their purpose is usually to produce hot water,
not boiler steam , and so they run at low pressure and try to avoid actual boiling. The
brittleness of cast iron makes it impractical for high-pressure boiler steam boilers.
CONFIGURATIONS OF BOILER:

Boilers are classified into different types based on their working pressure and
temperature, fuel type, draft method, size and capacity, and whether they condense the water
vapor in the combustion gases. Boilers are also sometimes described by their key
components, such as heat exchanger materials or tube design. These other characteristics are
discussed in the following section on Key Components of Boilers.

Two primary types of boilers include

 Fire Tube Boiler


 Cast iron sectional

Fire Tube Boiler:

In a Fire tube boiler, hot gases of combustion flow through a series of tubes surrounded
by water. Alternatively, in a Water tube boiler, water flows in the inside of the tubes and the
hot gases from combustion flow around the outside of the tubes. A drawing of a water tube
boiler is shown in Figure

Fire tube boilers are more commonly available for low pressure boiler steam or hot water
applications, and are available in sizes ranging from 500,000 to 75,000,000 BTU input. Water
tube boilers are primarily used in higher pressure boiler steam applications and are used
extensively for comfort heating applications. They typically range in size from 500,000 to
more than 20,000,000 BTU input.
Cast Iron Sectional Boilers:

Cast iron sectional boilers are another type of boiler commonly used in commercial space
heating applications. These types of boilers don’t use tubes. Instead, they’re built up from
cast iron sections that have water and combustion gas passages. The iron castings are bolted
together, similar to an old boiler steam radiator. The sections are sealed together by gaskets.
They’re available for producing boiler steam or hot water, and are available in sizes ranging
from 35,000 to 14,000,000 BTU input.

Cast iron sectional boilers are advantageous because they can be assembled on site, allowing
them to be transported through doors and smaller openings. Their main disadvantage is that
because the sections are sealed together with gaskets, they are prone to leakage as the gaskets
age and are attacked by boiler treatment chemicals.

Water-tube boiler:

In this type, tubes filled with water are arranged inside a furnace in a number of possible
configurations. Often the water tubes connect large drums, the lower ones containing water
and the upper ones boiler steam and water; in other cases, such as a mono-tube boiler, water
is circulated by a pump through a succession of coils. This type generally gives high boiler
steam production rates, but less storage capacity than the above. Water tube boilers can be
designed to exploit any heat source and are generally preferred in high-pressure applications
since the high-pressure water/boiler steam is contained within small diameter pipes which

can withstand the pressure with a thinner wall.

THE USE OF BOILER SYSTEMS IN PRACTICE

Industrial hot water boiler systems for generating thermal heat are very
similar to the household heating boilers in our cellars. The main difference is that industrial
boilers are dimensioned significantly larger, so their heating capacity is not only sufficient for
a family home but also for hotels, hospitals, skyscrapers, industrial buildings or entire
districts. When using process heat generated by boiler steam boiler systems the individual
applications are far more versatile. They are used in many industry sectors. But is all this just
hot air or what exactly is the boiler steam used for Let us choose a few industrial sectors and
have a closer look at them.

SAFETY ISSUES IN MANUFACTURING OF BOILER:

All combustion equipment must be operated properly to prevent dangerous


conditions or disasters from occurring, causing personal injury and property loss. The basic
cause of boiler explosions is ignition of a combustible gas that has accumulated within the
boiler. This situation could arise in a number of ways, for example fuel, air, or ignition is
interrupted for some reason, the flame extinguishes, and combustible gas accumulates and is
reignited. Another example is when a number of unsuccessful attempts at ignition occur
without the appropriate purging of accumulated combustible gas.

There is a tremendous amount of stored energy within a boiler. The state change of
superheated water from a hot liquid to a vapor releases an enormous amount of energy. For
example, 1 ft3 of water will expand to 1600 ft3 when it turns to boiler steam . Therefore, “if
you could capture all the energy released when a 30 gallon home hot water tank flashes into
explosive failure at 332o F, you would have enough force to send the average car to a height
of nearly 125 feet. This is equivalent to more than the height of a 14 story apartment building,
starting with a lift off velocity of 85 miles per hour.

Boiler safety is a key objective of the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel
Inspectors. This organization reports and tracks boiler safety and the number of incidents
related to boilers and pressure vessels each year. Their work has found that the number one
incident category resulting in injury was poor maintenance and operator error. This stresses
the importance of proper maintenance and operator training. Boilers must be inspected
regularly based on manufacturer’s recommendations. Pressure vessel integrity, checking of
safety relief valves, water cutoff devices and proper float operation, gauges and water level
indicators should all be inspected.

BEST PRACTICES FOR EFFICIENT OPERATION:

EFFICIENCY

The percentage of the heat energy contained in the fuel that is captured by the working fluid
in the boiler is defined as the combustion efficiency of the boiler. Combustion efficiencies of
80% or higher are usually possible for hot water boilers and low pressure boiler steam
boilers for commercial buildings.

Complete combustion results when a hydrocarbon fuel such as natural gas or oil burns and
produces only carbon dioxide, water and heat. If there is insufficient oxygen and/or poor
mixing of fuel and oxygen, then incomplete combustion will occur resulting in other products
of combustion including carbon monoxide and unburned fuel.
When incomplete combustion occurs, the chemical energy of the fuel is not completely
released as heat and the combustion efficiency is reduced. This is also a safety concern as
unburned fuel could ignite in the stack and cause an explosion. Boilers must be tuned to
achieve complete combustion. One strategy to ensure complete combustion is to provide
some amount of excess air. However, as shown in the figure below, a small amount of excess
air will improve combustion efficiency, but a large amount will reduce efficiency.

Use Boiler Controls for Optimized Air-to-Fuel Ratio

To ensure that complete combustion occurs, extra air is introduced at the burner. But
too much will result in air being wastefully heated and exhausted out of the boiler flue,
penalizing combustion efficiency, and creating a safety issue. When a boiler is tuned, the goal
is to maximize combustion efficiency by providing just enough excess air to assure complete
combustion but not too much to reduce efficiency. How much excess air is enough to assure
complete combustion? That varies with the design and condition of the burner and boiler, as
well as with the different firing rates of the burner, but is typically considered to be between
2% - 3%. Excess air must also be adjusted to allow for variations in temperature, density, and
humidity of the boiler combustion air throughout any daily and seasonal variations. It’s
desirable to maintain a constant amount of excess air across the entire firing range.

The important idea to remember is that complete combustion is critical to ensuring efficient
boiler operation. Incomplete combustion of the fuel can significantly reduce boiler efficiency
by 10% or more, while increasing excess air by 10% may only impact boiler efficiency by
about 1%. Signs of incomplete combustion are a smoky exhaust, a yellow flame, flame
failures, and sooty boiler tubes. It is a good idea to tune up a boiler annually to ensure the
combustion process is optimized.

SUPERHEATED BOILER STEAM BOILERS:

Most boilers produce boiler steam to be used at saturation temperature; that is, saturated
boiler steam. Superheated boiler steam boilers vaporize the water and then further heat the
boiler steam in a super heater. This provides boiler steam at much higher temperature, but can
decrease the overall thermal efficiency of the boiler steam generating plant because the
higher boiler steam temperature requires a higher flue gas exhaust temperature. There are
several ways to circumvent this problem, typically by providing an economizer that heats the
feed water, a combustion air heater in the hot flue gas exhaust path, or both. There are
advantages to superheated boiler steam that may, and often will, increase overall efficiency of
both boiler steam generation and its utilization: gains in input temperature to a turbine should
outweigh any cost in additional boiler complication and expense. There may also be practical
limitations in using wet boiler steam, as entrained condensation droplets will damage turbine
blades.

Superheated boiler steam presents unique safety concerns because, if any system component
fails and allows boiler steam to escape, the high pressure and temperature can cause serious,
instantaneous harm to anyone in its path. Since the escaping boiler steam will initially be
completely superheated vapor, detection can be difficult, although the intense heat and sound
from such a leak clearly indicates its presence.
CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
INTRODUCTION
This chapter shows what other scholars have written about motivation and organizational
performance.
 Balunywa, T. (2005) defines motivation as the inducement of a desired behavior with
in subordinates with a view of channeling their efforts and activity to achieve an
organization’s goals. He adds that it’s an internal drive to satisfy an unsatisfied need
in an organization and is also known as an incentive action.
 Traditionally, motivation has been defined by the two dimensions that comprise it
namely, energy and direction (Deci, 1980; Deci & Ryan, 1985; Roberts, 1992). The
energy dimension of motivation is the driving force behind someone’s effort and
persistence during engagement in a particular activity. Direction of motivation
determines the area or field of interest in which that effort is projected. Both are
necessary elements of a complete motivational act. Energy without direction has no
purpose, and direction without energy results in a state of motivation.
 Beyond defining motivation, however, researchers have also categorized various
types of motivation, based on whether the motivational states are internally or
externally derived. These two global motivational states are called intrinsic and
extrinsic motivation (Deci, 2000) theorized about both intrinsic and extrinsic
motivational states and about correlates of those states.

MOTIVATION PRACTICES
Many different scholars have agreed and disagreed on the ways employees should be
motivated. Some of them assert that in order to motivate an individual, a financial benefit has
to be foregone by the motivator whereas others believe that money is not a true motivator
hence both financial and nonfinancial incentives are considered in the discussion below;
 According to Cole (1998), financial incentives are rewards/payments that employees
get in consideration of their contribution towards the organization. He adds that these
are payments for labor as a factor of production.

Wages and Salaries


 Lindner (1995) notes that, though monetary methods of motivation have little value,
many firms still use money as a major incentive. She adds that wages are normally
paid per hour worked and workers receive money at the end of the week and overtime
paid for any additional hours worked for whereas salaries are based on a year’s work
and are paid at the end of each month.
Piece rate
 According to Lun Chien-Chung (2003) piece rate is the paying of a worker per item
produced in a certain period of time. He asserts that this increases speed of work and
therefore productivity. This is in agreement with the earlier revelations made by
Taylor (1993) who notes that though the employees will care less about the quality of
their work, their sped improves with the piece rate practice of motivation.
Fringe benefits
 According to Doellgast (2006) fringe benefits are often known as “perks” and are
items an employee receives in addition to their normal wage and/or salary. These
include company cars, health insurance, free meals, education e.t.c. he asserts that
these encourage loyalty to the company such employees may stay longer with the
company.

Performance related pay


 This is paid to those employees who meet certain targets. The targets are often
evaluated and reviewed in regular appraisals with managers.
 According to Higgins (1994) this system is increasingly being used by organizations
worldwide because it reduces the amount of time spent on industrial relations and he
therefore recommends its use.
 However, Doellgast (2006) discourages the use of this practice of motivation. He
asserts that it can be very difficult to measure employee performance more especially
those in the service industry and that the practice does not promote teamwork.
Bonuses
 Marler (2000) indicated that when your employees function as a team, you ought to
think like a coach; reward the whole group for a job well done. He says this will boost
morale both personally and collectively. He adds that employee incentive programs
such as small bonuses serve to better the morale of an individual employee and that of
a group as a whole by making them more satisfied.
 This is in agreement with Likert’s (2004) study which concluded that since everybody
wants to feel appreciated and special for the work done, they can therefore be
motivated by appreciating them and making them feel special. He adds that the more
satisfied the employee is, the better he/she will perform.
 Mwanje (2000) believes that non-financial incentives are the most important
motivators of human behavior in terms of the needs of human beings. He refers non-
financial incentives to non-monetary ways of rewarding employees. They are
opportunities that help employees in the accomplishments of the set goals. They
include;
Training opportunities
 Hammer (2000) asserts that an individual will be motivated to do something if they
have the mental ability and skills to accomplish it. He writes that when employees are
trained, they get the knowledge of hoe to deconstruct tasks and challenges and thereby
feel less intimidated by their jobs/tasks.
 Herzberg (1998) agrees to Hammers assertion. He adds that training makes the
employee earn confidence to do a job thereby improving their attitude hence
motivation.

Job rotation
 Fowler (2001) revealed that when an employee does one kind of job week-in week-
out, they will always get de-motivated to carry on with their work more especially
when the work is not very challenging. She suggested that employees need to be
rotated around the organization to meet new challenging tasks in order to keep their
minds busy and feel like they are doing something for the organization.
 However, Clifton (2002) disagrees with these revelations. He asserts that job rotation
does not actually lead to motivation of the employee; it just helps the employees not
to get bored with their work. In other words it helps the employers to maintain a
certain level of motivation in employees.

Communication style
 Managers need to be clear when talking to their employees and let them know that
their opinion or views are important in building a viable company. Strong
communications skills are necessary when assigning tasks to the employees so that
the tasks are clearly defined and understood.
 Marie (2000) asserts that the managers ought to communicate to their subordinates in
such a way that the subordinates feel like they are not forced to do a particular task
 . Jean (2002) agrees and asserts that managers should develop an inclusive approach
to decision making if at all they are to increase their employee motivation levels.

MOTIVATIONAL THEORIES.
THE HIERARCHY OF NEEDS THEORY
 The hierarchy of needs theory advanced by (Maslow 1943) contends that human
motives develop in a sequence according to the five levels of needs; physiological
needs, security and safety needs, affiliation, esteem and need for self actualization. He
emphasized that when one set of needs is satisfied, it ceases to be a motivator.
 Steinmetz (1983) discusses three main types of subordinates: ascendant, indifferent
and ambivalent that all react and interact uniquely and must be treated, managed and
motivated accordingly. An effective leader must understand how to manage all
characters and more importantly the manager must utilize avenues that allow room for
employees to work, grow and find answers independently.
The Hygiene Theory
Fredrick Hertz (1959), the two-factor theory also known as the hygiene theory, where he
referred to satisfiers as motivators, dissatisfiers as hygiene factors. He found out that
motivators were related to job experience and dissatisfies related to environmental conditions.
These are classified in the table below.

The Expectancy Theory


 Victor H (1964) advanced the expectancy theory. He contends that people will be
motivated to do things to attain a goal if they believe in the worth of that goal and if
they can perceive that what they do will help them in achieving it. The theory
contends that motivational force is a function of the value of money to a person
multiplied by his subjective estimate that equitable amount will be forth coming
should he perform in a desired way.
The Equity Theory
 It was developed by Stacy J. Adams (1967) and it refers to san individual’s subjective
judgment about the fairness of the rewards she receives relative to inputs such as
effort, experience and education, in comparison with the rewards of others who fall
under the same group. If the relation is not equal, then inequality shall be perceived
and will reduce the morale of the affected employee.
 As a researcher, I have noted with concern that it’s important for employees to
balance between intrinsic and extrinsic types of motivation as they deal with
employees and that one should first find out what particular motivation practice will
motivate a given employee as advanced by Maslow, A. (1943) in the Hierarchy of
needs theory.
Employee Performance
 Employee performance is a term typical to the Human Resource field where employee
performance can refer to the ability of employees to achieve organizational goals
more effectively and efficiently. It involves all aspects which directly or indirectly
affect and relate to the work of the employees. For performance to be effective,
employers should recognize the regiment desires and needs of the employees.
 According to Koontz, H. (1988) Ways in which employee performance can be
increased include; proper incentive systems which may be financial or nonfinancial.
Financial incentives include; salaries, allowances, overtime payment, bonus and
wages, while non financial incentives include; promotion, medical allowance,
training, transport, subsidized housing and meals. This should be after identifying the
needs and desires of employees that can be satisfied hence increased performance.
FACTORS AFFECTING EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE
Goal Clarity
 Willmot (2007) asserts that people must have in mind a clear picture of any end or
goal they are to achieve. If this picture does not exist, they cannot tell if they are
making progress or when they have completed the task or assignment, let alone if it
has been completed properly.
 Knight (2008) agrees and adds that keeping the end in view has been sage advice for
almost two thousand years. The time a manager spends in developing, communicating
and clarifying the goals or ends to be achieved is time well spent.
Repertoire
 Nickols (2003) writes that to achieve a goal, the people working toward it must
possess a suitable, flexible repertoire. They must be able to engage in whatever
behaviors are necessary to obtain that goal despite changing circumstances and
environmental disturbances. In some cases, this will involve carrying out a routine
that has been specified in advance by someone else. In other cases, it will require
figuring out — on the spot — an appropriate course of action. He concludes that in
many situations, the end to be achieved will remain constant but the conditions under
which it is to attained will vary. Therefore, employees need to posses a suitable and
flexible repertoire.
Knowledge of Structures
 According to Fred (2003), figuring out what to do in a particular situation requires
knowledge of the structure of that situation. People must understand the elements that
make up the situation, how those elements are connected to one another and the
relationships that exist between and among these elements. This knowledge of the
structure of the situation allows people to say how the actions they take will lead to
the result they seek. It also allows them to say, for a given result, the actions that will
lead to it. Absent this knowledge, action is little more than a shot in the dark and
achieving desired results depends mainly on luck or intuition.
 Sara (2004) agreed and added that employees can only perform to the best of their
knowledge and therefore those with good knowledge about the structures will perform
better.
Feedback
 Gerhart (2004) wrote that without information about actual conditions in relation to
intended goals or results, no one can perform to standard. Such information is known
as feedback. It informs progress, enables corrections and, eventually, signals
attainment of the objective. For most hard tasks (i.e., tasks involving tangible products
or other immediate and readily measured effects of one’s actions), feedback is
generally available without much effort on any-one’s part. We are aware of our
actions and their effects. But, for soft tasks (i.e., tasks where the effects of our actions
are not tangible, immediate nor readily measured), the feedback loop is essentially
open. This is especially true when the main effects of a person’s actions are the
reactions of other people. Therefore, lack of good feedback leads to lack of correction
and hence poor performance.

Mental Models
 Sara (2004) asserts that absent feedback, people have no choice except to act in ways
that are consistent with internally-held views or mental models of what is appropriate
or what should work instead of externally-based information about what is and isn’t
actually working. For this reason, it is worthwhile spending time working with people
to identify the mental models they currently use in situations where feedback isn’t
readily available. In some cases, this will surface mental models that are inappropriate
or inadequate. In other cases, it might surface mental models that are superior to those
held by most people. This means that employee performance does not only depend on
the information provided to the employees but also to their mental models.
Motivation
 Kathleen (2004) asserts that it is one thing to be capable of doing something; it is
something else altogether to want to do it. Setting aside the issue of coercion, people
generally want to do things for two basic reasons: (1) it serves some purpose of their
own or (2) it serves someone else’s purpose and they’ve accepted something in return
for doing whatever it is that someone else wants done. Self-satisfaction and
incentives; these are the two great motivators.
Environment
 In his studies on performance, Rynes (2004) found out that performance might not
occur if the environmental conditions are so unsuitable as to present insurmountable
barriers to performance. He writes that Most of us can successfully drive our cars on
windy days but none of us can drive through a tornado. In less dramatic terms,
missing tools and equipment, competing priorities, a repressive climate and other
factors can interfere with our ability to perform as expected, regardless of our motives
or our repertoire, the presence or absence of feedback and the quality of the mental
models that guide our thinking and actions. In short, the task environment must
support the desired performance; at the very least, it must be manageable.
Technology
 According to Samuel (2010), technology is primary tool that can be used to boost
employee performance. Ha writes that improvement in technology accompanied by
training of the employees can significantly increase their levels of performance
because it reduces the stress that comes with doing the job manually.
Abilities, training and experience
 Scott (2000) defined ability as the capacity to learn and perform the tasks required.
He revealed that a good mixture of ability, training and experience is the root cause
best performances. He asserts that best performing employees at least have two of the
three factors.

Work-Home Balance

 Berman (2001) wrote that as much as an employer may not want to be affected by the
personal life of his employees, personal problems can sometimes affect employee
performance. Managers need to be sensitive to employee personal problems, and be
prepared to discuss the issues with employees when necessary. If an employee
requires time off to deal with a personal problem, then granting that time off will help
to show all of your employees that the company values its employees.

As a researcher, I strongly support the above factors that affect employee performance as
valid even in the present situation hence employees should take them serious and find out
how to mitigate their effects to have improved employee performance.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MOTIVATION AND EMPLOYEE


PERFORMANCE
 According to Steers (1999), employee motivation is the process of enabling or
authorizing an individual to think, behave take action, control work and decision
making in an autonomous way.
 A number of studies have examined the relationship between motivation and
performance, Koestner (1999) wrote that if motivation is crucial for initiating
behavior, then performance exists at the opposite end of the spectrum and is defined
as the outcome of a motivated act.
 Posti, C. (2005) says that people need motivation just as pieces of equipment need
fuel and operators. This is highly demanded to ensure that they are always at their
optimum working condition. In turn, this will absolutely lead to optimum
productivity. People are one of the most important assets in business. They have
unlimited potential to contribute in the achievement of objectives. Their aggregate
productivity propels the operations of the company. It dictates the overall
performance, which creates an attractive corporate culture.
 According to Dems, K. (2010), The value of human resource productivity is a
managerial concern. Employee motivation is the classic response on this matter. This
has been utilized for ages by many different entities, small- and large-scale businesses
alike. It fosters mutual growth in an employer-employee relationship. Indeed,
motivation increases productivity.
 In their study Wood, Kakebeeke, Debowski, and Frese (2000) examined the role of
active exploration in an adult training program. Their results indicated that
participants who were trained to actively explore the environment during training had
higher intrinsic motivation levels, as well as higher performance on transfer tasks.
 In agreement Cooper, Clasen, Silva-Jalonen, and Butler (1999) found that intrinsic
motivation was associated with higher levels of creativity-based performance for an
in-basket work task. The in-basket technique is an employment screening task in
which an applicant is asked to complete a set of paperwork that would be
representative of his/her actual work tasks.
 Amodt (1999) and Graen (1999) also found that intrinsic motivation in employees
was related to higher levels of creative performance, as rated by work supervisors.
However, Fang (1997) reported that, although intrinsic motivation was related to
innovative performance, it was not related to other work outcomes.
 According to Hersey (1996), Motivation is concerned with human behavior. It is the
inner striving condition described as wishes, desires, drives or moves, human
psychological characteristics, which includes the factors that cause channel and
sustain human behavior. Therefore motivation deals with what makes people active.
It`s the influence force that gives rise to behavior involving creating conditions in
which employees want to work and are willing to accept responsibility.
 According to Waterman (1982), Motivation is the degree of effort an employee exerts
to accomplish a task; it shows an excitement about work. From the managers’ point of
view, person who is motivated has such characteristics as hardworking, sustaining a
pace of hard work, self directed behavior towards important organizational goals.
Motivation is the key to performance improvement. There is a saying that saying that
“you can take a horse to the well to drink water but you cannot force it to drink”, it
will drink if only it is thirsty-so with people. They will do what they want to do or
otherwise motivated to do. Whether it is to excel on the workshop floor or in the ivory
tower, they must be motivated or driven to it, either by themselves or through external
stimulus.
 According to Heneman,R.L. (1992)Differences in institutional arrangements
contribute to the feasibility and effectiveness of various monetary incentives, as do
differences in employees’ preferences for specific incentives. Therefore, companies
are wise to study these issues before implementing changes to existing incentive
plans. This is especially pertinent for service organizations, where financial
reinforcements tend to produce a stronger effect on task performance than non-
financial rewards used alone. Even stronger results are seen with a composite
approach. For example, one meta-analysis of 72 field studies found that monetary
incentives improved task performance by 23%, social recognition improved task
performance by 17% and feedback elicited a 10% improvement18. Simultaneously
combining all three types of reinforcements improved performance by 45%.
 Putting in consideration Milkovich,G.T(1991) presentation that team-based or small-
group incentives are defined as rewards whereby a portion of individual pay is
contingent on measurable group performance. In general, its effectiveness is
dependent on the characteristics of the reward system, the organization, the team and
the individual team members. Here again, studying this issue via employee surveys or
interviews can be useful.
 But generally speaking, research suggests that equally divided small-group incentives
sustain high levels of productivity and satisfaction for group members, and that small
group incentives are at least as effective as individual incentives with groups of two to
twelve people. Qualitative, quantitative and survey research studies of alternative pay
systems such as profit-sharing or gain-sharing plans are even more consistent in their
findings.
 These incentive programs include various pay-for-performance approaches that link
financial rewards for employees to improvements in the performance of the work
unit20. Research reveals that these types of incentive systems are associated in
practice – and in employer and employee minds – with both higher productivity and
improvements in organizational performance.

CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The procedures by which researchers go about their work of describing, explaining
and predicting phenomena are called methodology. Methods comprise the procedures used
for generating, collecting and evaluating data. Methods are ways of obtaining information
useful for assessing explanations.
RESEARCH DEFINITION:
The definition of research given by Creswell is "Research is a process of steps used to
collect and analyze information to increase our understanding of a topic or issue". It consists
of three steps: Pose a question, collect data to answer the question, and present an answer to
the question.
RESEARCH DESIGN:
The type of research chosen for the study is descriptive research. In descriptive
research various parameters will be chosen and analyzing the variations between these
parameters. This was done with an objective to find out the motivation level of the
employees.
DATA SOURCES:
The data collected for the study is mainly through the distribution of questionnaire; to
be precise the data collected for study was both primary and secondary sources.
PRIMARY DATA:
Primary data is the information collected for the first time; there are several methods
in which the data is complied. In this project it was obtained by mean of questionnaires.
Questionnaire was prepared and distributed to the employees.
SECONDARY DATA:
Secondary data needed for conducting research work were collected from company
websites, library and search engines.
RESEARCH INSTRUMENT:
In this study the primary data was collected by survey technique. In this we
distributed the questionnaires to the respondents. The researcher structured the questionnaire
in the form of:
1. Close Ended Questions
2. Multiple Choice Questions
QUESTIONNAIRE:
A questionnaire is a sheet of paper containing questions relating to contain specific
aspect, regarding which the researcher collects the data. Because of their flexibility the
questionnaire method is by far the most common instrument to collect primary data. The
questionnaire is given to the respondent to be filled up.
SAMPLING DESIGN:
Sampling design is to clearly define set of objective, technically called the universe to
be studied. Sampling technique used is simple random sampling method.
SAMPLE SIZE:
This refers to the number of items to be selected from the universe to constitute a
sample. The sample size for this study was taken as 150.
STATISTICAL TOOLS USED:
The data collected was analyzed by employing the following statistical technique:
PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS:
Percentage refers to special kind of ration. It is used in making comparison between two or
more series of data. It is used to describe relationship. It is used to analyses the data. Bar
charts, pie charts were used to explain tabulation clearly.
Formula:
Percentage (%) = number of respondents
X 100
Total number of respondents
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY:
 As the respondents were busy with their work, it was difficult for the researcher to
meet the respondents and gain information.
 The study was limited to a short period only.
 The data depends totally on the respondent’s view, which may be biased.
 In this study the sample size is 150.
 The findings of the study cannot be applied to all other fields since it lacks external
validity.
CHAPTER IV
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
TABLE 4.1
AGE OF THE RESPONDENT

Frequ Percent Valid Cumulative


ency percent percent
Below 20 29 19.3 19.3 19.3
21-30 33 22.0 22.0 41.3
Valid 31-40 42 28.0 28.0 69.3
41 above 46 30.7 30.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the age of the respondent are 19.3 % of the respondent
are aged between the below 20,22.0% of the respondent are aged between the below 21-30 ,
28.0% of the respondent are aged between the 31-40,and 30.7 % of the respondent are aged
between the41 and above.,

CHART 4.1
AGE OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.2
GENDER OF THE RESPONDENT
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Male 90 60.0 60.0 60.0
Valid Female 60 40.0 40.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the age of the respondent are 60 % of the respondent are
male, 40 % of the respondent are female.

CHART 4.2
GENDER OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.3
MARITIAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENT

Maritialstatus
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Married 72 48.0 48.0 48.0
Unmarrie 78 52.0 52.0 100.0
Valid
d
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the marital status of the respondent are 48 % of the
respondent are married, 52 % of the respondent are unmarried.

CHART 4.3
MARITIAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.4
DEPARTMENT OF THE RESPONDENT
Department
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Hr department 27 18.0 18.0 18.0
Marketing 30 20.0 20.0 38.0
department
Valid Finance department 21 14.0 14.0 52.0
Production 72 48.0 48.0 100.0
department
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the department of the respondent are 18% of the
respondent are working in hr department.. 20 % of the respondent are working in marketing
department. 14 % of the respondent is working in finance department, 48 % of the respondent
are working in production department..
.
.

CHART 4.4
CHILDREN STATUS OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.5
QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENT
Qualification
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Iti 17 11.3 11.3 11.3
Diploma 52 34.7 34.7 46.0
Engineering 30 20.0 20.0 66.0
Valid
Under graduate 37 24.7 24.7 90.7
Post graduate 14 9.3 9.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the qualification of the respondent are 13.3 % of the
respondent are qualified that they iti, 34.7 % of the respondent are qualified that they
diploma, 20.0% of the respondent are qualified that they engineering , 24.7% of the
respondent are qualified that they graduate , 9.3 % of the respondent are qualified that they
post graduate.

CHART 4.5
QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.6
MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENT
Monthlyincome
Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative
cy percent percent
Below 10000 49 32.7 32.7 32.7
10000-20000 64 42.7 42.7 75.3
Valid
20000 above 37 24.7 24.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the monthly income of the respondent are 32.7% of the
respondent are earn the monthly income is below 10000, 42.7 % of the respondent are earn
the monthly income is 10000-20000, 24.7 % of the respondent are earn the monthly income
is above 20000.

CHART 4.6
MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENT
TABLE 4.7
YOUR JOB ROLE
Yourjobrole
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Individual 35 23.3 23.3 23.3
contributor
Team leader 18 12.0 12.0 35.3
Manager 41 27.3 27.3 62.7
Senior manager 5 3.3 3.3 66.0
Valid
Regional manager 24 16.0 16.0 82.0
Vice president 22 14.7 14.7 96.7
Volunter 2 1.3 1.3 98.0
Others 3 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observed that the your job role in this company from 23.3% of the
respondent are job role in individual contributor, 12.0% of the respondent are job role in
team leader , 27.3 % of the respondent are job role in individual manager , 3.3% of the
respondent are job role in senior manager,16.0 % of the respondent are job role in regional
manager, 14.7% of the respondent are job role in vice president, 1.3% of the respondent are
job role in job role in volunteer and 2.0 % of the respondent are job role in other.,

CHART 4.7
YOUR JOB ROLE
TABLE 4.8
I AM PLEASED WITH CARRIER ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR ME
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 22 14.7 14.7 14.7
Agree 46 30.7 30.7 45.3
Neutral 37 24.7 24.7 70.0
Valid
Disagree 25 16.7 16.7 86.7
Strongly disagree 20 13.3 13.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 14.7 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
carrier advancement opportunities, 30.7% of the respondent are says agree with the carrier
advancement opportunities, 24.7% of the respondent are says neutral with the carrier
advancement opportunities, 16.7% of the respondent are says disagree with the carrier
advancement opportunities, 13.3 % of the respondent are says that strongly disagree with the
carrier advancement opportunities,

CHRAT 4.8
I AM PLEASED WITH CARRIER ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR ME
TABLE 4.9
I AM SATISFIED WITH JOB RELATED TRAINING MY ORGANIZATION
OFFERS
Iamsatisfiedwithjobrelatedtraining
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 25 16.7 16.7 16.7
Agree 15 10.0 10.0 26.7
Neutral 38 25.3 25.3 52.0
Valid
Disagree 41 27.3 27.3 79.3
Strongly disagree 31 20.7 20.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 16.7% of the respondent are strongly agree with the
job related training my organization offers, 10.0 % of the respondent are says agree, 25.3 %
of the respondent are says neutral with the job related training my organization offers, 27.3 %
of the respondent are says disagree with the job related training my organization offers, 20.7
% of the respondent are says that strongly disagree with the job related training my
organization offers.

CHART 4.9
I AM SATISFIED WITH JOB RELATED TRAINING MY ORGANIZATION
OFFERS
TABLE 4.10
I AM INSPIRED TO MEET MY GOALS AT WORK
Iaminspiredtomeetmygoalsatwork
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 8 5.3 5.3 5.3
Agree 56 37.3 37.3 42.7
Neutral 9 6.0 6.0 48.7
Valid
Disagree 60 40.0 40.0 88.7
Strongly disagree 17 11.3 11.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 5.3% of the respondent are strongly agree with the
inspired to meet my goals at work, 37.3 % of the respondent are says agree 6.0% of the
respondent are says neutral with the inspired to meet my goals at work , 40.0% of the
respondent are says agree with the inspired to meet my goals at work , 11.3 % of the
respondent are says that strongly disagree with the inspired to meet my goals at work.

CHART 4.10
I AM INSPIRED TO MEET MY GOALS AT WORK
TABLE 4.11
I AM DETERMINED TO GIVE MY BEST EFFORT AT WORK EACH DAY
Determinedtogivemybesteffortatwork
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 20 13.3 13.3 13.3
Agree 43 28.7 28.7 42.0
Neutral 37 24.7 24.7 66.7
Valid
Disagree 35 23.3 23.3 90.0
Strongly disagree 15 10.0 10.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 13.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
my best effort at work each day , 28.7 % of the respondent are says agree that my best effort
at work each day ,24.7 % of the respondent are says neutral, 23.3 % of the respondent are
says disagree with the my best effort at work each day , 10.0 % of the respondent are says
that strongly disagree with the my best effort at work each day.

CHART 4.11
I AM DETERMINED TO GIVE MY BEST EFFORT AT WORK EACH DAY
TABLE 4.12
EMPLOYEE IN MY ORGANIZATION TAKE THE INITIATIVE GIVE TO HELP
OTHER EMPLOYEE WHEN THE NEED ARISE
Employeeinmyorganizationtaketheinitiative
Frequ Percent Valid Cumulative
ency percent percent
Strongly agree 19 12.7 12.7 12.7
Agree 30 20.0 20.0 32.7
Neutral 45 30.0 30.0 62.7
Valid
Disagree 29 19.3 19.3 82.0
Strongly disagree 27 18.0 18.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 12.7 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
initiative give to help other employee , 20.0% of the respondent are says agree that initiative
give to help other employee ,30.0 % of the respondent are says neutral that initiative give to
help other employee, 19.3 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 18.0 % of the
respondent are says that strongly disagree with the initiative give to help other employee.

CHART 4.12
EMPLOYEE IN MY ORGANIZATION TAKE THE INITIATIVE GIVE TO HELP
OTHER EMPLOYEE WHEN THE NEED ARISE
TABLE 4.13
MANAGEMENT WITH MY ORGANIZATION RECOGNIZE STRONG JOB
PERFORMANCE
Managementwithmyorganizationrecognize
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 26 17.3 17.3 17.3
Agree 48 32.0 32.0 49.3
Neutral 32 21.3 21.3 70.7
Valid
Disagree 28 18.7 18.7 89.3
Strongly disagree 16 10.7 10.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 17.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
organization recognize strong job performance , 32.0 % of the respondent are says agree that
organization recognize strong job performance ,21.3 % of the respondent are says neutral ,
18.7 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 10.7 % of the respondent are says that
strongly disagree with the organization recognize strong job performance.

CHART 4.13
MANAGEMENT WITH MY ORGANIZATION RECOGNIZE STRONG JOB
PERFORMANCE
TABLE 4.14
MY SUPERVISOR AND I HAVE A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP
Mysupervisorandihaveagoodworkingrelationship
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 35 23.3 23.3 23.3
Agree 39 26.0 26.0 49.3
Neutral 36 24.0 24.0 73.3
Valid
Disagree 24 16.0 16.0 89.3
Strongly disagree 16 10.7 10.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 23.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
good working relationship, 26.0 % of the respondent are says agree that good working
relationship,24.0 % of the respondent are says neutral that good working relationship , 16.0
% of the respondent are says disagree with good working relationship ,10.7 % of the
respondent are says that strongly disagree with the good working relationship.

CHART 4.14
MY SUPERVISOR AND I HAVE A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP
TABLE 4.15

MY CO-WORKERS AND I HAVE A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP


Mycoworkersandihaveagoodworkingrelationship
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 21 14.0 14.0 14.0
Agree 23 15.3 15.3 29.3
Neutral 25 16.7 16.7 46.0
Valid
Disagree 40 26.7 26.7 72.7
Strongly disagree 41 27.3 27.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 14.0% of the respondent are strongly agree with the
co-workers and i have a good working relationship , 15.3% of the respondent are says agree
,16.7 % of the respondent are says neutral that co-workers and i have a good working
relationship , 26.7 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 27.3% of the respondent are
says that strongly disagree with the co-workers and i have a good working relationship.

CHART 4.15
MY CO-WORKERS AND I HAVE A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP
TABLE 4.16
MY ORGANIZATION HAVE A SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENT
Myorganizationhaveasafeworkenvironment
Frequ Percent Valid Cumulative
ency percent percent
Strongly agree 40 26.7 26.7 26.7
Agree 58 38.7 38.7 65.3
Neutral 19 12.7 12.7 78.0
Valid
Disagree 9 6.0 6.0 84.0
Strongly disagree 24 16.0 16.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 26.7% of the respondent are strongly agree with the
safe work environment , 38.7n% of the respondent are says agree that safe work environment,
12.7 % of the respondent are says neutral that safe work environment, 6.0 % of the
respondent are says that disagree, 16.0 % of the respondent are says that strongly disagree
with the safe work environment

CHART 4.16
MY ORGANIZATION HAVE A SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENT
TABLE 4.17
I AM SATISFIED WITH THE AMOUNT PAID LEAVE OFFERED BY THE
ORGANIZATION

Satisfiedwiththeamountpaidleaveoffered
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 26 17.3 17.3 17.3
Agree 37 24.7 24.7 42.0
Neutral 34 22.7 22.7 64.7
Valid
Disagree 36 24.0 24.0 88.7
Strongly disagree 17 11.3 11.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 17.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
amount paid leave offered by the organization, 24.7 % of the respondent are says agree that
amount paid leave offered by the organization, 22.7 % of the respondent are says neutral ,
24.0 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 11.3 % of the respondent are says that
strongly disagree with the amount paid leave offered by the organization.

CHART 4.17
I AM SATISFIED WITH THE AMOUNT PAID LEAVE OFFERED BY THE
ORGANIZATION

TABLE 4.18
COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SENIOR LEADER AND EMPLOYEE GOOD IN
MY ORGANIZATION

Communicationbetweenseniorleaderandemployee
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 7 4.7 4.7 4.7
Agree 73 48.7 48.7 53.3
Neutral 24 16.0 16.0 69.3
Valid
Disagree 37 24.7 24.7 94.0
Strongly disagree 9 6.0 6.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the4.7 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
communication between senior leader and employee good in my organization ,48.7 % of the
respondent are says agree ,16.0 % of the respondent are says neutral with communication
between senior leader and employee good in my organization, 24.7% of the respondent are
says that disagree, 6.0% of the respondent are says that strongly disagree communication
between senior leader and employee good in my organization

CHART 4.18
COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SENIOR LEADER AND EMPLOYEE GOOD IN
MY ORGANIZATION

TABLE 4.19
I AM SATISFIED WITH THE HEALTH CARE RELATED BENEFITS OFFERED
BY MY ORGANIZATION

Freque Percent Valid Cumulative


ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 14 9.3 9.3 9.3
Agree 7 4.7 4.7 14.0
Neutral 56 37.3 37.3 51.3
Valid
Disagree 18 12.0 12.0 63.3
Strongly disagree 55 36.7 36.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 9.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
health care related benefits offered by my organization, 4.7 % of the respondent are says
agree that health care related benefits offered by my organization, 37.3 % of the respondent
are says neutral, 12.0% of the respondent are says that disagree, 36.7 % of the respondent are
says that strongly disagree with the health care related benefits offered by my organization.

CHART 4.19
I AM SATISFIED WITH THE HEALTH CARE RELATED BENEFITS OFFERED
BY MY ORGANIZATION

TABLE 4.20
HOW MANY YEARS YOU HAVE BEEN WORKING IN THIS ORGANIZATION

Howmanyyearsyouhavebeenworkinginthisorganization
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
0-5 years 31 20.7 20.7 20.7
5-10 years 31 20.7 20.7 41.3
10-15 years 40 26.7 26.7 68.0
Valid
Above 15 48 32.0 32.0 100.0
years
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 20.7% of the respondent are 0-5 years working in this
organization, 20.7 % of the respondent are 5-10 years working in this organization, 26.7 % of
the respondent are 10-15 years working in this organization, 32.0 % of the respondent are
above 15 years working in this organization.

CHART 4.20
HOW MANY YEARS YOU HAVE BEEN WORKING IN THIS ORGANIZATION
TABLE 4.21
RATE YOU LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE WORKING CULTURE IN
THIS ORGANIZATION
Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative
cy percent percent
Highly dissatisfied 14 9.3 9.3 9.3
Dissatisfied 35 23.3 23.3 32.7
Neutral 38 25.3 25.3 58.0
Valid
Satisfied 43 28.7 28.7 86.7
Highly satisfied 20 13.3 13.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 9.3 % of the respondent are highly dissatisfied with
the working culture in this organization , 23.3 % of the respondent are says that dissatisfied
that working culture in this organization , 25.3 % of the respondent are says that neutral ,
28.7 % of the respondent are says that satisfied with the working culture in this organization
and 13.3 % of the respondent are says that highly satisfied with the working culture in this
organization.

CHART 4.21
RATE YOU LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE WORKING CULTURE IN
THIS ORGANIZATION
TABLE 4.22
TOP MANAGEMENT IS INTERESTED IN MOTIVATING THE EMPLOYEE
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 51 34.0 34.0 34.0
Agree 32 21.3 21.3 55.3
Neutral 20 13.3 13.3 68.7
Valid
Disagree 32 21.3 21.3 90.0
Strongly disagree 15 10.0 10.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 34.0% of the respondent are strongly agree with the
interested in motivating the employee , 21.3 % of the respondent are says agree that
interested in motivating the employee,13.3 % of the respondent are says neutral , 21.3 % of
the respondent are says that disagree, 10.0 % of the respondent are says that strongly
disagree with the interested in motivating the employee.

CHART 4.22

TOP MANAGEMENT IS INTERESTED IN MOTIVATING THE EMPLOYEE


TABLE 4.23
WHAT IS YOUR OPINION ABOUT THE MANAGEMENT INVOLVE YOU IN
DECISION MAKING REGARDING YOUR DEPARTMENT

Decisionmakingregardingyourdepartment
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Very rarely 15 10.0 10.0 10.0
Rarely 49 32.7 32.7 42.7
Occasionally 41 27.3 27.3 70.0
Valid Frequently 29 19.3 19.3 89.3
Very 16 10.7 10.7 100.0
frequently
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 10.0% of the respondent are very rarely with the
initiative give to help other employee , 32.7 % of the respondent are says that rarely ,27.3 %
of the respondent are says occasionally , 19.3 % of the respondent are says that frequently ,
10.7 % of the respondent are says that very frequently .

CHART 4.23
WHAT IS YOUR OPINION ABOUT THE MANAGEMENT INVOLVE YOU IN
DECISION MAKING REGARDING YOUR DEPARTMENT
TABLE 4.24
CROSS FUNCTIONAL TEAM TO REMOVE THE WOKING OF DISAPPOINTED
THE EMPLOYEE
Freque Percent Valid Cumulative
ncy percent percent
Strongly agree 21 14.0 14.0 14.0
Agree 43 28.7 28.7 42.7
Neutral 32 21.3 21.3 64.0
Valid
Disagree 34 22.7 22.7 86.7
Strongly disagree 20 13.3 13.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 14.0 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the
cross functional team ,28.7 % of the respondent are says agree that cross functional
team,21.3 % of the respondent are says neutral that cross functional team, 22.7% of the
respondent are says that disagree, 13.3 % of the respondent are says that strongly disagree
with the cross functional team.

CHART 4.24
CROSS FUNCTIONAL TEAM TO REMOVE THE WOKING OF DISAPPOINTED
THE EMPLOYEE
TABLE 4.25
WHICH TYPE OF INCENTIVES MOTIVATES YOU MORE
Typeofincentivesmotivatesyoumore
Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative
y percent percent
Financial 32 21.3 21.3 21.3
Non 64 42.7 42.7 64.0
Valid financial
Both 54 36.0 36.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 21.3% of the respondent are financial type
of incentives motivates you more, 42.7% of the respondent are non financial type of
incentives motivates you more, 36.0 % of the respondent are both type of incentives
motivates you more

CHART 4.25
WHICH TYPE OF INCENTIVES MOTIVATES YOU MORE
TABLE 4.26
YOUR SATISFACTION LEVEL ON OPPORTUNITIES PROVIDED TO DEVELOP
YOUR SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE

Frequ Percent Valid Cumulative


ency percent percent
Highly satisfied 48 32.0 32.0 32.0
Satisfied 39 26.0 26.0 58.0
Neutral 25 16.7 16.7 74.7
Valid
Dissatisfied 28 18.7 18.7 93.3
Highly dissatisfied 10 6.7 6.7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
The above table it can observe that the 32.0 % of the respondent are highly dissatisfied with
the opportunities provided to develop your skills and knowledge, 26.0 % of the respondent
are says that dissatisfied that opportunities provided to develop your skills and knowledge,
16.7 % of the respondent are says that neutral , 18.7 % of the respondent are says that
satisfied with the opportunities provided to develop your skills and knowledge and 6.7 % of
the respondent are says that highly satisfied with the opportunities provided to develop your
skills and knowledge

CHART 4.26
YOUR SATISFACTION LEVEL ON OPPORTUNITIES PROVIDED TO DEVELOP
YOUR SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
CHI-SQUARE TEST
Case Processing Summary
Cases
Valid Missing Total
N Percent N Percent N Percent
Age * 150 100.0% 0 0.0% 150 100.0%
Iaminspiredtomeetmyg
oalsatwork

Age * Iaminspiredtomeetmygoalsatwork Crosstabulation


Count
Iaminspiredtomeetmygoalsatwork Total
Strongly Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly
agree disagree
Below 2 6 2 17 2 29
20
Age 21-30 1 15 2 11 4 33
31-40 1 11 4 22 4 42
41 above 4 24 1 10 7 46
Total 8 56 9 60 17 150

Chi-Square Tests
Value Df Asymp. Sig.
(2-sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 20.579a 12 .057
Likelihood Ratio 21.486 12 .044
Linear-by-Linear 2.489 1 .115
Association
N of Valid Cases 150
A. 11 cells (55.0%) have expected count less than 5. The
minimum expected count is 1.55.

Symmetric Measures
Value Approx.
Sig.
Nominal by Contingency .347 .057
Nominal Coefficient
N of Valid Cases 150
CORRELATION METHOD

Case Processing Summary


Cases
Valid Missing Total
N Percent N Percent N Percent
Qualification * 150 100.0% 0 0.0% 150 100.0%
levelofsatisfactionwitht
heworkingculture

Qualification * levelofsatisfactionwiththeworkingculture Crosstabulation


Count
Levelofsatisfactionwiththeworkingculture Total
Highly Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied Highly
dissatisfied satisfied
Iti 2 2 3 5 5 17
Diploma 0 12 19 14 7 52
Qualificatio Engineering 12 13 1 3 1 30
n Under 0 7 13 16 1 37
graduate
Post graduate 0 1 2 5 6 14
Total 14 35 38 43 20 150

Symmetric Measures
Value Asymp. Std. Approx. Approx.
Errora Tb Sig.
Nominal by Contingency .597 .000
Nominal Coefficient
Interval by .056 .082 .682 .496c
Pearson's R
Interval
Spearman .025 .087 .304 .762c
Ordinal by Ordinal
Correlation
N of Valid Cases 150
A. Not assuming the null hypothesis.
B. Using the asymptotic standard error assuming the null hypothesis.
C. Based on normal approximation.

ONE WAY ANOVA

ANOVA
Communicationbetweenseniorleaderandemployee
Sum of Df Mean F Sig.
Squares Square
Between 8.601 4 2.150 1.966 .103
Groups
Within Groups 158.573 145 1.094
Total 167.173 149

Multiple Comparisons
Dependent Variable: Communicationbetweenseniorleaderandemployee
Tukey HSD
(I) (J) Mean Std. Error Sig. 95% Confidence
yoursatisfactionlevelono yoursatisfactionlevelono Difference (I- Lower U
pportunitiesprovidedtode pportunitiesprovidedtode J) Bound
velop velop
Satisfied -.16346 .22544 .950 -.7862 .4
Neutral -.01167 .25793 1.000 -.7242 .7
Highly satisfied
Dissatisfied .13690 .24868 .982 -.5500 .8
Highly dissatisfied -.89167 .36352 .107 -1.8958 .1
Highly satisfied .16346 .22544 .950 -.4593 .7
Neutral .15179 .26793 .980 -.5883 .8
Satisfied
Dissatisfied .30037 .25903 .774 -.4152 1
Highly dissatisfied -.72821 .37068 .289 -1.7522 .2
Highly satisfied .01167 .25793 1.000 -.7008 .7
Satisfied -.15179 .26793 .980 -.8919 .5
Neutral
Dissatisfied .14857 .28775 .986 -.6463 .9
Highly dissatisfied -.88000 .39129 .168 -1.9609 .2
Highly satisfied -.13690 .24868 .982 -.8239 .5
Satisfied -.30037 .25903 .774 -1.0159 .4
Dissatisfied
Neutral -.14857 .28775 .986 -.9435 .6
Highly dissatisfied -1.02857 .38525 .064 -2.0928 .0
Highly satisfied .89167 .36352 .107 -.1125 1
Satisfied .72821 .37068 .289 -.2958 1
Highly dissatisfied
Neutral .88000 .39129 .168 -.2009 1
Dissatisfied 1.02857 .38525 .064 -.0356 2

Communicationbetweenseniorleaderandemployee
Tukey hsda,b
Yoursatisfactionlevelo N Subset for alpha =
nopportunitiesprovided 0.05
todevelop 1 2
Dissatisfied 28 2.5714
Highly satisfied 48 2.7083
Neutral 25 2.7200
Satisfied 39 2.8718 2.8718
Highly dissatisfied 10 3.6000
Sig. .871 .140
Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are displayed.
A. Uses Harmonic Mean Sample Size = 22.503.
B. The group sizes are unequal. The harmonic mean of
the group sizes is used. Type I error levels are not
guaranteed.

CHAPTER V
FINDING, SUGGESTION AND CONCLUSION
FINDING

1. Majority of age of the respondent are 28.0% of the respondent are aged between the
31-40,and 30.7 % of the respondent are aged between the41 and above
2. Majority of age of the respondent are 60 % of the respondent are male
3. Majority of marital status of the respondent are 48 % of the respondent are married,
52 % of the respondent are unmarried.
4. Majority of department of the respondent are 20 % of the respondent are working in
marketing department. 14 % of the respondent is working in finance department, 48
% of the respondent are working in production department..
5. Majority of qualification of the respondent are 34.7 % of the respondent are qualified
that they diploma, 20.0% of the respondent are qualified that they engineering , 24.7%
of the respondent are qualified that they graduate
6. Majority of monthly income of the respondent are 32.7% of the respondent are earn
the monthly income is below 10000, 42.7 % of the respondent are earn the monthly
income is 10000-20000
7. Majority of your job role in this company from 23.3% of the respondent are job role
in individual contributor, 12.0% of the respondent are job role in team leader , 27.3 %
of the respondent are job role in individual manager
8. Majority of 14.7 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the carrier advancement
opportunities, 30.7% of the respondent are says agree with the carrier advancement
opportunities, 24.7% of the respondent are says neutral with the carrier advancement
opportunities
9. Majority 25.3 % of the respondent are says neutral with the job related training my
organization offers, 27.3 % of the respondent are says disagree with the job related
training my organization offers, 20.7 % of the respondent are says that strongly
disagree with the job related training my organization offers.
10. Majority of 37.3 % of the respondent are says agree 40.0% of the respondent are says
agree with the inspired to meet my goals at work , 11.3 % of the respondent are says
that strongly disagree with the inspired to meet my goals at work.
11. Majority of13.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the my best effort at
work each day , 28.7 % of the respondent are says agree that my best effort at work
each day ,24.7 % of the respondent are says neutral
12. Majority of 30.0 % of the respondent are says neutral that initiative give to help other
employee, 19.3 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 18.0 % of the respondent
are says that strongly disagree with the initiative give to help other employee.
13. Majority of17.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the organization
recognize strong job performance , 32.0 % of the respondent are says agree that
organization recognize strong job performance ,21.3 % of the respondent are says
neutral
14. Majority of23.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the good working
relationship, 26.0 % of the respondent are says agree that good working
relationship,24.0 % of the respondent are says neutral that good working relationship
15. Majority of 16.7 % of the respondent are says neutral that co-workers and i have a
good working relationship , 26.7 % of the respondent are says that disagree, 27.3% of
the respondent are says that strongly disagree with the co-workers and i have a good
working relationship.
16. Majority of26.7% of the respondent are strongly agree with the safe work
environment , 38.7n% of the respondent are says agree that safe work environment,
17. Majority of17.3 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the amount paid leave
offered by the organization, 24.7 % of the respondent are says agree that amount paid
leave offered by the organization, 22.7 % of the respondent are says neutral
18. The above table it can observe that,48.7 % of the respondent are says agree ,16.0 %
of the respondent are says neutral with communication between senior leader and
employee good in my organization, 24.7% of the respondent are says that disagree,
19. Majority of 37.3 % of the respondent are says neutral, 12.0% of the respondent are
says that disagree, 36.7 % of the respondent are says that strongly disagree with the
health care related benefits offered by my organization.
20. Majority of 26.7 % of the respondent are 10-15 years working in this organization,
32.0 % of the respondent are above 15 years working in this organization.

21. Majority of 23.3 % of the respondent are says that dissatisfied that working culture in
this organization , 25.3 % of the respondent are says that neutral , 28.7 % of the
respondent are says that satisfied with the working culture in this organization and
22. Majority of34.0% of the respondent are strongly agree with the interested in
motivating the employee , 21.3 % of the respondent are says agree that interested in
motivating the employee
23. Majority of10.0% of the respondent are very rarely with the initiative give to help
other employee , 32.7 % of the respondent are says that rarely ,27.3 % of the
respondent are says occasionally
24. Majority of14.0 % of the respondent are strongly agree with the cross functional team
,28.7 % of the respondent are says agree that cross functional team,21.3 % of the
respondent are says neutral that cross functional team
25. Majority of 42.7% of the respondent are non financial type of incentives motivates
you more, 36.0 % of the respondent are both type of incentives motivates you more
26. Majority of32.0 % of the respondent are highly dissatisfied with the opportunities
provided to develop your skills and knowledge, 26.0 % of the respondent are says that
dissatisfied that opportunities provided to develop your skills and knowledge

SUGGESTIONS

There have been numerous studies on employee motivation, but a lack of research
dividing the segments in a restaurant between hourly tipped and no tipped employees. This
study was performed to examine current restaurant front of the house personnel’s motivations
and commitment. To better understand the motivation and organization commitment of
current restaurant employees, this research focused on the front of the house motivations as a
whole, the individual employment groups’ motivations, socio-demographic impacts on
motivation, and the relationship between employee motivation and organization commitment.
CONCLUSION
Employee motivation is vital to the success of organizations. A lack of employee
motivation may cause organizational problems in turnover and retention, morale, and poor
productivity. Restaurants are not unfamiliar with these human resource issues, however,
many restaurants choose to accept these issues as part of the business or utilize ineffective,
archaic motivation techniques.
Recognition of the problem of employee motivation is the first step a restaurant
organization may choose to tackle the problem. Given the understanding that the restaurant is
comprised of two different types of employee, the hourly tipped employee and the hourly
non-tipped employee, employers must understand the different needs of these employee
groups.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
 Battisti, Pete. "Reward to Motivate." Walls & Ceilings. December 2005.
 Frase-Blunt, Martha. "Driving Home Your Awards Program." hrmagazine. February
2001.
 Hohman, Kevin M. "A Passion for Success: Employee buy in is the key." Do-It-
Yourself Retailing. February 2006.
 "In Brief: Recognition is greatest motivator." Employee Benefits. 10 February 2006.
 "Incentive Schemes are Still Failing to Retain Staff." Employee Benefits. 4 November
2005.
 Parker, Owen. "Pay and Employee Commitment." Ivey Business Journal. January
2001.
 "Providing Opportunities to Grow." Computer Weekly. 7 February 2006.
 White, Carol-Ann. "Expert's View on Managing Demotivated Employees." Personnel
Today. 15 November 2005.
ANNEXURE
A STUDY ON INDENTIFY THAT WHAT MOTIVATE THE STAFF TOWARDS
BETTER PERFORMANCE OF THE EMPLOYEE AT VINAYAGA BOILERS
INDUSTRY PRIVATE LIMITED AT CHENNAI
QUESTIONNAIRE
PERSONAL DETAILS:
1. Name:
2. Age group
a) Below 20
b) 21-30 years
c) 31-40 years
d) 41 Above
3. Gender
a) Male
b) Female
4. Marital status
a) Married
b) Unmarried
5. Department
a) HR department
b) Marketing department
c) Finance department
d) Production department
6. Educational Qualification
a) ITI
b) Diploma
c) Engineering
d) Under graduate
e) Post graduate

7. Monthly income
a) Below 10000
b) 10000-20000
c) 20000 above
8. What is your job role
a) Individual contributor
b) team leader
c) Manager
d) Senior manager
e) Regional manager
f) Vice president
g) Volunteer
h) Other
EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION:
9. I am pleased with carrier advancement opportunities available for me
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
10. I am satisfied with job related training my organization offers
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
11. I am inspired to meet my goals at work
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree

12. I am determined to give my best effort at work each day


a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
13. Employee in my organization take the initiative give to help other employee when the
need arise
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
14. Management with my organization recognize strong job performance
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
15. My supervisor and I have a good working relationship
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
16. My co-workers and I have a good working relationship
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree

17. My organization have safe work environment


a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
18. I am satisfied with the amount paid leave offered by the organization
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
19. Communication between senior leader and employee good in my organization
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
20. I am satisfied with the health care related benefits offered by my organization
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
21. Since how many years you have been working in this organization
a) 0-5 years
b) 5-10 years
c) 10-15 years
d) Above 15 years

22. Rate your level of satisfaction with the working culture in this organization
a) Highly satisfied
b) Satisfied
c) Neutral
d) Dissatisfied
e) Highly dissatisfied
23. Top management is interested in motivating the employee
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
24. Cross functional team to remove the Working of disappointed the employee
a) Strongly agree
b) Agree
c) Neutral
d) Disagree
e) Strongly disagree
25. What is your opinion about the management involve you in decision making regarding
your department
a) Very Frequently
b) Frequently
c) Occasionally
d) Rarely
e) Very rarely
26. Which type of incentives motivates you more
a) Financial
b) Non-financial
c) Both

27. What is your satisfaction level on opportunities provided to develop your skills and
knowledge
a) Highly satisfied
b) Satisfied
c) Neutral
d) Dissatisfied
e) Highly dissatisfied
Note: Ratings
 Strongly agree-5
 Agree-4
 Neutral-3
 Disagree-2
 Strongly disagree -1

 Highly satisfied-5
 Satisfied-4
 Neutral-3
 Dissatisfied-2
 Highly dissatisfied-1

 Very Frequently-5
 Frequently-4
 Occasionally-3
 Rarely-2
 Very rarely-1