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Issue #765 Harrisburg, PA Feb.

25, 2019

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PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years

On February 19, Public Utility Commission Chairman Gladys


Brown told the Senate Appropriations Committee at the
Commission’s budget hearing it recognizes it does not have
enough staff to deal with pipeline safety issues and will be
asking to at least double or possibly triple the number of
pipeline inspectors over the next 5 years.
Chairman Brown said their FY 2019-20 request includes 4
new pipeline inspection positions and she anticipates asking for
4 more in each of the next 5 years increasing the complement of
15 inspectors (​according to written testimony​) to about 35 or 40.
A significant amount of the PUC’s day-to-day work
involves safety oversight of the distribution and transmission pipelines within the
Commonwealth,” said Chairman Brown.
PUC Commissioner John Coleman explained one of the bottlenecks in bringing new
inspectors on board are Federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
training and certification requirements.
Commissioner Coleman said it takes about 3 years to train new staff and get enough
experience to do their job and there is a lot of competition for trained people from other states,
PHMSA and pipeline companies themselves.
The PUC now has oversight over 47,000 miles of natural gas and other hazardous liquid
distribution lines and over 1,100 miles of intrastate pipelines.
Chairman Brown also noted the General Assembly directed the PUC to take on new
responsibilities for enforcement of PA One Call underground utility damage prevention program,
including pipelines.
Several members asked Chairman Brown and the other commissioners at the hearing
about issues related to the Mariner East Pipelines. She and the other commissioners said they
were prevented from addressing the issues directly because of the matters relating to the
pipelines before the Commission.
Senators Tom Killion (R-Delaware) and Judith Schwank (D-Berks) both expressed

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frustration at the inability of Energy Transfer/Sunoco (owners of the Mariner East Pipelines) to
get communities and schools the information they ask for to deal with emergencies.
Commissioner Coleman said the Commission only has jurisdiction over safety issues at
the pipeline itself, but hoped Energy Transfer/Sunoco was listening to this hearing and the real
concerns being expressed and would communicate with communities about what’s going on..
Sen. Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and other Senators raised the question of the status of
nuclear power plants and consideration of whether to prevent them from closing for reasons
related to the environment and their economic impact.
Chairman Brown said as a result of the deregulation law passed in 1996, the PUC does
not have jurisdiction over generation since Pennsylvania has a competitive energy market. She
said the Commission would certainly act as an information resource for members of the General
Assembly as they consider this issue.
Sen. Lisa Boscola (D-Lehigh), Minority Chair of the Senate Consumer Protection and
Professional Licensure Committee, expressed doubts about whether renewable energy sources
could make up for the loss of nuclear power plants when nuclear accounts for nearly 40 percent
of the electricity generated and renewables account for only about 3 percent.
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place said he does not believe Pennsylvania will reach 100
percent renewables in his lifetime, but suggested incremental movement over time will come
with the declining cost of renewables.
Commissioner Place added there is “pretty good information” that wind and solar are or
will soon be fairly competitive with fossil fuel sources and the only way to drive down the cost
curve is to deploy those assets.
Sen. Sharif Street (D-Philadelphia) said the issue of nuclear power generation is
important in maintaining a safe electric grid and also to not increasing the state’s carbon
footprint. He said he felt removing nuclear power would mean a less stable grid and less clean
grid and the PUC panel indicated that was a fair statement.
Sen. Pat Browne (R-Lehigh), Majority Chair of the Appropriations Committee, said when
the General Assembly considered the deregulation law in 1996 it also dealt with the issue of
“stranded costs” for facilities, like nuclear plants, that would be more uneconomical in a
competitive environment.
He said the law asked ratepayers to pay for those stranded costs as part of the package. In
response to a question, Chairman Brown said she believed those costs to be about $11 billion.
Sen. Browne asked if there is any precedent in the country in the context of defining
alternative energy sources to include nuclear power. Chairman Brown said she was not aware of
any, but mentioned other entities that have done zero carbon emission as the basis.
Click Here​ for a copy of Chairman Brown’s written testimony.
Copies of written testimony and videos of all Senate Appropriations Committee budget
hearings are available at the ​Budget Hearings Summary​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Why Chester County DA Is Investigating The Mariner East Pipeline
Pipeline Compressor Station May Be Coming To Fairmount Twp, Luzerne County
Editorial: Natural Gas Pipelines Needed, But So Is Safety
Crable: U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear Nuns’ Challenged Against Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Delaware County Seeks To Join Lawsuit Against Owners Of Mariner East Pipelines
Delaware County Asks To Join Safety 7 Lawsuit Challenging Mariner East Pipeline

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[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

Bill Introduced Again To Require Drilling Rights Compensation If DRBC Adopts Fracking
Ban

On February 19, Sen. Lisa Baker (R-Luzerne) reintroduced legislation--


Senate Bill 305​-- declaring an action to ban fracking in the Delaware River
Watershed by the Delaware River Basin Commission an act of eminent
domain requiring compensation for property owners for drilling rights.
Last year’s bill-- ​Senate Bill 1189​-- was reported out of the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee just 12 days after it was
introduced ​in June of last year​ and died in the Senate Appropriations
Committee at the end of session.
Opposition by members of the Senate and House to a proposed oil and gas
fracking ban in the Delaware River Watershed goes back to an action
taken by the Delaware River Basin Commission ​in 2009 to impose a
moratorium​ on new natural gas wells until DRBC could adopt
requirements to regulate drilling.
In December 2017​, DRBC formally proposed draft amendments to its regulations and a
plan to prohibit high volume hydraulic fracturing in the watershed and held extensive hearings
on the proposal.
In April 2018​, DRBC posted all the comments it received on the proposal, but has not yet
set a timetable for finalizing the proposal.
In an unusual step, Sen. Baker joined Sen. Joe Scarnati (R-Jefferson) and Sen. Gene Yaw
(R-Lycoming) in ​actions in 2016​ and ​in 2018​ to intervene in a Wayne County landowner federal
court challenge to DRBC’s actions that was ​dismissed in 2017​ and overturned and ​continued in
court in 2018​.
Last June, the House State Government Committee ​held a hearing​ where Wayne County
Commissioner Joseph Adams said he believes the Delaware River Basin Commission stands in
the way of economic development in his County with its regulation of water withdrawals and
water quality, and oil and gas development in particular with its proposed fracking moratorium.
Adams said he believes science should be brought to bare on regulating oil and gas
drilling and not a blanket moratorium, especially with the track record of gas development in
other areas of the state.
He noted he and his wife have their names on the deeds of over 5,000 acres in the county.
He said property owners should be compensated for the loss of the right to develop their
land if DRBC finalizes the fracking ban and supported Sen. Baker’s previous bill.
Adams suggested a water use fee be imposed on water users in the Delaware Watershed
to pay oil and gas rights owners. He estimated the fee would be about $20 per month per person.
The bill has again been referred to the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy
Committee. A ​sponsor summary​ of the bill is available.
NewsClips:
State Grand Jury Probing Natural Gas Drilling Calls Washington County Property As Witness
Frazier: Woman Who Sued Range Resources Testifies Before State Grand Jury
Litvak: DEP Gives NOV To Leaking Westmoreland Utica Gas Well

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Legere: DEP Threatened To Shut Down A Gas Storage Field, Fearing Risks To Approaching
Coal Mine
Oakmont Boro: One PA Town Shows How To Properly Zone Fracking
PaEN: Partnership For Delaware Estuary Launches 10-Year Comprehensive Conservation &
Management Plan, Including Mussel Hatchery
Mussel Hatchery To Be Built To Reduce Pollutants In Delaware River
Feb. 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent

On February 21, DEP’s ​Citizens Advisory Council​ sent


letters to members of the House and Senate​ urging them
to act now to find a funding source for DEP’s ​Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program​ before it becomes insolvent.
“The HSCF [Hazardous Sites Cleanup Fund] will
become insolvent as early as fiscal year 2019-2020
because of the expiration of the Capital Stocks and
Franchise Tax in 2015. It is important to act now to find
a revenue stream for the HSCF to avoid cessation of
cleanup activities and grant programs and to allow
enough lead time for money to be allocated before
potential insolvency.
“Public health, welfare, and the environment will be jeopardized and economic
development will be thwarted if the HSCF becomes insolvent.
“Whether it is water supply replacement for citizens with contaminated drinking water or
the redevelopment of blighted properties in depressed communities, citizens across this
Commonwealth benefit from the activities carried out under the HSCF.
“Many of these contaminated sites are legacy sites with no responsible party to fund
remediation activities.
“Cleanup of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination is just one example of the
work that will be forced to stop if the HSCF runs out of funding.
“DEP is currently responding directly under HSCA at 3 sites where PFAS is threatening
human health and is overseeing investigations by the military at 10 other sites where PFAS has
been detected, all with money from the HSCF.
“Efforts to protect drinking water sources at these and additional sites and coordinate
with the federal government on PFAS contamination will cease or become severely restricted if
the HSCF becomes insolvent.
“The Hazardous Sites Cleanup Program is a perfect example of the legislative and
executive branches of our government working together as Constitutional trustees of the
Commonwealth’s public natural resources for the benefit of all citizens, including generations
yet to come. I urge you [on behalf of the Council] to continue this cooperation by passing
legislation that will fully fund this vital program.”
Click Here to read the entire letter​.

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The 18-member Citizens Advisory Council is appointed equally by the Senate, House
and Governor to advise DEP on its programs.
For more information, visit the ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions
should be directed to Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.
More information on the program is available at DEP’s ​Hazardous Sites Cleanup
Program​ webpage. ​Click Here to read​ the FY 2017-18 Annual Report on the program.
​ hoto:​ From DEP’s 2017-18 Annual Report on the program.)
(P
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Taking Money From Dedicated Environmental Funds
Editorial: Wolf Taking Severance Tax Down A Different Road
Related Stories:
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change,
Permit Fees, Fund Transfers
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA
PaEn: PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny
County
PaEN: PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home
Workshops In Allegheny County
PaEN: Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways,
Other Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
PaEn: Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

PEMA: Over $101.5 Million In Flood Damage Not Covered By Feds In 2018; Intense
Flooding Events Increasing In PA

On February 21, Randy Padfield, Acting Director


of the ​PA Emergency Management Agency​, told
the Senate Appropriations Committee the
Commonwealth had over $101.5 million in public
infrastructure flood damages that were not covered
by federal disaster assistance in 2018.
He added the frequency and intensity of
precipitation events in the Northeast, including
Pennsylvania, is increasing by as much as 75
percent causing more localized pockets of flood
damage.
He made the comments in response to questions from Sen. Sharif Street (D-Philadelphia)
who asked what the costs associated with increasingly frequency flooding were and would
installation of green infrastructure upstream from these areas help mitigate those impacts.
Padfield said PEMA documented about $163.5 million in public infrastructure damages
in Pennsylvania during 2018, but only just over $62 million was covered by federal disaster aid.

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The remaining $101.5 million in damage had to be absorbed by municipalities, counties and state
agencies.
He said one problem has been the thresholds used by the Federal Emergency
Management Agency to declare a federal disaster. He also said FEMA is looking for states to
cover more of the disaster related costs.
As an example, he said Pennsylvania had 5,206 homes damaged by flooding in 2018, but
no single storm event reached the 800 homes threshold used by FEMA for individual assistance.
Padfield said flood mitigation-- getting people off a floodplain and other measures-- is
critical to limiting future loses.
He pointed out for every $1 spent on flood mitigation $7 are saved in emergency
response and recovery costs in the future.
He said as a result of last year’s flooding, Pennsylvania received about $10 million in
mitigation funding from FEMA, however, his agency has identified about 70 mitigation projects
that would cost over $30 million to complete.
He added there were ​a lot more​ mitigation projects out there to do.
Padfield also pointed to the landslides that occured in Western Pennsylvania as a result of
multiple rainfall events as another issue with the federal response. He explained federal disaster
relief was denied because FEMA is geared to dealing with single events and the landslides were
caused by a series of rain events over a period of time.
Padfield suggested Gov. Wolf’s ​Restore Pennsylvania proposal​ would be helpful in
addressing mitigation and funding to help families and communities recover from and prevent
flooding.
Restore PA would establish a Disaster Relief Trust Fund to help individuals who suffer
losses not compensated by FEMA or other programs as well as pay for green infrastructure,
floodplain, stream and flood control projects to prevent flood damage in the future.
Sen. Street said it is critical to address these issues with green infrastructure much of
which has disaster mitigation benefits and also has the benefit of creating jobs and improving the
quality of life.
He added it is also important moving forward as we deal with the results of climate
change on the Commonwealth and the impacts of increasing rainfall.
Click Here to watch a video​ of the hearing and for written testimony from the hearing.
Additional Background
As explained above, frequent and sustained smaller stream flooding this past summer
across all of Pennsylvania not only caused significant property damage, but landslides in
Western parts of the state, repeated property losses and sinkholes in the Northcentral and Eastern
areas and a dramatic increase in the mosquito population carrying West Nile Virus.
A Penn State/Florida Gulf Coast University study done for the ​Center for Rural
Pennsylvania in 2017​ ​found ​very heavy precipitation events have increased 71 percent​ over the
last 50 years and the frequency is likely to keep increasing.
The ​2015 Draft Pennsylvania Climate Impacts Assessment Update​ done for ​DEP’s
Climate Change Advisory Committee​ by Penn State’s ​Environment and Natural Resources
Institute​ found “There are substantial and increasing flooding risks in Pennsylvania for both
urban areas and infrastructure in rural areas. Adaptation strategies that focus on increasing flood
preparedness, reducing vulnerabilities and increasing resilience in more extreme and more
frequent flooding scenarios are of high priority.”

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An update to the Pennsylvania Climate Impacts Assessment will be discussed by DEP’s
Climate Change Advisory Committee on February 26​.
The ​J​une 2018 update to Pennsylvania’s Federal Hazard Mitigation Plan​ submitted by the
PA Emergency Management Agency to FEMA for the first time include a more “robust”
evaluation of how climate change would affect the risk of flooding and other natural disasters in
the state.
The Plan concluded, in part-- “Across the United States, natural and human-made
disasters have led to increasing levels of deaths, injuries, property damage, and interruption of
business and government services. This trend is projected to increase due to the impacts of
climate change, therefore adding data, analysis, and action related to climate change was an
important component of this plan update.”
The ​4th National Climate Assessment issued in November​ of last year specifically
pointed to an increase in extreme, recurring precipitation events in its assessment of impacts on
the Northeast, including Pennsylvania.
The report said, “The recent dominant trend in precipitation throughout the Northeast has
been towards increases in rainfall intensity, with increases in intensity exceeding those in other
regions of the contiguous United States. Urban areas are at risk for large numbers of evacuated
and displaced populations and damaged infrastructure due to both extreme precipitation events
and recurrent flooding, potentially requiring significant emergency response efforts and
consideration of a long-term commitment to rebuilding and adaptation, and/or support for
relocation where needed.”
It continued, “Much of the infrastructure in the Northeast, including drainage and sewer
systems, flood and storm protection assets, transportation systems, and power supply, is nearing
the end of its planned life expectancy. Climate-related disruptions will only exacerbate existing
issues with aging infrastructure.”
For more information, visit PEMA’s ​Hazard Mitigation​ webpage and DEP’s ​Climate
Change​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Small stream flood damage to a road in York County last summer.)
NewsClips:
State Officials Proposed Funding Flood Protection With Natural Gas Severance Tax
Help Sought For Flood-Prone Mill Creek In Avoca
2-Part Plan Could Prevent Flooding On Mill Creek In Avoca
Grafius Run Flood Mitigation Project Moves To Next Stage In Lycoming
Pittsburgh Corps Of Engineers Said It Prevented $1 Billion In Flood Damage
Related Stories:
PaEN: DEP Climate Advisory Committee Meets Feb. 26 For Update On Action Plan, Impacts
Assessment, Inventory
PaEN: 71% Increase In Very Heavy Precipitation Events In Last 54 Years, 831,000
Pennsylvanians Living At Risk On Floodplains
PaEN: DEP Working With Villanova University On Update To Stormwater BMP Manual To
Encourage Green Infrastructure
PaEN: Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater
Pollution, Reducing Flood Damage
PaEN: The Economic Value Of Green Infrastructure: Calculating A Return On Investments In
Parks, Watershed Restoration, Farmland BMPs, Open Spaces

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PaEN: 4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding,
Wildfires, Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
PaEN: New National Wildlife Federation Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing
Climate Impacts
Related Stories This Week:
PaEN: DEP Outlines Flood Prevention Benefits Of Restore PA For Luzerne County
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

DEP Outlines Flood Prevention Benefits Of Restore PA For Luzerne County

On February 22, Department of


Environmental Protection Regional Director
Mike Bedrin joined Rep. Mike Carroll
(D-Luzerne) and local leaders to discuss
Avoca Borough’s challenges with flood
control and how the bipartisan ​Restore
Pennsylvania​ infrastructure proposal will
help prevent future flooding.
“Like other municipalities across
Pennsylvania, Avoca faces a flood control
problem, with recurring flooding on Mill
Creek bringing damage to local businesses,”
said DEP Regional Director Bedrin. “With
the increased frequency of extreme weather, the problem isn’t going away anytime soon. The
community needs a lasting solution. Restore Pennsylvania gives us that solution, on the scale we
need.”
Restore Pennsylvania, the $4.5 billion bipartisan proposal funded through a
commonsense severance tax to rebuild Pennsylvania’s infrastructure, will increase resources for
storm preparedness and disaster recovery.
Avoca has a history of floods and ice jams near the York Avenue bridge on Mill Creek.
DEP dam safety expert Doug Hill discussed a proposed two-part, public-private project to create
a floodplain and then raise the bridge and modify the channel.
The floodplain work is underway, with $150,000 in grant support from DEP, but
additional funding is needed to support the project’s estimated remaining $1.5 million cost.
If passed, Restore Pennsylvania would be able to fund this project and others like it
around the state.
Restore Pennsylvania is a statewide plan to aggressively address the commonwealth’s
vital infrastructure needs. Funded through a commonsense severance tax, Restore Pennsylvania
is the only plan that will help make Pennsylvania a leader in the 21st century.
To learn more, view the full Restore Pennsylvania plan.
(​Photo:​ Mike Bedrin, DEP Regional Director.)
NewsClips:
State Officials Proposed Funding Flood Protection With Natural Gas Severance Tax
Help Sought For Flood-Prone Mill Creek In Avoca
2-Part Plan Could Prevent Flooding On Mill Creek In Avoca

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Grafius Run Flood Mitigation Project Moves To Next Stage In Lycoming
Pittsburgh Corps Of Engineers Said It Prevented $1 Billion In Flood Damage
Related Stories:
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating
Costs Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
PaEN: Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community &
Environmental Infrastructure Investment Program
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Related Stories This Week
PaEN: PEMA: Over $101.5 Million In Flood Damage Not Covered By Feds In 2018; Intense
Flooding Events Increasing In PA
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8

The ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation


Plan Steering Committee​ is now scheduled to meet on
March 8 to hear presentations from Adams and Franklin
counties on the plans they developed to meet their
nutrient pollution reduction targets.
Click Here​ for the complete agenda.
Adams, Franklin, Lancaster and York counties were
selected to ​pilot the county clean water planning process
developed by the Steering Committee for the
development of county-level clean water plans.
Here are some of the handouts available for the
Adams and Franklin county presentations--
-- ​Handout A1 – Adams County Narrative​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout A2 – Adams County Snapshot​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout A3– Adams County Programmatic Recommendations Template​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout A4 – Adams County Planning and Progress Template​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout A5 – Adams County Technical Appendix​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout A6 – Adams County Presentation​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout F1 – Franklin County Narrative​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout F2 – Franklin County Snapshot​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout F3 – Franklin County Programmatic Recommendations​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout F4 – Franklin County WIP Template​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout F5 – Franklin County Template 2 Detailed BMPS​ (PDF)
Also on the agenda is a presentation by the Local Area Goals Workground on
recommended updates to the Countywide Action Planning Process. Here are some of the
handouts available--
-- ​Handout LAG1 – Local Area Goals Workgroup Powerpoint presentation​ (PDF)

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-- ​Handout LAG2 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Recommendations and Planning Templates
(PDF)
-- ​Handout LAG3 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Planning and Progress Template: Watershed
Wide Approach​(PDF)
-- ​Handout LAG4 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Planning and Progress Template: Staged
Approach​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout LAG5 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup County Planning Process and Community
Clean Water Toolbox Updates and Recommendations​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout LAG6 – Revised Pennsylvania's Community Clean Water Planning Guide​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout LAG7 – Revised Pennsylvania's Community Clean Water Technical Toolbox​ (PDF)
Handouts for meetings are posted on the ​Steering Committee webpage​.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg
starting at 9:00. [​Note:​ Meetings are typically webcast and registration information should be
posted soon on the ​Steering Committee webpage​.]
The next meeting of the Steering Committee is on March 22.
For more information and copies of available handouts, visit the ​PA Chesapeake Bay
Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee​ webpage.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
PaEN: Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
PaEN: Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension
PaEN: Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
PaEN: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For
Science & The Arts In Harrisburg
NewsClips:
Sen. Yaw Pushing To Incorporate Local Stream Cleaning With Chesapeake Bay Efforts
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
Crable: Injecting Manure Into Farm Fields Could Combat Runoff, Odor Problems
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support

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On February 21, DEP’s ​Citizens Advisory Council​ sent ​letters to members of the House and
Senate urging​ them to support legislation creating a Keystone Tree Fund to support DCNR
programs to plant riparian stream buffers.
House Bill 374​ was introduced by Rep. Garth Everett (R-Lycoming) and is now on the
House Calendar for action. The companion bill-- ​Senate Bill 108​-- introduced by Sen. Gene
Yaw (R-Lycoming) is in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
“The Commonwealth is faced with hard decisions and difficult obstacles in complying
with the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. The Keystone Tree Fund, however, is just the kind of initiative
that can raise a significant amount of money that will go directly towards a proven method of
improving water quality without placing further strain on the state budget—truly a win-win.
“The sooner this bill is passed the sooner we will begin to see measurable water quality
gains.
“Cleaner streams mean better aquatic habitats, drinking water sources, and recreational
uses. A citizen-driven volunteer fund that supports these goals and can help the Commonwealth
comply with the Chesapeake Bay TMDL should be a legislative priority.”
The legislation would create a voluntary $3 checkoff on driver and vehicle registrations
to support DCNR’s TreeVitalize and Riparian Forest Buffer Grants programs. ​Click Here​ for a
copy of the bill summary.
Click Here​ for a copy of the letters which support the respective House and Senate bills.
The 18-member Citizens Advisory Council is appointed equally by the Senate, House
and Governor to advise DEP on its programs.
For more information, visit the ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions
should be directed to Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
PaEN: Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Related Stories:
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits

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Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Partnership For Delaware Estuary Launches 10-Year Comprehensive Conservation &


Management Plan, Including Mussel Hatchery

On February 19, ​The Partnership for the Delaware


Estuary​ kicked-off the implementation of a revised
Comprehensive Conservation and Management
Plan​. Implementation of the plan to include a
mussel hatchery at Bartram’s Garden​ in
Philadelphia.
The plan focuses on several pillars: Clean Waters;
Strong Communities; Healthy Habitats; and a
Financial Strategy and Monitoring Approach to help
achieve the goals set forth in the plan.
The Delaware Estuary – the tidal Delaware River
and Bay – is the heart of the Delaware River
Watershed. It spans a diverse set of geographies and ecological conditions.
Each region is supported by unique rivers and tributaries, such as the wild and scenic
Delaware River above Trenton that provides the mainstem flows necessary to sustain life in the
Estuary; the mighty Schuylkill, Cooper, and Christina Rivers that fuel the growth of cities and
industry in the region; and the coastal plain rivers including the Broadkill and Maurice that
support farms and fisheries.
These natural resources support vibrant communities of fish, wildlife, and millions of
people in the watersheds that surround them.
As part of the process of designating the Delaware Estuary a ​National Estuary Program​,
hundreds of stakeholders worked together to develop a Comprehensive Conservation and
Management Plan (CCMP) that was approved in September, 1996.
The original CCMP was intended to guide the collective efforts of environmental
agencies and organizations in the region to protect and enhance the Delaware River and Bay,
including the surrounding watersheds.
Much has changed since 1996, and PDE worked with members of the Steering
Committee, the Estuary Implementation Committee, the Science and Technical Advisory
Committee, hundreds of local partners, experts and stakeholders, to establish a revised set of
goals and strategies for achieving and tracking improvements to the health of the Estuary.
This revised plan seeks to continue and accelerate improvement of habitats, waters, and
quality of life in the watershed over the next ten years to benefit the people who live, work, and
play in the Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania tri-state region.
"Delaware stands strong with PDE partners, including our good neighbors in
Pennsylvania and New Jersey, on our shared goals of ensuring clean water, strong communities,
and healthy habitats throughout the estuary," said ​Delaware Department of Natural Resources
Secretary Shawn M. Garvin​. "By collaborating with state and federal agencies, municipalities,
businesses, community groups, non-profits, and tri-state residents through this new

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comprehensive management plan, we are unified in working toward a vibrant and
fiercely-protected future for our beautiful, fragile, and vitally important Delaware Estuary and its
precious resources."
As part of the implementation of the CCMP, PDE will work with their partners to
conserve, restore and enhance depleted shellfish beds, which provide many ecological and
economic benefits and are a hallmark feature of a healthy aquatic ecosystem.
The targeted shellfish range from oysters in Delaware Bay to freshwater mussels in
streams and rivers.
As an example, PDE and partners in the new Aquatic Research and Restoration Center
are launching a ​Mussels for Clean Water Initiative​ (MuCWI) to promote cleaner water and
healthier aquatic ecosystems via the propagation, rearing and outplanting of freshwater mussels
from a hatchery planned for ​Bartram’s Garden​ in southwest Philadelphia.
“The Delaware Estuary Program places critical emphasis on clean waters, strong
communities and healthy habitats. ,” said ​EPA Region 2 Administrator Pete Lopez​. “EPA
recognizes and supports the goal of carefully managing our resources to meet multiple
objectives. The Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan helps chart a balanced,
thoughtful course for further enhancement of ecological health and recreational offerings, as well
as strengthened economic opportunities within the Estuary.”
Up to a half million baby mussels will eventually be produced annually using native
species that are genetically appropriate for specific areas of the watershed. These offspring will
be reared to hardier sizes at satellite partner facilities and ponds throughout the region.
When ready, these mussels will then be relocated to streams and rivers where they once
prospered, especially locations where they can help improve water quality the most.
“Our management plan is a blueprint for success in the estuary,” said ​EPA Region 3
Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio​. “It offers a sensible guide for achievable next steps
in providing cleaner water, healthier habitats and stronger communities. EPA was pleased to
work with PennVEST to provide funding for the mussel hatchery that will serve as a signature
accomplishment in our efforts.”
Like oysters in saltwater, freshwater mussels are filter-feeders that remove substantial
amounts of microscopic particles, including many forms of pollutants.
Each adult mussel can filter up to 10 gallons of water per day, directly improving water
clarity and providing more light for bottom plants. Some harmful pollutants are removed or
transformed into less harmful forms.
A robust mussel bed can also help stabilize erosion and improve habitat conditions for
many other plants and animals.
As noted by ​Danielle Kreeger, senior science director at PDE​, "Freshwater mussels are
some of the most undervalued aquatic animals in the world. When healthy and abundant, they
can form beds that filter millions of gallons of water per acre every day, and the decline of
natural mussel beds in the Delaware River Basin makes it that much harder to keep the water
clean."
Construction and operation of the mussel hatchery are expected to cost between $10-11
million over the eight-year start up, and ​PennVEST has authorized $7.9 million​ for construction
phases.
The capital return on investment from mussel sales and associated income is expected to
be positive, not including the value of the ecological benefits that the mussel beds will provide to

13
our region’s waterways.
“Managing water resources in the Delaware River Estuary is endlessly complex. Water
quality in the Estuary has improved significantly over the past half century, no question. But as
our understanding increases, new challenges continually emerge. To address these challenges, it
is important that we set new and higher goals and find new strategies for achieving them. The
revised CCMP provides a vision, measurable goals and a dynamic plan towards a cleaner, more
resilient and healthier Estuary," said ​Steve Tambini, Delaware River Basin Commission
Executive Director​. "The DRBC’s scientists, engineers and planners have been proud to
contribute to the revised plan and are deeply committed to working with PDE, federal, state and
local partners to develop and implement the new strategies required to meet emerging
challenges.”
In addition to PDE, EPA, and DRBC, core partners in the Delaware Estuary Program
include the ​Philadelphia Water Department​, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and
Environmental Control, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and the New
Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
Executive Director of PDE Jennifer Adkins​ thanked all of these partners and the
hundreds of individuals who contributed time and expertise to revising the CCMP over the last
three years.
For more information on the plan’s contents and process, visit the ​Comprehensive
Conservation and Management Plan​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Partnership
for the Delaware Estuary​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Partnership, ​Like
the Partnership on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​,​ ​Join them on Instagram​ or ​Subscribe to
their YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here​ to support the Partnership’s work.
NewsClips:
Mussel Hatchery To Be Built To Reduce Pollutants In Delaware River
Feb. 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
Related Story:
PaEN: Bill Introduced Again To Require Drilling Rights Compensation If DRBC Adopts
Fracking Ban
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA

On February 21, the ​PA Resources Council


presented its fourth annual Zero Waste Awards
to 23 environmental leaders in recognition of
their commitment to adopting sustainable
environmental practices and diverting waste
through recycling, composting and reuse.
The award winners were recognized at a
special reception at ​Construction Junction​ in
Pittsburgh. Stephanie Barger, Director of Market
Transformation & Development at TRUE Zero
Waste Certification, served as keynote speaker. Event sponsors were Straub Brewing, Gateway

14
Recycling and Construction Junction.
“PRC’s Zero Waste Pennsylvania program provides special events, commercial
businesses and institutions with vital waste reduction assistance,” said PRC Co-Executive
Director Justin Stockdale. “We’re pleased to recognize the accomplishments of those committed
to preserving the environment, and we applaud the efforts of this year’s class of honorees for
their outstanding leadership, innovation and dedication.”
In 2018, PRC’s Zero Waste team assisted dozens of events, businesses and institutions
with sustainable waste management solutions. Last year, Zero Waste efforts diverted nearly 38
tons of materials to be recycled/composted and reached nearly 750,000 individuals directly and
indirectly through waste audits as well as public and private zero waste services.
“Our Zero Waste team members provide technical expertise and hands-on assistance to
enable a wide variety of organizations to pursue the ultimate goal of producing zero waste,” said
Stockdale. “Each year many successful partnerships result in diverting tons of material to
become valuable compost and recycled products.”
At the fourth annual PRC Zero Waste Event & Business Awards Celebration, the 23
honored events and businesses received recognition of their commitment to zero waste
principles.
The 2018 Zero Waste Award recipients are--
Zero Waste Excellence Awards
-- ​Pittsburgh Conroy Education Center Recycling Program​: Pittsburgh Public Schools
-- ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center
-- ​Food Recovery Heroes​: University of Pittsburgh
Event Achievement Awards -​Recognizing events/institutions that diverted a significant
percentage of waste in 2018
Platinum - 95 percent or greater waste diversion
-- ​Environmental Charter School​ 10th Anniversary Campfire: Donna Bour Associates
-- Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh Impact 2018: Donna Bour Associates
-- Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race: City of Pittsburgh Office of Special Events
-- Steel Chef Cookoff: ​Focus On Renewal Sto-Rox​ & ​Sustainable Pittsburgh
Gold - 90-94 percent waste diversion
-- Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon: ​Pittsburgh Three Rivers Marathon, Inc.​ (P3R)
-- EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler: ​Pittsburgh Three Rivers Marathon, Inc​. (P3R)
-- Grand Opening Party: ​Patagonia Pittsburgh
-- Hollow Oak Brewhaha: ​Hollow Oak Land Trust
-- Mt. Lebanon Earth Day: ​LeboGreen.org
Silver - 75-89 percent waste diversion
-- Alcosan Open House: ​Alcosan
-- Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival: ​Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
-- Kayafest: ​Big Burrito Restaurant Group
-- Kickball For A Cause: ​PUMP
-- Steel City Big Four: ​Construction Junction
-- Triboro Ecoblast Pool Party: ​Triboro Ecodistrict
-- Walk MS: ​National Multiple Sclerosis Society
Bronze - 60-74 percent waste diversion
-- Colfax Carnival: ​Pittsburgh Colfax PTO

15
-- ​Deutschtown Music Festival
-- Night In The Tropics: ​National Aviary
-- Walk To Defeat ALS: ​ALS Association Western Pennsylvania Chapter
For more information on the Zero Waste Program and the services available, visit PRC’s
Zero Waste Pennsylvania​ webpage or call 412-488-7490.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Suburban Philly Recycling Programs Face Challenges, Settle Into New Normal
Moment Of Reckoning: U.S. Cities Burn Recyclables After China Bans Imports
O’Neill: Waste Not, Want Not, Salvaged Materials
Litterbugs Pick Up And Pay Up In Pennsylvania
Everything You Need To Know About Litter And Illegal Dumping In Philadelphia
Allegheny CleanWays Tackles Illegal Dumping While Making Community Connections
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny
County
PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home Workshops In
Allegheny County
Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways, Other
Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny


County

On February 22, the ​PA Resources Council


announced it will hold a series of ​8 “pop-up” glass
recycling collection events​ in Allegheny County in
response to the sudden removal of glass from many
of the region’s residential curbside recycling
programs.
“Based on overwhelming demand from residents,
local governments and the glass industry, PRC is
announcing a new alternative for glass recycling,”
according to PRC Co-Executive Director Justin
Stockdale. “This exciting new program will ensure
that glass is not trash, even if it can no longer be put out for curbside recycling in numerous
municipalities due to recent changes in waste haulers’ contracts.”
Residents can drop off all colors of glass bottles, jars and jugs at no cost. PRC staff and

16
volunteers will be on-site to assist recyclers.
“PRC is excited to introduce this new opportunity for glass recycling in the Pittsburgh
area that will not only provide a solution for residents but that keeps the supply of recycled glass
flowing to the mills that consume it as a raw material,” said Stockdale.
The pop-up glass recycling network is sponsored by ​CAP Glass​, ​Owens Illinois​ and
Straub Brewery​ in conjunction with several local municipalities impacted by recent changes in
curbside recycling regulations.
“We commend the municipal governments who helped PRC develop this network for
their strong commitment to recycling and leadership, and we thank Oxford Development, Quaker
Valley School District and Avonworth Park for serving as site partners,” said Stockdale. “PRC
hopes to expand this service by partnering with additional municipalities who also recognize that
glass remains a valuable commodity with vibrant demand in the regional/national recycled
materials marketplace.”
Pop-Up Schedule
The initial schedule of glass recycling events will be held from 9:00 to 2:00--
-- March 9:​ Village Square Mall, sponsored by Municipality of Bethel Park
-- March 30:​ Edgeworth Elementary School, sponsored by Edgeworth Borough
-- April 6:​ South Fayette Municipal Complex, sponsored by South Fayette Township
-- April 13: ​Dormont Pool, sponsored by Borough of Dormont
-- April 27: ​Avalon Borough Park, sponsored by Borough of Avalon & Bellevue Borough
-- May 11:​ Village Square Mall, sponsored by Township of Upper St. Clair
-- June 1:​ Avonworth Park, sponsored by Kilbuck Township
-- June 8:​ [location to be announced] sponsored by Municipality of Mt. Lebanon
For more information, visit PRC’s Glass Recycling webpage or send email to:
glass@prc.org​.
Why Recycle Glass?
-- Glass bottles and jars are 100 percent recyclable and can be recycled endlessly without any
loss in purity or quality.
-- Recycled glass containers are always needed because glass manufacturers require high-quality
recycled container glass to meet market demand for new glass containers.
-- Glass containers returned for recycling can be made into new glass bottles and jars that
constitute up to 95 percent recycled content.
-- Your glass bottles and jars can go from your recycling bin to the store shelf in as little as 30
days.
-- 1 ton of carbon dioxide is reduced for every 6 tons of recycled container glass used in
manufacturing.
Where Will The Glass Go?
Pennsylvania is home to three glass mills that depend on our recycled glass bottles and
jars as the raw material to produce glass containers. In addition several other glass mills operate
in neighboring states resulting in one of the strongest markets for glass recycling in North
America.
PRC will ship all collected glass to our partner ​CAP Glass​ who will prepare it to the mill
specifications. This glass will be used to make beer and liquor bottles, pickle and mayonnaise
jars and many other consumer products.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources

17
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Suburban Philly Recycling Programs Face Challenges, Settle Into New Normal
Moment Of Reckoning: U.S. Cities Burn Recyclables After China Bans Imports
O’Neill: Waste Not, Want Not, Salvaged Materials
Litterbugs Pick Up And Pay Up In Pennsylvania
Everything You Need To Know About Litter And Illegal Dumping In Philadelphia
Allegheny CleanWays Tackles Illegal Dumping While Making Community Connections
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA
PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home Workshops In
Allegheny County
Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways, Other
Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Pittsburgh's U.S. Steel Tower Becomes 2nd Largest Building In The World To Achieve
LEED Silver Certification For O+M

Winthrop Management​ and ​evolve environment ::


architecture​ recently announced the iconic U.S.
Steel Tower, in the heart of downtown Pittsburgh,
has earned a LEED for Building Operations and
Maintenance (O+M): Existing Buildings Silver
Certification, making it the second largest building
in the world to achieve such a distinction.
LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) is the most widely used
green building rating system and is the globally
recognized symbol of sustainability achievement.
The LEED for O+M: Existing Buildings rating
system is unique compared to other versions of LEED because it is concerned with how existing
buildings actually perform.
The certification measures how existing buildings perform in the areas of energy and
water efficiency, indoor environmental quality, use of sustainable materials, transportation and
other criteria.
“This is a tremendous honor and a true collaborative effort with our partners, building
tenants, and owners,” said Thomas J. Harrington, General Manager of the U.S. Steel Tower. “To
earn this designation for a building designed when energy was inexpensive and energy efficiency
not a first priority is a notable accomplishment. We salute all our tenants who have supported our

18
efforts, particularly UPMC, whose commitment to sustainability in multiple floor renovations
has earned several Silver and Gold LEED certifications.”
Even after 50 years, the Tower is the nation’s seventh-largest high-rise office building
and was designed when resource efficiency was not an expectation.
Winthrop Management is continually improving the building operations, and this
achievement was preceded by a BOMA 360 certification and three consecutive years of Energy
Star certification (2016 – 2018) resulting from Winthrop’s leadership.
UPMC’s LEED Silver and Gold certifications of nearly half of the building’s leasable
square footage, over one million square feet, has also been instrumental in setting the tone for
updating building standards and leveraging building improvements.
“LEED for O+M: Existing Buildings certification is the culmination of over ten years of
various efforts, beginning with UPMC’s tenant certifications, then the Owner’s building systems
improvements, then the engagement of the building tenants through a unique Tenant
Sustainability Committee,” said Marc Mondor, AIA, Principal with evolveEA, the building’s and
UPMC’s sustainability consultant. “We’re especially proud of this Committee, as Winthrop and
the tenants rely upon it as a mechanism for ongoing awareness, engagement and improvement
for the building and its users.”
Angelica Ciranni, Vice President of Strategy and Innovation at ​Green Building Alliance
adds, “As a founding partner of the Pittsburgh 2030 District, the U.S. Steel Tower has
continually advanced market standards for occupant health. Their performance-based
investments across the spectrum of sustainable innovations present a national model for building
renovations, driving Pittsburgh toward 50% reductions in energy, water, and transportation
emissions.”
Built in 1970 and stretching 841 feet and 64 floors high, it was constructed at the height
of Pittsburgh’s first renaissance and reflected Pittsburgh’s then dominance of the steel
manufacturing industry.
The building’s signature triangular shape was designed to reflect the city’s three rivers.
Practices deployed by U.S. Steel Tower to achieve LEED Silver O+M certification
include:
-- Location & Transportation​: Support for alternative modes of transportation, including secure
bicycle parking, electric vehicle charging stations, and rideshare matching. Approximately 60
percent of USS Tower employees commute using alternative modes of transportation.
-- Sustainable Sites:​ Site management practices that reduce harmful chemical use, energy waste,
water waste, air pollution, solid waste, and chemical runoff.
-- Water Efficiency:​ Fixture and fitting upgrades, water sub-metering, increased cooling tower
water cycles, and drip irrigation for the landscape.
-- Energy & Atmosphere:​ Installation of highly efficient LEDs in the lobby and garage,
installation of Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs), HVAC upgrades, and new energy-efficient
elevator system
-- Materials & Resources:​ Adoption of sustainable purchasing and recycling practices
Indoor Environmental Quality: Green cleaning practices, products, and equipment that improve
human health, reduce impact on the environment, and provide a clean workspace for all tenants.
Now a national model for building renovations, the U.S. Steel Tower is helping to drive
forward the City of Pittsburgh’s goal of 50 percent reductions in energy, water, and
transportation emissions by 2030 as part of the ​Pittsburgh 2030 District​ initiative.

19
Questions about the U.S. Steel Tower should be directed to Daniel Klein, evolveEA, at
daniel@evolveea.com​ or 412-362-2100, Tom Harringon, Winthrop Management at
tharrington@winthroppgh.com​ or 412-261-9940 and Angelica Ciranni, Green Building Alliance,
at ​angelicac@gbapgh.org​ or 412-773-6013.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
NewsClips:
Erie 2030 District Set To Launch With 9 Partners To Save Energy, Water
U.S. Steel Tower Earns LEED Distinction
LEED Silver Certification For O+M
Related Story:
PaEN: Firefly-Inspired Surfaces Improve Efficiency Of LED Lightbulbs
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Senate/House Bills Moving Last Week

The following bills of interest saw action last week in the House and Senate--

House

Removing SRBC Employees From State Pension System​: ​House Bill 60​ (Cox-R-Berks)
removing new Susquehanna River Basin Commission employees from state employees pension
system (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was amended on the House Floor, reported into and
out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed the House ​108 to 81 by a party-line vote​,
Republicans supporting. [​Note: ​This bill is being moved by conservative House Republicans in
retribution for what they see as SRBC overstepping its authority-- SRBC didn’t. ​Click Here for
more​.]

Keystone Tree Fund: ​House Bill 374 ​(Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing the Keystone Tree
Fund to support tree planting programs by the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources (​sponsor summary​) was reported from the House Transportation Committee and is
now on the House Calendar for action.

Agriculture Security Law:​ ​House Bill 370​ (Klunk-R-York) amending the Agricultural Area
Security Law to provide for the voluntary relinquishment of the right to construct a residence on
a preserved farm ​(sponsor summary​) and ​House Bill 441​ (Sonney-R-Erie) amending the
Agricultural Area Security Law to allow wind energy projects on preserved farmland (​sponsor
summary​) were reported from the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and Tabled.

Tree Of Heaven:​ ​House Bill 404​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) designating the Tree of Heaven, a
favorite of the Spotted Lanternfly, as a noxious weed (​sponsor summary​) was reported from the
House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and Tabled.

Maple Syrup Week:​ ​House Resolution 84​ (Causer-R-Cameron) designating March 11-17
Maple Producers Week in Pennsylvania (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the House.
20
Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (March 11): ​House Bill 60​ (Cox-R-Berks) to prohibit new employees of the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission from being part of the PA State Employees Retirement
System (​sponsor summary​); ​ ​House Bill 374 ​(Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing the Keystone
Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 9​ (Yaw-R-Lycoming) designating the Eastern
Hellbender as the state amphibian and clean water ambassador (​sponsor summary​).​ ​ <> ​Click
Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (March 19): ​Senate Bill 147​ (Laughlin-R-Erie) authorizing the Game Commission to
allow Sunday hunting. ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meetings This Week

House:​ the ​Game and Fisheries Committee​ holds an informational meeting on Game and Fish &
Boat Commission’s Annual Reports. <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ Appropriations Budget Hearings: DEP. <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee
Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Paying For Delaware Watershed Drilling Rights:​ ​Senate Bill 305​ (Baker-R-Luzerne)
declaring an action to ban fracking in the Delaware River Watershed by the Delaware River
Basin Commission an act of eminent domain requiring reimbursement to property owners for
drilling rights (​sponsor summary​). ​Click Here for more.​

Lead Testing: ​Senate Bill 312​ (Baker-R-Luzerne, Yudichak-D-Luzerne) bipartisan initiative


requiring the testing of children and others for lead levels (​sponsor summar​y).

Land Trust Set Aside:​ ​House Bill 574​ (Greiner-R-Lancaster) to set aside a portion of state
21
agricultural preservation funds for use by land trusts to preserve farms (​sponsor summary​).

House and Senate Co-Sponsorship Memos

House: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos


Senate: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
Budget Hearings: Through March 8
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House
Budget Hearings: Through March 7
March 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change,


Permit Fees, Fund Transfers

On February 19, the ​House


Environmental Resources and
Energy Committee​ held an
informational meeting on the
Department of Environmental
Protection’s budget that covered
lots of ground from whether
climate change was real, proposed
Oil and Gas Program fee increases,
22
whether public hearings on pipeline permits were necessary and more.
DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell was joined at the meeting by Ramez Ziadeh, P.E.
Executive Deputy Secretary for Programs and Scott Perry, Deputy Secretary for Oil and Gas
Management.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler), Majority Chair of the Committee, and Kathy Rapp
(R-Warren), questioned the statement in the ​written budget overview DEP provided​ that said,
“​the most serious environmental threat facing Pennsylvania is climate change.”
Rep. Metcalfe said he thought most people believe issues like [​Binghamton​] New York
dumping 50 million gallons of wastewater into our river is a more serious problem. In a way, he
said, DEP’s statement is good because it means issues like fracking are not a serious threat. He
said he believes fracking is not a threat, not having energy independence is.
Rep. Metcalfe added he thought climate change is just an excuse for government to tax
CO2 (carbon dioxide), adding the government would tax oxygen if they could. He said he looks
forward to continuing the climate debate.
Rep. Rapp asked if DEP is advocating a severance tax on wind or solar energy, like the
Administration is for natural gas.
Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware), Minority Chair of the Committee, and Rep.
Carolyn Comitta (D-Chester) said they believe climate change is a real threat and needs to be
dealt with.
DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell said Pennsylvania is already seeing the impacts of
climate change ​in increased precipitation events​, flooding and stormwater issues that need to be
addressed. He added DEP is not advocating a severance tax on wind or solar energy.
Rep. Comitta followed up by asking DEP what impact the forthcoming ​Climate Change
Action Plan recommendations​ will have on DEP’s budget and how the ​Restore Pennsylvania
proposal​ could address climate change issues.
McDonnell said DEP has been addressing issues like controlling methane emissions from
oil and gas operations in its ​General Permit 5​ update and is developing ​new regulations to cover
existing facilities​.
In addition, he said ​Gov. Wolf’s recent Executive Order​ sets a greenhouse emissions
reduction goal for the state and tasks the GreenGov Council to take steps to implement the
Order.
McDonnell added as you look at adaptation and mitigation strategies to deal with issues
like more frequent stormwater and flooding impacts, those could be addressed by the Restore
Pennsylvania proposal.
Here’s a quick rundown on other issues raised at the meeting, some of which were also
addressed in ​last week’s House hearing on DEP’s budget​ request--
-- Unnecessary Hearings On Pipeline Permits:​ Rep. Timothy O’Neal (R-Washington) asked if
DEP looking at eliminating doing certain things that are not necessary, like holding hearings on
pipeline permit applications when they are not required. He pointed to the example of the Shell
Falcon ethane pipeline in his district. McDonnell said generally the agency is looking at doing
more with general permits that simplify the permit process and taking other steps to improve
efficiencies. On pipeline permits, McDonnell said the challenge is issuing a permit that will
withstand appeals. He added he believes DEP has had a defensible record on issuing pipeline
permits in particular. He also said DEP received a number of requests for hearings on the Shell
Falcon pipeline and other projects they have to respond to.

23
-- ​Special Fund Transfers:​ Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) expressed concern about proposed
transfers from Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener), Oil and Gas Lease Fund,
Keystone Recreation, Parks and Conservation Fund and Recycling Fund to pay operating costs
and generally about significant reductions in funding and staff in the agency over the last decade
or more.
-- Recycling Fund:​ Rep. Chris Dush (R-Jefferson) asked why the balance in the Recycling Fund
does not go down and whether grants were going out the door. McDonnell said when the $2
Recycling Fee was in danger of sunsetting in 2017, DEP slowed down giving out grants because
DEP wanted to meet all existing commitments without creating new ones. He also explained
revenue and outflow from the Recycling Fund tends to come in and go out in larger chunks.
-- ​Fee Supported Programs:​ Rep. Metcalfe asked which programs are solely supported by fees.
McDonnell said it varies, the Oil and Gas Program is funded entirely by fees and a $6 million
transfer from the Marcellus Legacy Fund financed by Act 13 impact fees. The Air Quality and
Radiation Protection Programs are supported by a combination of fees and federal funds. The
Safe Drinking Water Program is funded by federal, state and permit fees.
Rep. Metcalfe asked specifically about the “huge” proposed increase in oil and gas permit
fees. McDonnell said the program is losing up to $800,000 a month to support the program and
as a result things are not getting done, like some inspections. He noted permit fees are the only
tool the agency has to raise funds to support its programs. Deputy Scott Perry said the previous
fee was predicated on DEP receiving a larger number of permits applications to review-- 2,600
when the actual number has been about 2,000. He explained permit reviews are only a small part
of what the Oil and Gas Program does saying about 8 people handle permit reviews out of the
190 now in the program. The fee is, by statute, required to cover the costs of the entire program,
not just permit review. While there have been a smaller number of permits coming in the door,
Perry said DEP’s overall workload grows because they have to assure compliance with
requirements cover all the wells that have already been drilled.
-- Calculation Of Permit Fee Amounts:​ Rep. Lee James (R-Venango) asked about how DEP
calculates its permit fees (​following up on question he asked​ at the budget hearing last week) and
what happens if an applicant does not pay a fee. McDonnell said a workload and cost analysis is
done on each program. DEP also looks at opportunities for efficiencies and reducing costs
before it arrives at a proposed fee increase. He noted adopting permits fees is the only means the
agency has under state law to address funding gaps. He added the agency does not count on
fines and penalties to pay for programs. He explained DEP follows the Regulatory Review Act
in adopting its fees which calls for review by the House and Senate and the Independent
Regulatory Review Commission and the public. Advisory committees are also typically involved
inside DEP as well in developing fee proposals. He explained if someone doesn’t pay a permit
fee, that’s a violation of DEP’s regulations.
-- Business Process Improvement:​ Rep. Chris Dush (R-Jefferson) asked if McDonnell was
familiar with the 6-sigma business improvement process and what steps DEP has taken to change
its processes. McDonnell said as of today [February 19] DEP has a new Director of Business
Transformation on board that is looking at making its business practices more efficient and
effective. He noted, however, he personally was familiar with “lean” transformative process like
six-sigma and ISO 14,000 certifications. McDonnell explained the agency has already improved
its permitting processes by switching to epermitting which started with the mining program. The
results there, he said, were encouraging because it reduced the application by about 25 percent.

24
-- ​Emergency Permits For Stream Work:​ Rep. David Zimmerman (R-Lancaster) asked with
all the rain a lot of sandbars developed, roads have been damaged and there has been erosion in
fields. He asked if DEP’s emergency stream work permit can be changed to allow more area
beyond 50 feet for stream clearance and asked about an increase in permit fees. McDonnell said
DEP recently put out handbook on emergency stream work permits​ that explains what is covered
and not covered by these permits. Executive Deputy Ziadeh added under emergency permits
areas can be extended beyond the 50 feet. He added that emergency permits are free. McDonnell
said last summer with all the flooding the DEP Northcentral Office reviewed over 200
emergency permits and turned them around in 24 to 48 hours.
-- MS4 Stormwater Pollution Reduction Program:​ Rep. Metcalfe said he has heard
complaints about the potential costs about the MS4 Program for reducing pollution from
stormwater and asked what can be done to reduce this burden. McDonnell said the MS4
stormwater program was expanded by EPA to do more to reduce water pollution from
stormwater. He noted Pennsylvania has the large number of MS4 communities involved in this
program compared to other states in the region. He said DEP has been encouraging
municipalities to join together to reduce costs, which in some cases could reduce the cost of
compliance by 50 percent. He added DEP has no role in setting any local stormwater fees to
implement the program. A big focus of the ​Restore Pennsylvania Initiative​, he added, is helping
communities meet MS4 stormwater obligations.
Click Here​ for an overview chart of DEP’s budget. ​Click Here​ for narrative overview of
DEP’s budget.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
Next DEP Budget Hearing
The Senate Appropriations Committee will hold a hearing on DEP’s budget request on
February 28 starting at 3:00.
Copies of written testimony and videos of all Senate Appropriations Committee budget
hearings are available at the ​Budget Hearings Summary​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Rep. Metcalfe, Rep. Vitali, Secretary McDonnell.)
NewsClips:
Lawmakers Question Taking Money From Dedicated Environmental Funds
Editorial: Wolf Taking Severance Tax Down A Different Road
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Letter: Increased Energy Taxes Do Not Help PA - Gene Barr
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Related Stories:

25
Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate Petitioners
Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition
House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development Plan
Turns Into Climate Change Debate
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects​ - [Last week’s House DEP budget hearing summary]
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
DEP Citizens Advisory Council: The Consistent Cuts To DEP’s Budget Are Unsustainable
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate


Petitioners Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition

On February 19, Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler), Majority Chair of


the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, ​wrote
to DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell asking​ him to request
petitioners to resubmit their greenhouse gas cap-and-trade petition to
the Environmental Quality Board.
Rep. Metcalfe said he believes DEP failed to comply with
requirements in ​25 Pa Code Chapter 23​ on notifying members of the
Environmental Quality Board it had determined the petition was
complete and ready to submit to the EQB to determine if it should be
accepted for study.
The letter said, "As part of its obligation, the Department is required
to notify the Environmental Quality Board ("EQB") and the
petitioner of its determination within 30 days of receipt of the
petition.
"The CAC Petition was filed on November 27, 2018, and the Department sent its
"Petition Acceptance Letter," ​dated December 26, 2018​. The Department failed to notify the
EQB Members of the Department's determination or the fact that the Department sent the letter
to the petitioner.”
DEP notified the members of the EQB by email of the completeness determination on

26
February 15.
Rep. Metcalfe’s letter continued, “In the Department's e-mail, the first line opens with
“Now having the Environmental Quality Board (EQB) membership fully established..." The
EQB Board had been established. Whether individual Members were waiting to be appointed is
moot. The Board, as a whole, still existed, and the Board Members have been requesting updates
on the CAC Petition.
“I find this failure concerning especially when EQB Members have been asking for
updates on the CAC Petition since the Department received it and have continuously requested
updates on the CAC Petition as recently as last week.
“What is even more alarming is that the Department assured the EQB Members that the
Members would be notified when the Department completed its determination. This lack in
transparency is disrespectful to all the EQB Members as well as the public.
“This also serves to place EQB Members at a disadvantage by not giving them the same
amount of time to be adequately prepared to not only discuss but vote on whether to accept the
CAC Petition for further study.”
“... I believe that as a result of this failure, the Department should notify the petitioner
that as a result of the Department's failure to comply with 25 Pa. Code Chapter 23, the
Department must notify the petitioner that it needs to re-submit the CAC Petition for the
Department's determination.
“Just as the Department is obligated to comply with 25 Pa. Code Chapter 23 in terms of
the Petitioner's rights to have the petition considered, the EQB Members have an equal right to
be notified.
Click Here​ for a copy of Rep. Metcalfe’s letter.
A spokesperson for DEP said they are reviewing the letter.
NewsClip:
Rep. Metcalfe Says Reducing Carbon Dioxide Will Kill His Vegetables
Related Stories:
PaEN: Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Petition Complete, Will Be On Next EQB Meeting
Agenda
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change,
Permit Fees, Fund Transfers
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development
Plan Turns Into Climate Change Debate
PaEN: PEMA: Over $101.5 Million In Flood Damage Not Covered By Feds In 2018; Intense
Flooding Events Increasing In PA
PaEN: Federal Judge Dismisses Clean Air Council Lawsuit Challenging Federal Actions On
Climate Change, Rollback Of Regulations
PaEN: Wetlands Will Play A Key Role In Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development Plan


Turns Into Climate Change Debate

On February 20, the ​House Environmental


Resources and Energy Committee​ information

27
meeting on the ​Forge The Future​ energy and economic development plan proposed by state
business groups turned into a classic debate over climate change.
Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware), Minority Chair of the Committee, and Rep. Elizabeth
Fiedler (D-Philadelphia) said there is no doubt climate change is real.
Rep. Vitali said he is concerned about the report because it doesn’t take into account the
need to address climate change by moving away from all fossil fuels, including natural gas,
which the report highlights.
Kevin Sunday, from the PA Chamber of Business and Industry, pointed to the success the
free market shift to natural gas has had in significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions in
Pennsylvania in particular, and lowering the cost of energy.
He noted not only have greenhouse emissions been reduced by 30 percent or more,
traditional air pollution has also been reduced. He called it “the greatest story not told.”
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) said you can’t get rid of all CO2 (carbon dioxide)
emissions because he “​enjoys his vegetables and plants need CO2​. I want to make sure there is
plenty of CO2 out there.” He said energy like natural gas is critical to keeping everyone warm
without having to wear your hats and gloves inside, especially on a [snowy] day like today.
Rep. Cris Dush (R-Jefferson) said the free market does a much better job of reducing
emissions than a top-down, government-driven “Soviet-style” program that seeks to do the same
thing. Later, he added we have had climate change if you look back through history to the ice
age and other periods, saying volcanoes and other natural sources have created more problems
than man-made greenhouse gas emissions.
Rep. David Zimmerman (R-Lancaster) said he believed new energy technologies, like
manure digesters, are a key to dealing with many issues and asked how difficult is it to get new
technologies approved. Kevin Sunday said Pennsylvania has a complex regulatory environment
and Pennsylvania has some things other states don’t, like residual waste regulations. Each
situation is different and businesses have to work with DEP on each case.
Rep. Kathy Rapp (R-Warren) asked what the reaction of the Administration is to the
report. Kevin Sunday said the Administration has some different priorities, but he believes Gov.
Wolf understands the importance of the natural gas industry and the Chamber will work with
him “where our interests align.”
In concluding comments, Rep. Vitali said there is no doubt natural gas is better than coal,
but that’s not the problem we’re dealing with on climate change. He said expanding the use of
fossil fuels in the face of the impacts we’re seeing from climate change like increased flooding,
forest fires in California and more doesn’t make sense.
He added, there is a free market solution to the problem, it’s a carbon tax.
Rep. Metcalfe wrapped up the hearing by saying he would like to see the Forge The
Future Plan implemented “as fast and furious as we are able to for the benefit of Pennsylvania.”
Click Here to watch a video​ of Rep. Metcalfe’s concluding remarks.
Plan Background
Forge The Future​ is an initiative of Pennsylvania businesses across the state calling for a
new era of economic growth in Pennsylvania.
The plan includes ​Ideas for Action​, a report that highlights specific actions the
Commonwealth can and should implement to capitalize on its world-class energy assets and
grow its way to more revenue, population and job growth.
Among the recommendations​ are--

28
-- Cabinet-Level Energy Executive:​Pennsylvania should create a cabinet-level leadership
position (Energy Secretary, Executive, or “Czar”) with exclusive responsibility for driving
energy-enabled economic development in the state. This would give appropriate status to the
energy economy and its potential to create significant GDP, jobs, wages and population growth
impact.
-- Pennsylvania Energy Investment Office​: Create a new Pennsylvania Energy Investment
Office, led by a cabinet-level executive, to be the Commonwealth’s one-stop resource for
helping streamline the process of doing energy business in PA – serving as an ombudsman to
coordinate regulatory, permitting and other needs. The office should be staffed and funded
appropriately, with the goal of leveraging economic growth, which, as this and other
studies/reports have estimated, could be more than $60 billion.
-- Create Statewide Energy Investment Strategy:​ This new office would be charged with
creating and leading a well-defined statewide energy business and investment strategy. This
could include an energy-focused business attraction/investment resource kit for local and
regional economic development agencies, and regular interaction to coordinate and collaborate
on energy-related economic development.
-- Streamline Pipeline Permitting Process:​ Developing Natural gas transmission and
distribution is vital to utilizing the abundant resource across the state, and delivering NGLs and
LNG to export terminals, including a potential Penn America LNG facility in Chester County.
Many regulatory hurdles exist, including oversight at both the state and federal level for natural
gas infrastructure projects.
-- Expand Pipeline Investment Program: ​which currently provides grants to construct the last
few miles of natural gas distribution lines to business parks and existing manufacturing and
industrial enterprises, to include residential uses.
-- Natural Gas Micro-Grids: ​Create partnerships with organizations and institutions that
operate large physical plants (government, universities, health care institutions) to build
gas-fueled micro-grids for power generation
-- New Distributed Energy Technology: ​Develop partnerships between industries and STEM-
focused colleges and universities to explore new technologies in distributed energy
-- Encourage CHP, Fuel Cells:​ Leverage utility ratemaking policy to facilitate adoption of
natural gas as a heating and power source (such as CHP and fuel cells)
-- Convert Transit Fleets To Gas, Support Fueling Infrastructure:​ Seek federal and state
assistance to convert all major transit fleets to gas powered buses; Support installation of natural
gas fueling stations at all PA Turnpike service plazas; Develop port infrastructure for natural gas
fueling on cargo ships in Philadelphia to take advantage of the eventual move from high-sulfur
diesel.
-- District Energy Zones: ​where long-term Power Purchase Agreements would incent use of
natural gas-fueled micro-grids for manufacturing facilities and support the work of the CHP
working group within the Public Utility Commission to identify additional ways to help
manufacturers adopt CHP solutions for their facilities.
Click Here ​for more information.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.

29
(​Photo:​ Rep. Metcalfe, Rep. Vitali.)
NewsClip:
Rep. Metcalfe Says Reducing Carbon Dioxide Will Kill His Vegetables
Related Stories:
House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change, Permit
Fees, Fund Transfers
Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate Petitioners
Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition
[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee

On February 19, the ​House Transportation Committee​ approved and


reported out ​House Bill 374 ​(Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing the
Keystone Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources on February 19.
The bill authorizes a voluntary $1 checkoff on drivers and
vehicle license applications to support a new Keystone Tree Fund to
provide funding to DCNR’s ​TreeVitalize Program​ (40 percent) and
for ​Riparian Forest Buffer Grants ​(60 percent).
The new Fund is intended to supplement the existing capacity
of these programs (​sponsor summary​).
A companion bill is pending in the Senate--​ ​Senate Bill 108
(Yaw-R-Lycoming).
The bill now goes to the full House for action.
Rep. Tim Hennessey (R-Chester) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-3431 or by sending email to: ​henness@pahousegop.com​. Rep.
Mike Carroll (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by calling
717-787-3589 or by sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
(​Photo:​ ​Rep. Garth Everett​, prime sponsor.)
NewsClips:
PaEN: DCNR: Wildfires Increase In 2018 Over 2017, But Nowhere Near 2016
Schneck: Wet 2018 Resulted In Fewer Wildfires In Pennsylvania
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
PaEN: Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Horses Help Drag Felled Trees Out Of Erie Park
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst

30
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Bipartisan Group Of House Members Unveil Bill Authorizing Community Solar Projects

On February 19, a bipartisan group of House


members announced the introduction of ​House
Bill 531​ to authorized community solar projects
in Pennsylvania.
The group includes Representatives
Aaron Kaufer (R-Luzerne), David Millard
(R-Columbia), Donna Bullock (D-Philadelphia)
and Peter Schweyer (D-Lehigh).
“All too often Pennsylvania property
owners interested in relying on solar power to
meet their energy needs learn their homes are
not properly situated to have solar panels on their roofs. I am one of those homeowners,” said
Rep. Kaufer (R-Luzerne). “The bill, which has more than three dozen co-sponsors, we are
introducing today would give such homeowners, and others, the option to join their neighbors in
creating community solar projects.”
At this time last year, the number of solar energy system installations in the state
increased 24 percent over the same period in 2017. At nearly the same time, the cost to install
large solar farms decreased 11 percent while the cost of rooftop systems decreased 26 percent.
Solar is becoming increasing popular and even more cost effective for consumers.
“As our environment and economy rapidly changes, it is important that we support and
sustain our communities,” Rep. Schweyer said. “By enabling community solar projects, we give
individuals and businesses the opportunity to engage in renewable clean energy endeavors. I’m
excited to join my colleagues from both sides of the aisle to advocate for this important bill.”
Under the bill, homeowners, renters and other property owners would be able to join
other participants in subscribing to a portion of an offsite solar project and receive credit on their
electricity bill for the power that is produced, just as if the panels were on their roofs.
“This bill would give residents a choice to take part in greener energy production,” Rep.
Millard said. “Those who we anticipate taking part in this initiative include renters, who may be
prohibited from installing panels on a property, property owners with shaded properties or
homeowners who may not intend to stay at their current property long enough to reap the full
financial benefits of a personal solar energy system.”

31
The bill would also create new and exciting energy markets in the Commonwealth and
encourage entrepreneurship. It would also open solar energy systems to low- and
moderate-income residents who may otherwise not be able to afford solar energy systems.
Nineteen other states and Washing, D.C., have already given their residents the option of
taking part in community solar projects.
“As the clean energy industry grows, we must make sure it is affordable and accessible to
all consumers, including renters and low-income households. That is why I am excited to
co-sponsor a bipartisan community solar bill that will break down the physical and financial
barriers to solar energy,” Rep. Bullock said. “Community solar can drive energy equity, reducing
exposure to pollution as well as energy costs for all consumers.”
Click Here to watch a video​ of the press conference. A ​sponsor summary​ of the bill is
available.
NewsClips:
Rep. Kaufer Pushing Legislation To Expand Use Of Solar Energy In PA
Crawford County Solar Co-op Takes Next Step
Schneck: Sunny Work? Where Pennsylvania Ranks In Solar Jobs
Caruso: Bipartisan Bill Would Expand Access To Solar Energy In Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh Summit To Focus On Solar Energy In PA
Tyrone Fields Proposals For Use Of Nearly $1M In Community Payments From Wind Turbine
Project
Shell Leads Big Oil In Clean Energy Shift
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
Related Story:
PaEN: PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Senate Appropriations Holds Hearings On DEP’s Budget Feb. 28, DCNR’s Budget March
4

The ​Senate Appropriations Committee​ will hold a


hearing on the Department of Environmental
Protection’s budget request on February 28 starting at
3:00.
The Senate hearing on the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources’ budget request is
on March 4 starting at 3:00.
Watch Senate hearings live and get copies of written
testimony and past videos of all Senate Appropriations
Committee budget hearings at the ​Budget Hearings
Summary​ webpage.
House Appropriations Committee budget ​hearing videos​ and ​written testimony​ are also
available online.

32
Related Stories:
PaEN: DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For
Environmental Improvement Projects
PaEN: DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address
State’s Infrastructure Needs
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

The Feds

Federal Judge Dismisses Clean Air Council Lawsuit Challenging Federal Actions On
Climate Change, Rollback Of Regulations

On February 19, Eastern Federal District Court Judge Paul S.


Diamond ​granted a U.S. Department of Justice request to
dismiss a lawsuit​ on procedural grounds brought by the ​Clean
Air Council​ and two Pennsylvania children alleging harm from
recent efforts to rollback federal environmental regulations.
Judge Diamond said, “The Clean Air Council and two
minors ask me to declare that the United States of America, the
President, the Secretaries of Energy and the Interior as well as
the Departments themselves, and the Environmental Protection
Agency and its Administrator have violated and will violate
Plaintiffs’ rights by considering amendments to environmental
laws, by “rolling back” environmental regulations, and by making related personnel and budget
changes.
“Plaintiffs thus effectively ask me to supervise any actions the President and his
appointees take that might touch on “the environment.”
“Because I have neither the authority nor the inclination to assume control of the
Executive Branch, I will grant Defendants’ Motion.”
33
In reaction to the decision, ​Joseph Minott, Executive Director of the Clean Air
Council​ said, “We respectfully disagree with the decision and will discuss next steps with our
counsel.
“The Trump administration continues to rely on junk science to implement reckless
climate change policies in the face of indisputable U.S. and international scientific consensus.
“For decades, the U.S. government has acknowledged that climate change presents a
clear and present danger to life, and represents an urgent and potentially irreversible threat to
human societies and the planet.
“These acts of deliberate indifference are increasing U.S. contributions to climate change,
thereby increasing the frequency and intensity of its life-threatening effects, and violating our
constitutional rights.
“We are troubled that the opinion states the federal government "do[es] not produce
greenhouse gases" and that "climate change is the creation of those that pollute the air, not the
Government. These statements are both irrelevant to our claims and factually incorrect.”
The Clean Air Council lawsuit alleged rollbacks of environmental regulations by the
named agencies increased the frequency and/or the intensity of the life-threatening effects of
climate change and are based on “junk science” in violations of the plaintiffs’ rights under the
due process clause and the public trust doctrine.
One of the children in the case, a 7-year old from Philadelphia, suffers from severe
seasonal allergies that they said will be exacerbated and will continue to worsen as climate
changes becomes more severe.
The second child is an 11-year old from Chester County who is “passionate about
protecting the environment, experiences anxiety about climate change and suffers from asthma.
He also experienced the “frightening impact of Super Storm Sandy in 2012 and Hurricane Irene
in 2011.
The opinion recounts part of the argument by the Council, saying “The United States
Government purportedly has known for some fifty years that climate change “presents a clear
and present danger to the health and welfare of its citizens and an immediate threat to the
planet.”
“As alleged, climate change causes “more frequent, extreme, and costly weather events,
such as floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes,” impairing human health and disproportionately
affecting children.
“Defendants have nonetheless acted with “reckless and deliberate indifference” to the
danger of climate change by “roll[ing] back regulations and practices previously directed at
addressing and minimizing the United States[’] contribution to climate change.””
Some specific actions taken or reversed cited in the Council’s lawsuit are--
-- President’s March 28, 2017 Executive Order: (1) directing the EPA to review the Clean Power
Plan, which limits carbon emissions for existing fossil fuel power plants; (2) revoking the policy
requiring that Federal agencies avoid and minimize effects on natural resources; (3) halting
agency calculation of “social cost of carbon”; and (4) directing the DOI to amend or withdraw a
policy requiring an environmental review of the Federal coal leasing plan and lifting the plan’s
suspension
-- Methane gas reporting requirement for oil and gas companies (weakened);
-- Keystone XL pipeline project’s suspension (reversed);
-- Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, which banned offshore drilling in Atlantic and Alaskan

34
waters (reversed);
-- An order requiring national parks to consider climate change when managing resources
(reversed);
-- Bureau of Land Management’s public land use rule (reversed); and
-- Rule requiring consideration of climate change when altering infrastructure (reversed).
The judge dismissed the case, in part, based on whether the Clean Air Council and the
other plaintiffs had standing to bring the lawsuit. He concluded they did not because they failed
to show how Council members or the other plaintiffs would be harmed by the actions of the
federal government.
The judge also concluded, “... Plaintiffs’ claims are not viable because: (1) there is no
legally cognizable due process right to environmental quality; (2) the Ninth Amendment
provides no substantive rights to sustain Plaintiffs’ action; and (3) Plaintiffs’ public trust claim
has no basis in law.”
In his conclusion, the judge said, “Invoking Marbury v. Madison, Plaintiffs admonish that
“[i]t is the Judiciary’s duty to determine when the Executive has committed constitutional
violations, and Plaintiffs allege such violations here.”
“There is a difference, however, between determining the constitutionality of particular
Executive action and regulating all statutory, regulatory, budgetary, personnel, and
administrative Executive actions that relate to the environment. The former is certainly within
the province of the Judiciary. The latter would make the Executive a subsidiary of the Judiciary.
“I will dismiss the Amended Complaint on alternative grounds: lack of standing and
failure to state a claim.”
Click Here for a copy​ of Judge Diamond’s decision.
Related Stories:
House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change, Permit
Fees, Fund Transfers
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development
Plan Turns Into Climate Change Debate
Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate Petitioners
Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition
PaEN: Wetlands Will Play A Key Role In Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania
NewsClips:
Rep. Metcalfe Says Reducing Carbon Dioxide Will Kill His Vegetables
Climate Change Means More Floods, Great And Localized
Sharp Rise In Methane Levels Threatens World Climate Targets
Sisk: Report Shows How More PA Drivers Can Go Electric
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Pittsburgh Summit To Focus On Solar Energy In PA
Kummer: Study: Philly Could Be As Hot As Memphis By 2080 Because Of Climate Change
Sisk: Could Membranes At Coal-Fired Power Plants Help Stop Climate Change?
Op-Ed: Bailout Tax: Profitable Companies Need To Come Clean On Nuclear Energy
Op-Ed: In PA, Cap-And-Trade To Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions A Constitutional
Necessity - Clean Air Council
Op-Ed: How Many Times Are We Going To Bailout Three Mile Island?​ - Erie Epstein
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal

35
Op-Ed: Here’s What Green New Deal Advocates Can Learn From The 2009 Stimulus
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
EPA: Carbon Dioxide From Power Plants Rose Last Year
Climate Change Doubter Is Leading Effort To Advise Trump
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst

By Rachel Felver, ​Chesapeake Bay Program

Dana Aunkst has always been drawn to the water.


Whether through recreation—he is an avid fly fisher—or
in his professional career, ensuring that local waters
remain clean and healthy has always been near and dear
to his heart.
Aunkst is a Pennsylvania native through and through.
Growing up in north central Pennsylvania, he obtained a
Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering from Penn
State University. Afterwards, he spent several years in
private industry, as well as in local and state government.
Getting back to that desire to keep local waters healthy,
he joined the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) in 2002 and held several executive level positions during his tenure.
In his role as Deputy Secretary for Field Operations at DEP, Aunkst oversaw programs
for surface and groundwater quality, soil and water conservation, public water supply
withdrawals, flood protection and stream improvements, among other responsibilities.
But most notably, this position brought him face-to-face with the challenges of Bay
restoration, and in 2016, he authored the ​Pennsylvania Chesapeake Bay Reboot Strategy​.
The position of Chesapeake Bay Program director is no easy task—instead of working
with partners in one state, there are now nearly 40 partner agencies across six states and the
District of Columbia in which to work with.
In addition to these, partners also span 19 federal agencies, more than 20 academic
institutions, more than 60 non-governmental organizations and a multitude of local governments
spread across 64,000 square miles.
As a partnership that prides itself on consensus decision making, it can fall to the director
to drive discussion and reach an agreement.
Aunkst likes to be challenged though and he comes into his new role with a familiarity of
how the Bay Program works, including the importance of building relationships with the many
partners we work with.
Through his work with such regulatory matters as ​Watershed Implementation Plans
(WIPs) and strategies to address point source pollution, Aunkst has worked hard to build trust
with the agriculture and municipal sectors, as well as many others.
Being the person to lead the partnership “over the finish line” in regard to the ​Chesapeake

36
Bay Total Maximum Daily Load​ (Bay TMDL)is a logical next step in an impressive
environmental career, which is built upon among many other things, collaboration with a variety
of partners to protect water quality.
While his immediate priority is guiding the partners through the Phase III WIP process in
order to address the pollution reduction goals of the Bay TMDL, Aunkst is adamant that we can’t
forget the many other outcomes of the ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement​.
These outcomes—ranging from blue crab abundance to environmental
literacy—complement the achievements made under the Bay TMDL, providing the framework to
ensure the sustainability of Bay restoration and benefits to those who live in the watershed.
The restoration of the Chesapeake Bay is reliant upon keeping the water the flows into it
clean and healthy.
The upstream perspective that Dana Aunkst brings to the Chesapeake Bay Program will
not only help the Bay, but also the local rivers and streams, and the people that depend on them.

(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Program​ website.)


NewsClips:
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Million Trees Partnership
Crable: Injecting Manure Into Farm Fields Could Combat Runoff, Odor Problems
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
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Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
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Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

News From Around The State

Susquehanna River Basin Commission March 15 Meeting Agenda Includes Adopting


Recommendations In Auditor General’s Report
37
The agenda for the March 15 ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ includes a resolution
adopting recommendations made in the Auditor General’s 2018 Performance Audit of the
Commission. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
In November, Auditor General DePasquale ​released a performance audit of the
Susquehanna and Delaware River Basin Commissions​ looking at issues like overlap of
responsibilities with DEP, financial accountability and transparency.
The Audit concluded there is no overlap of responsibilities between the Commissions and
DEP, as some House Republicans have alleged, but the Auditor General recommended an update
of the memorandums of understanding between the agencies to clarify their roles and
responsibilities.
That process is going on now as DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell said in his ​House
budget hearing​ February 14.
With respect to permit fees charged by SRBC and the fact ​House Republicans cut
funding for both Commissions in half in the last two state budgets, ​the Audit said, “​SRBC
management stated that in light of the current lack of funding being provided by signatory parties
[Pennsylvania and others], the SRBC may need to consider reducing/eliminating discounts
offered to municipal authorities.
“This could negatively impact Pennsylvania’s public authorities that have dockets with
the SRBC in the form of increased fees.
“Additionally, while SRBC management indicated the reduced contributions have not
affected fees charged to project applicants and docket holders to date, it must balance revenues
with its expenses, which could ultimately result in increased fees.”
Also at the ​House budget hearing​, Secretary McDonnell said they are taking the Auditor
General’s recommendations seriously and he supports restoring funding to the Commissions
because Pennsylvania has not been paying its “dues” and when you are the one in the room not
paying their dues it does color the discussions.
Auditor General DePasquale did pan the SRBC for “extravagant” food expenses, noting
the SRBC provided itemized receipts for only $14,072 of the $16,259 in food expenses, which
included appetizers, filet mignon, salmon, and Maryland crab cakes, along with side dishes and
desserts.
SRBC said in its response printed with the Audit in November that steps had already
been taken to address these issues ​(​page 47 of the Audit)​ .
Click Here for more​ background on the Audit.
Also on the agenda is an informational presentation from Maryland of interest to the
lower Susquehanna River region; Fiscal Year 2020 budget reconciliation; consideration of an
amendment to the irrevocable retiree health trust; ratification/approval of contracts/grants; a
report on delegated settlements; resolution to balance renewal cycle workload; and Regulatory
Program projects.
The meeting will be held at the ​Crowne Plaza Annapolis, 173 Jennifer Road in Annapolis
starting at 9:00.
Click Here​ for more information on the meeting. Questions should be directed to Ava
Stoops, 717-238-0423 Ext. 1302.
For more information on programs, training opportunities and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for SRBC’s newsletter.

38
Follow SRBC on Twitter​, ​visit them on YouTube​.
NewsClips:
Crable: Abandoned Quarry Near Susquehanna Gets New Purpose To Replenish River In
Droughts In Lancaster
Efforts To Repopulate American Eels In The Susquehanna River A Success
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA


Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan

By Heidi Reed, ​Penn State Extension​ Educator

[​Note:​ Agriculture and other stakeholders met February 6-8 in the second PA In The Balance
meeting to help shape the Phase 3 Watershed Improvement Plans for the Chesapeake Bay. The
first meeting was held in 2016​. This is a brief recap of the second meeting by Penn State
Extension.]

Background
In spring 2010, EPA set goals to reduce nitrogen,
phosphorus, and sediment pollution in the Chesapeake
Bay. The Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load
(TMDL), was set to a level which would require a 25
percent reduction in nitrogen, a 24 percent reduction in
phosphorus, and a 20 percent reduction in sediment
compared to 2009 levels by the year 2025.
A significant swath of Pennsylvania, including the most
agriculturally productive counties, lie within the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed, so the state was tasked with reducing its individual contribution of
pollutants.
To make strides towards the Bay TMDL, all jurisdictions within the watershed formed
Phase 1 Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs), basically blueprints with specific strategies
and measurable goals—stepping stones to reach the TMDL.
Phase 1 WIPs lasted through spring 2012, at which point Phase 2 plans were released.
In 2017, the EPA performed midpoint assessments to see how states progressing towards
meeting the TMDL goals—the performance benchmark that was set for midpoint performance
was meeting 60 percent of the necessary nutrient reductions.
Based on this report, jurisdictions within the watershed are now in the process of forming
Phase 3 WIPs, which are due to the EPA in April.
The 2017 midpoint report by EPA shows that Pennsylvania has an uphill climb to reach
the TMDL targets by 2025.
EPA has instated “backstop action levels” for both agriculture and urban/suburban
programs, meaning there are “substantial concerns” regarding whether we will meet our goals in
these areas, so federal actions have been taken to get them “back on track.”
The trading/offset programs are under “enhanced oversight,” implying EPA may take
action at the federal level to get the program “back on track.”

39
The wastewater program is the only sector receiving a green light, with “continued
oversight,” meaning EPA will continue to monitor, but the wastewater sector is on track to reach
TMDL goals at the local and state level, so federal actions are not warranted.
PA In The Balance II
Knowing we have a lot of work to do, farmers, non-profits, agency, university, and ag
service providers from all reaches of the Chesapeake Bay watershed met in Hershey, PA on
February 6-8 to tackle the monumental task of brainstorming the role agriculture must play in
Pennsylvania’s Phase 3 WIP.
The event was sponsored by the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences. The big
idea, and theme of the event: “harnessing agriculture’s culture of stewardship as a solution to
clean water.”
The three-day event started with updates on Pennsylvania’s progress thus far from Matt
Royer of the ​Penn State Agriculture and Environment Center​.
One of the priority initiatives identified at the last Pennsylvania in the Balance meeting in
2016 which has gained the most momentum and support from farmers is soil health.
Lancaster County Farmer Jim Hershey of the ​PA No Till Alliance​ explained the strides
farmers are making towards soil health, and how this has immense impacts on water quality.
Other speakers included representatives from: the Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection (PA DEP); the ​County Commissioners Association​; the ​Susquehanna
River Basin Commission​; ​PA Farm Bureau​; ​The Chesapeake Bay Foundation​; ​PA State
Conservation Commission​; ​Lancaster Farmland Trust​; and several other farmers from around
Pennsylvania.
Topics ranged from the Phase 3 WIP planning process, local engagement activities, and
importantly, perspectives on the opportunities, barriers, and challenges for conservation
agriculture practices.
Each day was a mix of large group lecture style presentations, discussion panels, small
group breakout working sessions, and reporting out to the large group the main points from the
working sessions.
Attendees were given over an hour in small groups to discuss each of the following over
the three days: thoughts on the current draft of the Phase 3 WIP; how to advance soil health and
nutrient management in agricultural landscapes; how to meet technical assistance capacity needs;
the need for new funding and delivery strategies; and incentives for performance beyond
compliance.
Since farmers are charged with doing so much of the heavy lifting to reach the TMDL
targets, it is important that their voices were heard.
Overall, the meeting was a great demonstration of how we can come up with creative and
common-sense ideas by collaborating with a diverse range of people with different backgrounds,
motivations, and day-to-day realities to try to reach these lofty Chesapeake Bay TMDL targets.
Stay tuned for Pennsylvania’s Phase 3 WIP to be ​published later this spring​.
(​Photo:​ From the first PA In The Balance Conference.)
(Reprinted from ​Penn State Extension​ webpage.)
Related Stories:
Chesapeake Bay - PA In The Balance Conference Report Now Available From Penn State​ -
2016
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Presented With More Detailed

40
Recommendations To Include In Plan
Related Stories This Week:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
NewsClips:
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Bill Would Tweak Housing Rules For Preserved Farms
Urban Farming Proponents See Unlimited Potential In Erie
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Op-Ed: How Much Longer Can Dairy Farmers Endure Their Financial Crisis?
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality

While direct water quality impacts from education


and certification of professional manure handlers is
hard to measure, a recent survey of the
Pennsylvania industry by demonstrates that
program participants gain knowledge on key
competencies.
Increased awareness of water quality issues,
manure nutrient conservation, and regulatory
compliance surely empowers industry workers to
make wise decisions in the field that increase
environmental stewardship.
This article describes​ Pennsylvania’s ​Act 49 Commercial Manure Hauler and Broker
Certification Program​ and provides some interesting results from a recent industry survey that
demonstrates program impact on participant knowledge.
Certification Structure and Requirements
Pennsylvania’s Act 49 Commercial Manure Hauler and Broker Certification Program
began in 2006 when the law mandated that all individuals that handle manure in a commercial
manner become certified.
The law outlined a number of educational competencies to be included in certification

41
processes. Oversight of the program is housed with the State Conservation Commission and
educational efforts are led by ​Penn State Extension​.
There are over 700 individuals certified in the program as demonstrated in Figure 1,
where the distribution by certification level is outlined.
Due to the structure of workers within the professional manure handling industry the
following five certification levels were incorporated into the policy. The general philosophy is
that more responsibility requires more education and demonstration of proficiency.
Manure Hauler Level 1
This certification level is often referred to as the “trucker” level. Those certified at this
level can transport and deliver manure but cannot land-apply manure. Certification at this level
requires no formal training, testing, or continuing education.
To become certified an individual completes a checklist, verifying that they understand
basic environmental risk and safety hazards associated with their role.
Manure Hauler Level 2
Often referred to the “employee” level, certification includes testing that is supervised at
the county level. Exam material is based on material found in a thorough 46-page study
workbook. The workbook is provided to the industry online or mailed upon request.
Once certified, individuals are required to attain 6 Continuing Education Credits (CEC)
in a 3-year period. A CEC is equivalent to an hour of approved educational training. Personnel in
this category must be supervised by a Hauler Level 3 or Broker when they work.
Manure Hauler Level 3
This “owner or manager” category requires both attendance in classroom training and
exam completion. To maintain certification Hauler Level 3s must attain 9 CECs in a 3-year
period.
Manure Broker Level 1
Brokers at this level go through the same training and testing, and have the same CEC
requirements, as those certified as Manure Hauler Level 3. However, they choose to have the
authority to assume ownership of manure and determine its end use.
Typically, this means the manure is exported from the farm where it was generated with
no control of its destination by management at the original farm.
When manure is exported from a farm in the Pennsylvania Act 38 Nutrient Management
Program is must be land-applied under the guidance of a Nutrient Balance Sheet (NBS).
A caveat of this broker level is that they are not certified to develop the NBS, yet they
must provide the NBS as developed by another certified Broker Level 2 or Act 38 Nutrient
Management Plan Writer.
Manure Broker Level 2
In addition to the training and testing performed to become a Broker Level 1, those
certified at this level complete training and testing that authorizes them to develop NBSs.
In addition to the 9 CECs required for other levels, Broker Level 2’s must also attend 3
CECs specifically geared toward NBS development, for a total of 12 CECs in a 3-year period.
The Pennsylvania NBS provides three options for development of manure application
rates. Broker Level 2s can initially utilize only basic Phosphorus and Nitrogen-based application
rates that come with several conservative application restrictions that limit risk of nutrient loss.
However, brokers at this level can complete additional training that allows them to
develop NBS application rates based on Phosphorus Indexing.

42
2018 Industry Survey
In January and February 2018, a survey was distributed to attendees at eleven different
CEC events. The survey gathered anonymous information about the attendees and asked 18
knowledge-based questions centered around program competencies. The survey was completed
by 218 individuals.
Data showed that individuals in higher levels of certification were both in the program
longer and scored higher on knowledge-based questions. Question content included manure
nutrient management and cycling, manure application setbacks and requirements, emergency
response, soil compaction, farm biosecurity, and fly control.
Analysis of each individual question across certification level allowed educators and
agency personnel to recognize strengths and weaknesses in past educational efforts, and to
identify topics for future educational focus.
Both those that listed themselves as an owner and/or a supervisor scored higher than
those that did not. This indicates that education of industry leaders and decision makers is likely
to have broader impact as they influence actions of employees in the field.
The summary of an additional question helps to demonstrate the influence this
education-based certification program can attain. The average number of farms that the 218
survey-takers work on in a year was listed as 40.3 farms. This average certainly contains overlap
as employees from the same company could all consider the same farms in their response to this
question.
Nonetheless, empowering professional manure handlers with the ability to make
science-based, in-field decisions can have impact across many farms and acres.
Program educators feel that survey results supported their belief that educational efforts
and certification help the industry to continually improve responsible handling of manure
nutrients in the state, and that these programs have real — but hard-to-measure — positive
impacts on water and air quality.
For more information on the certification program, visit Agriculture’s ​Commercial
Manure Hauler and Broker Certification Program​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ York County Conservation District.)

(Reprinted from Penn State Extension’s latest ​Watershed Winds newsletter​. ​Click Here​ to sign
up to receive a variety of helpful information from Penn State Extension.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg

43
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension

Animals at a farm operation are enclosed in


pastures, meadows, barnyards, and barn
areas. This leads to concentrated areas of
manure where piles add up. Even when a
just a few animals, or a single animal, are
being raised for a couple months before
summer fair season that manure can add up
fast.
Did you know that a single pig can produce
1 ton of manure in the five months it takes to grow to 250 pounds?
Manure makes great fertilizer, but it also can have a significant impact on our local
waterways.
Manure can leach into our groundwater and run downhill in the rain and melting snow,
ending up in our creeks and ponds. Manure can carry pathogens, like bacteria, into our drinking
water and favorite fishing holes.
It also adds nutrients to the water, that good stuff in our fertilizer (nitrogen, phosphorus.)
That may not sound bad, but it is.
When we have too much nutrient in the water, it causes algae to bloom. A thick coat of
algae in the water not only looks bad, it also ends up depleting all of the oxygen dissolved in the
water.
That oxygen is critical for fish and other aquatic life to survive. Some major bodies of
water across the country now have "dead zones" because the oxygen isn't there to support life.
In Pennsylvania, everyone who produces manure or applies manure to the land is
required to have a written plan​ about how they are managing their manure.
Many smaller farms, hobby farms, and youth raising project animals may not know about
the impacts of manure and the type of plan they need to write.
Penn State Extension has created a new resource to help. With the support of the
Department of Environmental Protection and the contributions of partners at the Lancaster
County Conservation District and Manheim Central Ag-Ed program, a new project book is
available to help guide youth in manure management.
"​Manure Management Planning for Youth Animal Projects​" is a curriculum full of
hands-on activities, career exploration, and more.
It includes chapters on manure composition, soil types, how plants utilize manure,
manure impacts on water, mapping for planning, and the basics of a ​PA Manure Management
Plan​.
We encourage all youth raising animals for 4-H and FFA/Ag-Ed programs to include this
new project in their learning experiences. Teaching youth about manure management also makes
a great topic for a ​Meaningful Watershed Education Experience (MWEE)​.

(Reprinted from Penn State Extension’s latest ​Watershed Winds newsletter​. ​Click Here​ to sign

44
up to receive a variety of helpful information from Penn State Extension.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier

Are you a farmer in Pennsylvania, Delaware, New


York or New Jersey? ​Rodale Institute​ and the
Stroud Water Research Center​ want to hear from you
to help make it easier for farmers to adopt
conservation and “water-friendly” practices while
protecting their bottom line.
Click Here​ to see how you can take a survey to make
your voice heard as part of the Grow Clean Water
Initiative.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits

45
On April 2, the ​PA Recreation and Park Society​ will hold a ​Parks and Green Infrastructure
Workshop - Managing Water For Multiple Community Benefits​ at the Penn Stater Conference
Center in State College from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
This workshop is designed to bring together elected officials, municipal staff, parks &
recreation professionals, watershed organizations, and other stakeholders to explore how
incorporating green infrastructure into parks, trails and other public amenities creates a variety of
user experiences, reduces flooding and sediment pollution, and improves water quality.
Participants will also learn about regulatory drivers facing local governments, the
challenges facing park systems, discuss case studies, and explore a range of pertinent issues
including funding sources, best practices for constructing and incorporating green infrastructure
into parks, and management and maintenance of green infrastructure features once they are in
place.
Keynote Speaker Richard Dolesh, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives NRPA will start
the day and attendees will have the opportunity to choose two out of three afternoon educational
sessions--
-- Leveraging Funding Sources for Park Rehabilitation
-- Changing Landscapes of Parks
-- Maintenance & Management of Green Infrastructure
To register or for more information, visit the ​Parks and Green Infrastructure Workshop
webpage or call 814-234-4272.
This workshop is being held in conjunction with the ​PRPS 2019 Conference and Expo
being held April 2-5 in State College.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming events and training
opportunities, visit the ​PA Recreation and Park Society​ website. Like them ​on Facebook​,
Follow them ​on Twitter​, visit their ​YouTube Channel​, and find them ​on Instagram​. ​Click Here
to support their work.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For Science &
The Arts In Harrisburg
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
NewsClips:
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26

46
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May

The ​PA Environmental Council​ and DCNR are seeking


volunteers for 2 tree planting events coming up April 20 in
Weiser State Forest, Columbia County and May 4 in
Moshannon State Forest, Clearfield County.
The April 20 tree planting will be held from 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. starting at the ​Weiser State Forest
District Office, 16 Weiser Lane, Aristes, Columbia
County. ​Click Here to sign up​ as a volunteer.
The May 4 tree planting will be held from 9:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. starting at the ​Moshannon State Forest
District Office, 3372 State Park Road in Penfield
Clearfield County. ​Click Here to sign up​ as a volunteer.
These events will be held rain or shine. Be sure to wear boots or sturdy shoes. PEC and
DCNR will take care of the rest, including food and supplies.
Click Here to learn more​ about reforestation efforts by PEC, DCNR and others as part of
the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, ​PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker​, follow ​PEC
on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click
Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.
NewsClips:
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Horses Help Drag Felled Trees Out Of Erie Park
Related Story:
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Will Review Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative
[Posted: Feb. 23, 2019]

Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center For
Science & The Arts In Harrisburg

47
On March 20 the ​Expedition Chesapeake iMax film will premiere​ at the ​Whitaker Center For
Science & The Arts​ in Harrisburg at 5:30.
This is the first giant screen film to feature the Chesapeake Bay and its 64,000 square
mile watershed.
Biologist and wildlife conservationist ​Jeff Corwin​ takes us on a journey from the
headwaters of the Susquehanna River in New York through the rugged Allegheny Mountains,
and down to the sandy shores of uninhabited islands at the southern end of the Chesapeake Bay.
Along the way we meet dedicated scientists who have devoted their careers to studying,
nurturing and sustaining beloved animal species in the region.
The survival and resilience of iconic and intriguing animal species, including river otters,
blue crab, osprey and hellbenders, illustrate the important role that each of us plays in the
reclamation, conservation and future health of watersheds and estuaries wherever we live.
This is Whitaker Center Production's first world premiere event and the first public
screening of the film. To remember this special occasion, each child and adult in attendance will
receive a film poster suitable for framing.
Click Here​ for tickets or more information. The film will be playing at the ​Whitaker
Center from March 21 to 29​.
For more information on the film, visit the ​Expedition Chesapeake​ website. ​Click Here
to explore the education modules for teachers that accompany the film.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA Chesapeake
Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State Extension
Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
[Posted: Feb. 18, 2019]

Bottle Works Ethnic Arts Center Hosts 3rd Annual NatureWorks March 2 In Johnstown

Get connected with the outdoors during the ​Bottle


Works Ethnic Arts Center’s​ 3rd Annual
NatureWorks on March 2, a free one-day nature
and conservation interactive educational
experience for all ages in Johnstown, Cambria
County.
More than two dozen conservation-themed groups
will be on-hand with vendor booths and activities.
Some of the hands-on activities include learning
about water safety and local kayaking with the ​Benscreek Canoe Club​; turkey calling with the

48
National Wild Turkey Federation – Allegheny Plateau Chapter​; viewing live reptiles with the
Cambria County Conservation District​; playing recycling games with the ​Cambria County Solid
Waste Authority​; investigating animal clues with ​Prince Gallitzin State Park​; tying a fly with
Mountain Laurel Trout Unlimited​; learning the life cycle of monarch butterflies and the
importance of native plants with ​Brandywine Conservancy’s Penguin Court​; matching
invertebrates living in state waterways with the ​Somerset County Conservation District​; and
making iron oxide chalk from products from local water with the ​Stonycreek-Conemaugh River
Improvement Project​ (SCRIP).
Immediately following NatureWorks, attendees may participate in a hike at 2:00 on the
Incline Plane Trail​ with those responsible for its rehabilitation and extension.
“NatureWorks, now in its third year, is a wonderful opportunity for families to learn
about conservation and recreational opportunities in our region,” Bottle Works’ Executive
Director Laura Argenbright said. “This year, conservation takes on an even greater role as we
open the Green Roof above the Art Works building in June. NatureWorks is a great way to
introduce youth and adults to the importance of environmental responsibility at the grass roots
level. Designed for stormwater management, the Green Roof will be a dynamic instructional
outdoor classroom as well as an exciting events venue.”
In conjunction with the March 2 NatureWorks event, The Bottle Works will feature three
exhibitions from local artists Richard Hower and Terry Smith. Richard Hower’s Aesthetic
Challenges features both acrylic paintings and stone-carved sculptures.
Hower’s favorite subjects​ are the rolling hills and mountains of Pennsylvania and its
waterways, trees, and meadows. His personal inspirations come mostly from the play of light and
atmosphere and their effects on objects and landscapes.
Terry Smith’s exhibition​, the Art of Nature, uses the medium of watercolor to bring to
life the delicate beauty of the natural world through the application of color in slow layers. Using
this process, she shows the finest detail of her subject matter.
In the Tulip Building, the Black Box Theater will house an exhibit showcasing the 2018
winners of the ​Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau Photo Contest​. These award-winning images
also focus on the beauty of our region.
The Main Gallery Exhibits are sponsored by SCRIP, the 2019 NatureWork’s Art
Sponsor. ​Brandywine Conservancy’s Penguin Court​ has assisted Bottle Works with this event’s
planning.
Admission is free. Food and drinks will be available to purchase.
NatureWorks will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. March 2 at the Artworks’ Events
Center, 413 Third Avenue in the Cambria City section of Johnstown.
For more information, visit the ​Bottle Works Ethnic Arts Center​ website or call
814-535-2020.
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Penn State Master Well Owner Course Accepting Volunteer Applications

Interested in learning more about the proper


management of private water wells, springs and
cisterns and sharing what you learn with others?
Check out the Master Well Owner online course

49
being offered by Penn State Extension!
The ​Penn State Master Well Owner Network​ (MWON) will provide free, online training
for the first 20 volunteers who submit an application and meet the following criteria:
-- You must NOT be employed by any company that provides paid services to private water
supply owners (i.e. water testing companies, water treatment companies, water well drillers, etc.)
and
-- You must be willing to pass along basic private water system management knowledge to other
private water system owners.
Each volunteer who applies and is accepted into the program will receive details on how
to access the new, online MWON online course at no cost.
Successful applicants will be able to start the course in March and will have 60 days to
complete the course which includes six chapters covering private water system basics, well and
spring construction, water testing, water supply protection, water treatment, water conservation,
and outreach strategies.
Each chapter includes a mixture of short videos and text along with links to additional
resources and a short quiz.
Volunteers must answer 70 percent of the online quiz questions correctly to be certified
as a volunteer. The course can be completed at your own pace but must be finished within 60
days from the starting date.
A computer with a high-speed internet connection is recommended to view all of the
course materials and videos.
Volunteers who successfully complete the training course and pass a short exam will
receive a free copy of the 80-page publication - ​A Guide to Private Water Systems in
Pennsylvania​, discounted water testing through the Penn State water testing lab, and access to
various MWON educational materials.
In return, MWON volunteers are asked to pass along what they have learned to other
private water supply owners and submit a simple, one-page annual report of their educational
accomplishments.
Volunteers who recently completed the online course stated:
-- The course was very educational and included items that I had not given any thought or
concern to. Thank you for the opportunity to get more educated.
-- I have had water wells for over 35 years and had found it difficult to get GOOD information
on care and maintenance of existing wells.
Fill out an application for the MWON program​ if you are interested.
Pennsylvania is home to over one million private water wells and springs but it is one of
the few states that do not provide statewide regulations to protect these rural drinking water
supplies.
In 2004, Penn State Extension and several partner agencies created the Master Well
Owner Network; trained volunteers who are dedicated to promoting the proper construction,
testing, and maintenance of private water wells, springs and cisterns throughout Pennsylvania.
Since its inception, hundreds of MWON volunteers have provided education to over
50,000 private water supply owners throughout the state.
For more information, visit the ​Penn State Master Well Owner Network​ webpage.
Related Story:
Solving Bacteria Problems In Wells And Springs​ - Video

50
(Reprinted from Penn State Extension’s latest ​Watershed Winds newsletter​. ​Click Here​ to sign
up to receive a variety of helpful information from Penn State Extension.)
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Newly Updated Watershed Decisions Activity Kit Now Available From Penn State
Extension

Penn State Extension has available a updated


Watershed Decisions Activity Kids​, a hands-on,
inquiry based activity kit that helps older youth and
adults learn about water quality issues in small
watersheds and the decision making processes that
go into improving those water quality issues.
As "new members" of a community organization
interested in improving local water quality,
Watershed Decisions participants role-play while
examining simulated water samples, exploring the land users in their community, and then
creating a plan for improving their watershed on a limited budget.
There is no one solution to this activity and the results are dependent upon the creativity,
opinions, and ideas of the participants.
Designed for use with 2 or more small groups of 4-10 people each.
The Activity Kit is the recipient of Excellence Awards from the National Association of
Natural Resource Extension Professionals and the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents
(NAE4-HA).
Click Here​ to order your copy or for more information.

(Reprinted from Penn State Extension’s latest ​Watershed Winds newsletter​. ​Click Here​ to sign
up to receive a variety of helpful information from Penn State Extension.)
NewsClips:
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
Schneck: Biggest Supermoon Of 2019 Shines Tonight, Tuesday
Related Stories:
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
PaEN: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center In
Harrisburg
PaEN: Bottle Works Ethic Arts Center Host 3rd Annual NatureWorks March 2 In Johnstown
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
PaEN: Newly Updated Watershed Decisions Activity Kit Now Available From Penn State
Extension
PaEN: Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Education Programs Coming In March

51
PaEN: Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension
PaEN: Call For Abstracts: Bucknell 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium April 26-27
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Wetlands Will Play A Key Role In Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania

Swamp, marsh, and bog. These are a few words that


are used to describe wetlands; but what is a wetland
and why do they matter?
Historically, wetlands have been hard to define
because their characteristics can be highly variable
based on their location and the time of year;
however, all wetlands typically need to have the
following three features:
-- Land that is either flooded or saturated by water
for part of the growing season each year.
-- Prevalence of hydric soils, which are soils that
form when saturated by water and are often dark grey in color and may have orange, brown, red,
or black spots called mottles.
-- An abundance of water-loving plants that can tolerate or thrive under saturated soil conditions,
known as hydrophytes. Wetlands serve many functions, both to the ecosystem and the human
population. They provide a home to a wide range of wildlife, which offers recreational
opportunities for people that hunt and fish.
Wetlands are also able to absorb large amounts of runoff and release it at a slower rate,
leading to reduced flooding. Additionally, wetlands can remove many different water pollutants
from water flowing across them such as sediment, nutrients, and other toxins.
Some wetlands are even created to treat abandoned mine discharge, waste water, and
other types of nonpoint source pollution.
Each year ​World Wetlands Day​ occurs on February 2nd to raise awareness on the
importance of wetlands in our environment. This year’s theme: Wetlands and Climate Change,
focuses on the role wetlands can play in relation to climate change.
According to the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources ​2018 Climate
Change Adaptation and Mitigation Plan​.
Pennsylvania has seen warmer temperatures, more precipitation, and more intense
storms, and it is expected that this trend will continue in the future. These changes have caused
more flooding which can harm infrastructure, increase erosion, and reduce water quality.
The presence of wetlands will play a key role in addressing climate change in
Pennsylvania because of their ability to slow water flow, capture runoff, and absorb water
pollutants which will reduce the risks of intense precipitation and flooding that are associated
with climate change.
To learn more about wetlands in Pennsylvania, the benefits they provide for wildlife and
society, and wetland management practices, consult the Penn State Extension Publication,
Wetlands and Wildlife​.
To discover how the DCNR will address climate change in Pennsylvania, visit the online

52
Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Plan​.
(​Photo: ​Westmoreland County wetland/lake by D.Rhea, Penn State.)
NewsClips:
Climate Change Means More Floods, Great And Localized
Sharp Rise In Methane Levels Threatens World Climate Targets
Sisk: Report Shows How More PA Drivers Can Go Electric
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Pittsburgh Summit To Focus On Solar Energy In PA
Kummer: Study: Philly Could Be As Hot As Memphis By 2080 Because Of Climate Change
Sisk: Could Membranes At Coal-Fired Power Plants Help Stop Climate Change?
Op-Ed: Bailout Tax: Profitable Companies Need To Come Clean On Nuclear Energy
Op-Ed: In PA, Cap-And-Trade To Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions A Constitutional
Necessity - Clean Air Council
Op-Ed: How Many Times Are We Going To Bailout Three Mile Island?​ - Erie Epstein
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal
Op-Ed: Here’s What Green New Deal Advocates Can Learn From The 2009 Stimulus
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
EPA: Carbon Dioxide From Power Plants Rose Last Year
Climate Change Doubter Is Leading Effort To Advise Trump
Related Stories:
DCNR Outlines 123 Action Steps In Climate Change Mitigation, Adaptation Report On Public
Lands
Related Stories This Week:
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development
Plan Turns Into Climate Change Debate
Rep. Metcalfe Says Reducing Carbon Dioxide Will Kill His Vegetables
PaEN: Federal Judge Dismisses Clean Air Council Lawsuit Challenging Federal Actions On
Climate Change, Rollback Of Regulations
PaEN: Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate
Petitioners Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition

(Reprinted from Penn State Extension’s latest ​Watershed Winds newsletter​. ​Click Here​ to sign
up to receive a variety of helpful information from Penn State Extension.)
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways,


Other Areas To Keep Them Litter Free

Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​ is inviting communities


and groups to adopt local roads, waterways, parks and
other areas to help keep them litter free as part of the
KPB Adoption Program​.
PennDOT’s ​Adopt-a-Highway Program​ is also

53
available to adopt state maintained roads.
Although we have not seen many signs of spring, you probably have caught glimpses of
the trash lining our roads, neighborhoods and waterways. It’s never too early to start planning a
spring cleanup of the places you care about.
The KPB Adoption Program can help residents, organizations, civic groups, and
businesses be part of the solution.
By joining their statewide adoption program, local areas such as municipal roads,
communities, parks, neighborhood blocks, greenways, waterways and trails can be formally
adopted and cared for by local individuals or groups.
The commitment is two cleanups per year and in-turn, the organization provides a sign
recognizing the group’s efforts.
According to Keep America Beautiful’s 2009 National Visible Litter Survey and Litter
Cost Study, litter clean-up costs the U.S. more than an estimated $11.5 billion each year with
municipalities spending more than $790 million and counties spending $185 million each year.
The Keep PA Beautiful Adoption Program helps mitigate the costs associated with
cleaning up by encouraging local residents to take ownership of our neighborhoods.
Keep PA Beautiful provides a sign recognizing the groups or individuals who have
adopted the road or area and seeks the support of the local municipalities to provide the sign
post, install the sign and provide trash disposal options, as needed.
“Many communities depend on volunteers to clean up litter. Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful
works hand in hand with local municipalities and counties to provide residents with the tools and
resources they need to keep our communities clean and beautiful,” said Shannon Reiter,
President of Keep PA Beautiful. “Our adoption program encourages partnerships between local
residents and municipalities to work together to reduce the amount of litter in our shared spaces.
We are grateful for the support of municipalities and volunteers across the state.”
The benefits of removing roadside litter are far-reaching. It sends a message to travelers
that littering and dumping will not be tolerated, removes dangers to people, animals and
equipment, makes our communities more attractive for residents, tourists and potential
newcomers and increases property values and community pride.
So, after this long winter, get outside and do something that will make you and your
neighborhood feel good. Adopt an area you care about today.
For more information, visit the KPB ​Adoption Program​ webpage or contact Stephanie
Larson by sending email to: ​slarson@keeppabeautiful.org​ or call 724-836-4121 x104.
For information about adopting a state maintained road, visit the PennDOT’s
Adopt-a-Highway Program​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
Sign up now for the ​2019 Great American Cleanup of PA​ and volunteer or set up your
own cleanup and beautification event runs March 1 to May 31.
NewsClips:
Litterbugs Pick Up And Pay Up In Pennsylvania

54
Everything You Need To Know About Litter And Illegal Dumping In Philadelphia
Allegheny CleanWays Tackles Illegal Dumping While Making Community Connections
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA
PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny
County
PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home Workshops In
Allegheny County
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home
Workshops In Allegheny County

On February 21, the ​PA Resources


Council​ announced its schedule of
2019 ​Backyard Composting, Rain
Barrel and Healthy Body & Health
Home Workshops​ in Allegheny
County.
Backyard Composting
-- March 2:​ from 12:30 – 2 p.m.,
Ross Township Community Center
-- March 5: ​from 7 – 8:30 p.m.,
Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park
-- March 7: ​from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Sewickley Public Library
-- March 16:​ from 10:30 a.m. – Noon, Cooper-Siegel Community Library, Fox Chapel
-- March 20: ​from 6:30 – 8 p.m., East End Food Co-Op, Point Breeze
-- April 6:​ from 10:30 a.m. – Noon, Construction Junction, Point Breeze
-- April 13:​ from 10:30 a.m. – Noon, Lauri Ann West Community Center, O’Hara Twp.
-- May 18:​ from 4 – 5:30 p.m., Ross Township Community Center
-- May 21:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Mt. Lebanon Library
-- June 11: ​from 6:30 – 8 p.m., North Park Rose Barn
-- June 13:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park
Learn the benefits of backyard composting, including the overall process, methods for
setting up a compost pile, proper maintenance and ways to use finished compost.
Course fee includes 90 minutes of instruction plus a FreeGarden EARTH compost bin,
which features an 82-gallon capacity ideal for both urban and suburban settings.
Cost: $70 per person ($75 per couple) and includes one composting bin. Pre-registration
is required.
Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel
-- April 10: ​from 6:30 – 8 p.m., East End Food Co-Op, Point Breeze

55
-- April 17:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park
-- April 20:​ from 10:30 a.m. – Noon, Construction Junction
-- April 24:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Sewickley Public Library
-- May 1:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Green Tree Municipal Building
-- May 11:​ from 10:30 a.m. – Noon, Lauri Ann West Community Center, O’Hara Township
-- May 16:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Mt. Lebanon Library
-- June 4:​ from 6:30 – 8 p.m., North Park Rose Barn
-- June 6:​ from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park
Discover how to harvest rainwater from your roof, store it in a barrel and use it in the
landscape. Learn about problems associated with stormwater runoff and techniques to reduce
your contribution to watershed pollution.
Course fee includes 90 minutes of instruction plus a FreeGarden RAIN 55-gallon
easy-to-install rain barrel.
Cost: $80 per person ($85 per couple) and includes one rain barrel. Pre-registration is
required
Healthy Body & Healthy Home
-- May 22: ​from 7 – 8:30 p.m., Sewickley Public Library
Take action concerning the issue of toxins in the environment by discovering how to
combat exposure to chemicals, carcinogens and toxins. At this workshop you’ll learn what to
look out for and how to find alternative options to reduce everyday exposure.
During the session, you’ll learn how to make your own cleaning products and personal
care products – and then take home a green cleaning starter kit at the conclusion of the class.
Cost: $30 per person ($35 per couple) and includes a non-toxic cleaning kit.
Pre-registration is required.
To register or for more information, visit PRC’s ​Conservation Workshops​ webpage or
call 412-488-7490 x226.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA
PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny
County
Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways, Other
Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs

The ​PA Association Of Hazardous Materials

56
Technicians​ will hold its 27th Annual Hazmat Training and Education Conference on August
22-25 in Seven Springs, Somerset County.
The Conference will feature hands on training, response case studies, equipment
demonstrations, professional qualification certifications and much more.
Check their website​ or ​Facebook page​ periodically for more information.
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Honors 23 Organizations With Zero Waste Awards In Western PA
PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In Allegheny
County
PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home Workshops In
Allegheny County
Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways, Other
Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For Hazardous
Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Group Against Smog & Pollution Joins Pittsburgh Mayor For Kickoff Of First Clean
Construction Project To Reduce Diesel Pollution:

On February 21, the ​Group Against


Smog and Pollution (GASP)
executive director Rachel Filippini
joined Mayor Bill Peduto and other
local officials Thursday in the Duck
Hollow section of Pittsburgh for the
kickoff of the city’s first “​Clean
Construction​” project.
The guidelines require all city
government construction projects that
cost more than $2.5 million to use
diesel emission control strategies on construction vehicles, including the use of ultra-low sulfur
diesel fuel.
The City of Pittsburgh Department of Mobility and Infrastructure is set to begin
reconstruction of the McFarren Street Bridge over Nine Mile Run, which is the first such project
to be performed following the city’s “Clean Construction” guidelines.
GASP, which has long been supportive of the Clean Construction legislation, called the
project an important milestone for the city.
“We are happy to finally see a city project include the clean construction requirements,”
Filippini said. “We know that diesel particulate matter poses one of the greatest cancer risks from
any toxic outdoor air pollutant and that black carbon found in diesel pollution is a potent global
warming agent.”
She noted that diesel pollution has been shown to cause asthma, cancer, and other
negative health impacts.
Filippini also acknowledged that further steps will be needed to ensure green construction

57
in Pittsburgh is the rule rather than the exception to it.
“This project has been a long time coming and represents an important first step in
advancing greener construction in Pittsburgh,” she added. “While we think the city’s clean
construction legislation is important, its impact is unfortunately limited. To have a greater
impact, we will need the Urban Redevelopment Authority, Pittsburgh Water and Sewer
Authority—and other groups that undertake considerably more activity than the city—to also
adopt the policy.”
The Clean Construction guidelines were introduced by then-city Councilman William
Peduto in 2011 and revised in 2016 in and effort to “make them easier to follow for contractors.”
Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto discusses the Duck Hollow “Clean Construction” project.
The McFarren Bridge project in the city’s Duck Hollow neighborhood is the first major
project to come under these revised guidelines.
“This project allows the City of Pittsburgh to be a model for construction activities that
are responsible to both the planet and our budget’s bottom line,” Mayor Peduto said.
As part of the project, a new steel girder bridge will be constructed to provide access to
the Duck Hollow neighborhood. The bridge will carry two lanes of traffic. One side of the bridge
will include a sidewalk.
The new bridge will connect Old Browns Hill Road with McFarren Street, upstream of
the existing Second Avenue Bridge and the CSX Railroad Bridge. The new bridge will replace
the existing Second Avenue Bridge which has an 11-ton weight restriction.
Access to the neighborhood will be maintained throughout construction. Construction is
expected to begin in May and is expected to be complete in the summer of 2020.
Other stakeholders also instrumental in getting the “clean construction” legislation off the
ground were Pittsburgh United, Clean Water Action, Sierra Club of Pennsylvania, SEIU, and
others!
Click Here for a copy ​of the Clean Construction Legislation. For more information on
this program, visit GASP’s ​Clean Construction Legislation​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Group
Against Smog and Pollution (GASP)​ website.
(​Photo:​ Mayor Peduto, Rachel Filippini from GASP.)
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh To Enforce Clean Construction Law On New Bridge Project
What’s Next In The Battle Over Clairton Coke (Coal) Works?
Sisk: Environmental Groups Plan To Sue U.S. Steel After Clairton Coke (Coal) Fire
Lt. Gov. Fetterman Tours Clairton Coke (Coal) Works, Backs Repair Efforts
Editorial: Public Deserves Clean Understanding Of Erie Coke (Coal) Plant Health Impacts
Lower Summer Gasoline Prices In Western PA After Regulation Change
Highlands Schools Renews Air Monitoring Agreement With Allegheny County
Related Story:
GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Feb. 23, 2019]

GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh

The ​Group Against Smog and Pollution​ is now

58
accepting registrations for its student summer camp Air Adventures in Pittsburgh to be held from
June 17 to 21.
This STEAM-based day camp will allow campers aged 9-11 to use their creative and
logical sides as they learn about the history, health effects, and future of air pollution in the
Pittsburgh region.
Camp includes field trips, use of the latest air quality tech, and guest speakers from a
variety of professional backgrounds. To keep things fun and exciting, we’ve also teamed up with
City of Play, to design activities specifically for this camp.
By the end of the week campers will have completed various stewardship projects, so that
they leave camp knowing that they’ve already done something to improve the air around them.
The Camp has 20 open spots, ensuring a high teacher-to-student ratio that will give your
child a chance to thrive. Campers are expected to bring a lunch.
The $150 fee includes all camp activities and field trips. Scholarships available to those
in need of financial assistance.
The Camp will be held at the ​Environmental Charter School​, 829 Milton Street in
Pittsburgh.
Click Here ​to register or for more information. Questions should be direct to Chelsea
Hilty, GASP's Education and Events Coordinator, by sending email to: ​chelsea@gasp-pgh.org​ or
calling 412-924-0604 ext 207.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Group
Against Smog and Pollution​ website.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Group Against Smog & Pollution Joins Pittsburgh Mayor For Kickoff Of First Clean
Construction Project To Reduce Diesel Pollution
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
Wildlands Conservancy: Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
[Posted: Feb. 18, 2019]

DEP Issues Water Quality Certification For UGI LNG Truck Loading Facility In Berks

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the February 23 PA Bulletin it


has issued the Section 401 Water Quality Certification for a proposed UGI liquefied natural gas
truck loading facility at 5665 Leesport Avenue, Reading, Ontelaunee Township, Berks County
(​PA Bulletin, page 893​).
Approximately 9.5 acres of earth disturbance is proposed within the property footprint of
the existing Temple Truck Rack site, with approximately 5.6 acres of permanent use areas
proposed.
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Firefly-Inspired Surfaces Improve Efficiency Of LED Lightbulbs

59
By Asher Jones, ​Penn State News

A new type of light-emitting diode


lightbulb could one day light homes
and reduce power bills, according
to Penn State researchers who
suggest that LEDs made with
firefly-mimicking structures could
improve efficiency.
"LED lightbulbs play a key role in
clean energy," said ​Stuart (Shizhuo)
Yin​, professor of ​electrical
engineering​. "Overall commercial LED efficiency is currently only about 50 percent. One of the
major concerns is how to improve the so-called light extraction efficiency of the LEDs. Our
research focuses on how to get light out of the LED."
Fireflies and LEDs face similar challenges in releasing the light that they produce
because the light can reflect backwards and is lost.
One solution for LEDs is to texture the surface with microstructures — microscopic
projections — that allow more light to escape. In most LEDs these projections are symmetrical,
with identical slopes on each side.
Fireflies' lanterns also have these microstructures, but the researchers noticed that the
microstructures on firefly lanterns were asymmetric — the sides slanted at different angles,
giving a lopsided appearance.
"Later I noticed not only do fireflies have these asymmetric microstructures on their
lanterns, but a kind of glowing cockroach was also reported to have similar structures on their
glowing spots," said Chang-Jiang Chen, doctoral student in electrical engineering and lead
author in the study. "This is where I tried to go a little deeper into the study of light extraction
efficiency using asymmetric structures."
Using asymmetrical pyramids to create microstructured surfaces, the team found that they
could improve light extraction efficiency to around 90 percent. The findings were recently
published online in Optik​ and will appear in the April print edition.
According to Yin, asymmetrical microstructures increase light extraction in two ways.
First, the greater surface area of the asymmetric pyramids allows greater interaction of
light with the surface, so that less light is trapped.
Second, when light hits the two different slopes of the asymmetric pyramids there is a
greater randomization effect of the reflections and light is given a second chance to escape.
After the researchers used computer-based simulations to show that the asymmetric
surface could theoretically improve light extraction, they next demonstrated this experimentally.
Using nanoscale 3D printing, the team created symmetric and asymmetric surfaces and
measured the amount of light emitted. As expected, the asymmetric surface allowed more light to
be released.
The LED-based lighting market is growing rapidly as the demand for clean energy
increases, and is estimated to reach $85 billion by 2024.
"Ten years ago, you go to Walmart or Lowes, LEDs are only a small portion (of their
lighting stock)," said Yin. "Now, when people buy lightbulbs, most people buy LEDs."

60
LEDs are more environmentally friendly than traditional incandescent or fluorescent lightbulbs
because they are longer-lasting and more energy efficient.
Two processes contribute to the overall efficiency of LEDs. The first is the production of
light — the quantum efficiency — which is measured by how many electrons are converted to
light when energy passes through the LED material.
This part has already been optimized in commercial LEDs. The second process is getting
the light out of the LED — called the light extraction efficiency.
"The remaining things we can improve in quantum efficiency are limited," said Yin. "But
there is a lot of space to further improve the light extraction efficiency."
In commercial LEDs, the textured surfaces are made on sapphire wafers. First, UV light
is used to create a masked pattern on the sapphire surface that provides protection against
chemicals. Then when chemicals are applied, they dissolve the sapphire around the pattern,
creating the pyramid array.
"You can think about it this way, if I protect a circular area and at the same time attack
the entire substrate, I should get a volcano-like structure," explained Chen.
In conventional LEDs, the production process usually produces symmetrical pyramids
because of the orientation of the sapphire crystals.
According to Chen, the team discovered that if they cut the block of sapphire at a tilted
angle, the same process would create the lopsided pyramids. The researchers altered just one part
of the production process, suggesting their approach could easily be applied to commercial
manufacture of LEDs.
The researchers have filed for a patent on this research.
"Once we obtain the patent, we are considering collaborating with manufacturers in the
field to commercialize this technology," said Yin.
Other researchers who worked on the project were Jimmy Yao, Wenbin Zhu, Ju-Hung
Chao, Annan Shang and Yun-Goo Lee, doctoral students in electrical engineering.

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


NewsClips:
Erie 2030 District Set To Launch With 9 Partners To Save Energy, Water
U.S. Steel Tower Earns LEED Distinction
LEED Silver Certification For O+M
Related Story:
PaEN: Pittsburgh's U.S. Steel Tower Becomes 2nd Largest Building In The World to Achieve

[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

Call For Abstracts: Bucknell 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium April 26-27

The ​Bucknell University's Center for


Sustainability and the Environment​ will
hold its 7th annual Sustainability
Symposium "Young People’s World:
Making Your Future Energy, Climate &
Human Rights" on April 26-27 at various

61
locations on the Bucknell University campus in Lewisburg.
Organizers of the Conference have issued a call for abstracts from presenters interested in
showcasing and share their projects. Proposals are due March 18.
Abstracts for both oral and poster presentations are being sought from all interested
parties, including faculty, students, professionals, state and federal environmental agencies,
conservancies, watershed groups, and regulators.
Please limit submissions to 400 words or less. Example topics include, but are not
limited to:
-- Climate:​ Climate change policy; public perceptions of climate change; climate change
impacts, adaptations, and mitigation; variability and change; modeling of boundary layer
dynamics
-- Community: ​ Organizational strategies for sustainable communities; community
revitalization; local and global social movements for sustainability, inclusion, climate change
action, etc
-- Ecosystems:​ Impacts of climate change; impacts of energy development; diversity of
terrestrial and aquatic life; invasive species
-- Energy:​ Renewable technologies; energy retrofitting; smart grids; energy policy;
transportation
-- Food: ​Agriculture; food production; food waste; food shortages; farm labor
-- Human Rights:​ Environmental (in)justice; ethical and moral dimensions of climate change
impacts and responses
-- Management:​ Intersection of business and sustainability; establishing sustainable initiatives;
ensuring long-term corporate viability; employee concerns
-- Planning:​ Sustainable design; green buildings; eco-landscaping; planning for sustainable
growth; urbanization and related issues
-- UN Sustainable Development Goals:​ Particularly related to affordable and clean energy;
sustainable cities and communities; climate action, although all 17 SDG areas are welcome
-- Water: ​Sources and uses; sustainable watershed management; floods and droughts; climate
change impacts; equitable access to clean water.
Click Here to submit your abstract​.
Dr. James Hansen​ will be the keynote speaker at the Symposium which will also feature
Sophie Kivlehan​, Dr. Hansen's granddaughter.
Dr. Hansen was formerly Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, is
Adjunct Professor at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, where he directs a program in
Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions​.
More details will be posted on the ​Center’s webpage​. Questions should be directed to:
BCSE@bucknell.edu​ or call 570-577-2437.
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Penn State Extension Webinar On How Colorado Prioritizes Oil & Gas Well Inspections

On February 21, Penn State Extension held a


webinar on ​How Colorado Prioritizes Oil and Gas
Well Inspections Using a Risk-Based Approach​.
Click Here​ to view an archived copy of the

62
webinar when posted.
In 2014, Colorado instituted the statute for the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation
Commission (COGCC) to transition to a risk-based strategy for oil and gas inspections.
This strategy was implemented in March, 2016, establishing relative risks in six
parameters regarding population density, environment, site inspection history, years in service,
historic spills and corrective action.
Mike Leonard, community relations manager with the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation
Commission, will discuss the COGCC’s risk-based approach to well inspections, covering the
background, approach, implementation and outcomes thus far.
“This program has enabled COGCC to develop a more uniform inspection process by
utilizing defined parameters to determine inspection priority," Leonard said. "By using a
manageable GIS-based model, we can obtain daily relative risk factor scores for all wells in the
state.”
Leonard has 26 years’ experience working in the oil and gas industry in well completion
and oilfield construction prior to joining the COGCC in 2006. Previously, he has worked as field
inspector, field inspection supervisor, quality assurance professional with the Field Inspection
Group.
In addition to his professional experience, Leonard has nine years’ experience in the
volunteer fire service and was a Colorado State Certified Emergency Medical Technician. He
attained the rank of Assistant Chief of the #1 Cheyenne County Fire Department and was a State
Certified EMT assistant instructor, as well as holding certifications as a First Aid/CPR instructor.
Click Here​ to view an archived copy of the webinar when posted.
Related Story:
Penn State Extension March 14 Webinar On Methane Migration & Changes In Aquifer
Properties
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Penn State Extension March 14 Webinar On Methane Migration & Changes In Aquifer
Properties:

Penn State Extension will host a ​webinar on March


14​ starting at 1:00 on a ​case study of methane
migration and changes in aquifer properties​.
Josh Woda, a Penn State Department of
Geosciences graduate student, will explain how
methane migration can change aquifer properties as
well as what we can learn by investigating case
studies near hydrocarbon migration.
The origin of methane migration into water
resources has been an area of concern in areas of
shale development. Pennsylvania does not regulate
private homeowner water wells on top of the naturally occurring methane.
Detection of a methane leakage source can be difficult to determine. Recent Penn State
research has found new tracers that can help determine impacts from recent gas migration.
“Very little is understood about how methane migrates in the subsurface and what

63
geochemical changes it can induce along its flow path,” Woda stated. “We studied an area
containing elevated methane for over seven years to understand observations related to and the
plausible causes of methane migration. Observed changes in metal concentrations and sulfate
depletion at the study site might allow better prediction of what happens in the subsurface at
other locations when methane is introduced, as well as revealing whether methane is natural or
anthropogenic in origin.”
Click Here to register​ or for more information.
Related Stories:
Penn State Extension Webinar On How Colorado Prioritizes Oil & Gas Well Inspections
Penn State Ground And Stream Water Research Reveals Clues To Shale Drilling Impacts
After 10 Days, Pressure Problem From Fracking Utica Gas Well In Westmoreland County Said
To Be Under Control
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Agriculture: 3,333 Acres In 19 Counties Added To Farmland Preservation Program

On February 21, the state ​Farmland Land


Preservation Board​ took action to preserve 35
farms covering 3,333 acres across 19 counties.
The 35 farms preserved are in Allegheny, Beaver,
Berks, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Chester,
Cumberland, Dauphin, Greene, Lackawanna,
Lancaster, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mercer,
Northampton, Washington, Westmoreland, and
York counties.
“Looking at the geographic, ownership, and
production diversity of the farms preserved at this week’s meeting, it’s clear that this program
has a statewide impact and benefits farm families of all types and at all stages, from those
growing their operations to those transitioning to a new generation,” said Agriculture Secretary
Russell Redding. “More than $56 million committed for strategically safeguarding our most
vulnerable farmland this coming year is an incredible success only made possible because of the
commitment of government at all levels, farm families, volunteer county and state board
members, and the citizens of Pennsylvania. Together, we have created and sustained a program
that is a model for our country.”
The 17-member board approved its highest annual spending threshold in a decade: $38
million approved for 2019 purchases of development rights from farm owners. Additionally,
counties certified the highest amount of funding for preservation in twelve years at $18.2 million.
Since the program began in 1988, federal, state, county, and local governments have
purchased permanent easements on 5,462 farms totaling 562,920 acres in 59 counties for
agricultural production.
The Pennsylvania Agricultural Conservation Easement Purchase Program, as it is
formally known, is dedicated to slowing the loss of prime farmland to non-agricultural uses.
Funding allows state, county and local governments to purchase conservation easements,
from owners of quality farmland.
State, county, local, and federal funds committed at the Board meeting, and allocated to

64
county programs, will secure the purchase of development rights to preserve farms waiting on
the county backlog lists.
In some cases, federal funding helps to preserve these lands. The 2018 Farm Bill provides
a significant opportunity to leverage federal funds through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s
Natural Resources Conservation Service.
The department will negotiate a cooperative agreement to participate in the federal
Agricultural Conservation Easement program in the coming year.
Click Here​ for a list of farms preserved as a result of this action.
For more information, visit Agriculture’s ​Farmland Preservation​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Agriculture Preserves Nearly 146 Acres Of Farmland In Benton Twp
Crable: Study Urges Farmers To Inject Manure Into Fields To Combat Runoff, Odor Problems
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Penn State Extension To Help Retail Operations At Agricultural Businesses
Bill Would Tweak Housing Rules For Preserved Farms
Urban Farming Proponents See Unlimited Potential In Erie
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Op-Ed: How Much Longer Can Dairy Farmers Endure Their Financial Crisis?
Related Stories:
Natural Lands Transfers 57- Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
PA Land Trust Assn. Updates 2 Model Conservation, Stewardship Easements
PaEN: Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PaEN: Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
PaEN: Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
PaEN: Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Natural Lands Transfers 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park

On February 19, ​Natural Lands​ announced 57-acres


of land the organization purchased has been
transferred to ​Marsh Creek State Park​ in Wallace
Township, Chester County. The land was slated to
be developed.
Now as part of the State Park, it will be open to the
public for hiking, birdwatching, horseback riding,
and other passive recreation uses.
The forested property adjoins the 1,727-acre Marsh
Creek State Park, used by more than 1,000,000
visitors every year.
The downturn in the housing market a decade ago put a hold on the developer’s plans to
create a large-scale resort community with residences, hotel space, and a golf course. Natural

65
Lands approached the landowner when foreclosure seemed likely and offered to purchase the
property for appraised value.
After several years of planning and gathering the needed public funding, Natural Lands
purchased the property at the close of 2018.
“Seventy-one percent of Pennsylvania’s forests are privately owned, leaving them at risk
for development,” said Oliver Bass, president of Natural Lands. “Saving these 57 acres simply
could not have happened without all of us—U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chester County, PA
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the PA Turnpike Commission, Wallace
Township, and Natural Lands—working together. I’m certain it would have been developed;
now it will be preserved and enjoyed by everyone.”
Chester County Commissioners Michelle Kichline, Kathi Cozzone, and Terence Farrell
noted, “This is the year that we are planning to reach a goal of 30 percent preserved open space
in Chester County. Projects like this that expand beautiful areas already enjoyed by residents and
visitors illustrate the thoughtful, planned approach that we take to preserving land. For 30 years,
Chester County has been following that plan, which is why our preservation efforts are smart;
why they encourage partnerships with conservancies, municipalities, and other organizations;
and why the County is recognized as a great place to live, work, retire, and visit.”
“Whenever we can add land to our state parks, it is great news. When we add to an
increasingly popular park serving residents of southeastern Pennsylvania, it is truly great news!”
said Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. “This
almost 60-acre tract will help enrich the experiences of the thousands of visitors drawn to Marsh
Creek each year. We salute Natural Lands for the untiring effort to make it happen.”
Support for this conservation success was provided by Highlands Act; US Forest Service
– Highlands Conservation Act; Chester County – Preservation Partnership Program; PA
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Keystone Recreation, Park and
Conservation Fund; Virginia Cretella Mars Foundation; and Wallace Township.
Additionally, the PA Turnpike Commission contributed a five-acre portion of the
protected, 57-acre parcel to account for a nearby parcel it acquired for a future six-lane widening
project west of the Downingtown Interchange (#312).
The property provided by the Turnpike sits at the northwest side of the state park adjacent
to Chalfont Road. The planned PA Turnpike improvement project, which is now in the final
design stage, will result in a smoother, safer, and wider I-76 between mileposts 308 and 312 in
Upper Uwchlan Township.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Natural
Lands​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from Natural Lands and ​Like them on
Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their activities.
Related Stories:
Agriculture: 3,333 Acres In 19 Counties Added To Farmland Preservation Program
PA Land Trust Assn. Updates 2 Model Conservation, Stewardship Easements
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

PA Land Trust Assn. Updates 2 Model Conservation, Stewardship Easements

The ​PA Land Trust Association​ recently


finalized the text of two easements-- a

66
conservation easement and a model environmental stewardship easement.
The ​Model Grant of Conservation Easement and Declaration of Covenants​ and is
identical to the proposal posted in January. All users are strongly encouraged to adopt this
change immediately.
The 2nd edition of the ​Model Access Easement for Environmental Stewardship​ is also
available to help organizations secure long-term access to land for remediating the effects of
abandoned mine drainage.
For the second edition, the model’s provisions have been modified to facilitate
customizations of the model for other types of environmental stewardship projects. The model
also has been updated to reflect changes in state law and received a host of miscellaneous
improvements.
Visit PALTA's ​Conservation Tools​ webpage for copies of these easements and much
more.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming educational programs and other
events, visit the ​Allegheny Land Trust​ website. ​Click Here​ to read the Trust’s most recent
newsletter. ​Click Here​ to add your email to their mailing list. ​Click Here ​to support their work.
Reminder: Workshop proposals for the ​PA Greenways & Trails Summit​ are due February
25.
Register now for the ​2019 PA Land Conservation Conference​ May 16-18 in the Poconos.
Related Stories:
Agriculture: 3,333 Acres In 19 Counties Added To Farmland Preservation Program
Natural Lands Transfers 57- Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
[Posted: Feb. 20, 2019]

2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit Set For May 10 At Raystown Lake Visitors Center

The ​PA Environmental Council​ and DCNR are hosting


the ​2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit​ on May 10 at the
Raystown Lake Visitors Center​ in Huntingdon County
from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Mountain bike advocates, land managers and anyone
interested in improving off-riding will be gathering for a
discussion around what it will take to improve and expand
riding opportunities throughout Pennsylvania.
Different perspectives on how to achieve this will be
given time and there will be an opportunity to be heard.
The outcome of the meeting will help lay the groundwork for DCNR's 5-year plan to
improve off-road riding in the state.
For those interested, free camping for the weekend is being made available as part of the
celebration of the 10-year anniversary of the Allegrippis Trails.
Click Here​ to RSVP for this important opportunity.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, ​PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker​, follow ​PEC
on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click
Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.

67
NewsClips:
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
New Lackawanna State Park Manager: Like Being Mayor Of A Small Town
Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Ski Resorts See Sunny Skies As They Hit Presidents’ Day Groove
Kummer: William Penn Foundation Gives $2M toward New Waterfront Park In Philly
Chester County Acquires 80 Acres To Extend Nottingham Park
Reliance Bank Donates To Logan Twp’s Greenwood Park Project
The Healing Power Of Horses
Op-Ed: Congress Must Reach Across Aisle And Protect Grand Canyon
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Related Stories:
PaEN: DCNR Blog: Connecting Diverse Communities To Experience And Appreciate Our
Natural Places
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
PaEN: Feb. 21 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
[Posted: Feb. 23, 2019]

DCNR Blog: Connecting Diverse Communities To Experience And Appreciate Our


Natural Places

Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the


common property of all the people, including
generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources,
the Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them
for the benefit of all the people.”
Our state constitution is clear -- Pennsylvania state
parks and forests belong to everyone.
However, according to an ​Outdoor Industry
Association report​ (PDF), only 33 percent of Black
people participate in outdoor recreation activities,
compared to 50 percent of White people.
In another study about Americans’ relationship with nature, ​researchers found that more
than half of Black adults say the outdoors is unsafe as a barrier to their interests in nature.
But that is changing! Several programs are working in Pennsylvania to encourage people
of color, especially the Black community, to get outside and enjoy and appreciate the abundance
of the Commonwealth’s natural places.
Let’s Go Outdoors

68
Sisters Keisha and Tarsha Scovens founded ​Let’s Go Outdoors in Philadelphia​ to connect
city communities to outdoor experiences.
As Black women, they know people of color are under-represented in the conservation
world, and seek to change that through their local and regional programs.
If a young person experiences the outdoors with a family member, they are more likely to
continue to engage in the great outdoors in their adulthood.
As mothers, Keisha and Tarsha take this message to heart and are passionate for other
caregivers to aim for the same.
Let’s Go Outdoors, through their nonprofit affiliate Urban Outdoors Initiatives, is
launching a new pipeline program called Conservation Careers 101 with some funding from
DCNR.
This pilot aims to foster the next generation of conservationists through lessons, field
experiences, and connections to job opportunities in the conservation and outdoor recreation
field.
Environmental lessons supplement classroom work, and field trips to local environmental
sites bring those lessons to life. This “next step” serves as a pipeline for youth of color to launch
into conservation careers.
The unique program, operating in Philadelphia, is currently engaging 56 youth with a
goal of impacting 150 by 2020.
Recently, the group visited ​Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center​ to learn about
snowshoeing, forest conservation and stewardship, and about environmental career opportunities.
Mid-Atlantic Youth Anglers & Outdoor Partners
Todd Pride of ​Mid-Atlantic Youth Anglers & Outdoor Partners​ has introduced more than
11,000 diverse youth -- our next generation’s stewards -- to outdoor resources in southeastern
Pennsylvania and surrounding states.
The organization’s core work has been introducing and training students and their
supporting adults in fishing, boating, hunting heritage, archery, wildlife education, agriculture,
and conservation -- with a mission focus of training in the “STEM path to college” through these
activities.
Todd says one of the biggest barriers to introducing more youth and families to the
outdoors and conservation activities is the ethnic, cultural, and gender connection of
organizations to the communities they are targeting.
Outdoor activities are personal and social, so building community connections for
long-term participation is key.
“As a minority-led organization, the Mid-Atlantic team is intentionally diverse...because
we want to look like the communities we serve, and realize this is important to getting more
youth and families into fishing, hunting, conservation and outdoors activities.”
The Mid-Atlantic Youth Anglers & Outdoor Partners has made the connection of
education and health benefits to the outdoors with the groups they work with, which has opened
doors to outdoor activities in a way that may not have been -- with the demands youth and
families have with their time.
Generations Yet to Come
We at DCNR applaud these efforts to inspire current and future generations of
conservationists and outdoor enthusiasts.
Our mission to conserve and sustain Pennsylvania’s natural resources for present and

69
future generations’ use and enjoyment depends on making these connections for all
Pennsylvanians.
DCNR also is taking action to ensure its lands are accessible to all, to provide inclusive
and equitable programs and services, and to recruit and retain a diverse workforce.
Learn more about DCNR’s ​Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Plan​ (PDF).
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo:​ ​Todd Pride of Mid-Atlantic Youth Anglers & Outdoor Partners.​ )

(Reprinted from the ​February 21 DCNR Resource newsletter.​ C


​ lick Here​ to sign up for your
own copy​.)
NewsClips:
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
New Lackawanna State Park Manager: Like Being Mayor Of A Small Town
Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Ski Resorts See Sunny Skies As They Hit Presidents’ Day Groove
Kummer: William Penn Foundation Gives $2M toward New Waterfront Park In Philly
Chester County Acquires 80 Acres To Extend Nottingham Park
Reliance Bank Donates To Logan Twp’s Greenwood Park Project
The Healing Power Of Horses
Op-Ed: Congress Must Reach Across Aisle And Protect Grand Canyon
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Related Stories:
PaEN: 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit Set For May 10 At Raystown Lake Visitors Center
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
PaEN: Feb. 21 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County

Ron Beach, a former PennDOT traffic


technician supervisor of 30 years and former
Game Commission Deputy Game Protector
of 20 years, has continued his passion for
wildlife into his retirement.
While serving at the Game

70
Commission, Ron’s main responsibilities were law enforcement, which consisted of
investigations, arrests, and court appearances. He met with land owners, presented public
programs, and taught hunter education.
Ron also volunteered to assist Game Commission wildlife biologists with research on
black bears, coyotes, and bobcats -- which he found very rewarding.
“If you showed an interest in learning about wildlife, they were more than willing to
share their knowledge,” said Ron. “The knowledge that I gained is attributed to these wildlife
professionals that I had the distinct pleasure to work with.”
Ron has continued his wildlife work after his professional career. He spends time as a
citizen scientist working with mammals, as well as barred owls and American kestrels.
Some of the organizations he works with are: ​The Wildlife Society​; ​Lycoming Audubon
Society​; ​The National Wildlife Federation​; and ​American Kestrel Partnership​.
Ron shares his passion and knowledge with others.
He enjoys working with young people, and is involved in presenting classes in
conjunction with the Audubon Society, DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry, and the ​Clean Water
Institute of Lycoming College​ to elementary and high school students of Loyalsock, South
Williamsport, Williamsport, and Muncy school districts
He also gives presentations to civic organizations about Pennsylvania wildlife, and is
joined by college biology students to help with field work.
“I am not a professional educator, but I do enjoy sharing my knowledge and speaking
with people, young or old, on wildlife and the environment,” said Ron. “I hope I can make just a
little difference.”
Ron’s love of nature permeates through other parts of his life as well. He is an
accomplished painter whose subjects​ often include Pennsylvania’s scenic vistas, farms, and
wildlife.
“There wasn’t any question on what subjects to paint -- wildlife and landscapes were my
only interests,” said Ron. “I believe painting makes you more aware of your surroundings and
what you’re stepping over.”
While he would love to paint all the time, he cannot, saying, “It would become work.”
So, Ron divides his time -- if he wants to paint a particular animal or bird, he does research about
it. Ron lives in Montoursville.
Know of a good natured Pennsylvanian who is passionate about outdoor recreation and/or
conservation that we should feature? Contact DCNR at ​ra-resource@pa.gov​ to nominate
someone.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.

(Reprinted from the ​February 21 DCNR Resource newsletter.​ C


​ lick Here​ to sign up for your
own copy​.)
NewsClips:
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
New Lackawanna State Park Manager: Like Being Mayor Of A Small Town

71
Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Ski Resorts See Sunny Skies As They Hit Presidents’ Day Groove
Kummer: William Penn Foundation Gives $2M toward New Waterfront Park In Philly
Chester County Acquires 80 Acres To Extend Nottingham Park
Reliance Bank Donates To Logan Twp’s Greenwood Park Project
The Healing Power Of Horses
Op-Ed: Congress Must Reach Across Aisle And Protect Grand Canyon
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Related Stories:
PaEN: DCNR Blog: Connecting Diverse Communities To Experience And Appreciate Our
Natural Places
PaEN: 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit Set For May 10 At Raystown Lake Visitors Center
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
PaEN: Feb. 21 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9

Private woodland owners are encouraged to attend the


Dauphin County Woodland Owners Association’s​ 9th
Annual ​Woodland Owner’s Conference​ on March 9 at the
Dauphin County Agricultural & Natural Resources Center​,
1451 Peters Mountain Road in Dauphin from ​8:30 to 3:15​.
The day-long conference will provide private forest
landowners with forest management strategies to promote
sustainable forestry.
Topics include: Pest and disease, Timber management,
Invasive species control, Timber stand improvement,
Habitat management for wildlife, and Forest health issues.
This program is free and open to the public with an optional catered lunch available for
$10 payable at registration. Additional information, including how to register, is available at the
Dauphin County Woodland Owners Association​ website.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.

(Reprinted from the ​February 21 DCNR Resource newsletter.​ C


​ lick Here​ to sign up for your
own copy​.)
NewsClips:

72
Schneck: Wet 2018 Resulted In Fewer Wildfires In Pennsylvania
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Horses Help Drag Felled Trees Out Of Erie Park
Related Stories:
PaEN: DCNR: Wildfires Increase In 2018 Over 2017, But Nowhere Near 2016
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
PaEN: Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

DCNR: Wildfires Increase In 2018 Over 2017, But Nowhere Near 2016

On February 21, the Department of Conservation and


Natural Resources reported there were a total of 690
wildfires in 2018 which burned 1,843 acres.
In 2017 there were ​531 reported fires
affecting 1,644 acres​. In 2016, however, Bureau of
Forestry personnel and volunteer firefighters ​battled
more than 850 reported​ field, brush, and forest fires
that scorched more than 12,000 acres across the state.
“Pennsylvania’s 2018 wildfire season was
relatively short-lived in the spring, resulting in
below-average instances of acres burned,’” said Mike
Kern, chief of DCNR's ​Bureau of Forestry’s Forest Fire Protection​ section. “Heavy summer and
fall rains resulted in an extremely low number of fires after July.”
Debris burning accounted for the most wildfires in 2018, with 424 incidents scorching
1,325 acres. A total of 58 fires, burning 146 acres, were labeled arson. Campfires, equipment
use, fireworks, and smoking accounted for 72 wildfires throughout the state.
DCNR statistics show nearly 85 percent of Pennsylvania’s wildfires occur in March,
April, and May, before the greening of state woodlands and brushy areas.
Wildfire Prevention Week is usually designated during the first week in March.
For more on wildfires, visit DCNR’s ​Wildfire​ webpage. ​Click Here​ for tips on how
homeowners can reduce the risk of wildfires.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:

73
Schneck: Wet 2018 Resulted In Fewer Wildfires In Pennsylvania
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Horses Help Drag Felled Trees Out Of Erie Park
Related Stories:
DCNR Urges Caution To Prevent Wildfires
Related Stories This Week:
PaEN: Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
PaEN: Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal

​ ebruary 21 DCNR Resource newsletter​. ​Click Here


(The 2018 information here came from the F
to sign up for your own copy​.)
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Feb. 21 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

The ​February 21 Resource newsletter​ is now available


from the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources featuring articles on--
-- ​DCNR Blog: Connecting Diverse Communities To
Experience And Appreciate Our Natural Places
-- ​DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach,
Lycoming County
-- ​Gov. Wolf Outlines Plan To Restore Critical
Pennsylvania Infrastructure
-- ​Weather Kept Wildfire Numbers Low In 2018
-- ​Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9
-- ​Tree Tender Training Classes For Volunteers In Southeast PA
-- ​Sustainable Backyard Workshop In Westmoreland County March 16
-- ​Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
-- ​DCNR Names New Manager At Lackawanna State Park Complex
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important

74
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
Schneck: Wet 2018 Resulted In Fewer Wildfires In Pennsylvania
New Lackawanna State Park Manager: Like Being Mayor Of A Small Town
Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
Op-Ed: Congress Must Reach Across Aisle And Protect Grand Canyon
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Related Stories:
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
PaEN: Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit Set For May 10 At Raystown Lake Visitors Center
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits

[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Education Programs Coming In March

The Lehigh Valley-based ​Wildlands Conservancy


highlighted ​educational and other programs coming
up in March​ for students and adults, including--
-- ​Project FeederWatch​: Every Saturday and Sunday
-- March 2:​ ​Bird Blinds And Bridges
-- March 14:​ ​Pre-K Pathfinders: Birds And Kites
-- March 23: ​Where Elk And Bison Roam
-- March 27:​ ​You And Me: Enchanted Forest
-- March 30--​ ​Nature Treks: Drink Your Tree Wild
Edibles Hike
-- ​Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Wildlands
Conservancy​ website. ​Like on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​ and ​Join on Instagram​. ​Click Here
to support the Conservancy.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
Wildlands Conservancy: Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR

75
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

PA Council Of Trout Unlimited Adopts Policy Strongly Favoring Preserving, Enhancing


Populations Of Wild Trout

Periodically, the ​PA Council of Trout Unlimited


reviews its various policies to incorporate updates that
reflect current views on these guiding principles. The
following Policy on Trout Management prepared by
the Trout Management Committee was approved and
adopted by Council’s Executive Committee on Feb. 9,
2019.

Trout Unlimited was founded as a conservation


organization dedicated to ensuring that wild and native
trout populations are allowed to thrive as nature intended. The Pennsylvania Council of Trout
Unlimited (PATU) is comprised of 49 local chapters representing over 14,000 members.
Our mission is, “To conserve, protect, restore, and sustain Pennsylvania’s coldwater
fisheries and their watersheds, especially our wild trout resources.”
Both PATU and its parent organization, National Trout Unlimited, believe that
conservation should be a true partnership between landowners, agencies, municipalities, and all
stakeholders.
We work to protect critical habitat, to reconnect degraded waterways, and re- store
populations of coldwater fisheries.
We strive to ensure that our decisions and programs reflect the very best information
available.
The following statements communicate PATU’s policy on the management of wild trout
populations. All Pennsylvania chapters, as well as their individual members, are strongly
encouraged to follow these guidelines and to adhere to this policy when representing Trout
Unlimited.
PATU strongly favors conservation programs and projects that preserve or enhance
existing populations of wild trout and facilitate re-establishment of native brook trout
populations in water bodies within their historical range.
The goals of these programs are: Improvements to water quality, Habitat improvement
and Re-establishing connectivity within watersheds.
PATU strongly believes that conservation efforts should be based on sound science and
will support programs and policy decisions that meet these requirements. PATU will make every
effort to advance our knowledge of coldwater environs and the trout that reside therein.
In the execution of its mission, PATU will work cooperatively with the Pennsylvania
Fish and Boat Commission, as well as with other agencies of the Commonwealth, other
conservation organizations, county conservation districts, landowners, business and industry,
local government entities, and elected officials.
PATU will work to educate its members and others regarding the importance of
protecting and enhancing wild trout populations. Conversely, it will advocate against measures

76
that will result in adverse impacts on wild trout.
Given the historically deleterious impacts of human activity on the state’s waterways,
hatchery trout provide recreational fishing for anglers in a variety of waters.
PATU supports the stocking of hatchery trout in waters that cannot support naturally
sustaining numbers of wild trout.
PATU defines naturally sustaining as a wild trout population that is able to maintain a
stable population in both size and age over an extended period of time, while recognizing the
typical year to year variability of wild trout populations.
Further, PATU supports the stocking of fingerlings or advanced fingerlings in waters
where this approach would prove successful.
Recognizing that not all waters are suitable for sustaining a successful fingerling stocking
program, waters possessing the characteristics best suited to this stocking approach could be
added to the program and surveys conducted to determine success or failure.
PATU advocates that no hatchery trout be introduced to any waters holding naturally
sustaining native brook trout throughout the entire year.
Acknowledging PFBC’s classification system of Pennsylvania’s wild trout waters, we
support cessation of all stocking in Class A, Class B, and Class C waters. Instead, we support
actions directed at enhancing those populations.
We also recommend periodic resurveying of Class B, Class C, and Class D waters to
determine if changes or improvements in habitat or water quality may be appropriate to enhance
the wild trout population.
PATU also encourages consideration of the stocking of sterile rainbow trout (triploids) as
a potential method of reducing or discontinuing the stocking of hatchery brook, brown, and
non-sterile rainbow trout species.
This will allow for wild populations of both brook and brown trout to be more accurately
assessed, and the chance of introducing species specific diseases will be greatly reduced. Waters
should be selected for introduction of triploids for a trial period, and data gathered for evaluation
of the impacts on those waterways and watersheds.
PATU recommends that streams in watersheds that support migratory populations of wild
brook or brown trout be managed on a watershed level for the resource opportunities afforded
during all seasons of the year.
There are sustaining numbers of wild trout in fisheries that are currently classified as
Warm Water Fisheries. Two examples are the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River and
Sherman’s Creek.
PATU believes that wild trout populations existing in entire watersheds such as these are
not being documented due to the surveys being conducted only in mid-summer.
These riverine migratory wild trout populations should be identified and then managed on
a watershed level to protect these wild trout seeking thermal refuge during the spawning season.
This approach could also set the stage and provide an example for managing trout
populations on a watershed level rather than by the current method of utilizing stream segments
and determining management decisions based on those sections alone.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Council
of Trout Unlimited​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (top of page). ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Follow PATU on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to
support their work.

77
(Reprinted from the ​Winter PA Trout newsletter​ from the ​PA Council of Trout Unlimited​. ​Click
Here​ to sign up for your own copy (top of page).)
NewsClip:
Schneck: Trout Stocking Schedules Ahead Of PA’s Regional Opening Day
Related Story:
Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29

Registrations are now being accepted for the


Keystone/Trout Unlimited Teens Conservation
Camp​ to be held from June 23 to 29 at ​Keystone
College​ in Dickson City, Lackawanna County.
Teens ages 14 to 18 with or without
experience can register for this fun-filled week of
learning and developing skills, while establishing
lifelong friends at the same time.
Keystone/TUTeens has been in existence
for the last six years and is located on the
Southern Branch of Tunkhannock Creek on the campus of Keystone College, just minutes from
Scranton at the gateway to Pennsylvania’s Endless Mountains region.
Instruction includes tackle nomenclature, casting, fly tying, environmental sciences, team
building, plant identification, waterways protection, and a final conservation project.
Boy Scouts can earn merit badges and Girl Scouts can earn Stream Girl patches. The
Stream Girls curriculum allows young girls to develop an interest in the outdoors and outdoor
sciences, including engineering sciences of water and hydraulics.
The addition of the Stream Girls curriculum now completes our plan to convert from
STEM-based education to what National TU refers to as STREAM-based education – Science
Technology Recreation Engineering Art and Math.
Instructors include professionals from the Fish and Boat Commission, Department of
Environmental Protection, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (Parks and
Forestry), county conservation districts, university professors, conservation groups, and
volunteers from National TU, ​Pennsylvania Council of Trout Unlimited​ and local Trout
Unlimited chapters.
To register or for more information, visit the ​Keystone/Trout Unlimited Teens
Conservation Camp​ website. Questions or requests for information can be sent to:
ffnepa@epix.net​ or call Charlie Charlesworth at 570-954-5042.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Council
of Trout Unlimited​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (top of page). ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Follow PATU on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to
support their work.

(Reprinted from the ​Winter PA Trout newsletter​ from the ​PA Council of Trout Unlimited​. ​Click

78
Here​ to sign up for your own copy (top of page).)
Related Stories:
PaEN: PA Council Of Trout Unlimited Adopts Policy Strongly Favoring Preserving, Enhancing
Populations Of Wild Trout
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
Wildlands Conservancy: Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

PA Sea Grant Program Holds Aquatic Invasive Species Lunch n’ Learn Webinars March
1, 8

The ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ will hold 2


webinars for professionals and anyone else interested
in ​aquatic invasive species​ on March 1 and 8. Here
are the webinar topics--
-- March 1: How To Develop A Watercraft
Inspection Program To Prevent The Spread Of
Aquatic Invasive Species. ​ Noon to 1:00.
Aquatic invasive species are species found
outside their natural geographic range that cause
ecological or economic harm, or harm to human
health. Recreational boating is one pathway that can move plants and animals from one water
body to another in a short amount of time, which can lead to the spread of aquatic invasive
species.
One way to prevent their spread is to inspect a boat or trailer and remove any visible
plants, animals, or organic materials before launching into a different lake or pond.
Contact Sarah Whitney, Director, for details by sending email to: ​swhitney@psu.edu​.
-- March 8: How Mock Scenarios Are Shaping The Future Of Aquatic Invasive Species
Rapid Response.​ Noon to 1:00.
The ​Governor’s Invasive Species Council of Pennsylvania​ approved the Pennsylvania
Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Rapid Response plan in September 2014. Since that time, it been
used to conduct rapid response trainings, or exercises that mock the actions necessary when
dealing with a new infestation of an AIS species.
Past rapid response exercises have trained professionals how to properly report and
address new infestations.
This presentation will provide an overview of the rapid response process in Pennsylvania,
highlight key and updated aspects of the plan, and discuss results of past mock exercises to
ensure all participants are up to date on AIS rapid response process in Pennsylvania.
Contact Sara Stahlman, Extension Leader, for details by sending email to:
sstahlman@psu.edu​.
Visit the PA Sea Grant’s ​Aquatic Invasive Species​ webpage for more resources on

79
managing and educating others about aquatic invasive species.
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​ is now


accepting registrations for its ​Youth
Appalachian Adventure Camp​ on July 8-12
and August 12-16 at the Sanctuary.
Kids entering grades 4-8 are invited to
spend five days immersed in the glorious
Appalachian forest, learning about the
plants and animals that call it home.
Activities include kayaking, hiking, bird
watching, music and art making, kestrel nest box building, owl pellet dissection, radio telemetry
hide and seek, meeting live raptors, team building games, and much more!
The program will be held 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the Camp. Sibling discounts are
available. Morning care (8:00 to 9:00) and evening care (4:00 to 5:00) is available.
There is also an optional overnight stay Thursday into Friday for students in grades 7 and
8.
The cost is $200 for members or $250 for non-members of the Sanctuary. Early Eagle
Registration rates are available using the code earlyeagleCAMP redeemed before June 16.
Click Here to register​ or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​ website or call 610-756-6961. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates
from the Sanctuary, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​visit them on Flickr​ and visit
their ​YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here ​to support Hawk Mountain.
Related Stories:
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
Wildlands Conservancy: Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
[Posted: Feb. 19, 2019]

Winter PA Trout Newsletter Now Available From PA Council Of Trout Unlimited

The ​Winter issue of the PA Trout newsletter


is now available from the PA Council of
Trout Unlimited featuring articles on--
-- ​State Council Adopts Policy On Trout
Management To Preserve, Enhance
Populations Of Wild Trout
-- Comment Now On Federal Rule Change

80
To Sustain Protection Of Clean Water
-- ​Keystone/TUTeens Conservation Camp Registration Opens
-- Updates On TU Chapter Activities
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Council
of Trout Unlimited​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (top of page). ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Follow PATU on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to
support their work.
Related Stories:
PaEN: PA Council Of Trout Unlimited Adopts Policy Strongly Favoring Preserving, Enhancing
Populations Of Wild Trout
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Agriculture: Fulton, Clearfield County Deer Test Positive For Chronic Wasting Disease

On February 20, the Department of Agriculture announced


a doe on a Bethel Township, Fulton County breeding farm,
and a buck on a Bloom Township, Clearfield County
hunting preserve have tested positive for ​Chronic Wasting
Disease​.
Both farms will remain under quarantine for five years
from the date the positive tests were confirmed. The
department also quarantined the Fulton County farm where
the buck had been purchased four weeks prior to its
harvest in Clearfield County.
Neither deer tested showed signs of CWD prior to its death. Both deer were born and
raised in an area of Fulton County where wild deer have tested positive for CWD since 2015 and
captive deer have tested positive since 2017.
The department’s Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg tested the deer, as
required by the department’s CWD program. Positive test results were confirmed at the National
Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.
CWD attacks the brain of infected deer, elk and moose. There is no known treatment or
vaccine. Animals can get the disease through direct contact with saliva, feces and urine from an
infected animal, or contaminated environment.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been no reported
cases of CWD infection in people.
Clinical signs of CWD include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and
urination, and abnormal behavior like stumbling, trembling, and depression. Infected deer and
elk may also allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators.
The infectious agent, known as a prion, tends to concentrate in the brain, spinal column,
eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes.
To prevent disease spread, these high-risk parts must be properly handled and disposed of
where the animal is killed. Parts such as deboned meat, clean skull caps and capes present little
risk and may be taken home.
The Department of Agriculture coordinates a mandatory surveillance program for the

81
disease for 874 breeding farms, hobby farms and hunting preserves across the state. Since 1998,
accredited veterinarians and certified CWD technicians have tested more than 39,000 captive
deer in Pennsylvania, of those, 96 have tested positive.
The Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer, and elk and wild
deer that appear sick or behave abnormally.
For more information about Pennsylvania’s captive deer CWD programs, visit
Agriculture’s ​Chronic Wasting Disease​ webpage. Information on CWD in wild deer, elk and
moose is available at the Game Commission’s ​Chronic Wasting Disease​ webpage.
NewsClip:
Chronic Wasting Disease Continues To Spread Among PA Deer, Elk
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal

On February 22, the Game Commission announced forester


Brent McNeal has been presented with the ​National Wild
Turkey Federation’s Joe Kurz Wildlife Manager of the Year
Award​ for his dedication to wild turkeys and wildlife habitat
management.
The award is named after former Georgia Department of
Natural Resources wildlife chief Joe Kurz, who was a
principal figure in wild turkey trap-and-transfer programs
across North America and who played a vital role in
improving wildlife management.
McNeal received the award last week at the 43rd annual
NWTF Convention and Sport Show in Nashville, Tenn.
In addition to supervising foresters in the Game
Commission’s Southcentral Region, McNeal is responsible for all aspects of forest management
efforts on nearly 225,000 acres of game lands, where controlled burns and other habitat
treatments are implemented to increase mast production and reach other habitat-management
goals.
Regarding ​controlled burns​, McNeal achieved certification as an "RxB2," which requires
hundreds of hours of classroom instruction and participation in prescribed burns and wildfires.
He’s the only employee in the region with such a certification.
McNeal has spent over 2,500 hours, mostly since 2009, training for, preparing, and
conducting controlled burns.
Southcentral Region GIS specialist Jeremy Diehl, who serves on the regional
controlled-burns team says the region has been able to do more burning in the last five years,
especially on forestland and barrens, than at any time in the past.
“We would not have been able to do that without Brent's training, expertise, and
experience," Diehl said.
NWTF CEO Becky Humphries noted these projects benefit turkeys and a variety of
wildlife, and McNeal deserves credit for his important role.
“Brent is far more than a forester,” Humphries said. “His conservation practices combine
forest and habitat management to enhance the landscape and benefit all wildlife.”

82
“It makes me very proud to represent the agency that I have spent most of my career
with,” McNeal said. “Habitat management has evolved throughout my career to a point where I
feel we are making great strides every day to improve wildlife habitat for current and future
generations, and this award reflects that. I credit my peers in habitat management. I credit my
Dad for raising me to be a steward of the resource and to appreciate every day spent in the
woods. My wife and children have supported me throughout my career, tolerating me leaving
early and coming home late from prescribed burns and wearing muddy boots into the house. For
that, I thank them!”
For information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA
Chapter-National Wild Turkey Federation​ webpage. Also visit the Game Commission’s ​PA
Wild Turkey​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Brent McNeal and his wife Crystal.)
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Names Susan Hawthorne New Executive Director

On February 21, the ​Wildlife for Everyone Foundation


announced it has named Susan Hawthorne as its new Executive
Director.
“We are excited to have found an experienced individual
such as Susan to guide the future direction of the Wildlife for
Everyone Foundation. Susan possesses the right blend of
qualifications to continue the Foundation’s momentum into its
next phase of expansion that began under the former Executive
Director, Jerry Regan, who now serves as a trustee on the
Board,” said Russ Schleiden, Chairman of the Board.
Hawthorne holds a B.S. in Organizational Leadership and
a M.S. in Strategic Leadership from Mountain State University,
Beckley, West Virginia. She received a M.P.S. in Community and Economic Development from
Penn State University. She and her husband reside in Boalsburg.
“I am excited to join the Wildlife for Everyone Foundation, which has supported some
amazing projects across the state, and right here in Centre County is building a Wildlife Center at
the Tom Ridge and Julian Wetlands. This is an exciting time for all of us at the Wildlife for
Everyone Foundation,” said Hawthorne.
Hawthorne previously served as a former executive director and director of development,
communications for three nonprofit organizations in Centre and Clearfield Counties.
She specializes in program development and evaluation, strategic planning,
communications, fundraising and donor cultivation
In addition, Hawthorne worked as executive liaison for Blackboard/Schoolwires, Inc., an
education technology firm based in State College. She also worked in the radio broadcasting
field for 25 years as a news director and reporter/radio personality.
The vision of the ​Wildlife for Everyone Foundation​ is to be the leading advocate for
wildlife conservation in Pennsylvania. The foundation was formed in 2004 to provide all wildlife
enthusiasts with a way to show their commitment through much-needed financial support for
wildlife conservation efforts and education.

83
Since its inception, the Foundation has raised millions of dollars to support projects
including wildlife and wetland habitat improvements, creek and lake restorations, the Seedlings
for Schools program and student educational opportunities.
The Foundation’s mission connects all wildlife and nature enthusiasts to the great
outdoors, including birders, hunters, anglers, students and everyone with an appreciation for
nature’s treasures.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Wildlife for
Everyone Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to buy tickets for the upcoming Pennsylvania Wildlife
Gala on April 5 in State College.
[Posted: Feb. 21, 2019]

Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR

Know a college student interested in learning


more about the Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources and being a part of our
mission to conserve and sustain Pennsylvania’s
natural resources for present and future
generations?
DCNR will be hosting paid internships at state
parks and forest districts across the state, and in
Harrisburg at our central office for the summer.
Some of the areas where internship
opportunities are available include: Natural
resources, Parks and recreation, Environmental education, Environmental sciences, Engineering,
Surveying, Forestry, Biology, Communications and media and Finance and budget.
Candidates for an internship must:
-- Be currently enrolled full-time in a bachelor’s degree or advanced degree program in an
acceptable major
-- Have freshman year completed
-- Have good academic standing (2.0 GPA or higher)
-- Have Pennsylvania residency or enrollment at a Pennsylvania college or university
To apply, please visit the ​PA Government Employment Internships​ webpage, then filter
by department for DCNR-specific internships. Candidates must apply separately for each
internship opportunity he/she is interested in.
If you have any questions about applying for DCNR internships, please send email to:
RA-DCNRInterns@pa.gov​.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.

(Reprinted from the ​February 21 DCNR Resource newsletter.​ C


​ lick Here​ to sign up for your
own copy​.)
Related Stories:

84
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
Wildlands Conservancy: Register Now for Summer Camp 2019!
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Feb. 22, 2019]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​ and ​Twitter Feed​.

Politics
Caruso: Rep. Grove Named Chair Of House Investigative Committee
Rep. Grove Named Chair Of New House Oversight Committee
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
What’s Next In The Battle Over Clairton Coke (Coal) Works?
Sisk: Environmental Groups Plan To Sue U.S. Steel After Clairton Coke (Coal) Fire
Lt. Gov. Fetterman Tours Clairton Coke (Coal) Works, Backs Repair Efforts
Editorial: Public Deserves Clean Understanding Of Erie Coke (Coal) Plant Health Impacts
PaEN: Group Against Smog & Pollution Joins Pittsburgh Mayor For Kickoff Of First Clean
Construction Project To Reduce Diesel Pollution
Pittsburgh To Enforce Clean Construction Law On New Bridge Project
Lower Summer Gasoline Prices In Western PA After Regulation Change
Highlands Schools Renews Air Monitoring Agreement With Allegheny County
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
Alternative Fuels
Sisk: Report Shows How More PA Drivers Can Go Electric
Awards & Recognition
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal
PaEN: Pittsburgh's U.S. Steel Tower Becomes 2nd Largest Building In The World to Achieve
LEED Silver Certification For O+M
U.S. Steel Tower Earns LEED Distinction
Westmoreland Natural Gas Power Plant Garners Accolades
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
PaEN: PA Sea Grant Holds Aquatic Invasive Species Lunch n’ Learn Webinars March 1, 8
Budget
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On DEP Budget Covers Climate Change,
Permit Fees, Fund Transfers
85
Lawmakers Question Taking Money From Dedicated Environmental Funds
PaEN: DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Editorial: Wolf Taking Severance Tax Down A Different Road
PaEN: PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years
PaEN: PEMA: Over $101.5 Million In Flood Damage Not Covered By Feds In 2018; Intense
Flooding Events Increasing In PA
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Letter: Increased Energy Taxes Do Not Help PA - Gene Barr
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Chesapeake Bay
Sen. Yaw Pushing To Incorporate Local Stream Cleaning With Chesapeake Bay Efforts
PaEN: Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee Meets March 8
PaEN: Chesapeake Bay Program Looks Upstream For Its New Director, Dana Aunkst
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center In
Harrisburg
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Crable: Injecting Manure Into Farm Fields Could Combat Runoff, Odor Problems
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Citizen Action
PaEN: Penn State Master Well Owner Course Accepting Volunteer Applications

86
PaEN: Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways,
Other Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
PaEN: PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In
Allegheny County
PaEN: PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home
Workshops In Allegheny County
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
Allegheny Front: The Pageant Queen On An Environmental Mission
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
Bucks County Residents Pushing Back On Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Bring Concerns To Falls Twp
Climate
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Meeting On Forge The Future Energy/Development
Plan Turns Into Climate Change Debate
Rep. Metcalfe Says Reducing Carbon Dioxide Will Kill His Vegetables
PaEN: Majority Chair Of House Environmental Committee Asks DEP To Make Climate
Petitioners Resubmit Cap-And-Trade Petition
Climate Change Means More Floods, Great And Localized
PaEN: Federal Judge Dismisses Clean Air Council Lawsuit Challenging Federal Actions On
Climate Change, Rollback Of Regulations
PaEN: Wetlands Will Play A Key Role In Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania
Sharp Rise In Methane Levels Threatens World Climate Targets
Sisk: Report Shows How More PA Drivers Can Go Electric
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Pittsburgh Summit To Focus On Solar Energy In PA
Kummer: Study: Philly Could Be As Hot As Memphis By 2080 Because Of Climate Change
Sisk: Could Membranes At Coal-Fired Power Plants Help Stop Climate Change?
Op-Ed: Bailout Tax: Profitable Companies Need To Come Clean On Nuclear Energy
Op-Ed: In PA, Cap-And-Trade To Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions A Constitutional
Necessity - Clean Air Council
Op-Ed: How Many Times Are We Going To Bailout Three Mile Island?​ - Erie Epstein
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal
Op-Ed: Here’s What Green New Deal Advocates Can Learn From The 2009 Stimulus
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
EPA: Carbon Dioxide From Power Plants Rose Last Year
Climate Change Doubter Is Leading Effort To Advise Trump
Coal Mining
Legere: DEP Threatened To Shut Down A Gas Storage Field, Fearing Risks To Approaching
Coal Mine
Black Lung Disease Screening For Coal Miners In Armstrong County
AP: DEP: Centralia Sinkhole Unrelated To Underground Mine Fire
Judge Rules Westmoreland Coal Can Cut Retiree Benefits, Union Contracts

87
Sisk: Could Membranes At Coal-Fired Power Plants Help Stop Climate Change?
EPA: Carbon Dioxide From Power Plants Rose Last Year
Compliance Action
Litvak: DEP Gives NOV To Leaking Westmoreland Utica Gas Well
Dam Safety
Efforts Underway To Save 19th Century Wayne County Dam
Delaware River
PaEN: Partnership For Delaware Estuary Launches 10-Year Comprehensive Conservation &
Management Plan, Including Mussel Hatchery
PaEN: Bill Introduced Again To Require Drilling Rights Compensation If DRBC Adopts
Fracking Ban
Mussel Hatchery To Be Built To Reduce Pollutants In Delaware River
Feb. 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
Bagenstose: Cong. Fitzpatrick Calls For EPA Timeline On Toxic PFAS Chemicals
Editorial: Hold EPA To its Promise To Address Dangerous Threats To Drinking Water
Editorial: No Need For State To Wait For Safe Water​ - PFAS Standard
High Lead Levels Found At Erie’s Emerson-Gridley School
Lead At Erie School Said To Pose No Immediate Threat
Pittsburgh Water Authority Issues Boil Advisory For 3 Neighborhoods
Pittsburgh Water Authority Lifts Boil Water Advisory In Hazelwood, Swisshelm Park,
Greenfield
Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Charleroi Area Of Washington County
Aqua Once Again Mulling Options In Chester Water Authority Deal
Aqua America Out $60 Million On Interest-Rate Bet
PaEN: Penn State Master Well Owner Course Accepting Volunteer Applications
Economic Development
Schneck: Sunny Work? Where Pennsylvania Ranks In Solar Jobs
PaEN: PA Wilds Buyers Market Wholesale & Retail Show Featuring Regionally Made Products
March 2 In Clarion
Penn-Northwest Has A Product To Sell: Mercer County​ [Shell Ethane Plant]
Education
PaEN: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker Center In
Harrisburg
PaEN: Bottle Works Ethic Arts Center Host 3rd Annual NatureWorks March 2 In Johnstown
PaEN: Registration Now Open For Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp June 23-29
PaEN: GASP: Registration Now Open For Air Adventures Summer Camp In Pittsburgh
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
PaEN: Newly Updated Watershed Decisions Activity Kit Now Available From Penn State
Extension
PaEN: Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Education Programs Coming In March
PaEN: Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension
PaEN: Call For Abstracts: Bucknell 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium April 26-27

88
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Summer Internship Opportunities Available At DCNR
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
Schneck: Biggest Supermoon Of 2019 Shines Tonight, Tuesday
Emergency Response
PaEN: Save The Date: PA Hazardous Materials Technicians Conference August 22-25 At Seven
Springs
Energy
PaEN: Bipartisan Group Of House Members Unveil Bill Authorizing Community Solar Projects
Caruso: Bipartisan Bill Would Expand Access To Solar Energy In Pennsylvania
Erie 2030 District Set To Launch With 9 Partners To Save Energy, Water
Rep. Kaufer Pushing Legislation To Expand Use Of Solar Energy In PA
Crawford County Solar Co-op Takes Next Step
Shell Leads Big Oil In Clean Energy Shift
AP-Levy: Uncertainty Shadows Pennsylvania’s Debate Over Nuclear Power
Expected Legislation Might Save Three Mile Island
PA Post: See Inside The Peach Bottom Nuclear Power Plant
Exelon Sets Final Deadline For Subsidies To Save Three Mile Island-- By June
Editorial: Can Nuclear Power Plants Be Replaced Cleanly? Data Needed
Sisk: Could Membranes At Coal-Fired Power Plants Help Stop Climate Change?
Westmoreland Natural Gas Power Plant Garners Accolades
Report: Brattle Study Shows Utilities Overspending Billions On Transmission Revamps
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
Editorial: Should Pennsylvania Bail Out Its Nuclear Industry?
EPA: Carbon Dioxide From Power Plants Rose Last Year
Energy Conservation
PaEN: Pittsburgh's U.S. Steel Tower Becomes 2nd Largest Building In The World to Achieve
Erie 2030 District Set To Launch With 9 Partners To Save Energy, Water
U.S. Steel Tower Earns LEED Distinction
LEED Silver Certification For O+M
PaEN: Firefly-Inspired Surfaces Improve Efficiency Of LED Lightbulbs
Farming
PaEN: Farmers Invited To Complete Survey On Making Farm Conservation Easier
PaEN: Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
PaEN: Agriculture: 3,333 Acres In 19 Counties Added To Farmland Preservation Program
Agriculture Preserves Nearly 146 Acres Of Farmland In Benton Twp
PaEN: Certification Of Professional Manure Handlers Can Influence Water Quality
PaEN: Manure Management For Youth Projects Curriculum Available From Penn State
Extension
Crable: Study Urges Farmers To Inject Manure Into Fields To Combat Runoff, Odor Problems
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26

89
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Penn State Extension To Help Retail Operations At Agricultural Businesses
Bill Would Tweak Housing Rules For Preserved Farms
Urban Farming Proponents See Unlimited Potential In Erie
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Op-Ed: How Much Longer Can Dairy Farmers Endure Their Financial Crisis?
Flooding
PaEN: PEMA: Over $101.5 Million In Flood Damage Not Covered By Feds In 2018; Intense
Flooding Events Increasing In PA
PaEN: DEP Outlines Flood Prevention Benefits Of Restore PA For Luzerne County
State Officials Proposed Funding Flood Protection With Natural Gas Severance Tax
Help Sought For Flood-Prone Mill Creek In Avoca
2-Part Plan Could Prevent Flooding On Mill Creek In Avoca
Grafius Run Flood Mitigation Project Moves To Next Stage In Lycoming
Pittsburgh Corps Of Engineers Said It Prevented $1 Billion In Flood Damage
Forests
PaEN: DCNR: Wildfires Increase In 2018 Over 2017, But Nowhere Near 2016
Schneck: Wet 2018 Resulted In Fewer Wildfires In Pennsylvania
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
PaEN: Dauphin County Woodland Owners To Hold Annual Conference March 9
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bill Reported From House Transportation Committee
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
PaEN: Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal
40th Crawford Conservation District Seedling Sale Underway
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
How, Where To Get Fresh Maple Syrup From The Tree In Philadelphia
Horses Help Drag Felled Trees Out Of Erie Park
Geologic Hazards
Condemned House Collapses Along Landslide-Prone Pittsburgh Street
Landslide Closes Section Road In Springdale Township
Landslide Area In Allegheny Township Remains Hazardous, One Lane
AP: DEP: Centralia Sinkhole Unrelated To Underground Mine Fire
Massive Sinkhole Opens In Centralia​ - Video
Grants & Funding
Conservation And Recreational Grant Applications Being Accepted By DCNR
Green Infrastructure
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple

90
Community Benefits
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
PaEN: PEC, DCNR: Volunteers Needed For Tree Plantings At State Forests In Columbia,
Clearfield Counties In April, May
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
Hazardous Substances
Free Lead Screening Coming To Palmerton, Carbon County After Feds Detect High Levels In
Air
Lead At Erie School Said To Pose No Immediate Threat
Bagenstose: Cong. Fitzpatrick Calls For EPA Timeline On Toxic PFAS Chemicals
Editorial: Hold EPA To its Promise To Address Dangerous Threats To Drinking Water
Editorial: No Need For State To Wait For Safe Water​ - PFAS Standard
Hazardous Sites Cleanup
PaEN: DEP Citizens Advisory Council Urges Senate, House To Adopt Funding Source For
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Program Before It Becomes Insolvent
Hazardous Waste
Bucks County Residents Pushing Back On Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Bring Concerns To Falls Twp
Land Conservation
Bill Would Tweak Housing Rules For Preserved Farms
PaEN: Agriculture: 3,333 Acres In 19 Counties Added To Farmland Preservation Program
Agriculture Preserves Nearly 146 Acres Of Farmland In Benton Twp
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
Chester County Acquires 80 Acres To Extend Nottingham Park
PaEN: PA Land Trust Assn. Updates 2 Model Conservation, Stewardship Easements
Letter: When It Comes To Public Lands, Let’s Do More Of What Teddy Roosevelt Did
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Lake Erie
Possible Record Water Levels Forecast For Lake Erie
Editorial: High Waters In Lake Erie A Cause For Concern
Littering/Illegal Dumping
PaEN: Keep PA Beautiful Invites Communities, Groups To Adopt Local Roads, Waterways,
Other Areas To Keep Them Litter Free
Litterbugs Pick Up And Pay Up In Pennsylvania
Everything You Need To Know About Litter And Illegal Dumping In Philadelphia
Allegheny CleanWays Tackles Illegal Dumping While Making Community Connections
Mine Reclamation
Mine Runoff Sending Bright Orange Water Into Allegheny County Man’s Basement​ - Video
Oil & Gas

91
State Grand Jury Probing Natural Gas Drilling Calls Washington County Property As Witness
Frazier: Woman Who Sued Range Resources Testifies Before State Grand Jury
Litvak: DEP Gives NOV To Leaking Westmoreland Utica Gas Well
Legere: DEP Threatened To Shut Down A Gas Storage Field, Fearing Risks To Approaching
Coal Mine
PaEN: Bill Introduced Again To Require Drilling Rights Compensation If DRBC Adopts
Fracking Ban
Oakmont Boro: One PA Town Shows How To Properly Zone Fracking
Westmoreland Natural Gas Power Plant Garners Accolades
Letter: Increased Energy Taxes Do Not Help PA - Gene Barr
Litvak: EQT Going After 2 Employees Laid Off Last Month For Stealing Secrets
PaEN: DEP Issues Water Quality Certification For UGI LNG Truck Loading Facility In Berks
PA Fracking Wastewater Turned Into Clorox Pool Salt
Clorox Selling Pool Salt Made From Fracking Wastewater
Penn-Northwest Has A Product To Sell: Mercer County​ [Shell Ethane Plant]
Shell Leads Big Oil In Clean Energy Shift
PaEN: Penn State Extension March 14 Webinar On Methane Migration & Changes In Aquifer
Properties
PaEN: Penn State Extension Feb. 21 Webinar On How Colorado Prioritizes Oil & Gas Well
Inspections
Lower Summer Gasoline Prices In Western PA After Regulation Change
Permitting
PaEN: DEP Posts 45 Pages Of Permit-Related Notices In Feb. 23 PA Bulletin
Pipelines
PaEN: PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years
Why Chester County DA Is Investigating The Mariner East Pipeline
Pipeline Compressor Station May Be Coming To Fairmount Twp, Luzerne County
Editorial: Natural Gas Pipelines Needed, But So Is Safety
Crable: U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear Nuns’ Challenged Against Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Delaware County Seeks To Join Lawsuit Against Owners Of Mariner East Pipelines
Delaware County Asks To Join Safety 7 Lawsuit Challenging Mariner East Pipeline
Radiation Protection
PaEN: PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years
AP-Levy: Uncertainty Shadows Pennsylvania’s Debate Over Nuclear Power
Expected Legislation Might Save Three Mile Island
PA Post: See Inside The Peach Bottom Nuclear Power Plant
Cusick: Does Clean Energy Include Nuclear? PA Is Latest State To Debate
Exelon Sets Final Deadline For Subsidies To Save Three Mile Island-- By June
Op-Ed: Bailout Tax: Profitable Companies Need To Come Clean On Nuclear Energy
Editorial: Can Nuclear Power Plants Be Replaced Cleanly? Data Needed
Editorial: Should Pennsylvania Bail Out Its Nuclear Industry?
Exelon Refutes Nuclear Plant Closure Reports In Illinois, But Stresses Need For State Action
Recreation
Somerset County’s Laurel Hill Wins Park Of The Year Award
PaEN: 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit Set For May 10 At Raystown Lake Visitors Center

92
PaEN: DCNR Blog: Connecting Diverse Communities To Experience And Appreciate Our
Natural Places
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Ron Beach, Lycoming County
Guided By The Moon, Keystone State Park Hosts Lunar Hike
PaEN: Natural Lands Transfer 57 Acres Of Preserved Land To Marsh Creek State Park
New Lackawanna State Park Manager: Like Being Mayor Of A Small Town
Feb. 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
The Learning Never Stops At Raccoon Creek State Park, Even In The Middle Of Winter
Editorial: Commitment To State Parks Is Important
PaEN: Feb. 21 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
PaEN: PRPS: Parks & Green Infrastructure Workshop April 2, Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits
Ski Resorts See Sunny Skies As They Hit Presidents’ Day Groove
Kummer: William Penn Foundation Gives $2M toward New Waterfront Park In Philly
Chester County Acquires 80 Acres To Extend Nottingham Park
Reliance Bank Donates To Logan Twp’s Greenwood Park Project
The Healing Power Of Horses
Op-Ed: Congress Must Reach Across Aisle And Protect Grand Canyon
Massive Public Lands Bill Expected To Receive Easy Approval In U.S. House
Highlands Region Funding Doubled In 2019 Federal Spending Bill
Recycling/Waste
Suburban Philly Recycling Programs Face Challenges, Settle Into New Normal
Moment Of Reckoning: U.S. Cities Burn Recyclables After China Bans Imports
PaEN: PA Resources Council Launches Glass Recycling Pop-Up Collection Events In
Allegheny County
O’Neill: Waste Not, Want Not, Salvaged Materials
PaEN: PRC Sets 2019 Schedule For Backyard Composting, Rain Barrel, Healthy Home
Workshops In Allegheny County
Renewable Energy
PaEN: PUC Seeks To At Least Double Pipeline Safety Inspectors Over Next 5 Years
Tyrone Fields Proposals For Use Of Nearly $1M In Community Payments From Wind Turbine
Project
PaEN: Bipartisan Group Of House Members Unveil Bill Authorizing Community Solar Projects
Rep. Kaufer Pushing Legislation To Expand Use Of Solar Energy In PA
Crawford County Solar Co-op Takes Next Step
Schneck: Sunny Work? Where Pennsylvania Ranks In Solar Jobs
Caruso: Bipartisan Bill Would Expand Access To Solar Energy In Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh Summit To Focus On Solar Energy In PA
Shell Leads Big Oil In Clean Energy Shift
Column: Cong. Boyle Steps Into Radical Territory By Backing New Green Deal
Op-Ed: There’s A Remedy For Climate Change, The Green New Deal Isn’t It
Op-Ed: Take A Look At The Green New Deal Before You Attack It​ - Mark Singel
Op-Ed: Congressional Dems Might Recognize Problems, But Green New Deal Won’t Fix Them
Stormwater
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants

93
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
Superfund-Federal
Free Lead Screening Coming To Palmerton, Carbon County After Feds Detect High Levels In
Air
Susquehanna River
PaEN: Susquehanna River Basin Commission March 15 Meeting Agenda Includes Adopting
Recommendations In Auditor General’s Report
Efforts To Repopulate American Eels In The Susquehanna River A Success
Sustainability
PaEN: Pittsburgh's U.S. Steel Tower Becomes 2nd Largest Building In The World to Achieve
LEED Silver Certification For O+M
PaEN: Call For Abstracts: Bucknell 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium April 26-27
Education, Climate & Sustainability Highlight PA Sustainable Ag Conference
Watershed Protection
Sen. Yaw Pushing To Incorporate Local Stream Cleaning With Chesapeake Bay Efforts
PaEN: Recap Of 2019 PA In The Balance Farm Stakeholder Meeting To Help Shape PA
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Cleanup Plan
PaEN: DEP Awards $28.7 Million In 2018 Growing Greener Watershed Restoration Grants
Lycoming County Accepts $327,284 Growing Greener Grant For Stream Bank Repair
DEP Awards $1.2M In Growing Greener Grants In Region For Stream, Stormwater Projects
Centre County Receives $1.7 Million Growing Greener Grant To Restore Streams
PaEN: Keystone Tree Fund Bills In Senate, House Gain DEP Citizens Advisory Council Support
Rep. Boback Pushing For Government Funding For Stormwater Mandate
1 Luzerne Municipality Gets Out Of Stormwater Mandate, Another Seeking Reprieve
Lehman Twp Officials Seeks Waiver From Luzerne Stormwater Fee
Editorial: Cong. Meuser Showing Leadership In Stormwater Fee Fight In Luzerne
Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase April 26
PaEN: Partnership For Delaware Estuary Launches 10-Year Comprehensive Conservation &
Management Plan, Including Mussel Hatchery
Crable: Brenda Lee Sieglitz On Planting Trees And Healing Power Of Nature​ - Keystone 10
Million Trees Partnership
PaEN: Wetlands Will Play A Key Role In Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania
PaEN: Newly Updated Watershed Decisions Activity Kit Now Available From Penn State
Extension
Possible Record Water Levels Forecast For Lake Erie
Editorial: High Waters In Lake Erie A Cause For Concern
Efforts To Repopulate American Eels In The Susquehanna River A Success
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter

94
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
PaEN: National Wild Turkey Federation Honors Game Commission Forester Brent McNeal
PaEN: Agriculture: Fulton, Clearfield County Deer Test Positive For Chronic Wasting Disease
Chronic Wasting Disease Continues To Spread Among PA Deer, Elk
Venesky: Sunday Hunting Measure Advances, But Some Groups Oppose It
Reilly: Sunday Hunting In PA Still Has A Long Road Ahead
Op-Ed: State Residents Benefit From Ending Sunday Hunting Ban
Op-Ed: Hunters, Let’s Share The Outdoors​ - Sunday Hunting
Editorial: Go Slow On Decision On Sunday Hunting
Jessup Police Warn Of Possible Rabid Foxes, Racoon
PaEN: Register Now For Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp At Hawk Mountain In Berks
County
Great Backyard Bird Count Invites York Residents To Explore Nature
Great Backyard Bird Count Drop-In At York County Park
Video Captures Pittsburgh Bald Eagle Shaking Off Snow While Incubating Eggs
Pittsburgh Hays Bald Eagles Deliver 3rd Egg
Weather Could Send Middle Creek Snow Geese South This Week
Signs Of Spring In Erie As Rough-Legged Hawk Makes Early Arrival
Otter-Spotters Invited To Cook Forest State Park Feb. 23
Schneck: PA Birders Pushed The State To #4 In Great Backyard Bird Count Reports
PaEN: PA Sea Grant Holds Aquatic Invasive Species Lunch n’ Learn Webinars March 1, 8
PaEN: PA Council Of Trout Unlimited Adopts Policy Strongly Favoring Preserving, Enhancing
Populations Of Wild Trout
Schneck: Trout Stocking Schedules Ahead Of PA’s Regional Opening Day
PaEN: Winter PA Trout Newsletter Now Available From PA Council Of Trout Unlimited
Mussel Hatchery To Be Built To Reduce Pollutants In Delaware River
Efforts To Repopulate American Eels In The Susquehanna River A Success
Schneck: PA Coyote Hunters Claim Nearly $50,000 In Prize Money
PaEN: Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Names Susan Hawthorne New Executive Director
Letter: When It Comes To Public Lands, Let’s Do More Of What Teddy Roosevelt Did
Study: Polar Vortex Kills Of 95% Of Stink Bugs
Letter: Toomey Voted Against Wildlife Protection Bill
Other
Douglas Costle, An Architect Of The EPA Who Became Its Top Administrator, Dies At 79
Federal Policy
U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Case That Could Restrict Federal Clean Water Rules

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.
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Note: ​DEP published the 2019 schedules of its advisory committees, councils and board
meetings in the ​Dec. 10 PA Bulletin, page 7708​.

February 23--​ ​Jennings Environmental Education Center Cherry Pie Hike​. Butler County.

February 24-25--​ Registration Open.​ ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA Organization For
Watersheds & Rivers​. ​Statewide Watershed Connections Conference​. State College. ​PA
Environment Digest is a proud sponsor of this event.

February 25--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- State Police/
Homeland Security, 3:00- Dept. of Health. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
webcast through the H

February 25--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of


Transportation. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 26--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of


Transportation, 3:00- Dept. of General Services. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
typically webcast through the H

February 26-- ​Agenda Posted.​ ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​. ​Click
Here for more​ on the agenda.

February 27--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the
House Republican Caucus​ website.

February 27--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Health.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 27-- ​House Game and Fisheries Committee​ informational meeting on Game and Fish
& Boat Commission’s Annual Reports. Room 205 Ryan Building. 10:00 and 1:30.

February 27--​ ​DCNR Webinar On Applying For Statewide and Regional Partnership Grants​.
10:00 to 11:30.

February 27- ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Workshop​. Monroeville, Allegheny County.

February 27--​ ​Audubon Society Of Western PA Buffalo Creek Watershed Plan Meeting
(Butler, Armstrong)​. Worthington Community Center, 214 East Main Street, Worthington,
Armstrong County. 6:30 to 8:00.

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February 27-- ​East Stroudsburg University Madelon Powers Art Gallery River Fugues: Catalyst
For Action On Water Quality Issues Facing Monroe County​. East Stroudsburg, Monroe County.
7:00 to 9:00.

February 28--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of


Environmental Protection. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 28--​ ​Lehigh Valley Sustainability Network Regional Water We Share Forum​.
Northampton Community College​, Fowler Family Southside Center, 511 E 3rd Street, Room
605, Bethlehem. 6:00 to 8:00.

February 28--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Energy Efficiency For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

February 28--​ ​Protect PT & Mountain Watershed Association Public Meeting On CNX Shale
Gas Well Failure In Westmoreland County​. ​Delmont Fire Hall​, 2360 PA66, Delmont. 6:30.

March 1--​ ​York County Conservation District Writing Your Own Manure Management Plan
Workshop​. ​York County Annex Building, 118 Pleasant Acres Road, York. 8:00 to 3:30.

March 1-- ​NEW​. ​PA Sea Grant Program Webinar - How To Develop A Watercraft Inspection
Program To Prevent The Spread Of Aquatic Invasive Species​. Noon to 1:00.

March 2--​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 2--​ ​NEW​. ​Bottle Works Ethnic Arts Center 3rd Annual NatureWorks Program​. Bottle
Works, Johnstown, Cambria County. 10:00 to 2:00.

March 2--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Ross Township,
Allegheny County. 12:30 to 2:00.

March 3--​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association Reflections On A Changing Climate Program​.


Brodhead Creek Heritage Center, 1539 Cherry Lane Road, Analomink, Monroe County. 1:00.

March 4--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Education.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

March 4--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of Conservation &
Natural Resources. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 5--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

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March 5--​ ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. Contact: Kris Shiffer, 717-772-5809, ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.

March 5-- ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

March 5-- ​DEP Public Meeting On Proposed Elcon Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage
Facility In Bucks County​. Sheraton Bucks County Hotel, 400 Oxford Valley Road, Langhorne,
Bucks County. 6:00 to 9:00.

March 5--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Phipps Garden
Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

March 5--​ ​Montgomery Master Watershed Stewards Environmental Advisory Councils In


Action Workshop​. Lower Frederick Township Building, 53 Spring Mount Rd., Schwenksville,
Montgomery County. 6:00 to 7:00

March 5 --​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff​.
Susquehanna River Basin Commission Headquarters, 4423 North Front Street, Harrisburg. 9:00
to 3:00.

March 5-6--​ ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​. ​Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy
Efficiency​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College, Centre County.

March 6--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Governor’s Budget
​ ouse
Secretary. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H
Republican Caucus​ website.

March 6--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 6--​ ​10th Annual Sustainability Conference: Smart Cities: Transforming Cities For A New
Era​. Pittsburgh.

March 6-7--​ ​PA Lake Management Society Conference​. Ramada Conference Center, State
College.

March 7--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Open. Room 140 Main
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H

March 7--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development, 3:00- Budget Secretary. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

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March 7--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Sewickley Public
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

March 8-- ​NEW​. ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee
meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. ​Click Here​ for more on the agenda.

March 8--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Sea Grant Program Webinar - How Mock Scenarios Are Shaping The
Future Of Aquatic Invasive Species Rapid Response.​ Noon to 1:00.

March 9--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​.
Montgomery County Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 9--​ ​Penn State Extension York County Master Gardeners GardenWise Native Plants,
Ecosystems Gardening Workshop​ ​Central York Middle School​, 1950 N. Hills Road, York. 7:30
to 4:00.

March 9--​ ​NEW.​ ​Dauphin County Woodland Owners Annual Conference​. Dauphin, Dauphin
County. 8:30 to 3:15.

March 9--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Bethel Park, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

March 11-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Clearfield County.

March 12--​ ​DEP Drive Electric Pennsylvania Coalition​ meeting. Duquesne Light Company, 411
7th Avenue, Pittsburgh. 10:00 to 2:00. DEP Contact: Mark Hand, ​mhand@pa.gov​.

March 12-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Tioga County.

March 13-- ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​.

March 13--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission meeting​. ​Washington Crossing Historic Park
Visitor Center​, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, Bucks County. 10:30. ​ ​(​formal notice​)

March 13 --​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff​. Jane
Schultz Room 1st Floor of the Wertz Student Center at Lycoming College, Williamsport. 8:30 to
3:00.

March 13-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Chester County.

March 14--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel

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Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(formal notice)​

March 14--​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Extension Webinar - Methane Migration & Changes In Aquifer
Properties​. 1:00.

March 15--​ ​NEW​. ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ meeting. Crowne Plaza Annapolis,
173 Jennifer Road, Annapolis. 9:00. Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423 Ext. 1302. ​(​formal
notice)​ C
​ lick Here for more​ on the agenda.

March 15--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Legal Pathways To Zero Greenhouse Gas
Emissions. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30
to 1:00.

March 16--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Creating The Appalachian Trail In
The South​. ​Pine Grove Furnace Ironmasters House​, Gardners, Adams County. Noon.

March 16--​ ​South Mountain Partnership, Capital Resource Conservation & Development Area
Council Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities For Greater Impact Workshop​. ​Adams
County Conservation District Office, 670 Old Harrisburg Road, Gettysburg. 9:00 a.m. to Noon.

March 16--​ DCNR Bureau Of Forestry. ​Making The Most Of Your Piece Of Nature: A
Sustainable Backyard Workshop​. ​Franklin Regional Senior High School, 3200 School Road in
Murrysville, Westmoreland County. 8:30 to 12:30.

March 16--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Fox Chapel,
Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

March 18--​ ​Penn State Extension 2 Home Water And Septic System Workshops​. Gracedale
Nursing Home Conference Room, 2 Gracedale Ave., Nazareth, Northampton County. 1:30 and
6:00.

March 18-19-- ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators​. ​2019 Cityscapes & Greenscapes
Conference​. Philadelphia.

March 19--​ ​Joint Conservation Committee informational meeting on promoting PA Route 6 for
biking and local tourism​. Room 108 Irvis Building. 10:00.

March 19--​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

March 19--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. The next scheduled meeting
is April 16. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.

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March 19--​ ​DCNR, Penn State Extension Forest Health, Insect & Disease Briefing​. Penn Stater
Hotel and Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:30.

March 20--​ Joint ​Senate​ & ​House​ Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees hold joint hearing
on Gov. Wolf’s proposed PA Farm Bill. Hearing Room 1 North Office Building. 9:00. ​Click
Here for more​ on PA Farm Bill

March 20--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Options For Meeting MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction Requirements Without Breaking The Budget​. Noon to 1:15.

March 20--​ ​NEW​. ​Whitaker Center for Science & The Arts Premiere Of Expedition Chesapeake
iMax Film​. ​Whitaker Center,​ Harrisburg. 5:30.

March 20--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Point Breeze,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

March 20-21-​- ​Registration Open​. ​Northeast Recycling Council Spring Conference.


Wilmington, DE.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 22-23--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Penn State Center For Private Forests 4th Biennial Forest
Landowners Conference​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

March 23--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Adams County Barn Survey Volunteer
Training​. ​Apple Museum in Biglerville​. 8:30.

March 25-29-​- ​Carnegie Mellon University Energy Week 2019​. Pittsburgh.

March 27-28--​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

March 28--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

March 29--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Natural Gas In PA: Energy, Innovation And The
Environment. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg.
11:30 to 1:00.

March 30--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Edgeworth Borough,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

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April 2-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 2-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Cambria County.

April 2--​ ​NEW​. ​PRPS Parks & Green Infrastructure - Managing Water For Multiple Community
Benefits Workshop​. Penn Stater Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:00.

April 4-6--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit​. Philadelphia.

April 5-- ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​. Nittany Lion Inn,
State College.

April 5--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate Disruption
& Sustainable Development Series​: Towards A Public Web-Platform For Limiting Methane
Emissions From The Oil & Gas Sector. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326
Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 6--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. South Fayette Twp.,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 6--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Point Breeze,
Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 7-9--​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 8-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Westmoreland County.

April 9-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 9-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Crawford County.

April 10--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Point
Breeze, Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

April 11- ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to: ​kdalal@pa.gov​.

April 11-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding

102
Programs​. Lehigh County.

April 13--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Dormont Borough,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 13--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. O’Hara Township,
Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 16--​ ​NEW​. ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

April 16-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov​.

April 16- ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Charcoal Hearths, Collier Huts And
Haul Roads​. Dickinson College in the​ ​Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium​, Carlisle, Cumberland
County. 7:00.

April 16-- ​PA Environmental Council Dinner Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For
Environmental Excellence​. Hilton Harrisburg. 5:00. ​PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor
of this special event.

April 16-18-- ​PA American Water Works Association Annual Conference​. Hershey Lodge and
Convention Center.

April 17--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Making The Most Of Historical And
Heritage Assets​. Noon to 1:15.

April 17--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Phipps
Garden Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Benefits Of Energy Management
Systems Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

April 19--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Using The Latest Digital Innovations To Address
Energy Poverty In Developing Counties. Harrisburg University, Room 1151, 326 Market Street,
Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 20--​ ​Clean Air Council Run For Clean Air​. Philadelphia.

April 20--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​.
Construction Junction​, Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

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April 20--​ ​NEW.​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting Weiser State Forest,
Columbia County​. 9:00 to 1:00.

April 22-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Dauphin County.

April 24--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​.
Sewickley Public Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 25--​ ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund 717-772-5636 or ​jbraund@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

April 26-- ​Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase​. ​Berks County 4H
Center, 1206 County Welfare Road, Leesport. Noon.

April 26-27--​ ​NEW​. ​Bucknell University 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium​. Bucknell
University, Lewisburg, Union County.

April 27--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Avalon & Bellevue
Boroughs, Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 29-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Lackawanna County.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National
Watershed and Stormwater Conference​. South Carolina.

April 30-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Bedford County.

May 1--​ ​Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium​. State College.

May 1--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Green Tree
Municipal Building, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 4--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Moshannon State Forest Tree Planting, Clearfield
County​.

May 4--​ ​Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale​. Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and
Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.

May 4--​ ​NEW.​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting at Moshannon State Forest,
Clearfield County​. 9:00 to 2:00.

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May 8--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Pollinators And Their Habitat​. ​Messiah
College​, Boyer Hall Room 131, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00.

May 8--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Annual Awards Celebration​. Susquehanna Club, New
Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:00. ​Click Here ​for sponsor information. PA Environment
Digest is a proud sponsor of this special event.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 10--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit​.
Raystown Lake Visitors Center​, Huntingdon County. 10:00 to 4:00.

May 11--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Upper St. Clair Twp,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

May 11--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. O’Hara
Township, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

May 15--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​The Benefits And Challenges of
Ridesharing On The Transportation System​. Noon to 1:15.

May 16--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Basics Of Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

May 16-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Luzerne County.

May 16--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Mt.
Lebanon Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 16-18--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​.
Monroe County.

May 18-​- ​Registration Open​. ​Environmental Advisory Council Network Conference​. Held in
conjunction with the ​PA Land Conservation Conference​ in Monroe County.

May 18--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Ross Township,
Allegheny County. 4:00 to 5:30.

May 21--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Mt. Lebanon Library,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 22--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Healthy Body & Healthy Home Workshop​. Sewickley
Public Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

105
June 1--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Kilbuck Township,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 3-7--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​American Society of Mining & Reclamation Annual Meeting​.
Montana.

June 4--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. North Park
Rose Barn, Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 6--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(formal notice)​

June 6--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Phipps
Garden Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 8--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 11--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Appreciating The PA Local Craft Brew
Industry​. ​ ​Appalachian Brewing Company in Shippensburg​. 6:30.

June 11--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. North Park Rose
Barn, Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 13--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Phipps Garden
Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 16-21--​ ​Cumberland Valley TU Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp​. ​Messiah
College​, Grantham, Cumberland County.

June 17-21--​ ​NEW​. ​Group Against Smog And Pollution Air Adventures Summer Youth Camp​.
Pittsburgh.

June 23-29--​ ​NEW​. ​Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp​. Keystone College, Lackawanna
County.

July 8-12--​ ​NEW​. ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp​. ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​, Berks County.

July 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Funding & Incentives To Implement
Energy Efficiency Projects Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

July 24-26-- ​Registration Open​.​ ​Professional Recyclers Of PA Annual Recycling & Organics
Conference​. Harrisburg.

106
August 12-16--​ ​NEW​. ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp​. ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​, Berks County.

August 15--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning For Energy
Efficiency In Downtown Buildings Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

August 22-25--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Association Of Hazardous Materials Technicians Annual Hazmat
Training and Education Conference​. Seven Springs, Somerset County.

September 8-11--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation and National
Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​. Pittsburgh. PA Environment Digest is a proud
sponsor of this event.

September 11-- ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

September 12--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Methods Of Combating Illegal
Dumping And Vandalism In A Forest Setting​. ​Caledonia State Park​ in Fayetteville, Franklin
County. 6:30.

September 19--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Alternative Energy Projects For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

September 22-24--​ ​Pennsylvania Greenways And Trails Summit​. Shippensburg University


Conference Center.

October 3--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Economy, Energy And Environment
For Food-Related Industries Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

October 8-10--​ ​Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference​. Pittsburgh.

October 16-17--​ ​7th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum​. Allentown.

November 21--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Entrepreneurship Ecosystem At


Penn State Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
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Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

February 26--​ ​POWR PA Sojourn Grants


February 28-- ​Lake Erie Shipboard Science Workshop For Teachers
February 28--​ ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Winter Photo Contest
February 28--​ ​DEP PA State Clean Diesel Grants
March 1--​ ​Lackawanna Heritage Valley Conservation, Preservation Education Grants
March 1--​ ​PHMC Keystone Fund Historic, Archaeological Protection Grants
March 1--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Wilderness Wheels Grants​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 1--​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 4-- ​DCNR PA Outdoor Corps Young Adult Crews​ ​(At The Very Latest!)
March 4-- ​Kroger Food Waste Reduction Grants
March 6-- ​PA Lake Management Society Photo Contest
March 7--​ ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Community Stormwater Grants
March 11-- ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Research Grants
March 15-- ​WPC TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree Planting Grants
March 21--​ ​Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp
March 20--​ ​EPA Conowingo Dam Watershed Implementation Plan Grants
March 22--​ ​PA American Water Stream Of Learning College Scholarship
March 22-- ​DEP Section 902 Recycling Implementation Grants
March 22--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
March 29-- ​PA Environmental Professionals Karl Mason, Walter Lyon Awards
March 29--​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
March 31--​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
March 31--​ ​DEP Municipal, Hazardous Waste Host Municipality Inspector Grants
April 10--​ ​DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Recreation, Buffer Grants
April 10--​ ​Appalachian Regional Commission Coal Regions Workforce Grants
April 12--​ ​PA American Water Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
April 18-- ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
May 3-​- ​Pike Conservation District Environmental Ed Grant
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
May 17--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
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May 17--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement and Treatment Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grants
July 1--​ ​PA Wilds Center Champion Of PA Wilds Awards
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
July 19--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

No new regulations published this week. ​Pennsylvania Bulletin - February 23, 2019

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance published this week.

Permits ------------

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the February 23 PA Bulletin of


a federal Coastal Zone Management consistency determination for a maintenance dredging in

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Conneaut Harbor, OH.

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ published ​notice in the February 23 PA Bulletin​ of
projects approved in January.

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 45 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the February 23 PA Bulletin -
pages 850 to 895​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

CLICK HERE To View Or Print Entire PA Environment Digest

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long.

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Stories Invited - About PA Environment Digest

Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
programs for publication in the ​PA Environment Digest​ to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com​.

PA Environment Digest​ is a publication of ​PA Environment News LLC​ and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
be contacted by sending email to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com​.

Did you know you can search back issues of ​PA Environment Digest​ since May 28, 2004 on
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Sponsor: Statewide Watershed Connections Conference

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the ​Statewide Watershed Connections


Conference​ on February 24-25 in State College.

Sponsor: PEC Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence Dinner

PA Environment Digest​ is a proud sponsor of the ​PA Environmental Council Dinner


Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence​ on April 16 in

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Harrisburg.

Sponsor: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Awards Celebration

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Annual Awards Celebration​ on May 8 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County.

Sponsor: 2019 PA/National Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the ​2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation


and National Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​ to be held in Pittsburgh on September
8-11.

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