You are on page 1of 3

ELA Wk 3 Day 4

Author: Katy Schooler
Date created: 03/10/2018 8:10 PM PST ; Date modified: 03/10/2018 8:41 PM PST

General Information
Grade/Level Grade 2
Subject(s) Language Arts (English)
Topic or Unit of
What can different cultures teach us?
Study

Time Allotment 1 hour

Home languages
English, Spanish, and Russian
present

Emerging: 4

English language Expanding: 2
levels present Bridging: 5

Non­ELs: 9

Materials and Technology

Technology Goboard with story displayed

­TM

­student packet of story
Materials
­pencil

­compare and contrast chart

Sources

Content and Assessment

Concepts Prosody when reading poems and comparing/contrasting points of view in two different stories

CA­ California Common Core State Standards (2012)
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
Grade: Grade 2 students:
Content Area: Literature K–5
Strand: Reading
Domain: Key Ideas and Details
Standard:
3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

Standards Strand: Speaking and Listening
Domain:
Comprehension and Collaboration
Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Indicator:
1.a. Follow agreed­upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts
under discussion).

Indicator:

Page 1 of 3
1.b. Build on others’ talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.

1.  Students will be able to identify and annotate repetition in a poem. (How do I idetify repetition in a poem?)
Objectives
2.  Students will be able to compare/contrast points of view in two stories. (How do I compare/contrast points of view in two stories?)

Students will be informally assessed on whether they are able to determine who the narrator is in the two stories. Students will also be informally
Assessment/Rubrics
assessed on being able to discuss what each charater's point of view is in the two stories and also how they compare to each other. 

Literacy Skills

Reading Students will be able to read to determine who the narrator is in the story, as well as what their points of view are.

Writing Students will be able to fill in a compare and contrast chart on the narrators in the two stories and their points of view.

Students will listen to the teacher's directions and modeling. Students will also listen to the people on their groups and their partners during shared
Listening
reading. Lastly, students will listen to students who share with the class.

Speaking Students will read the poem expressively, talk to their partners, groupmates, and share ideas/answers with the whole class.

point of view: a particular attitude the character has

prefix: a word added to the beginning of a root word that changes the meaning of a root word

repetition: when a word is written or spoken more than once
Vocabulary
compare: how are they the same?

contrast: how are they different?

narrator: the person who is telling the story

Classroom Management Details
Room
Students will remain in desk for the majority of the lesson. Students will be in different areas of the room during group work.
Arrangement(s)

Student Groupings Students will be working with the person next to them during shared reading and will be grouped by ability during group work.

Other Reminders

Instructional Model: Direct Instruction 
Procedure

Read Aloud and Shared Reading:

Review what reading with excellent prosody means. 

Have students partner read "Try, try again" with one reader saying the repeated line and the other reading the rest of the poem. Then have them
switch roles. How does the poem's title support the central message? What did you learn from reading this poem?
Focus/Motivation
(Open) Model: Underline the repeated lines in the poem saying try, try again. Think aloud that the repetition helps me understand the poem's message.
Reread the poem aloud, pausing for students to say the repeated line in unison. 

Review Prefixes: point to the word disgrace in line 9 and tell students to read it aloud. Then, have students determine the meaning of the word
by breaking the word apart.

Page 2 of 3
Close Reading: Compare and Contrast Points of View in Two Stories:

Review what a narrator is and point out that sometimes a narrator is not a character in a story. 

Model: How do the narrator's point of views in "A Foxy Garden" and "On One Wheel" differ? As I read paragraphs 1­3 in "A Foxy Garden",
Development narrator is not a character in the story because they use pronounces such as he, they, and their. I'll underline Bear's spoken words in paragraph 2
(Body) and underline Fox's words in paragraph 3. These words show what the characters want. Looking at "On One Wheel", I read paragraphs 1­4 to
listen for the voice of the narrator. The narrator uses pronouns such as I, me, and my so that means the character is in the story. I'll underline
Casey's words and Martha's words to show their point of view. 

Guided Practice: Using a compare and contrast chart, I'll analyze my findings to see what both stories have in common when it comes to
narrators. 

To conclude this lesson, we will specifically look at Bear and Casey's point of view at the end of the story. How are they alike? Students will
Closure (Close)
work in groups to find this information and present their findings to the class. 

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Considerations and Differentiation

UDL and Students will be in groups for collaborative learning in order to meet the needs of all learners. Graphic organizers such as compare/contrast charts
Differentiation help students organize their thinking. 

English Learners will be provided with sentence frames to use when sharing aloud to the class.

Reading expressively means ______.

The meaning of the prefix dis means _____ and the meaning of the root word grace means ______. This means that the word disgrace means
_______.
Modifications for
English learners The narrator in _____ is _____.

The point of view of ________ is _______.

The stories compare because ______.

The stories are different because ______.

Modifications for
special learning none
needs
Modifications for
none
gifted

Final Thoughts

1.  Review what reading with excellent prosody means. 
2.  Have student partner read the poem. Ask them questions about the central message of the poem.
3.  Underline the repeated lines in the poem and express how the reveal the central message.
4.  Review prefixes by looking at the word disgrace in line 9
Summary
5.  Review what a narrator is
6.  Reread both stories to find the narrator
7.  Compare/contrast the narrators in both stories
8.  In groups, students will identify the narrator's point of views and how they compare/contrast and will share to the class.

Author's Comments
& Reflections

Page 3 of 3