Practical Astronomy

Total Solar Eclipse
JULY 2010
Your Images
Ursa Major
Practical Astronomy July 2010 2
Practical Astronomy July 2010
Editor: Kevin Brown FRAS
editor@practicalastronomy.com
Advertising: ads@practicalastronomy.com
Website: www.PracticalAstronomy.com
Publisher: Structure Ltd
Telephone: +44 (0)1622 891151
3 TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2010
How to enjoy a free eclipse trip to Argentina
5 READERS’ IMAGE GALLERY
Your astronomical images
8 PRACTICAL CONSTELLATIONS
Moving on to Ursa Major
9 SKY VIEW - JULY
Maps of the Night Sky - looking East, South, West, North
13 SOCIETY NEWS
News and events from your astro societies
14 OBSERVERS’ DELIGHTS
Special observing sights not to miss this month
Welcome to
the July
issue of
Practical
Astronomy
It’s the
middle of
summer in the northern
hemisphere.. and interest in
practical astronomy is
probably waning somewhat.
But stick with it!
The dark (and cold) nights will
return soon and the night sky
will become so much more
attractive again.
For your sustenance in the
meantime, here is the July
issue.
Hope you like it. Perhaps
leave a comment on the
Feedback page?
Clear skies,
Kevin Brown
Practical Astronomy
July 2010
In this month’s issue..
Practical Astronomy magazine is published monthly
online. ISSN 2042-2687
Views expressed are not necessarily those of the
editor or publisher. May include errors and
omissions. Trademarks are the property of their
respective owners. The publisher is not responsible
for the conduct of advertisers or external websites.
Compensation disclosure: may contain advertising
and afliate hyperlinks, which may pay compensation
to the publisher for purchases made.
©2010 All contents copyright. No reproduction
without express permission.
First Light
Sponsored By CADSAS.com
Find back issues and related resources in the
Members’ Area
(subscribe to get the password, if you haven’t yet)
Cover design: Pixeljuice snc
Image: A Ghamarinezhad (old Moon
rising)
Practical Astronomy July 2010 3
By Elvio Alanis, Argentina
There’s a total solar eclipse this year, on July
11th 2010.
Let’s assume you are in the UK on that day and
the midday sun is high in the sky, heading
south. It's summer.
You are close to
geographical
position: 50ºN
latitude and 0º
longitude (the
Greenwich
Meridian) on the
English Channel
and unfortunately,
you are a long way
away from a place
where the eclipse
can be seen that
day.
Let’s Take An
Imaginary Journey
Therefore, I propose you make a long journey
to see this beautiful astronomical phenomenon.
But to save time and make the journey safe, I
suggest you use a very special ship; your mind
and your imagination.
Gather Necessary Equipment, Then Fly
South...
But we will need some navigational aids. For
example, Google Earth would be ideal, or any
globe of the Earth that you have at home.
Then we take off, flying in a southerly direction
over such a famous meridian. We fly on over
Europe and then enter the exotic and huge
continent: Africa.
Soon we will pass above the Tropic of Cancer,
a mark on the Earth (parallel 23º 30’N)
indicating the greatest excursion of the Sun
into the northern hemisphere, just as happened
twenty days before (June 21).
Right now, the Sun is almost over our heads.
We continue our journey on the continent and
the Sun is left behind, more and more to the
north. Below, we suddenly see the Atlantic
Ocean.
Following our expedition flying over the ocean,
we will pass another landmark, the equator,
which divides the terrestrial sphere into the
north and south hemispheres.
Moving Into
Winter
And passing to the
south of the
equator, we
experience another
sudden change...
we are in winter.
Obviously we do
not notice any
immediate
difference, but as
we continue our
journey south, the
weather will
become colder and
colder.
There is another important landmark on the
Earth we have to pass: the Tropic of Capricorn.
Like the northern tropic, this parallel of 23º 30’S
indicates the largest incursion of the Sun above
the southern hemisphere. Today, only twenty
days after winter solstice, the Sun is low in the
north, some 43º above horizon.
Now we are in the southern winter, we continue
our educational, imaginary flight over the frigid
and turbulent waters of the Atlantic Ocean, until
we arrive at a symmetrical position to where we
began our adventure: the latitude 50ºS.
Travelling West
South of this point, except for the frozen
continent of Antarctica, there is no continental
mass. Well almost none... only the tip of the
American continent lies south of this parallel.
And that’s where we are heading, so let’s now
abandon the Greenwich meridian (0º longitude)
and head west, flying along the 50ºS parallel.
We still have to describe an arc of 70º on the
surface of the ocean, to reach our destination
(coordinates: 50ºS, 70ºW) on the southern tip of
South America.
Total Solar Eclipse 2010: Let’s Take A Special Trip
Together!
The Total Solar Eclipse At The End Of This Imaginary Journey
Practical Astronomy July 2010 4
Our Destination - El Calafate
We must now refine our direction of flight,
eventually landing near a beautiful resort town
of Argentina, El Calafate.
Surrounded by blue lakes, vast glaciers and
near the last, snowy foothills of the Andes, this
is a place where the eclipse will happen.
Due to astronomy and geometry, the morning is
just beginning at the end of our timeless flight...
it is 08:00am local time.
The Eclipse Happens At Sunset
The only drawback we face is that the total
solar eclipse will not begin until 3:51pm local
time, when the Sun will be setting behind the
Andes.
Although totality will last about three minutes,
will we see the Sun totally obscured by the
Moon for only a few moments, before they both
hide behind the mountains.
During that time, we can see the planets
Mercury, Venus, Mars and Saturn drawing
almost exactly the ecliptic across the sky, plus
some brilliant stars.
Light Levels Increase To Normal Twilight
After those three great minutes, the light will
start to increase up to the level that follows the
long twilight, that occurs in these high latitudes.
Later on, the true night will come. After
17:00pm, more and more stars will be seen in
the sky.
Sights Of The Southern Sky
At this latitude, the south celestial pole is as
high in the sky as Polaris is, at our trip starting
point back in UK and a plethora of interesting
and beautiful circumpolar objects, will be
displayed simultaneously.
The Southern Cross will be near the zenith with
its neighbouring jewellery box.
You'll also see the nearest star to the Sun,
Alpha Centaurus, the Magellan Clouds, the
globular clusters Omega Centaurs and 47
Tucan, plus the Nebula of Eta Carina will also
be seen.. all the night.
This is the last opportunity to see the 2010 total
solar eclipse because a few kilometres due
east and a few minutes after now, the Moon
shadow will take-off definitively from the face of
the Earth.
Resources
I recommend the following links and/or
bibliography for more precise information about
this spectacular event.
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/TSE2010/
TSE2010.html
Sky and Telescope magazine, January 2010
issue.
A planetarium computer utility, like as Starry
Night Backyard or Stellarium, etc.
Elvio has created a video simulation of this
total solar eclipse. Watch it online in the
Members’ Area
Total Solar Eclipse 2010: Let’s Take A Special Trip
Together! (cont.)
By Elvio Alanis, Argentina
Have YOUR Articles Published In Practical Astronomy Magazine
The magazine is keen to publish articles on any aspect of astronomy,
written by the readers.
The ideal article will be 350 - 600 words, plus a couple of images. However ALL
astronomical contributions are welcome. Please send as a text file (.txt) with
separate images (.jpg or .png)
It’s easy! Just use the SUBMIT AN ARTICLE facility on our website.
Practical Astronomy July 2010 5
Readers Image Gallery (1)
Coloured Moon by Philip Thompson, Bolsover UK
This image was taken in 2009 using a Nikon D40
DSLR at prime focus on a 6" F8 Newtonian.
The colours were brought out using Photoshop
We welcome your images for publication. Beginner, advanced or expert, just send to: editor@practicalastronomy.com
The Summer Triangle by Amir Ali Nasiri
Camera : Canon 500D
Lens : 18 mm /F:4.5
Exposure : 30 seconds
ISO : 3200
Date the photo was taken: 2010/06/2
Location: Zanjan, Iran
Description of the photo's content:
The Summer Triangle, as they call it in
summer sky guides, is comprised of three
bright stars: Vega, Altair and Deneb, with
Vega the most outstanding.
Vega is a slightly variable star, its magnitude
changing over 0.19 of a day.
Altair or Alpha Aquilae, another member of
this triangle, is magnitude 0.93 and is 17 light
years from the Sun.
The last member of the trio is Deneb or
Alpha Cygni. It is also a variable star and
3299 light years from the Sun.
In the picture you can see the rise of the
summer triangle, over late spring mountain
flora.
Practical Astronomy July 2010 6
Readers Image Gallery (2)
Solar Images by Simon Metcalf
We welcome your images for publication. Beginner, advanced or expert, just send to: editor@practicalastronomy.com
Practical Astronomy July 2010 7
Readers Image Gallery (3)
Andromeda Galaxy by Asadollah
Ghamarinezhad
The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the
nearest galaxy to us. It has 100 billion
stars and is 2 million light years distant
from our galaxy.
Photo detail: Megrez 72 FD Doublet
APO
350D Canon modified camera
8*pics with variable exposure times
We welcome your images for publication. Beginner, advanced or expert, just send to: editor@practicalastronomy.com
Full Moon by D.Vijayakumar
Telescope: 6" reflector
Camera: Panasonic Lumix
Digital Camera FX36
Exposure: Single
Date: 27/05/2010 at 9.30pm
Location: Chennai
Latitude/Longitude: 13º 04' N
80º 17' E.
Practical Astronomy July 2010 8
Practical Constellations: Ursa Major
By Dr Firas Safadi, Syria
Today we will start our
trip with Ursa Major to
introduce you to the
main features of this
rich constellation.
Ursa Major is one of the
most famous
constellations of the
night sky. It is well-
known to many people
due to its clarity and
ease of identification, in
addition to its famous
relation with Polaris. It is
also one of the
constellations that can
be seen clearly from
most cities.
Located in the northern
sky, Ursa Major, like Ursa
Minor, never sets
completely below the
horizon for northern
hemisphere dwellers,
and it never even
touches the horizon in central Europe.
Other names for Ursa Major are Great Bear and
Big Dipper, and I have heard people calling it
the Big "Pan", as opposed to Ursa Minor.
People also call it the "Plough" in the United
Kingdom and other countries. You may find the
name of Ursa Major abbreviated as UMa in a
star atlas.
As we stated above, Ursa Major is one of the
relatively bright constellations that can be
easily seen from your balcony, even if you live
in a city. This is because the constellation has
seven main bright stars, although the other
nearly one-hundred stars are fairly faint.
Like Ursa Minor, you may perceive the Great
Bear as a dipper more than a real bear. All
seven stars (which will be discussed in later
issues in more detail) seem equally bright, and
they all have proper names.
There are many interesting stories linked with
Ursa Major, the Roman myth being the most
famous and interesting among them. We talked
about the story of Ursa Major in a previous
issue (Practical Astronomy, May 2010, page 9).
Briefly, the Great Bear is Callisto, a maiden that
was loved by Jupiter, king of gods. She was
changed into a bear by Juno, the very-jealous
wife of Jupiter. Jupiter later placed Callisto
among stars, so that she could live peacefully. I
will tell you more stories about this
constellation in later issues.
Due to its clarity, Ursa Major is an excellent
starting point for practical astronomers to find
other constellations in the sky. If you are
interested in teaching astronomy, you will rely
heavily on this constellation to guide beginners
to many important adjacent constellations,
such as Ursa Minor, Draco, Leo and Bootes.
In the next issue of Practical Astronomy we will
continue our trip with a discussion of the seven
main stars and more mythology of Ursa Major.
Stay with us!
Practical Astronomy July 2010 9
Sky View
Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. 51N)
These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21.00 GMT in mid-July, for an
observer at latitude 51 degrees North.
Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local
southern horizon, but patterns are the same.
Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm
with Daylight Saving). Maps generated with Stellarium
Looking East
Practical Astronomy July 2010 10
Sky View
Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. 51N)
These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21.00 GMT in mid-July, for an
observer at latitude 51 degrees North.
Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local
southern horizon, but patterns are the same.
Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm
with Daylight Saving). Maps generated with Stellarium
Looking South
Practical Astronomy July 2010 11
Sky View
Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. 51N)
These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21.00 GMT in mid-July, for an
observer at latitude 51 degrees North.
Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local
southern horizon, but patterns are the same.
Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm
with Daylight Saving). Maps generated with Stellarium
Looking West
Practical Astronomy July 2010 12
Sky View
Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. 51N)
These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21.00 GMT in mid-July, for an
observer at latitude 51 degrees North.
Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local
southern horizon, but patterns are the same.
Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm
with Daylight Saving). Maps generated with Stellarium
Looking North
Practical Astronomy July 2010 13
Society News
Monthly Meetings 2010-11
The Iollowing are the details oI this season`s monthly meetings. All meetings are a Friday evening. starting at
7.15 p.m. All will be held at Wynyard Planetarium. Wynyard Woodland Park. Thorpe Thewles. TS21 3JG
(Ior Navsat users). except Ior October. which will be held at Grindon Parish Hall. Thorpe Thewles. iust north
oI Stockton-on-Tees. Admission Ior members oI the public is iust £1.50 Ior adults. and £1 Ior children.
10 September 2009 Title t.b.a.
by Gary Fildes oI Kielder Observatory A.S.
8 October Thomas Wright Trophy quiz competition.
at Grindon Parish Hall
12 November '30 Years oI The Planetary Society¨
by Andy Fleming oI CaDAS
10 December 'Meteor Crater. Arizona¨
by Graham Darke oI Sunderland A.S.
14 January 2010 'Galaxies With Proper Names¨
by Dave Newton oI Sunderland A.S.
11 February Members` Night Volunteers needed! Plus AGM.
11 March 'Nuclear Astrophysics¨
by Dr. David Jenkins oI York University
8 April Presidential Address: Title t.b.a.
by Jack Youdale FRAS. Honorary President oI CaDAS
13 May 'Variable Stars¨
by Roger Pickard oI Shropshire
10 June 'The Dark Side oI the Universe¨
by ProI. Christine Done oI Durham University
Any queries. please call Neil on 01332 740977. or e-mail neil.haggath(ntlworld.com. Please allow a
Iew days Ior replies. as I`m working away Irom home during the week.
Practical Astronomy July 2010 14
July 2010
Observers’ Delights
www.PracticalAstronomy.com/subscribe
MOON Full New Full
26th June 11th July 26th July
METEOR SHOWER Try the low ZHR Capricornids on 8th and 15th maxima,
when the Moon is not too bright
DEEP SKY
“WINDOW”
Starts ~
5th July
Ends ~
17th July
Difficult in Northern
hemisphere twilight
VENUS MARS JUPITER SATURN
In the twilight of the
western evening sky.
Getting closer to
Venus, but its
brightness has faded
greatly
Rising now
before
midnight
In a nice line with
Venus and Mars,
in the western
twilight.
Become A Member
Enjoy BACK ISSUES and BONUSES...
Simply visit our website and subscribe. You’ll be sent the
current password for the Members’ Area.
You’ll also get priority notification when the next issue of
Practical Astronomy is ready to download.

Practical Astronomy In this month’s issue. North July 2010 First Light Welcome to the July issue of Practical Astronomy It’s the middle of summer in the northern hemisphere.JULY Maps of the Night Sky . Perhaps leave a comment on the Feedback page? Clear skies. The publisher is not responsible for the conduct of advertisers or external websites.com Website: www. 3 5 8 9 TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2010 How to enjoy a free eclipse trip to Argentina READERS’ IMAGE GALLERY Your astronomical images PRACTICAL CONSTELLATIONS Moving on to Ursa Major SKY VIEW .PracticalAstronomy.. Kevin Brown Cover design: Pixeljuice snc Image: A Ghamarinezhad (old Moon rising) Sponsored By CADSAS.looking East.com Publisher: Structure Ltd Telephone: +44 (0)1622 891151 Practical Astronomy magazine is published monthly online. which may pay compensation to the publisher for purchases made. Hope you like it. ISSN 2042-2687 Views expressed are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. May include errors and omissions. here is the July issue. But stick with it! The dark (and cold) nights will return soon and the night sky will become so much more attractive again. South. Compensation disclosure: may contain advertising and affiliate hyperlinks. and interest in practical astronomy is probably waning somewhat. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners. if you haven’t yet) Practical Astronomy July 2010 Editor: Kevin Brown FRAS editor@practicalastronomy. Practical Astronomy July 2010 2 .com Advertising: ads@practicalastronomy.com 13 SOCIETY NEWS News and events from your astro societies 14 OBSERVERS’ DELIGHTS Special observing sights not to miss this month Find back issues and related resources in the Members’ Area (subscribe to get the password. West. For your sustenance in the meantime.. No reproduction without express permission. ©2010 All contents copyright.

the southern hemisphere. flying along the 50ºS parallel. so let’s now twenty days before (June 21). Right now. flying in a southerly direction began our adventure: the latitude 50ºS. I Like the northern tropic. For our educational. Google Earth would be ideal. but as where the eclipse we continue our can be seen that journey south. on July we will pass another landmark. abandon the Greenwich meridian (0º longitude) and head west. Winter You are close to geographical And passing to the position: 50ºN south of the latitude and 0º equator. just as happened And that’s where we are heading. not notice any you are a long way immediate away from a place difference. which divides the terrestrial sphere into the Let’s assume you are in the UK on that day and north and south hemispheres. Meridian) on the we are in winter... or any and turbulent waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Ocean. this parallel of 23º 30’S suggest you use a very special ship. Below. It's summer. the Sun is low in the Gather Necessary Equipment. to see this beautiful astronomical phenomenon. There’s a total solar eclipse this year. your mind indicates the largest incursion of the Sun above and your imagination. South. indicating the greatest excursion of the Sun into the northern hemisphere. Well almost none. there is no continental Soon we will pass above the Tropic of Cancer. South of this point. English Channel Obviously we do and unfortunately. 11th 2010. Today. some 43º above horizon. except for the frozen continent of Antarctica. more and more to the (coordinates: 50ºS. Now we are in the southern winter. mass. we continue But we will need some navigational aids. weather will become colder and Let’s Take An colder. the equator. until globe of the Earth that you have at home. over such a famous meridian. We still have to describe an arc of 70º on the We continue our journey on the continent and surface of the ocean. only twenty days after winter solstice. we suddenly see the Atlantic South America. the midday sun is high in the sky. We fly on over Travelling West Europe and then enter the exotic and huge continent: Africa.. imaginary flight over the frigid example. heading Moving Into south. 70ºW) on the southern tip of north.. Then Fly north. the Sun is almost over our heads. we longitude (the experience another Greenwich sudden change. we arrive at a symmetrical position to where we Then we take off. the The Total Solar Eclipse At The End Of This Imaginary Journey day. Practical Astronomy July 2010 3 . But to save time and make the journey safe.. only the tip of the a mark on the Earth (parallel 23º 30’N) American continent lies south of this parallel. to reach our destination the Sun is left behind.. Argentina Together! Following our expedition flying over the ocean. Imaginary Journey There is another important landmark on the Therefore. I propose you make a long journey Earth we have to pass: the Tropic of Capricorn.Total Solar Eclipse 2010: Let’s Take A Special Trip By Elvio Alanis.

Although totality will last about three minutes.html Sky and Telescope magazine. before they both hide behind the mountains. However ALL astronomical contributions are welcome.. the globular clusters Omega Centaurs and 47 Tucan. You'll also see the nearest star to the Sun. Argentina Together! (cont.. The Southern Cross will be near the zenith with its neighbouring jewellery box. After 17:00pm. the light will start to increase up to the level that follows the long twilight. This is the last opportunity to see the 2010 total solar eclipse because a few kilometres due east and a few minutes after now. Venus. etc. will be displayed simultaneously. Elvio has created a video simulation of this total solar eclipse. the south celestial pole is as high in the sky as Polaris is. when the Sun will be setting behind the Andes. plus the Nebula of Eta Carina will also be seen. plus a couple of images.txt) with separate images (. that occurs in these high latitudes. the Moon shadow will take-off definitively from the face of the Earth. written by the readers. the true night will come. http://eclipse. like as Starry Night Backyard or Stellarium. Please send as a text file (. A planetarium computer utility. Light Levels Increase To Normal Twilight After those three great minutes. plus some brilliant stars. January 2010 issue. Due to astronomy and geometry. snowy foothills of the Andes.gsfc. Alpha Centaurus. it is 08:00am local time. at our trip starting point back in UK and a plethora of interesting and beautiful circumpolar objects. The Eclipse Happens At Sunset The only drawback we face is that the total solar eclipse will not begin until 3:51pm local time. eventually landing near a beautiful resort town of Argentina. Surrounded by blue lakes. the morning is just beginning at the end of our timeless flight. more and more stars will be seen in the sky. the Magellan Clouds. During that time.. Mars and Saturn drawing almost exactly the ecliptic across the sky. we can see the planets Mercury.jpg or . all the night.) Our Destination .png) It’s easy! Just use the SUBMIT AN ARTICLE facility on our website.gov/SEmono/TSE2010/ TSE2010. Sights Of The Southern Sky At this latitude.nasa. Later on. vast glaciers and near the last.El Calafate We must now refine our direction of flight.600 words. Resources I recommend the following links and/or bibliography for more precise information about this spectacular event. this is a place where the eclipse will happen. El Calafate. Watch it online in the Members’ Area Have YOUR Articles Published In Practical Astronomy Magazine The magazine is keen to publish articles on any aspect of astronomy. The ideal article will be 350 . will we see the Sun totally obscured by the Moon for only a few moments. Practical Astronomy July 2010 4 .Total Solar Eclipse 2010: Let’s Take A Special Trip By Elvio Alanis.

com Coloured Moon by Philip Thompson. The colours were brought out using Photoshop The Summer Triangle by Amir Ali Nasiri Camera : Canon 500D Lens : 18 mm /F:4. In the picture you can see the rise of the summer triangle. is magnitude 0.93 and is 17 light years from the Sun. another member of this triangle. as they call it in summer sky guides. Practical Astronomy July 2010 5 . its magnitude changing over 0. advanced or expert. with Vega the most outstanding. Iran Description of the photo's content: The Summer Triangle. is comprised of three bright stars: Vega. Altair and Deneb. Bolsover UK This image was taken in 2009 using a Nikon D40 DSLR at prime focus on a 6" F8 Newtonian. over late spring mountain flora. just send to: editor@practicalastronomy. Beginner.19 of a day. Vega is a slightly variable star. Altair or Alpha Aquilae.5 Exposure : 30 seconds ISO : 3200 Date the photo was taken: 2010/06/2 Location: Zanjan. The last member of the trio is Deneb or Alpha Cygni. It is also a variable star and 3299 light years from the Sun.Readers Image Gallery (1) We welcome your images for publication.

Readers Image Gallery (2) We welcome your images for publication. advanced or expert.com Solar Images by Simon Metcalf Practical Astronomy July 2010 6 . Beginner. just send to: editor@practicalastronomy.

30pm Location: Chennai Latitude/Longitude: 13º 04' N 80º 17' E. It has 100 billion stars and is 2 million light years distant from our galaxy. Beginner. Practical Astronomy July 2010 7 .com Andromeda Galaxy by Asadollah Ghamarinezhad The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the nearest galaxy to us. just send to: editor@practicalastronomy.Readers Image Gallery (3) We welcome your images for publication. advanced or expert.Vijayakumar Telescope: 6" reflector Camera: Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera FX36 Exposure: Single Date: 27/05/2010 at 9. Photo detail: Megrez 72 FD Doublet APO 350D Canon modified camera 8*pics with variable exposure times Full Moon by D.

so that she could live peacefully.Practical Constellations: Ursa Major By Dr Firas Safadi. a maiden that was loved by Jupiter. king of gods. Ursa Major is one of the relatively bright constellations that can be easily seen from your balcony. Draco. Syria Today we will start our trip with Ursa Major to introduce you to the main features of this rich constellation. the very-jealous wife of Jupiter. I will tell you more stories about this constellation in later issues. in addition to its famous relation with Polaris. This is because the constellation has seven main bright stars. Like Ursa Minor. There are many interesting stories linked with Ursa Major. May 2010. She was changed into a bear by Juno. As we stated above. Leo and Bootes. In the next issue of Practical Astronomy we will continue our trip with a discussion of the seven main stars and more mythology of Ursa Major. Briefly. We talked about the story of Ursa Major in a previous issue (Practical Astronomy. It is wellknown to many people due to its clarity and ease of identification. you may perceive the Great Bear as a dipper more than a real bear. If you are interested in teaching astronomy. Due to its clarity. and I have heard people calling it the Big "Pan". although the other nearly one-hundred stars are fairly faint. All seven stars (which will be discussed in later issues in more detail) seem equally bright. the Great Bear is Callisto. Ursa Major is an excellent starting point for practical astronomers to find other constellations in the sky. never sets completely below the horizon for northern hemisphere dwellers. even if you live in a city. Ursa Major is one of the most famous constellations of the night sky. like Ursa Minor. the Roman myth being the most famous and interesting among them. People also call it the "Plough" in the United Kingdom and other countries. It is also one of the constellations that can be seen clearly from most cities. as opposed to Ursa Minor. page 9). and they all have proper names. Stay with us! Practical Astronomy July 2010 8 . and it never even touches the horizon in central Europe. Located in the northern sky. you will rely heavily on this constellation to guide beginners to many important adjacent constellations. You may find the name of Ursa Major abbreviated as UMa in a star atlas. Ursa Major. Jupiter later placed Callisto among stars. Other names for Ursa Major are Great Bear and Big Dipper. such as Ursa Minor.

51N) Looking East These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21. Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local southern horizon.00 GMT in mid-July. Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm with Daylight Saving). Maps generated with Stellarium Practical Astronomy July 2010 9 . for an observer at latitude 51 degrees North.Sky View Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. but patterns are the same.

but patterns are the same.00 GMT in mid-July. Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm with Daylight Saving).Sky View Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. Maps generated with Stellarium Practical Astronomy July 2010 10 . 51N) Looking South These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21. for an observer at latitude 51 degrees North. Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local southern horizon.

Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local southern horizon.00 GMT in mid-July.Sky View Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. Maps generated with Stellarium Practical Astronomy July 2010 11 . Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm with Daylight Saving). for an observer at latitude 51 degrees North. 51N) Looking West These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21. but patterns are the same.

51N) Looking North These maps show the sky view looking in different directions at 21. Local time zone not GMT? The view should be much the same at 9pm in your local time (10pm with Daylight Saving).00 GMT in mid-July. Further South? (but still in the northern hemisphere) Objects are higher above your local southern horizon. for an observer at latitude 51 degrees North.Sky View Mid-July 21:00 GMT (lat. but patterns are the same. Maps generated with Stellarium Practical Astronomy July 2010 12 .

Z (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(c"+)5(C*NE456("2(F%5"@.(.$(#"5$%( "2(F$"NE$"#0"#01)).(HD#)(((((((((((((((((((((((((X1%)(\45E(F*6)("2($%)(a#*<)5.)(4&&"3(4( 2)3(64'.$(R/9?.)A5D45'(((((((((((((((((((!)8A)5..("2(T*)&6)5(OA./GG-(>].*"#(2"5(8)8A)5.&)8*#+("2([4\:F (((/.("2($%*..*$' :#'(VD)5*).(#))6)6`(C&D.=(4.(QD.9(:&&(8))$*#+.)5."#7.Z (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(\59(\4<*6(H)#E*#.5*64'()<)#*#+=(.("2(Y"5E(a#*<)5.$45$*#+(4$( >9/?(@989( ((:&&(3*&&(A)(%)&6(4$(B'#'456(C&4#)$45*D8=(B'#'456(B""6&4#6(C45E=(1%"5@)(1%)3&).("2($%)(@DA&*N(*./.$*#)(\"#)("2(\D5%48(a#*<)5.*6)#$("2([4\:F (((/G(!4'(((((((((((((((((((((((((X_45*4A&)(F$45.(e78(3"5E*#+(434'(25"8(%"8)(6D5*#+($%)(3))E9 Practical Astronomy July 2010 13 .)(N4&&(K)*&("#(.(45)(4(.4$(D.Society News !"#$%&'(!))$*#+.(\)N)8A)5(((((((((((((((((X!)$)"5([54$)5=(:5*W"#4Z ((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(I54%48(\45E)("2(FD#6)5&4#6(:9F9 (((/](H4#D45'(-.Z (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(\4<)(K)3$"#("2(FD#6)5&4#6(:9F9 (((//(.=(@&)4.c:F=(P"#"545'(C5).(-.*N.L=()MN)@$(2"5(ON$"A)5=(3%*N%(3*&&(A)(%)&6(4$(I5*#6"#(C45*.S>>=("5()084*&(#)*&9%4++4$%d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b(1*$&)($9A949 (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(H4NE(Y"D64&)(.(B5*+%$(15"@%'(VD*W(N"8@)$*$*"#= ((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((4$(I5*#6"#(C45*.(Y)45.$5"@%'.S(((((((1*$&)($9A949 (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((A'(I45'(.%(P4&&=(1%"5@)(1%)3&).*$' ((((U(:@5*&(((((((((((((((((((((((((C5).(B*$%(C5"@)5(K48)./.

You’ll also get priority notification when the next issue of Practical Astronomy is ready to download. but its brightness has faded greatly JUPITER Rising now before midnight SATURN In a nice line with Venus and Mars. in the western twilight. when the Moon is not too bright VENUS In the twilight of the western evening sky. You’ll be sent the current password for the Members’ Area. Practical Astronomy July 2010 14 . DEEP SKY “WINDOW” Starts ~ 5th July Ends ~ 17th July Difficult in Northern hemisphere twilight Enjoy BACK ISSUES and BONUSES...com/subscribe Simply visit our website and subscribe.PracticalAstronomy.Observers’ Delights MOON Full 26th June New 11th July July 2010 Full 26th July METEOR SHOWER Try the low ZHR Capricornids on 8th and 15th maxima. MARS Getting closer to Venus. Become A Member www.