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DeviceNet Getting Results.

ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

DeviceNet Getting Results ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge
1788-CN2DN ControlLogix and PLC5 Controlled

This Document will allow a user to quickly setup and get started using the 1788-CN2DN module for DeviceNet applications. Configuring the ControlNet Schedule and Using RSNetWorx for ControlNet will not be discussed. The user of this document is expected to be familiar with ControlNet applications. Basic configuration and usage information will be detailed for some common devices on DeviceNet.

Last updated OCT 2002

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Table of Contents
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49.
Setting the Rotary Switches on the 1788-CN2DN Configuring RSLogix 5000 to Include a 1788-CN2DN Module Adding the 1788-CN2DN to the I/O configuration tree for the ContolLogix Processor Configuring RSNetWorx for DeviceNet Going On-line and selecting a driver Unrecognized Device Configuration Creating, Registering or Finding EDS files. Uploading From the Network Uploading from Devices Missing Devices Device Mismatches Looking at Device Properties Configuring the Series 9000 Photoeye Configuring the 1734-IV4 Module Looking at Parameter Help Configuring the 1734-OW2 Configuring an 855T Stack Light Configuring the 1792D-VT0D MaXum Block Using the Monitor on the Parameters Tab Configuring a 1794-ADN with 4 modules Configuring a 1794-ID2 in RSNetWorx for DeviceNet Configuring a 1794-OE4 in RSNetWorx for DeviceNet Configuring a 1794-IB16 in RSNetWorx for DeviceNet Configuring a Bulletin 160 Drive with a DN2 module Scaled Parameters Locked Parameters Configuring the 1788-CN2DN Module Configuring the Module Tab of the 1788-CN2DN Slave Mode for the 1788-CN2DN Foreground to Background Ratio Configuring the Scanlist for the 1788-CN2DN Configuring Shared Inputs Automapping Data definitions in I/O Tables Manually Mapping (Advanced Mapping) Summary tab of the 1794-ADN Getting a mapping error for the 1794 ADN module Downloading Scanlist to the 1788-CN2DN ADR (Auto Device Replacement) 1788-CN2DN Summary Tab Using RSLogix 5000 To Trigger and Monitor Data Triggering and Monitoring Data Idle Scanner and the Run Bit Output Data Structure Input Data structure Status Data Structure Common error descriptions Creating Aliases Turning on Lights on the 855T Stack Light 3 6 6 8 8 9 10 16 18 19 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 29 30 32 33 35 37 37 38 38 38 38 39 39 40 41 41 44 44 46 47 47 48 48 48 48 49 50 53 54 55

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN 50. 51. 52. 53. 54.
Operating the Bulletin 160 Drive Looking at Inputs from the Photoeye Turning on Analog Outputs for the 1794-OE4 Module Node Address/Status Indicator Device Failure Table 56 59 60 63 63

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Setting the Rotary Switches on the 1788-CN2DN
There are three sets of rotary switches on the 1788-CN2DN The leftmost controls the DeviceNet baud rate.

The top right is the DeviceNet node address.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

and finally the switch below the DeviceNet Node switch is the ControlNet node address.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Set the three sets of switches to the appropriate settings for your application. Remember: When any of the switches are changed for any reason the power MUST be cycled for the new settings to take effect. Otherwise the original position settings will remain until the power is cycled.

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Configuring RSLogix 5000
First we’ll configure RSLogix 5000 to accept the 1788-CN2DN Module. Open RSLogix 5000 and go to the IO configuration folder in the left hand window near the bottom. Right click and choose New Module. We’ll configure a local 1788-CNB here with the 1788-CN2DN attached to the ControlNet network.

First select the 1756-CNB then right click on the 1756-CNB you just added to select the 1788-CN2DN module from the list.

Click OK to select the new module and follow though the rest of the screens to finish configuring the module. Once the module has been added you should now see the module in the I/O tree.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

I’ve added an L1 Processor here as well. You should also see that Tags for the module have been created under the Controller Tags.

Save the file with the new 1788-CN2DN module added. We will go over how the data is mapped later on. On the Toolbar, Click File and then Save, or Save As to save your work.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

On-Line Configuration of RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
First, open RSNetWorx for DeviceNet. For a first time user, you’ll have no file of the network, so you must go online. If you have a file, open it now. To go online do one of three things: Click the Online Button Go to the toolbar then to Online

Or Press the F10 function key on the keyboard. Choose the path you use to get to the DeviceNet Network (1784-PCD, 1770-KFD, 1784-PCID, etc). Here we are using the 1784-PCD card.

Then Click Ok. RSNetWorx will then begin to browse the network. RSNetWorx will see all the devices that are listed under the driver, including the 1784-PCD card. Once the browse is completed, all the devices on the network, that are communicating properly, will be shown as an Icon on the network Graph.

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As you can see all the devices that were shown in the RSLinx Browse window in the above step are shown here on the Network Graph view. Here we have an Unrecognized Device as shown by the Icon below.

You’ll also get an error message in the message box at the bottom of the window. To resolve the unrecognized (Unregistered) device, we need to obtain the EDS file for it.

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Creating, Registering, Finding EDS file
There are several places to get EDS files. First, you could ask the vendor of the device for the EDS file. They should be happy to get that for you. All Rockwell Automation EDS files can be found at the internet address: http://www.ab.com/networks/eds Second you could check at the ODVA (Open DeviceNet Vendor’s Association) website: http://www.odva.org or you could try to upload the EDS file information from the device. Some devices allow this option. Some do not. This particular device is an Allen Bradley Bulletin 160 Drive. It allows uploading of the device parameters so that RSNetWorx can create a usable EDS file.

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First right click on the Unrecognized Device Icon and choose Register Device.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Next the EDS wizard will automatically be launched to help you register the device.

Choose Next to continue Then choose Create EDS file

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Once you have done this, follow the prompts to complete the EDS file information. You’ll be asked to enter a catalog number. You may do so at this time or just leave it blank. Leaving it blank will not affect how the device operates on the network.

I have chosen to leave mine blank, again, it does not effect proper device operation. Next we’ll be prompted to select the type of default connection (Polled, COS [Change Of State], or Strobed). By default most drives are polled, so we’ll click on the polled connection checkbox and then enter the default sizes for the drive. The sizes are 4 receive (input) and 4 transmit (output). These sizes can vary especially on these and other drives. But for now, we’ll select the default values.

Click Next to continue on… At this point, RSNetWorx should be uploading the parameter information from the drive and start building the EDS file. If you get an error you may have to check the connection to the device and start this process over again. If you continue to have communication problems while uploading you may have larger network trouble. Visit our Knowledge base at http://domino.automation.rockwell.com/applications/kb/RAKB.nsf/$$Search/?OpenForm and look at document G15098.

This is our DeviceNet Trouble Shooting Guide. It addresses many commons communication issues due to cabling problems, as well as, termination and grounding.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Once all the parameters have been uploaded, you’ll be prompted to select a graphic image, or icon, for the device, sometimes an appropriate Icon will be selected by default. If this choice is Ok with you, just click next. Otherwise, click the change icon button and choose from the built in selection of icons or point to a location that contains the icon file by clicking the browse button. Here the image of the 160 drive is already selected from the built in database of icons, so we’ll just leave it alone and click next.

Finally it will ask you to register the device, go ahead and click next. This step is crucial. RSNetWorx will add this file to its list of known device types as well as create a registry entry in the Operating system (Windows 98, NT 4.9 2000, etc..) Once you click next here, it may take a few minutes to update RSNetWorx’s files as well as update the registry information. If you find that you are unable to upload the file, you have to get the EDS file from the vendor of that product and the Register the file. Again, go to the EDS Wizard, select Tools from the toolbar, then EDS Wizard

Then hit Next button after the Splash Screen comes up.

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Then Select Register and EDS File from the four available options.

Then Select whether you want to register a Single file or a directory of files. Then either type in the path to the EDS file you want to configure or use the Browse button to browse out to the folder where the file(s) is (are) stored. Complete the Wizard by following the prompts (Next and Finish). Once you click next here, it may take a few minutes to update RSNetWorx’s files as well as update the registry information. You may also need to shut down and restart RSNetWorx for the update to fully complete. If the Icon shows up automatically after the hour glass disappears then you should not have to restart RSNetWorx. Otherwise, if the unrecognized device Icon remains, close RSNetWorx and restart it. Then, follow the above procedures again to get back Online. It should be as easy as restarting and clicking the online button or hitting the F10 function key. OK! Now we have all the devices registered and we can move on…

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Uploading from the Network

Now we can upload the device’s information from the device the software. If you upload now, to your preconfigured file, you’ll lose all your configuration information.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN To upload from the network, right click in the background and choose Upload from Network.

It may take a few minutes to upload all of the device’s information. If you want to upload from a particular device then select the device by double clicking on the Icon. You’ll get a window that looks similar to the scanner’s upload window. Just click the upload button to upload.

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Uploading from Devices
To upload from a single device, right click on the icon for that device and then choose Upload from Device.

After the Network information has been uploaded you may double click on any of the devices to configure them. Also Note: The message window at the bottom of the screen will have information about the upload for each device. If the device was successfully uploaded then you’ll see a message like the following messages for each node.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Missing Devices
If the software cannot find a device it will show and Icon that has a red box with a yellow minus sign.

And the messaged below will be displayed in the message window at the bottom of the window.

Device Mismatches
If you are using an Off-Line file and you get the following error message and Icon, this means that more than likely the device’s firmware is different.

With version 3.21 of the software you’ll get a device mismatch dialog box. If the Vendor, Device and Product Types are the same, it is just a revision difference and you’ll only need to click the OK button.

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If online identity and offline identity information other than Revision is different, then the whole device is different. It should tell you what is out there and what RSNetWorx was expecting. If this is the case, then you should double check dip switches and consult with the people that created your offline file to verify what should really be there. Ladder Logic depends on a particular device to be there. If the mismatch can be resolved by the software then the following message will appear in the message window.

First we’ll look at the non scanner modules.

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Looking at the Properties of Devices
You may right click and go to Properties

We’ll look at the simplest device first…

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Configuring the Series 9000 PhotoEye…
This device is probably the most basic device you can have. After we open the properties window we want to go the parameters tab. As you can see there are only three parameters here. Configure those now or leave them alone. We are going to leave them alone.

Note the Lock Icons next to the parameter information. This means this parameter is a READ ONLY parameter and it cannot be changed. Usually this is a value or an internal state of the device. Now click the Apply button to save the information to RSNetWorx. If you don’t click the Apply button the default information will be used when it comes time to download to the device. So always make sure you click the Apply to save the information. Also, the information is automatically applied if you click OK.

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Configuring Point I/O 1734-IV4 Module
Now we’ll look at the 1734-IV4, four pt DC input module. Open the Properties of the module. Note there are a few locked READ ONLY parameters. These are the input values of the module.

Since there are more parameters than the window can show, the second screen capture shows the additional parameter.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Parameters 5 through 12 are filter values for the inputs the module. Help for the Off-to-On delay parameters (parameters 5, 7, 9 and11) can be found by right clicking on the parameter and selecting Parameter Help.

The help window will be displayed for that parameter.

Since I know my input signal will be high for 10ms every time it comes and I want to know when it is on for 5ms, I can set these parameters for 5 ms. So, after 5ms the input on the IV4 module will be considered a good signal and will then be turned on. To change the value of the parameter, left click in the current value portion of the window and type in the desired value. Here I selected 5ms. Configure the rest of the parameters as desired. I have no further changes, so I’ll leave the rest of the parameters at their default values. I’ll then click the apply button and I’ll get the ‘Query window’ that asks if I’d like to download to the device. I prefer to download at this time since I know everything I want to configure is completed for this module.

So I’ll click Yes and download the changes the module. Then click Ok to close the device properties Box.

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Configuring the 1734-OW2 Module
Next we’ll configure the 1734-OW2 module, 2 point relay module. Again open the properties and the parameters tab for the 1734-OW2 module. I have selected a few of the parameters to explain them.

First, fault actions and values should be determined. They have been configured as shown above. Next the Idle values should be configured. These values will be used if the system is switched out of run mode OR parameter 11, the Run/Idle Command is used. Normally the module will be set to the Idle setting for scanner control. If you wish to manually test the outputs, set parameter 11 to RUN. This will allow output to be toggled from Parameters 1 and 2, the Output values. Now that the changes are made, click Apply and download.

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Configuring the 855T StackLight
Now we’ll configure the 855T StackLight Open the properties and the parameters tab configure the module appropriately.

Since I have no changes I’ll just Click Ok.

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Configuring the 1792D-VT0D MaXum Block
Next we’ll visit the Armor Block MaXum, 1792D-VT0D Again go to the Properties and then to the parameters.

The Parameters I have chosen to look at are the Connector Fault Status and the Connector Diagnostics. Since I am only going to be using 8 inputs I have chosen to group them to the first 4 connectors. There are two input points per connector. I have disable the Diagnostics for the last four connectors (E through H) so the block does not indicate an Open condition (OFF Wire). If I leave the Diagnostics enabled, the block would sense there is nothing connected to those connectors and set the fault bit and Flash the MS (module status) LED RED. The Output LED, too, would flash red. With the Diagnostics disabled for those connectors, there won’t be any false alarm condition generated. If the connectors to on the MaXum are removed then, in RSNetWorx you can also monitor the parameters to see if there is an OFF WIRE condition. First, choose whether you want to monitor one or all parameters. Then, start the monitor by clicking the Start Monitor button.

Then watch the scrolling blue ball as it moves through the parameters. This will display the state of the parameter as it is currently help within the device.

Once the parameter information is display you can shut off the monitor by clicking the Stop Monitor button.

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So if the inputs are disconnected from the Armor Block, we’ll get the following display from the monitor.

So again, click Apply to save the configuration information to the software and download to the module.

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Configuring the 1794-ADN Flex I/O Adapter
Next, we’ll configure the 1794-ADN Flex I/O Adapter Module. These can be somewhat tricky if they have already been configured. We’ll configure four modules in the scanlist of the 1788-CN2DN module. Open the properties to the Flex Module, then, go to the Module Configuration tab.

Under the Module configuration tab, there will be a list of the modules the ADN module sees connected to the right if itself. Here we have three modules connected. They are all being displayed correctly. We have a 1794-ID2/A, an incremental Encoder, a 1794-OE4/B, and analog output module, a 1794-IB16, a 16 pt 24V DC sink input module and I’ll leave the fourth module, a 1794-OB16, a 16 point output module up to the reader.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN To configure the 1794-ID2 Module click on the slot 0 button next to the module type name. Here is the Module configuration tab that shows the I/O sizes for the module. The manual for the module is available from http://www.theautomationbookstore.com or www.ab.com/manuals and search for the 1794-ID2 manual.

Here is the channel 0 tab configuration. I have enabled the Rollover and Count Enable bits. I have also configured the preset to be 1000. Since I want channel 1 to be the same I’ll repeat these settings there.

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Once the module is configured Click OK to close the window.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Next we’ll configure the 1794-OE4 module. This is the analog output module. By default, many the available parameters on the module are shut off. We’ll take a look at these additional parameters and make use of some of them. Click on the data description button to gain access to the additional data. Check all the buttons you want to use then click OK. I chose to use them all – now from the processor, I can control how the module operates.

Otherwise, if I had chosen Set for I/O Only, then I would be able to configure the module through RSNetWorx. Use the Pulldown to configure the input signal type.

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Finish configuring the module for the application. Next we’ll configure the 1794-IB16 module. I have again chosen to control the module from the processor by clicking on the Data Description button and selected to add the Input delay time to my data being transferred to the 1794-ADN mapping.

Click to Ok button once you are finished here. Click the apply button and download. If do not click the apply button none of the information will be applied when we look at the summary screen. It will contain the default of 2 input bytes or 1 input word.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Then go to the Summary tab. This will show all the modules in the rack and the total I/O data in both Words and Bytes. It will also show the order of the data as it will appear in the scanner module. We’ll refer back to this table when we map the 1794-ADN module.

These are the values for the 1794-ADN flex I/O adapter. Again, I’ll leave the 1794-OB16 Module as an Exercise for the user.

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Configuring the Bulletin 160 Drive
Now we’ll configure the Bulletin 160 Drive with the DN2 interface module. Since we are online, we’ve already set the address and baud rate with the dipswitch on the DN2 module. If you haven’t done this yet refer to publication 0160-5.18 at http://www.ab.com/manuals Set the baud rate and the node address according to the charts shown in the manual. They have been added here for convenience if you cannot see the drive, or is it being displayed at the incorrect address.

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Once the 160 shows up in RSLinx and RSNetWorx, open the properties up for the drive and go to the properties for that drive. There are several parameters that are very important to note for operation on DeviceNet. First is parameter 46. This parameter MUST be set to Network Control. Next is parameter 59. This parameter MUST be set to Internal Frequency Next are the data Assemblies that are to be used

You’ll want to consult the manual again at this point in Appendix B, pages 24 to 28. These assemblies will determine what data will be sent back to the 1788-CN2DN and processor from the drive.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Here, I have used Input assembly 71. This corresponds to:

I have also used Output assembly 21. This corresponds to:

To make the Drive operate, in the output assembly I have to set bit 5 for the Net Reference (for the Speed Reference) and bit 6 for the Net Control (Network Control). Then once these bits are set I can set bits 0 or 1 for run forward or reverse, respectively. Some of the parameters have a symbol next to them that looks like a scale. This means the parameter is being displayed as a scaled value rather than its raw data form. So when we look at parameter 1 the output frequency, we see the value as a scaled frequency value instead of the raw data coming back from the drive. You’ll also notice that this parameter is a READ ONLY parameter. This is known from the Lock symbol.

Set up the remaining parameters as necessary for your application. Click the Apply button to download the new information to the drive.

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Configuring the 1788-CN2DN Module
Last but not lease comes the 1788-CN2DN scanner configuration. Open the Properties of the scanner. First we’ll look at the Module tab of the 1788-CN2DN module. Most of these parameters will not be changed and most should not be changed, unless directed to do so. Improper network operation may result if the module is improperly configured.

Two Parameters that may be of interest are the Slave Mode button. By enabling this feature data from this scanner (set up as a Slave device) can be sent to another Master Scanner module. This is useful for noncritical data transfers between two or more processors over DeviceNet. The other parameter is the Foreground to Background Poll Ratio. This parameter is useful if: 1. You have very slow devices on the network that do not update their data often. 2. You do not require data from a particular device as often as the other devices. 3. Or, if the device has many bytes of data to transfer and bandwidth usage is an issue.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Next, we’ll configure the Scanlist then we can look at some of the other information that is available for this scanner module. Since we’re configuring the scanlist first; click on the scanlist tab. You’ll see that all the devices are in the available devices’ window.

To add all the devices to the scanlist at one time use the Double Arrow pointing to the scanlist window, otherwise use the single arrow to add just one device at a time. If you choose to add all of them, they will be automatically added to the scanlist in node order and the data will be as compacted into the I/O tables as possible. Sometimes, as shown in the pictures data can be split in, ‘not so friendly’ ways as shown by the bulletin 160 drive mapping. The upper word has been split which means the speed reference has been split. This would make it difficult to send a speed reference to the drive, and debugging would be just as difficult Note: If you right click on an Icon in the Available Devices window you can choose to share the Inputs for that device (Or in the white background for all the devices). This means that you can monitor the inputs of that device in another scanner on the same Network. It is like a listen only mode.

Then when you go to the second scanner’s Scanlist and choose Shared Inputs, you’ll get the following Icon

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You can leave this mapped this way and correct it in the logic, but that can increase the scan time of the processor or you can Unmap they are mapped. the devices you want to and change the locations and ways

To unmap go back to the scanlist and click the device to Unmap then click the single arrow pointing back to the available devices. Here I’m going to move everything around because I have particular requirements for certain devices. So I’ll click the double arrow to remove all the devices from the scanlist.

First I’ll automap the stacklight. It has 1 byte of input data and one word of output data. Then I’ll map the Photoeye. It has only 1 byte of input. Then I’ll map the armor block. It has 4 bytes of input data.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Next I’ll map the IV4 module. Something interesting to note here, is the plus ‘+’ sign next to the device. If the device is expanded (click on the plus), an explanation of the data for this module is available.

In addition to this information, if we select one of those input values, its position can be seen in the data table below. Not all devices have this additional functionality within the software. The devices that do will have the plus ‘+’ sign next to the module name.

We can see then that the 2nd input point of the module will be available at address: CN2DN.I.Data[17] here, 1:I.Data[17] since the 1788-CN2DN module is Scheduled on ControlNet. Next, I’ll map the 1734-OW2 module. But I want to manually map this module to the next available word. So by default, the 1734-OW2 module will be mapped to the second byte of Dword 0

I want to map it to the last 2 bits of Dword 0 So I’ll click the advanced button the module in a tabular kind of form. on the output tab and I’ll get a window with the location of

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I’ll need to change some of these values. Since I don’t need to make any changes to the Map From location, I’ll make only changes to the Map To location. First I’ll need to change the Bit from 8 to 30. Also, since only 2 bits are being used for this module I’ll change the bit length to 2 also.

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This mode allows you to take a block of data and segment it into at most 4 parts. In the Map From location, this shows the message type (Polled, COS, Strobed) and the starting location from within the module that you need start the new mapped segment. Next I’ll map the Bulletin 160 Drive In order to get it lined up properly on a Word (16 bit) boundary I’ll have to manually map the drive. I’ll map it to Dwords 2 and 3 of the input and I’ll map it to Dword 2 and 3 on the output. Here is how the Input table looks now.

Here is how the output table looks now.

I mapped the 160 drive’s output data in the same word location to make it easier to keep track of. I could have easily mapped it the next available word, (1:O.Data[1]) but this can make for difficult troubleshooting later on. Next I’ll map the 1794-ADN Flex adapter. We have already configured the individual Flex modules previously, so the only thing left to do is add the 1794-ADN module to the scanlist.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Looking first to the summary tab of the 1794-ADN module, we will see the order of the RX and TX data as it appears for this module in the 1788-CN2DN scanner.

I’m going to map the 1794-ADN in the following way. I’m going to map all 10 words of data from the 1794-ADN together in the 1788-CN2DN’s Scanlist I’ll do the same for the Output. Then, in my ladder logic, I’ll pull the data out to make it easier to work with. Note: If you are working with the 1794-ADN when it is mapped in the scanlist and you get the following error: Communication Error 12: Error Response received: Object State conflict

What this means is the 1794-ADN is mapped to a master scanner module, here the 1788-CN2DN module. First we have to unmap the module and download to the 1788-CN2DN module to make the changes to the 1794-ADN. Once the module has been removed from the scanlist, the changes can be downloaded to the 1794-ADN module. Once the changes have been made, the module can be added back into the scanlist.

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Input and Output Tables
The I/O tables should now look something like the following: Input table

Output table

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Now that the scanlist is finished, we need to download the information to the 1788-CN2DN scanner module. Go back to the scanlist tab on the 1788-CN2DN and download All records when prompted to do so.

There that’s done. The entire DeviceNet Network has been configured using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet. There are a couple of more Tabs for the Scanner Module. I won’t go into great detail here.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN There is the ADR tab. By selecting this tab you can set up the Auto Device Replacement feature. This allows out of the box, new devices that are software configurable, to be replaced on the network with no user intervention. In my case I could use ADR to automatically configure a new Photoeye from out the box when placed on the network if the old Photoeye fails. For additional information on ADR go to the Knowledgebase at http://domino.automation.rockwell.com/applications/kb/RAKB.nsf/$$Search/?OpenForm and search for document ID G18168 and for more information configuring ADR search for Document 17690. The other Tab is the Summary Tab. This shows a general table for the mapping of the scanner module. One thing to note: The Summary Tab will show the 1788-CN2DN <Slave Mode>. In the column next to the Node column, it will say Active and ‘No.’ This means the scanner is NOT in slave mode.

If the Active column said ‘Yes’ then the scanner would be in slave mode. Under normal operation the scanner should not be in slave mode.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Triggering Outputs and Monitoring Inputs
Now comes the fun part…. If you look at the 1788-CN2DN module, the DeviceNet Status LED should be flashing green and the Linking LED should be out. There is a bit (CommandRegister.Run bit) that must be set to 1 to put the scanner into Run mode. This bit, the run bit, is located in the 1788-CN2DN’s data structure in RSLogix 5000 in the Output table’s command register for the scanner module. This is listed in publication 1788-IN052C-EN-P. Below are descriptions for the data tables available in the 1788-CN2DN.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

You can see that the command word is the in the 1788-CN2DN Output, under the Command Register in the Processor’s data table. In general the address for the 1788-CN2DN in RSLogix 5000 is as follows: CN2DN:I.Data[x] or O.Data[X] So now we’ll set this bit in our ladder logic. Open RSLogix 5000 up, if it is not already open. Go to the Output table and set the Command Register.Run bit.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN The PLC5 doesn’t have aliases so we’ll use the data in the files we created for the 1788-CN2DN. Open RSLogix 500 if it is not already opened. Remember we configured File 11 for input, File 10 for the output and File 12 for the status. So here we will look at the output data file first. In general the address for the 1788-CN2DN is as follows: N<data file>:Word/bit First we’ll set the Run bit this will be the first bit (bit 0) of the first word (word 0) of the output data table.

The CommandRegister.Run Bit It will look like this in the RSLogix 5000 ladder logic:

It will look like this is in the RSLogix 5 Ladder Logic:

Here, the bit is used with an Unlatch instruction for safety reasons. I want the module to be put in Idle mode under certain circumstances. You’re application may vary. I have also added a comment to the Bit N10:0 to remind me this is the 1788-CN2DN’s run bit. Now that we’ve set the run bit for the scanner take a look at LEDs on the front of the 1788-CN2DN Module. They should all be solid green and the Linking Activity should be Flashing Green (Only if the ControlNet network has been properly configured and scheduled). If there is a configuration problem with the 1788-CN2DN the module Status LED will be blinking red and the DNet I/O Status will be blinking green.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN The error codes, similar to other scanners with LED displays can be found in the Status table of the 1788CN2DN, as shown below:

To get the status information for CN2DN in the PLC5 Controller we have to look in our data File we set up for the Status, File 12.

A few of the Common error codes are listed here for convenience. There are many error codes that can be displayed. Refer to publication 1788-IN052C-EN-P for a list of those error codes Error code77 means there is a size mismatch and most likely the module is configured improperly. Go back and check the module in question, also verify the scanlist entry. Error code 78 or 72 means the module in question is not communicating properly. A 72 means the connection is very intermittent and a 78 means the module is not responding at all. Usually faulty wiring and/or power are the causes of these errors.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Error code 91 is Bus Off condition. This can mean several things: 1. There is a short between one or both of the CAN lines (Blue or White) to either Ground (Shield or Black) or to 24v (Red). (verify wiring with an ohm meter or the 1788-MCHKR media checker). 2. It could mean there are devices on the network with the incorrect baud rate. Remove devices and cycle power after each device is removed. Check the 1788-CN2DN’s baud rate – refer the knowledge base and download the troubleshooting guide (document ID number G15098). 3. It could mean that there is a large amount of noise on your network. This could be due to High Voltage power cables being too close, improper or lack of termination, improper grounding (again refer to Knowledge base document ID G15098 or to the DeviceNet Media installation guide, publication DN-6.7.2. Error code 92 Means no Network Power (24V). Verify cabling or use an isolated, regulated, power supply rated for DeviceNet usage. Once all the error codes have been resolved we can control the outputs and monitor the slave modules. I’m not going to go into writing ladder logic here, but rather I will show the bits that should be used to set outputs, set the reference speed on the bulletin 160 drive and start it running, how to see the status of the photoeye. Ok now is the fun part – turning on outputs and monitoring inputs. Back in the scan list we mapped all the devices on our network. Each device now has it’s place in the processor’s data tables. To make our lives much easier, RSLogix 5000 allows us to configure Alias data tables so that we know Exactly what bit does what. Some choose not to take advantage of this powerful feature. We will, however, take advantage if this feature. Creating Aliases is easy. I’ll walk through a couple and leave the rest as Exercises for the reader.

Then enter the information as follows, then Apply

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Then the New tag will be added to the List of available tags

I have created a few more tags as follows.

The stacklight is mapped to the low byte of output Dword 0. I have created a single tag for the Stacklight. This will help me conserve some memory in my L1 processor. But in doing this, I am forced to use ladder. I’ll need to add a rung of ladder to move or copy the data from the Local Data array to the Stacklight data array.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Since the stacklight has 5 lights attached to the base the first 1 bit of that byte will turn on lights I’ll set bits 0, 2 and 4 so that every other light is on. Here’s how it looks in the data table in RSLogix 5000.

Here’s how it looks in RSLogix 5.

Here I have, again, used Alias tags to clearly identify the 1734- OW2 Outputs. We’ll set both relay outputs to 1.

Here is the data in RSLogix 5. Remember the 1788CN2DN Data table is DINTs (32 bits long) whereas the PLC5 data tables are INTS (16 bits long).

Now we’ll turn on the drive and set the reference speed. First I have added four tags, each 1 INT long to accept the command word, speed Reference of the Drive for the output and the Command status and Speed reference status. I’ll leave creating the ladder as an exercise for the user to get the data to and from the Local:1.Data array to the Tags created here.

First we’ll set the reference speed. Here we’ll be sending a raw unscaled value. Refer back to the data table mappings for the DN2 module attached to the drive.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

I’ll need to set a reference speed I’ll just pick a random value to make the drive run. So I’ll set the register speed reference word to 345. This should give a decent visual speed. Next I’ll set the Net Reference and Net Control bits, bits 5 and 6. Without these bits set using these instances the drive will not function. Lastly, I’ll set the run forward bit, bit 0. Once I set the run forward bit the drive begins to run forward.

You can see the status of the drive in the tags I have created for the command and speed reference data coming back from the drive. I’ll leave the Flex module as an exercise. Here is the same data as shown in the PLC5 in RSLogix 5. Again, remember the data table in the PLC5 is INT and the data table in the 1788-CN2DN is DINT

We’ll look at the bulletin 160 drive status first. Looking now at the command and speed reference status tags in the Controller Tags in RSLogix 5000:

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

We’ll see the Running Forward bit, bit 2 of the first word, is set to 1, As well as bits 5 and 6 set, Reference from Net and Control from Net, respectively. After some time we’ll see the At Reference Bit set, Bit 7 of word one In the second word we’ll see the speed of the drive. If, At Reference (bit 7) is set , then the reference speed will match the set control speed. We’ll look at the drive At Reference.

Here we see the same data from RSLogix 5

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Next we’ll look at is the Input from the Photoeye. The other inputs, I’ll leave as an exercise. We’ll see our Aliased tag we crated toggle from 1 to 0 and back again as the Photoeye is triggered. ON: OFF: Here is the same data from the PLC5 Data table for the Photoeye.

ON:

OFF:

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Lastly we’ll look at the Analog Output data table for the 1794-OE4 Module.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN We are using the following data from the 1794-ADN configuration when we set up the modules in the modules configuration tab.

Since we are not using all the data for the 1794-OE4, we will create tags to correspond to the data table below.

So, our output tags will look like the following

I’ll leave creating the tags and setting the delay time for the 1794-IB4 module as an Exercise. I’ll also leave creating tags and monitoring the 1794-ID2 module as an exercise.

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN Here’s the same 1794-OE4 data in RSLogix 5 In Decimal:

In Binary:

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DeviceNet Getting Results. ControlNet to DeviceNet Bridge 1788-CN2DN

Node Address/Status Indicator and Device Failure tables
Other status data of interest available in the 1788-CN2DN module is from the Status Tags is shown in the table below:

In RSLogix 5, this information is also transferred to Data File 12, I set up specifically for the 1788-CN2DN Status.

I Added the Descriptions so that referencing the data would be easier in the Data File A detailed description of this Status table can be found either in the Help in RSLogix 5000 or in publication 1788-IN052C-EN-P.

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