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Integrity Commissioner of Nunavut Commissaire a l'integrite du Nunavut

Hr JC <l"S\<l?n'b"CL\c-Lo-'Jc br\o.. .Do..~r Immimut Agviarutiqaqtailimanirmut Kamisana

REPORT TO THE SPEAKER OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NUNAVUT

CONCERNING THE CONDUCT OF ELECTED MEMBER CATHY TOWTONGIE

This Report is made to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly pursuant to


section 44(1) of the Integrity Act of Nunavut.

This matter arose as a result of concerns of two elected Members of the


Legislative Assembly which were communicated to the Clerk of the Assembly.
The Clerk in turn referred the matter to the Office of the Integrity
Commissioner as the subject matter of the concerns related to the ethical
conduct of an elected Member of the Assembly, Cathy Towtongie.

It should be pointed out that if Members or any other person wish to make a
complaint directly to the Integrity Commissioner, the procedure for doing so is
set out in the Integrity Act, and this procedure requires the Member making a
complaint to set out the complaint in writing (citing the details ofthe conduct
complained of). In addition, the complaint must be accompanied by a sworn
affidavit of the person making the request for a Review setting out the grounds
for the belief that a contravention of the Integrity Act may have occurred.

While this process did not occur in the present case, under section 40 of the
Act, the Integrity Commissioner may on her own initiative conduct a Review. In
this matter, due to the nature of the conduct in question, I have elected to
conduct such a Review.

The circumstances of the conduct involve a possible infraction of s. 10 of the


Act which states as follows:
Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

s. 10 A member shall not use his or her office to seek to


influence a decision made or to be made by another person so as to
further the member's private interest or improperly further another
person's private interest.

The matter concerns a court proceeding which occurred in the constituency of


the Member Towtongie. The court issued a publication ban regarding the
proceedings. Accordingly, I will not disclose the identities of any parties to the
proceedings, the location of the proceedings except in general terms nor the
date of the proceedings. Suffice it to say that the court matter occurred in the
constituency of Cathy Towtongie in the fall of 2018 and Ms. Towtongie was
present at the proceedings.

In conducting this Review, I reviewed the transcript of the legal proceedings in


its entirety, made written requests to Ms. Towtongie and the presiding Justice
regarding the circumstances of the matter and I spoke with each Ms.
Towtongie and the presiding Justice regarding their respective recollections of
the circumstances. While the circumstances of the matter as related by each
are not as clear as one would ideally like in a Review of this nature, it is not
unusual for there to be variations in memory and recollection from separate
individuals.

Ms. Towtongie had met or introduced herself to the presiding Justice the day
prior to the events in question. On the material day, a break occurred in the
proceedings and the Justice entered what I will refer to as the common area
open to the public to obtain a cup of coffee. While not wearing his complete
robe, he was attired in such a manner as to be recognizable as the presiding
Justice. While obtaining coffee he heard Ms. Towntongie make remarks to the
effect that she knew one of the parties to the proceedings and that she
thought well of that person. It is worth noting that the party to the
proceedings referred to by Ms. Towntongie was not a relative of the Member
nor was there any relationship of significance or otherwise between them.

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Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

The Justice recalls that he asked of Ms. Towtongie "Are you speaking to me?".
He further indicated that he advised that if that was the case, namely if Ms.
Towtongie was speaking to him regarding the proceedings which were then in
progress, she should not be doing so. Upon returning to the court proceedings,
the presiding Justice put on the record the nature of the exchange and that he
was disregarding any content of the remarks for the purposes of the legal
proceedings.

In speaking with the Justice he advised me that he had the impression that
Ms. Towtongie was speaking to him or speaking in such a manner that he
would hear her remarks. However he further advised that he did not feel that
Ms. Towntongie was specifically trying to influence the outcome of the
proceedings and that, at the conclusion ofthe brief exchange between them,
he considered the matter to be at an end. The Justice did not take steps to
bring the matter to the attention of myself as Integrity Commissioner.

Ms. Towtongie advised that she was not speaking directly to the Justice nor did
she intend for him to hear or take into account her words, which were,
according to her recollection, that "How could this be. All these facts .. he
works for -------------------" (omitted to maintain confidentiality of the
proceedings). She further advised that she is hard of hearing, did not have her
hearing aids at the time, and that, as a result, it was common for her to speak
her thoughts out loud in such a manner. I find this particular fact regarding the
hearing aids not persuasive in that hearing aids would necessarily affect what
the person wearing them hears, but not necessarily what that person says.

An infraction of section 10 of the Integrity Act, or similar provisions in Acts in


other jurisdictions, is considered a very serious matter. It is for this reason that
I embarked on this Review on my own initiative, without a specific complaint
having been filed.

In circumstances where there is a conflict in evidence, the nature ofthe facts


in disagreement must be carefully examined. In this case the most relevant

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Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

question for consideration is whether the elected Member was speaking


directly to the presiding Judge, or in a manner such that she intended him to
hear the remarks, with an intent to influence the proceedings for the benefit of
a third party. I am influenced by the following in this consideration:

- The presiding Justice inquired "Are you speaking to me?" which


indicates, at least to some degree, that he was uncertain as to whether
the remarks of Ms. Towtongie were specifically directed to him;

The presiding Justice, although putting the circumstances on the record


in court, considered the matter to be at an end. It is possible that in
putting the circumstances on the record, the presiding Justice was
careful to alleviate any concerns that legal counsel or parties directly
involved in the proceedings may have had regarding any verbal
exchange between him and the elected Member, rather than
specifically outlining a concern regarding the conduct of Ms. Towtongie;

Neither the presiding Justice nor any person directly involved in the
court proceedings brought the matter forward to myself as Integrity
Commissioner in the form of a complaint.

In reviewing this matter, and in reviewing decisions regarding improper


influence rendered in other jurisdictions, I am not satisfied that the elected
Member Ms. Towtongie specifically attempted to influence the decision of the
court in these legal proceedings. The evidence recalled by each of the
participants to this conversation is not sufficiently clear to support such a
conclusion. I therefore find that there has been no infraction of section 10 of
the Integrity Act.

However, I can state that the conduct in question of the elected Member
comes perilously close to such an infraction. Elected Members of the
Assembly must be vigilant, conscious and extremely careful of their words and
conduct in situations where these could be interpreted as attempts to

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Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

influence the decisions of those around them. Caution and discretion is always
the better course of conduct.

Where issues have arisen that give concern as to whether there has been a
breach of the Integrity Act by an elected Member or other person governed by
the legislation, I encourage such concerns to be set out in the form of a
complaint to the Integrity Commissioner in the form stipulated in the
legislation.

Katherine R. Peterson, Q.c.

Integrity Commissioner

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ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ
ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᖅ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ

ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᓄᓇᕗᒥ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑏᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᖅ


ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ

ᐅᓇ ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑏᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᒪᓕᒡᓗᒍ ᐃᓚᖓᓂ


ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᖓ 44(1) ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᒪᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᖓ ᓄᓇᕗᒥ.

ᐱᔾᔪᑎᐅᔪᖅ ᓴᖅᑭᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐃᓱᒫᓗᒍᑎᒋᔭᖏᓐᓂᑦ ᒪᕐᕉᒃ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᒃ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᓐᓄᑦ


ᑐᓴᖅᑎᑦᑎᓚᐅᖅᑑᒃ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ. ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑎ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᒐᒥ ᑐᓂᓪᓗᓂᐅᒃ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ
ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᖃᐅᔨᓴᖅᑎᒧᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᒧᑦ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᐅᖃᐅᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐊᒃᑐᐊᓂᖃᕐᒪᑦ
ᐱᑦᑎᐊᕐᓗᓂ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᓯᐊᕆᐊᖃᕐᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᓐᓄᑦ, ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᓪᓗᓂ
ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ, ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ.

ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᓯᓗᖓ ᓇᓕᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᑭᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒡᓗᓂ ᐅᖃᕈᒪᔪᖅ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ


ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᒧᑦ, ᐊᑐᕆᐊᖃᖅᑕᖏᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᖃᖅᑎᑕᐅᔪᑦ ᐃᓗᐊᓂ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ
ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᓂ, ᑖᑦᓱᒪ ᒪᓕᒐᖓ ᐃᒪᐃᓕᐅᕆᐊᖃᖅᑎᑦᓯᔪᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ
ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒃᓴᖅᑐᖅ ᑎᑎᕋᕐᓗᓂ ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒃᓴᕈᑎᖏᑦ (ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕆᓗᓂᒋᑦ ᐃᓗᓕᕆᔭᖏᑦ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ
ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒃᓴᕈᑎᖓᑕ). ᐃᓚᖃᕐᓗᓂ, ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒍᑎᖓᓄᑦ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᐱᖃᓯᐅᔾᔨᓯᒪᔭᕆᐊᖃᖅᑐᑦ ᓱᓕᓂᕋᕈᑎᒥᒃ
ᐊᑎᓕᐅᖅᓯᒪᔪᒥᒃ ᐱᖃᓯᐅᑎᓯᒪᓗᓂ ᑐᒃᓯᕋᕈᑎᒥᒃ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᖁᔨᓗᓂ ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᓯᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖓᑕ ᑐᓐᖓᕕᖓᓂᒃ
ᕿᒥᕐᕈᖁᔨᓂᖓᑕ ᐅᒃᐱᕈᓱᖕᓂᖓᑕ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥᒃ.

ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ ᐱᓕᕆᔾᔪᓯᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᑐᖅᑕᐅᓚᐅᖏᑦᑐᖅ ᐅᓪᓗᒥᒧᑦ ᑕᕝᕙᓂ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᐊᑖᒍᑦ ᐃᓚᖓᓂ


ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᖓᓂ 40 ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥ, ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇ ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᐊᐅᓚᔾᔭᐃᒍᓐᓇᖅᑐᖅ
ᖃᐅᔨᓴᐃᓂᕆᓂᐊᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ. ᐱᔾᔪᑎᐅᔪᒥᒃ, ᐱᓪᓗᒍ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᕆᔭᖓ ᐊᐱᖅᑯᑎᐅᔪᑉ, ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐊᑐᕈᒪᓪᓗᒍ
ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᒪᔭᕋ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓂᐊᕐᓂᕐᓄᑦ.

ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᒪᓕᒡᓗᒍ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᑐᐃᓐᓇᕆᐊᖃᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᓚᖓᓂ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᖓᓂ 10-


ᒥᒃ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥ ᐃᒪᓐᓇ ᐅᖃᖅᓯᒪᔪᒥᒃ:

S. 10 ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᑐᕆᐊᖃᖏᑦᑐᖅ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᓂᕆᔭᒥᓂᒃ ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑎᒋᓗᒍ


ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᔭᕆᐊᖃᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᐊᓯᖓᓄᑦ ᓯᕗᒧᐊᒍᑎᒋᒐᓱᐊᕐᓂᐊᕐᓗᓂᐅᒃ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒃᑐᐊᔪᑦ ᐊᑲᐅᓛᖑᔪᑦ
ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐊᓯᖓᓄᑦ ᐊᑲᐅᓛᖑᔪᒥᒃ ᐱᑎᑦᓯᒐᓱᐊᕐᓗᓂ.

ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ ᐱᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒃᑐᐊᓂᖃᖅᐳᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓂᖃᓚᐅᕐᒪᑕ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᒪᕕᖓᓐᓂ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᐅᑉ.


ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᕕᒃ ᓴᖅᑭᑦᑎᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᒥᒃ ᓴᖅᑭᑦᑎᖁᓇᒋᑦ ᖃᓄᐃᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᓐᓂᕐᒪᖔᑦ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ. ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒻᒪᑦ, ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕆᓂᐊᓐᖏᑕᒃᑲ ᑭᓇᒃᑰᓚᐅᕐᒪᖔᑕ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᖅᑕᐅᔪᑦ, ᓇᓂᓗ

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ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ
ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᖅ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ

ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓐᓂᕐᒪᖔᑕ ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐃᓗᓕᑐᐃᓐᓇᖏᑦ ᑭᓱᑐᐃᓐᓇᕐᒧᑦ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕆᓗᒋᑦ ᐅᓪᓗᖓᓗ


ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔪᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕆᖏᓪᓗᒍ. ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᓈᒻᒪᖕᒪᑦ ᑕᐃᒪᓐᓇ ᐅᖃᕆᐊᒃᓴᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ
ᓂᕆᐊᖅᑕᐅᒪᕕᖓᑕ ᐃᓗᐊᓂ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᐅᑉ ᐅᑭᐊᒃᓵᖓᓂ 2018 ᐊᒻᒪ ᑕᐃᑲᓂ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔪᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᒥᔅ
ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᓇᔫᑎᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ.

ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓪᓗᒍ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ, ᕿᒥᕐᕈᐊᓚᐅᖅᑕᒃᑲ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔪᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑕᐅᕙᓪᓕᐊᖃᑦᑕᖅᑐᑦ


ᐃᓘᓐᓇᓕᒫᖏᑦ, ᑐᒃᓯᕋᓚᐅᖅᑐᖓ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒧᑦ ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒋᔪᒪᓪᓗᒋᒃ
ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᓂᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᑐᓂ ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒋᓚᐅᖅᑖᒃᑲ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒪᓂ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᐅᖃᖁᓪᓗᒋᒃ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᓂ. ᑖᒃᑯᐊ
ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᒃᑐᐊᓂᖃᕋᓗᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᐅᓗᐊᖏᑦᑐᑦ ᐃᓗᓕᕆᔭᖏᑦ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓂᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᖓ
ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᑦᓯᐊᖅᑐᕕᓂᐅᒃᐸᑕ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑦᑐᓂᒃ ᓇᓗᓇᖏᓐᓂᖅᓴᐅᒐᔭᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂᓕ ᐋᓪᓚᐅᖏᑦᑐᖅ
ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᖏᑦ ᐊᔾᔨᒌᖃᑦᑕᖏᒻᒪᑕ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᓯᖏᓐᓂᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᔾᔨᒋᔭᐅᖃᑦᑕᖏᒻᒪᑕ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒐᔪᖕᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ.

ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᑲᑎᖃᑎᖃᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒥᒃ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓂᑦ ᐃᒻᒥᓂᒃ ᑭᓇᐅᓂᕐᒥᓂᒃ ᓇᓗᓇᐃᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ


ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒧᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᒋᐊᓚᐅᓐᖏᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᓱᓕ ᐸᖁᓇᐅᑕᐅᔪᒧᑦ. ᐅᓪᓗᐊᓂ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ,
ᕿᑲᑲᐃᓐᓇᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ ᐃᓯᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐅᐸᒃᑕᐅᓯᒪᕕᐅᒐᔪᒃᑐᒧᑦ ᑭᓇᒃᑯᑐᐃᓐᓇᕐᓄᑦ
ᐅᐸᒃᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᓐᓇᖅᑐᒧᑦ ᑳᐱᑐᕐᕕᖃᕐᕕᖕᒧᑦ. ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᓯᐅᑎᓂᒃ ᐃᓘᓐᓇᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᐊᓐᓄᕌᓂᒃ ᐊᑐᖏᒃᑲᓗᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ,
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᐅᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᓇᓗᓇᕋᓂ. ᑳᐱᑐᕐᓂᐊᖅᑕᒥᓂᒃ ᐱᒐᓱᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑐᓵᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ
ᐅᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᕋᖅᑐᓂᐅᒃ ᐃᓚᖓᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᖅᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᖅᑲᒋᓪᓗᓂᐅᒃ ᑖᓐᓇ ᐃᓄᒃ. ᐊᑲᐅᕗᖅ
ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᓯᒍᒪ ᑖᓐᓇ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᖅᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᐅᑉ ᑕᐃᔭᖓ ᐃᓚᒋᓐᖏᑕᖓ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᖃᓄᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ
ᐊᒃᑐᐊᓂᖃᑎᒌᖏᑦᑑᒃ ᑖᒃᑯᐊᒃ.

ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔪᖅ ᐊᐱᕆᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᒧᑦ “ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒃᐲᓐ?”.


ᐅᖃᐅᑎᒃᑲᓐᓂᖅᑐᓂᐅᒃ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑉᐸᑦ, ᐅᖃᐅᑎᓪᓗᓂᐅᒃ, ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒃᐸᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒧᑦ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᖅᑕᐅᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ, ᑕᐃᒪᐃᓕᐅᕆᐊᖃᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ. ᐅᑎᕋᒥ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᕕᐅᑉ ᐃᓗᐊᓄᑦ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ, ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑎᑦᓯᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᕙᓪᓕᐊᔪᑦ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᔭᐅᕕᖓᓐᓄᑦ
ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒌᒍᑕᐅᖅᑲᐅᔪᖅ ᖃᓄᐃᑦᑑᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓱᖁᑎᒋᓂᐊᖏᓐᓂᕋᖅᑐᒍ ᐃᓗᓕᕆᔭᖏᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᑕᐅᖅᑲᐅᔪᑦ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓂᕆᔭᖓᑕ ᐃᓗᐊᓄᑦ.

ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᓚᐅᖅᑐᒋᓪᓗᓂᐅᒃ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ


ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᑕᐃᒪᓐᓇ ᑐᓵᔭᐅᓂᐊᕋᒥ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ. ᑭᓯᐊᓂᓕ ᐅᖃᒃᑲᓐᓂᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ
ᐃᒃᐱᒍᓱᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᒐᓱᐊᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓂᖓᓂᑦ ᓴᖅᑭᓐᓂᐊᖅᑐᒥᒃ,
ᐱᔭᕇᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒌᖕᓂᕆᐊᕐᔪᒃᑕᖓᑦ, ᐃᓱᒪᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐱᔭᕇᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ. ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ
ᓴᖅᑭᑦᑎᓚᐅᖏᑦᑐᖅ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᕆᔭᐅᑎᓪᓗᖓ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ.

ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᕐᒥᓂᒃ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑐᓵᔭᐅᒐᓱᐊᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᕐᒥᓂᒃ


ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒃᑎᓪᓗᒍ, ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᑕᖏᑦ, ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᖓ ᒪᓕᒡᓗᒍ, “ᖃᓄᕐᓕ
ᑕᐃᒪᐃᓕᕙ. ᐅᑯᐊᕌᓗᐃᑦ ᓇᓗᓇᖏᔾᔪᑏᑦ...ᐃᒃᑯᓄᖓ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑐᖅ−−−−−−−−−−“ (ᐲᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᑖᒃᑯᐊ
ᐃᖅᑲᖅᖅᑐᐃᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑲᓐᖑᓇᖅᑑᑎᖁᓪᓗᒍ). ᐅᖃᓚᐅᕐᒥᔪᖅ ᑐᓯᓚᕐᓂᕐᒥᓂᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᑐᓵᔾᔪᑎᒥᓂᒃ
ᐊᑐᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒪᓂ, ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒻᒪᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᔭᒥᓂᒃ ᓂᓪᓕᐊᖃᑦᑕᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᓂᐱᖃᖅᑐᓂ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑎᓪᓗᒍ.

2
ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ
ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᖅ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ

ᖃᐅᔨᓴᐃᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᖓ ᖃᐅᔨᕙᕋ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐱᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᑐᓵᔾᔪᑎᓕᕆᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑎᒋᓂᐊᖏᓐᓂᓐᓂᒃ


ᐃᓱᒪᓐᓄᑦ ᐃᒪᐃᓐᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᑐᓵᔾᔪᑏᑦ ᑐᓴᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᐊᒃᑐᐃᒐᔭᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐊᑐᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᐅᖃᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᐊᒃᑐᐃᖏᓪᓗᓂ.

ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓚᖓᓂ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᖓ 10-ᒥᒃ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥ, ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ


ᐊᔾᔨᑲᓴᖓᓂᒃ ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕆᔭᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᓯᖏᓐᓂ ᑲᓇᑕᑉ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᕐᓯᒪᓂᖏᑕ ᐃᓗᐊᓂ, ᐊᒃᓱᐊᓗᒃ ᐱᕐᔪᐊᖑᖕᒪᑦ
ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ. ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓂᕐᒥᒃ ᐊᐅᓚᔾᔭᐃᒋᐊᓚᐅᖅᐅᖓ,
ᑐᓂᓯᔪᖃᓚᐅᖅᑎᓐᓇᒍ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔪᒥᒃ ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒍᑕᐅᔪᒥᒃ.

ᑕᐃᒪᓕ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᑕᖃᕐᓂᕐᒥᒃ ᑕᑯᒃᓴᐅᔪᖅᑕᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ, ᐃᓗᓕᕆᔭᖏᑦ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᑦ


ᐊᖏᖃᑎᒌᒍᑎᐅᖏᑦᑐᑦ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓇᒃᑕᐅᑦᑎᐊᕆᐊᖃᖅᐳᑦ ᐅᔾᔨᖅᓱᑦᑎᐊᕐᓗᑎᒃ. ᑕᕝᕙᓂᓕ ᐊᑑᑎᖃᕐᓂᖅᐹᖑᔪᖅ
ᐊᐱᖅᑯᑎ ᐃᓱᒪᒃᓴᖅᓯᐅᕈᑕᐅᔭᕆᐊᖃᖅᑐᖅ ᑖᓐᓇ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᖕᓂᕐᒪᖔᑦ
ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒡᕕᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒋᔭᐅᔪᖅ, ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᖕᓂᕐᒪᖔᑦ ᑐᓵᔭᐅᒐᓱᐊᖅᑐᓂ,
ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑎᒋᓂᐊᕐᕋᒥᐅᒃ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᕕᖕᒥ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑐᕐᓗᒍ ᐱᖓᔪᒋᔭᐅᔪᖅ. ᐃᒪᓐᓇ
ᐅᒃᐱᕈᓱᒃᐳᖓ ᐅᑯᐊ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᓪᓗᒋᑦ:

- ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨ ᐊᐱᕆᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ “ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒃᐲᓐ?” ᑖᓐᓇ ᐅᖃᖅᓯᒪᔪᖅ, ᐃᓚᖓᒍᑦ,


ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᖕᒪᖔᑦ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒧᑦ ᑐᕌᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ;

- ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᐅᔪᖅ, ᐃᓕᓯᓚᐅᕋᓗᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᖃᓄᐃᓕᓂᕆᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔪᖁᑎᖏᑕ ᐃᓗᐊᓄᑦ


ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑎᕕᓂᑦ, ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ ᐱᓕᕆᓂᕆᔭᖓ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᓚᐅᖅᐸᐅᒃ ᐃᓱᓕᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ. ᐃᓕᓯᔪᓐᓇᖅᑐᑦ
ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔪᒧᑦ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᓂᒃ, ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᐅᔪᖅ ᐅᔾᔨᖅᓱᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐃᓱᒫᓗᒍᑎᒃᓴᓂᒃ
ᓴᖅᑭᑦᓯᑦᑕᐃᓕᒪᓪᓗᓂ ᒪᓕᒐᕐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓄᑦ ᐅᕝᕙᓗ ᐃᓚᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᑐᕌᖅᑐᒃᑯᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᓂᕐᒧᑦ
ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒍᓯᒋᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᐅᑉ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂᓕ
ᓇᓗᓇᐃᑐᐃᓐᓇᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓ ᐃᓱᒫᓗᒍᑎᒋᔭᓂ ᐱᓪᓗᒍ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᖓ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏᐅᑉ;

- ᓇᓕᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᔨᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᑭᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᐃᓚᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ


ᓴᖅᑭᑎᑎᓚᐅᖏᑦᑐᑦ ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒍᑎᒥᒃ ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ ᐱᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᒥᒃ ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᕆᔭᐅᑎᓪᓗᖓ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ
ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ.

ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓪᓗᒍ ᑕᒪᓐᓇ ᐱᔾᔪᑕᐅᔪᖅ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᑦ ᓇᓚᒎᖏᑦᑐᖅ


ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᔾᔪᑎᖃᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᕙᒃᑐᑦ ᑲᓇᑕᐅᑉ ᐊᒡᒍᖅᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐊᓂ ᒐᕙᒪᐅᔪᓂ, ᓈᒻᒪᒃᓴᖅᐳᖓ ᑖᓐᓇ
ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᒥᔅ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑕᐅᒐᓱᐊᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᖅᑲᖅᑐᐃᕕᖕᒥ
ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᓂᐊᖅᑐᒧᑦ. ᑕᒪᒃᑯᐊ ᓴᖅᑭᑕᐅᔪᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᐃᓚᓚᐅᖅᑐᓄᑦ ᑖᒃᑯᐊ ᐅᖃᓪᒪᒃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ
ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᓯᓚᐅᖏᒻᒪᑕ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑐᐃᓂᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᓯᔾᔪᑎᒃᓴᕆᓪᓚᕆᖕᒥᒃ. ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒻᒪᑦ ᖃᐅᔨᓴᐃᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᖓ
ᖃᐅᔨᕙᕋ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᑎᓚᐅᖏᓐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᓚᖓᓂ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᖓᓂᒃ 10-ᒥᒃ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ
ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥ.

ᑭᓯᐊᓂᓕ, ᐅᖃᕈᓐᓇᖅᑐᖓ ᕿᒥᕐᕈᓇᒃᑎᓪᓗᖓ ᐸᖁᓇᐅᑕᐅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒃᓱᐊᓗᒃ


ᖃᓂᒃᓴᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᓂᐅᕙᒃᑐᑉ ᑭᒡᓕᖓᓄᑦ. ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑏᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕐᓗᑎᒃ,
ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓇᓱᑦᑎᐊᕆᐊᖃᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐊᒃᓱᐊᓗᒃ ᐅᔾᔨᖅᓱᕐᓗᑎᒃ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕐᓂᒃ ᐊᑐᖅᑕᐅᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐱᐅᓯᕆᔭᖏᓐᓂᒃ
ᑐᑭᓯᔭᐅᓂᕐᓗᒍᓐᓇᖅᑐᒦᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑐᐃᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕈᑕᐅᔭᕆᐊᖃᕐᓂᐊᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᓇᔪᖅᑕᖏᓐᓂ.
ᐅᔾᔨᖅᑐᕐᓂᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓱᒪᖅᓱᕐᓂᖅ ᐱᐅᓯᕆᔭᐅᑦᓯᐊᕐᓗᓂ ᐊᑲᐅᓂᖅᓴᐅᖏᓐᓇᐅᔭᖅᐳᖅ.

3
ᐅᓂᒃᑳᓕᐊᖅ ᑐᕌᖓᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᖅᑎᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᒪᓕᒐᓕᐅᖅᑎᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᖏᑕ
ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᖅᑐᖅ ᐱᓂᐊᕐᓂᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔫᑉ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔫᑉ ᑳᑎ ᑕᐅᑐᓐᖏ

ᑕᐃᒪᓕ ᐃᓱᒫᓗᒍᑎᐅᔪᑦ ᓴᖅᑭᖃᑦᑕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᔪᖃᖅᑐᒋᔭᐅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ


ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᓯᖁᒥᑦᓯᔪᕆᔭᐅᒃᐸᑦ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓂᑦ ᐊᓯᐊ ᒪᓕᒐᖃᖅᑎᑕᐅᔪᖅ
ᐱᖁᔭᕐᔪᐊᑎᒍᑦ, ᑎᓕᐅᕆᕗᖓ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑦᑐᑦ ᐃᓱᒫᓗᒍᑎᐅᔪᑦ ᐋᖅᑭᒡᓯᒪᖃᑦᑕᖁᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐅᓐᓂᕐᓗᒍᑎᐅᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ
ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᖃᐅᔨᓴᖅᑎᒧᑦ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᒧᑦ ᒪᓕᒃᑕᐅᓗᑎᒃ ᒪᓕᒐᕐᓂ ᐊᑐᕆᐊᖃᖅᑐᑦ ᓇᓗᓇᐃᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᑦ

ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑐᖅ,

ᑳᑐᕆᓐ R. ᐲᑕᓴᓐ

ᐃᒻᒥᒧᑦ ᐊᒡᕕᐊᕈᑎᖃᖅᑕᐃᓕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᖃᐅᔨᓴᖅᑎ (ᑲᒥᓴᓇ)

4
Integrity Commissioner of Nunavut Commissaire a l'integrite du Nunavut
Hr JC <l"S\<l?n'b"CL\c-Lo-'Jc br\o.. .Do..~r Immimut Agviarutiqaqtailimanirmut Kamisana

REPORT TO THE SPEAKER OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NUNAVUT

CONCERNING THE CONDUCT OF ELECTED MEMBER CATHY TOWTONGIE

This Report is made to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly pursuant to


section 44(1) of the Integrity Act of Nunavut.

This matter arose as a result of concerns of two elected Members of the


Legislative Assembly which were communicated to the Clerk of the Assembly.
The Clerk in turn referred the matter to the Office of the Integrity
Commissioner as the subject matter of the concerns related to the ethical
conduct of an elected Member of the Assembly, Cathy Towtongie.

It should be pointed out that if Members or any other person wish to make a
complaint directly to the Integrity Commissioner, the procedure for doing so is
set out in the Integrity Act, and this procedure requires the Member making a
complaint to set out the complaint in writing (citing the details ofthe conduct
complained of). In addition, the complaint must be accompanied by a sworn
affidavit of the person making the request for a Review setting out the grounds
for the belief that a contravention of the Integrity Act may have occurred.

While this process did not occur in the present case, under section 40 of the
Act, the Integrity Commissioner may on her own initiative conduct a Review. In
this matter, due to the nature of the conduct in question, I have elected to
conduct such a Review.

The circumstances of the conduct involve a possible infraction of s. 10 of the


Act which states as follows:
Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

s. 10 A member shall not use his or her office to seek to


influence a decision made or to be made by another person so as to
further the member's private interest or improperly further another
person's private interest.

The matter concerns a court proceeding which occurred in the constituency of


the Member Towtongie. The court issued a publication ban regarding the
proceedings. Accordingly, I will not disclose the identities of any parties to the
proceedings, the location of the proceedings except in general terms nor the
date of the proceedings. Suffice it to say that the court matter occurred in the
constituency of Cathy Towtongie in the fall of 2018 and Ms. Towtongie was
present at the proceedings.

In conducting this Review, I reviewed the transcript of the legal proceedings in


its entirety, made written requests to Ms. Towtongie and the presiding Justice
regarding the circumstances of the matter and I spoke with each Ms.
Towtongie and the presiding Justice regarding their respective recollections of
the circumstances. While the circumstances of the matter as related by each
are not as clear as one would ideally like in a Review of this nature, it is not
unusual for there to be variations in memory and recollection from separate
individuals.

Ms. Towtongie had met or introduced herself to the presiding Justice the day
prior to the events in question. On the material day, a break occurred in the
proceedings and the Justice entered what I will refer to as the common area
open to the public to obtain a cup of coffee. While not wearing his complete
robe, he was attired in such a manner as to be recognizable as the presiding
Justice. While obtaining coffee he heard Ms. Towntongie make remarks to the
effect that she knew one of the parties to the proceedings and that she
thought well of that person. It is worth noting that the party to the
proceedings referred to by Ms. Towntongie was not a relative of the Member
nor was there any relationship of significance or otherwise between them.

2
Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

The Justice recalls that he asked of Ms. Towtongie "Are you speaking to me?".
He further indicated that he advised that if that was the case, namely if Ms.
Towtongie was speaking to him regarding the proceedings which were then in
progress, she should not be doing so. Upon returning to the court proceedings,
the presiding Justice put on the record the nature of the exchange and that he
was disregarding any content of the remarks for the purposes of the legal
proceedings.

In speaking with the Justice he advised me that he had the impression that
Ms. Towtongie was speaking to him or speaking in such a manner that he
would hear her remarks. However he further advised that he did not feel that
Ms. Towntongie was specifically trying to influence the outcome of the
proceedings and that, at the conclusion ofthe brief exchange between them,
he considered the matter to be at an end. The Justice did not take steps to
bring the matter to the attention of myself as Integrity Commissioner.

Ms. Towtongie advised that she was not speaking directly to the Justice nor did
she intend for him to hear or take into account her words, which were,
according to her recollection, that "How could this be. All these facts .. he
works for -------------------" (omitted to maintain confidentiality of the
proceedings). She further advised that she is hard of hearing, did not have her
hearing aids at the time, and that, as a result, it was common for her to speak
her thoughts out loud in such a manner. I find this particular fact regarding the
hearing aids not persuasive in that hearing aids would necessarily affect what
the person wearing them hears, but not necessarily what that person says.

An infraction of section 10 of the Integrity Act, or similar provisions in Acts in


other jurisdictions, is considered a very serious matter. It is for this reason that
I embarked on this Review on my own initiative, without a specific complaint
having been filed.

In circumstances where there is a conflict in evidence, the nature ofthe facts


in disagreement must be carefully examined. In this case the most relevant

3
Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

question for consideration is whether the elected Member was speaking


directly to the presiding Judge, or in a manner such that she intended him to
hear the remarks, with an intent to influence the proceedings for the benefit of
a third party. I am influenced by the following in this consideration:

- The presiding Justice inquired "Are you speaking to me?" which


indicates, at least to some degree, that he was uncertain as to whether
the remarks of Ms. Towtongie were specifically directed to him;

The presiding Justice, although putting the circumstances on the record


in court, considered the matter to be at an end. It is possible that in
putting the circumstances on the record, the presiding Justice was
careful to alleviate any concerns that legal counsel or parties directly
involved in the proceedings may have had regarding any verbal
exchange between him and the elected Member, rather than
specifically outlining a concern regarding the conduct of Ms. Towtongie;

Neither the presiding Justice nor any person directly involved in the
court proceedings brought the matter forward to myself as Integrity
Commissioner in the form of a complaint.

In reviewing this matter, and in reviewing decisions regarding improper


influence rendered in other jurisdictions, I am not satisfied that the elected
Member Ms. Towtongie specifically attempted to influence the decision of the
court in these legal proceedings. The evidence recalled by each of the
participants to this conversation is not sufficiently clear to support such a
conclusion. I therefore find that there has been no infraction of section 10 of
the Integrity Act.

However, I can state that the conduct in question of the elected Member
comes perilously close to such an infraction. Elected Members of the
Assembly must be vigilant, conscious and extremely careful of their words and
conduct in situations where these could be interpreted as attempts to

4
Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut
Concerning the Conduct of Elected Member Cathy Towtongie

influence the decisions of those around them. Caution and discretion is always
the better course of conduct.

Where issues have arisen that give concern as to whether there has been a
breach of the Integrity Act by an elected Member or other person governed by
the legislation, I encourage such concerns to be set out in the form of a
complaint to the Integrity Commissioner in the form stipulated in the
legislation.

Katherine R. Peterson, Q.c.

Integrity Commissioner