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Sergey Grodzensky and Tim Harding


Red Letters

The Correspondence Chess Championships of the

Soviet Union

by Sergey G rodzen sky and Tim Harding

Translations from Ru ssian by Ken Neat

With a CD-ROM edited by T im Harding

Chess Mail Ltd., Du blin


First published in 2003
©Tim Harding, Sergey Grodzensky, 2003

The right of Timothy David Harding and Sergey Yakovlevich Grodzensky to be identified
as the joint authors of this work has been asserted under the laws of the Republic of Ireland
and the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, Internet, magnetic tape,
photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher.

ISBN 0953 853659

Published by Chess Mail Ltd., 26 Coolamber Park, Dublin, Ireland

Information about this book is available on the Internet at:


http://www.chessmail.com/sales/redletters .html

CHESS MAIL LIMITED


Editor-in-Chief: Tim Harding

Printed and bound in Ireland by Leinster Leader Ltd., Naas, Co. Kildare
CD Production by Saturn Fulfilment Services Ltd., Dublin.

Roll of Honour

1st USSR CC Ch 1 948- 1 9 5 1 A. Konstantinopolsky


2nd USSR CC Ch 1 95 2- 1 955 P. Atyashev
3rd USSR CC Ch 1 955- 1 95 7 G. Borisenko
P. Dubinin
4th USSR CC Ch 1 957- 1 960 A. Sadomsky
5th USSR CC Ch 1 960- 1 963 G. Borisenko
Ya. Estrin
6th USSR CC Ch 1 963- 1 964 V. Simagin
7th USSR CC Ch 1 965- 1 966 M. Yudovich senior
8th USSR CC Ch 1 967- 1 968 S. Sokolov
9th USSR CC Ch 1 969- 1 970 L. Omelchenko
10th USSR CC Ch 1 97 1 - 1 972 L. Omelchenko
1 1 th USSR CC Ch 1 973- 1 97 5 A. Voitsekh
1 2th USSR CC Ch 1 975-1 977 V. Semenyuk
13th USSR CC Ch 1977- 1 97 8 M. Umansky
14th USSR CC Ch 1 979- 1 980 B. Po stovsky
· 1 5 th USSR CC Ch 1 981-1 983 A. Lipiridi
16th USSR CC Ch 19 83- 1 986 D. Barash
1 7th USSR CC Ch 1986- 1 98 8 I. Kopylov
18th USSR CC Ch 1 988- 1 99 1 V. Yarkov
19th USSR CC Ch 199 1 - 1 993 Yu. Zelinsky
20th USSR CC Ch 1 994- 1 99 8 S. Khlusevich
21st USSR CC Ch 1 998-2002 V. Malinin
Contents
Roll of Honour: the USSR CC Champions 2
List of Photographs/ Acknowledgments 4
Preface by Tim Harding 5
Symbols and Abbreviations 8
Introduction: The Uncrowned Champions 9
1st USSR CC Championship, 1948-51 16
2nd USSR CC Championship, 1952-55 25
3rd USSR CC Championship, 1955-57 32
4th USSR CC Championship, 1957-60 39
5th USSR CC Championship, 1960-63 44
Find the finish (I) 54
6th USSR CC Championship, 1963-64 55
7th USSR CC Championship, 1965-66 63
8th USSR CC Championship, 1967-68 68
9th USSR CC Championship, 1969-70 74
10th USSR CC Championship, 1971-72 79
Miniature Games (I) 84
11th USSR CC Championship, 1973-75 85
12th USSR CC Championship, 1975-77 88
13th USSR CC Championship, 1977-78 94
14th USSR CC Championship, 1979-80 100
15th USSR CC Championship, 1981-83 107
Find the finish (II) 114
16th USSR CC Championship, 1983-86 115
17th USSR CC Championship, 1986-88 120
18th USSR CC Championship, 1988-91 127
19th USSR CC Championship, 1991-93 133
Miniature Games (II) 140
20th USSR CC Championship, 1994-98 141
21st USSR CC Championship, 1998-2002 145
Players & Arbiters in the USSR Championships 151
Solutions to Tactical Finishes · 157
Some Statistics 158
Indexes to openings of games 159
Index to players of games 160
List of photographs

The photographs are to be found in an 8-page art paper section in the centre of the book.

Page i Atyashev, Konstantinopolsky, Igor Kopylov.


Page ii Semenyuk, Zilberberg, Ufimtsev, Yarkov.
Page iii Simagin, Ragozin, Lipiridi, Sanakoev.
Page iv Estrin, Arkhangelsky; Neishtadt, V. Zagorovsky & Dubinin.
Page v Omelchenko, Zelinsky, Lutovinov.
Page vi Khlusevich, Lybin, Yakimenko, Serebriiskiy.
Page vii Umansky (2 photographs), Kosenkov.
Page viii Malinin, Godes, Kitaigorodsky, Grodzensky.

For information about the players see the appendix on pages 1 5 1 - 1 56.
Additional photographs of these and other personalities are on the CD-ROM.

Acknowledgments

During the five years we have worked on this book, countless people have assisted Sergey
and me in collecting games and information about these championships.
A special mention must be made of CC-GM Hermann Heemsoth who gave us the bul­
letins of the 4th Championship and many scrapbooks, in which over long years he had col­
lected press cuttings and manuscript games from numerous USSR correspondence events.
In the early stages, also, we received useful advice from GM Alexander Baburin and from
Michail Melts, who had collected the games of Championships 1 6- 1 9 before he emigrated
to the USA.
Many of the players in the championships were of considerable assistance. In particular,
we wish to mention Mikhail Umansky (who provided the crosstable and all his games from
the 13th Championship), Gennady Nesis and Alik Zilberberg who also provided games.
Sergey particularly wishes to thank the following for their help: Vladimir Filippov, Albert
Latash, Vasily Malinin, Lev Omelchenko, Nikolai Poleshchuk, Grigory Sanakoev, Vladimir
Semenyuk, Anatoly Sychyov, Evgeny Tyulin, and Vladimir Zaitsev.
Additionally, we wish to thank GM Paul Motwani for permission to include his annot­
ations to the Estrin-Sadomsky game from the 5th Championship, originally written by him
fo r 'Chess Mail' magazine. Some of the comments on the early opening moves had to be
cut for reasons of space.
A special mention is due to Ken Neat for his meticulously professional translation and
checking of Sergey's original manuscript, and for suggesting many analytical corrections.
Thanks also go to Philip Penny for his cover design, to Joe Cooke for adapting Philip 's de­
sign for the CD face and to Seamus O'Byme for proof-reading.
Finally, we both wish to thank our families for their support and understanding.
Sergey Grodzensky, Moscow Tim Harding, Dublin
July 2003
Preface by Tim Harding

THIS book is the culmination of many years that they had hundreds, if not thousands, of
research by its two authors, revealing a active players who were the equal of all but
wealth of forgotten chess masterpieces and a the very elite of western masters.
part of chess history which has hitherto been Playing through the games in the month­
unrecorded. This is the story of the Corre­ ly magazine 'Shakhmatny Byulleten' was a
spondence Chess Championships of the So­ revelation. After a few pages of games by
viet Union, many of which were among the famous players in the major international
greatest chess tournaments played by post tournaments, the reader would find a hun­
- stronger, even, than some of the World dred or more games from internal Soviet
Championships. events - quite a few of these played by
Several grandmasters, famous masters post - in which highly original opening
and noted chess writers competed in the 2 1 ideas, deeply-calculated combinations and
USSR C C Finals. Four o f them - Konstan­ fantastic complications often occurred.
tinopolsky, Estrin, Simagin and Yudovich However, this is a history book and
- succeeded in becoming USSR Champion. a practical chess book, not a book about
Yet in most of these events the well-known politics. It is about the 2 1 stories of the 21
names were eclipsed by talented players for championships, and the people who played
whom chess was not their principal career. in them, told principally by a man - my
One of these - Umansky - went on to even colleague, grandmaster Sergey Grodzensky
greater successes; the names of some of the - who was personally involved in some of
others are probably still unknown to most the later championships and knew many of
chess players in the West. the people involved.
Correspondence chess is a form of the
game ideally suited to those who are pre­
vented by career or family responsibilities, What is C C?
by geographical separation, by age or by
health difficulties from competing "over the Correspondence chess (CC) is basically
board" against their peers in normal club the game of chess played between oppo­
and tournament competitions. However, it nents at a distance over a period of weeks,
also has a strong appeal to many players months, even years sometimes. The trans­
for whom research and analysis - the intel­ mission of the moves until comparatively
lectual challenge of chess - is as important, recent times was almost always done by
or more important, than "sporting" elements post, although as early as the 1 9th cen­
like the race to beat the clock in a time tury the telegraph was sometimes used. The
scramble. Such are often the people who terms "correspondence chess" and "postal
become the champions of correspondence chess" have never quite been synonymous
chess. - and they certainly are not today, when
Growing up as a young western chess­ the majority of CC is played by email or on
player in the 1 960s, I soon learned that the World Wide Web servers.
USSR was the greatest chess-playing coun­ CC tournaments began to be played in
try on the planet. Such was the strength in several countries in the last third of the
depth of the Soviet Union' s chess culture 1 9th century. By the 1 930s, a wide range of
postal chess events and even national cham­ pened which was probably unexpected by
pionships and international team matches almost everyone who lived through those
were being played. In the 1 930s the IFSB times. The communist system suddenly
(precursor of today's ICCF) attracted large collapsed and each of the (hitherto only
numbers of European players including such partially self-governing) 'Soviet socialist re­
famous names as Eliskases, Keres, Vidmar publics' soon became an independent state.
and the artist/chess master Marchel Duch­ The political issues involved are no con­
amp. However, at that period the USSR cern of this book, but from a sporting view­
was undergoing major political and socio­ point there was a problem to be resolved,
economic changes and CC players there had which Sergey discusses in the chapter on
fewer opportunities. the 1 9th championship. The Russian chess
The Second World War forced a break federation decided to continue to their end
in the development of international CC ac­ the championships which had begun, even if
tivities. However, but by the late 1 940s the only the preliminaries were under way.
game had become a truly global phenom­ I doubt if they foresaw that 1 1 further
enon, aided by the arrival of affordable air­ years would be required to bring the series
mail. Intercontinental competitions became to its final conclusion. So the player who
feasible at last. Also in the USSR, this form won the 2 1 st and last of the USSR CC
of the game grew very rapidly after the war, Championships probably has the distinction
as Sergey describes in this book. of being the last person to win a Soviet title
in any kind of sporting or cultural activity !

A window on the world


About this book
Once the USSR joined ICCF, hundreds
of chess experts and masters for whom In the case of a co-authored work, read­
foreign travel was probably an impossibil­ ers are entitled to know who did what - at
ity, found the opportunity to exchange a least in a general way, as not everything can
few words (and often postage stamps and be separated. The original idea for the book
chess books too) with westerners, by means was mine and I am also thq person chiefly
of the international correspondence chess responsible for collecting games and notes.
postcard. In the darkest years of the Cold Sergey researched and wrote the 22 main
War, ICCF President Hans-Werner von chapters and any game notes in those chap­
Massow described these cards as his "doves ters that are not credited to somebody else.
of peace" flying around the world. In a few places, I have exercised my pre­
Of the 1 1 World Championship Finals rogative as co-author to make some small
(the 2nd to the 1 2th) that were played with changes and additions.
the participation of USSR players, five were The work of researching the results and
won by representatives of that country: four personal details of the players, and photo­
Russians and one Estonian. graphs, was shared roughly equally between
The great series of USSR CC Champion­ us. The CD was entirely edited by me.
ships became the apex of a large network of I began thinking about this project after I
qualifying tournaments, to which thousands interviewed the 1 2th CC World Champion,
of amateur players in the Soviet Union Grigory Sanakoev, at the ICCF Congress in
aspired. In ICCF events of the 1 970s and Germany, in August 1 996. To the surprise
1 980s, I played games against some of the of both Sergey and myself, the modest Sana­
participants in these championships. koev said that his "greatest correspondence
Then in the early 1 990s something hap- chess achievement so far" was not winning
the World Championship but his second I have been working on collecting and
place in the final of the 6th Soviet Union editing the games for years. Almost 3,000
CC Championship. were played in the finals; we have found
First place was grandmaster Simagin, over 1 ,400 of them of them. Unfortunately
second place was Sanakoev, followed by no bulletins were published of the early
ten masters of sport of the Soviet Union. "A championships (except the 4th), and it is
Master of the Soviet Union", he considered, only from the 1 6th Final onwards that the
perhaps controversially, to be "stronger at games were preserved more or less in full.
chess than an International Master". The selection ofjust over 80 games in the
Sanakoev went on to enumerate some main text of the book was made by Sergey
of those he had outscored in that tourna­ , who has annotated many of them him­
ment. "There were, for example, A. Zaitsev self, often with reference to contemporary
(later FIDE grandmaster), Estrin (who also sources. About half were annotated by one
became CC World Champion), Konstanti­ of the players involved and a small number
nopolsky (grandmaster), Bannik (famous of Sergey' s selection were annotated by me.
master), Sokolsky (famous theoretician) ... ". I also interpolated two reminiscences of
Sanakoev concluded that this was the GM Zilberberg (at the end of the chapter
strongest CC tournament held in the USSR, on the 8th championship) and selected the
and probably in the world" [up to 1 996]. four pages of tactical finishes and miniature
In 1 998 there appeared Bernard Cafferty games which punctuate the main text.
and GM Taimanov's book on the Soviet So in the printed book you have what we
(over-the-board) championships (published believe are the very best games from the
by Cadogan); I enjoyed it, but with one championships, but there are several hun­
regret. They could only give a small selec­ dreds more on the bonus CD-ROM which
tion of games and positions, and the rest readers with computers can enjoy. This CD,
were not easily available, unless a reader which I have edited, has (in various formats)
purchased them in a computer database over 4,500 games from the championships
elsewhere. With the CC championships, and other USSR postal events, of which over
it was even more important to provide the 1, 100 have notes of some kind, some very
games since most of them are not available detailed. The CD also includes Sergey's
anywhere else. original Russian text and numerous photo­
From an early stage, I intended to put the graphs that were not of good enough quality
games on a CD accompanying the book, to include in the printed book.
because in print the number of games that When studying these exciting games,
can be accommodated is of course relatively please remember that almost all of them
small - although we had only 2 1 tourna­ were played by post without the benefit of
ments to cover, compared with 5 8 for Caf­ any computer assistance. Perhaps a few of
ferty and Taimanov. the players in the last two or three champi­
I began by trying to establish the results onships had some access to computer chess
of the championships and going through programs, but they were the exception.
Soviet chess magazines and the ICCF maga­ Likewise the contemporary annotations
zine 'Fernschach' to find as many games as of the players, on which we have drawn
possible. Several crosstables were quickly for many of the notes to games, are from
found in print but others remained elusive the pre-computer era. We have sometimes
for some years. Eventually they were all interpolated a few computer-checked cor­
tracked down so the complete results of rections into the analyses, but kept these to a
these championships are now published, for minimum, preferring to let the players speak
the first time, in this book. for themselves most of the time.
Symbols & Abbreviations

+ check
# checkmate
good move
!! brilliant move
? bad move
?? blunder
!? interesting move
?! dubious move
+- White is winning
± large White advantage
;I; small White advantage
-+ Black is winning
+ large Black advantage
:j: small Black advantage
00 unclear position
/:::,. intending/ threatening/ with the idea
Ch championship
Cht team championship
EU European event
WT World event
Wch world championship
CC correspondence chess
GM grandmaster
CC-IM ICCF International Master
CC-SIM ICCF Senior International Master
CC-GM ICCF Grandmaster
corr correspondence game
FIDE World Chess Federation
OTB over-the-board
OL olympiad
CCOL Correspondence Olympiad
sf semifinal
zt zonal tournament
izt interzonal
ct candidates tournament
tt team tournament
ICCF International Correspondence Chess Federation
(D) see next diagram
w White to play in diagram
B Black to play in diagram
1-0 game ends in a win for White
0-1 game ends in a win for Black
Yz-Yz game ends in a draw
Introduction: the Uncrowned
Champions

THE history of the USSR correspondence consultants, conducted by the St Petersburg


chess championships is unusual. It has no clear city post from April to October 1837. The
beginning and it extended for a good decade game Petroff-Consultants, which began with
after the break-up of the Soviet Union. the moves 1 e4 e5 2 4Jf3 4Jf6, appeared
The official USSR championships began in chess publications right round the world,
to be held in the mid-20th century soon after and soon after it ended its name became es­
the Second World War. But they were pre­ tablished in opening theory as the 'Petroff
ceded by tournaments that also established Defence or Russian Game ' .
the strongest correspondence player in the At the end o f the 1 9th century the strong­
country, and so history has retained the est Russian player was Mikhail Chigorin
names of those who can be regarded as the ( 1 850- 1 908). Perhaps no other strong player
uncrowned champions. It is with a short ac­ paid so much attention to correspondence
count of them that we begin our book. play, with which he was fascinated all his
Correspondence play in Russia has life.
ancient traditions. The first Russian mas­ An event that was a kind of link between
ter Alexander Petroff ( 1 794-1 867) was the first stage of the development of corre­
fascinated by correspondence play and in spondence chess in Russia and the second,
one of his compositions he wrote: "Cor­ Chigorin stage, was the first correspondence
respondence play, it can be said, is real tournament organised in 1 882 by the Mos­
chess playing: blunders cannot happen, and cow publication ' Shakhmatny Zhurnal' . The
you win largely by a better knowledge of tournament, which attracted 1 2 participants,
theory or an unexpected discovery in it". lasted three years. After all the results were
Petroffs superiority over his compatriots in, prizes were received by: 1 . M. Shabelsky
was undisputed, and he was recognised as (Kharkov), E.Tomashevich (Tula), N.Apoll­
the strongest both in over-the-board play, onov (Pskov) and P.Vinogradov (Moscow).
and by correspondence. The following game was played between
It is with the name of the 'Northern two of the prize-winners of this first cor­
Philidor', as Petroff was called by his respondence tournament. The player with
contemporaries, that the earliest known cor­ Black was an outstanding historian, a
respondence game in Russia is associated. professor at Moscow University, Pavel Ga­
This was a game between Petroff and three vrilovich Vinogradov (1 854-1925).
White : M . Shabelsky the queen, since now Black should have
taken the knight, 1 3 .....xf6, and after 1 4
Black : P. Vinogradov ,S'.e l + played 1 4 ... �d8, while i f 1 4 dxc7
..g5 1 5 .l:!'.el+ (or 1 5 .. e2+) 1 5 ... @f8 (or
1 st Russian correspondence 1 5 . . . �d7).
tournament, 1 882-1 883 13 ... �d8 14 dxc7+ �xc7 15 QjdS+ �d8
16 ..xh4+ Qjxh4 17 �xf4 �xf4 18 Qjxf4
King 's Gambit (Muzio QJc6 19 .l:!'. ael Qjg6 (D)
Gambit) C3 7 It would have been better to develop the
bishop with 19 ... �d7.
Notes by Mikh ail Ch igorin

1 e4 e5 2 f4 exf4 3 Qjf3 g5 4 �c4 g4 5 0-0


gxf3 6 ..xf3 ..f6 7 d3 w
This continuation of the attack was
brought into use by St Petersburg players
in 1 877, and a positive defence, such as
that demonstrated in the numerous varia­
tions of the attack with 7 e5, has yet to be
found against it. Zukertort is reverting to the
former defence 6 .....e7.
7...d5
This defence was suggested by Chigorin
in 'Shakhmatny Vestnik' , February 1 878. 20 d4 ,S'.f8 21 d5 QJ as 22 �d3 b6 23
7 ... �h6 is less good, as then there follows b4 QJb7 24 c4 �d7 25 Cbe6+ �xe6 26
8 lLJ c3 ! lLJ e7 9 �xf4 �xf4 10 ..xf4 etc., .l:!'.xe6 .l:!'.c8 27 h4 Cbxh4 28 ,S'.h6 Qjg6
and White gains at least three pawns for the 29 .l:!'.xh7 lLJe7 30 c5 bxc5 31 �a6 Qjd6
piece. 32 �xc8 lLJdxc8 33 bxc5 lLJxdS 34 ,S'.dl
8 exd5 lLJce7 35 .l:!'.xe7 �xe7 36 ,S'.xd5 �e6 37
This is better than taking with the bishop; ,S'.d6+ �es 38 ,S'.a6 ,S'.c8 39 c6 �d5 40
then Black replies 8 ... c6 and 9 ... �e6. 8 ,S'.a5+ �e6 41 ,S'.c5 �d6 42 !:!. xf5 �xc6
exd5 gives a very strong attack in conjunc­ 43 g3 � d6 44 � g2 ,S'.c2+ 45 ,S'.f2 ,S'.c5
tion with the next move 9 QJc3. 46 � h3 1-0
8... �h6 9 QJc3! QJe7 10 lLJe4 ..h4 11 d6 The winner of this first correspondence
Shabelsky considers this to be the strong­ tournament, Mikhail Alexandrovich Shabel­
est move in the given position; we do not sky ( 1 848-1 909) became, as it were, the
share his opinion and suggest 1 1 �d2. A first unofficial champion of Russia. About
game between Shiffers and Chigorin went him it is known that from 1 875 he worked
1 1 �xf4 �xf4 12 ..xf4 ..xf4 1 3 ,S'.xf4 as a doctor in a military medical establish­
f5 14 Qjf6+ @f7. After 1 1 d6 Black's best ment, first in Kharkov, and then from 1 882
reply is l l . .. Qjf5 1 2 dxc7 QJc6 1 3 lLJ c5 in Kiev. After moving to St Petersburg in
lLJ cd4 ·14 ..e4+ �f8 and White cannot 1 899 he served in the Finance Ministry and
now take the f4-pawn. from 1 90 1 until his retirement in 1 907 as
11 ... fS 12 .. h5+ Qjg6 an assay-master. Shabelsky died in Yalta in
Black obviously loses a piece if he takes 1 909, outliving by one year Mikhail Chig­
the queen. orin, with whom he was a close friend and
13 Qjf6+ constant collaborator for more than thirty
It would have been better to capture years.
Shabelsky was the author of many articles
on the history, theory and teaching of chess.
w
After his victory in the first correspondence
tournament he played successfully in other
competitions, but here Mikhail Chigorin
was beyond comparison.
Thus in a competition organised by the
magazine 'Vsemirnoi Illustratsi' (World
Illustrated), which attracted the strongest
correspondence players (it was effectively
a Russian correspondence championship)
Chigorin won 20 games with two draws.
A.Bazarov and I.Dopper, who shared sec­ 19 C2Jf6+ @g7 20 Cll hS+ @g6
ond place, finished 4Yz points behind. If 20 ... @h6 there follows 21 1i¥f8+
Mikhail Ivanovich' s opponent in the fol­ @xh5 22 1iVh8+ @g5 23 '§g7+ @h5 24
lowing game, play�d in that tournament, was 1i¥h7+ @g5 25 f4+ and White wins.
one of the most experienced correspondence 21 Clif4+ @h7 22 ClidS �e6 23 Clixb6
players, Count Nikolai Valerevich Urusov axb6 24 dS �g8 2S � act 1i¥e7
(Novgorod). 25 . . .c5 fails to save the game, as then 26
e5 ! dxe5 27 '§f5+ @h8 28 '§xe5+ @h7
29 � c3 is decisive.
White : M . Chigorin 26 'ii°h3+ 1-0
Possible was 26. . . @g7 27 'ii'c 3+ or
Bla c k : N . U rusov 26 ... @g6 27 � c3.
A major event in the chess life of the
'Vsemirnoi lllustratsi' CC 1 890s was the telegraph match between
Tou rnament, 1 884-1 886 Chigorin and the first world champion Wil­
helm Steinitz, in which the Russian maestro
Evans Gambit C5 1 won both games, prompting the second
world champion Emanuel Lasker to say
1 e4 es 2 Clif3 Clic6 3 �c4 �cs 4 b4 about Chigorin: "In correspondence play he
�xb4 S c3 �cs 6 0-0 d6 7 d4 exd4 8 cxd4 has no equals".
�b6 9 Clic3 CliaS 10 �gs Clie7 At the start of the 20th century, all­
Steinitz against Chigorin (London 1 883) Russian correspondence tournaments
played 10 ... f6. After 1 1 �f4 Clixc4 1 2 were organised by 'Shakhmatny Zhumal'
1iVa4+ 1iVd7 1 3 1iVxc4 1iV f7 14 Clid5 g5 in St Petersburg and by 'Shakhmatnoe
15 �g3 �e6 1 6 1iVa4+ �d7 17 1iVa3 Obozrenie' in Moscow, as well as by Sergey
� c8 1 8 � fel White gradually gained the Mirotvorsky, a resident of Samara� But to
advantage. none of these events was it possible to at­
11 ClldS f6 12 �xf6 gxf6 13 Clixf6+ @fB tract all the strongest players, and therefore
14 l2JgS l2Jg8 none of the winners of these tournaments
After 14 . . . Clixc4 White appears to have can be regarded as an uncrowned champion
nothing better than perpetual check by 1 5 of the country. I should mention only that
�h5 @g7 1 6 '§f7+ @h6 1 7 'ii°h5+. one of the participants in the ' Shakhmatnoe
lS l2Jgxh7+ @g7 16 �xg8 � xh7 17 Obozrenie' tournaments was the future
.:-i:Jxh7 1i¥h4 18 '§13 @xg8 (D) world champion Alexander Alekhine, and
If 1 8 . . . �g4, then 1 9 1i¥f7+ @h8 20 one of the organisers of the tournaments
;i:Jf8 and White wins. from 1 9 1 3 - 1 9 1 6 (through 'Shakhmatny
Vestnik' , which he edited) was his elder A.Manevich - 7Yz; 5. A.Konstantinopolsky
brother Aleksey Alekhine. - 7; 6. K.Vygodchikov - 6Yz; 7. S.Lebedev
During the years of the First World - 6; 8-9. M.Zhudro and I.Rudakovsky - 5;
War chess life came to a standstill, and 10. D.Russo - 4Yz; 1 1 . Kh.Baranov - 4; 12.
correspondence tournaments also ceased. V.Gergenreder - 3Yz; 13. V.Breitman - 3.
In 1 922, through 'Shakhmatny Listok' the The following was the decisive game of
All-Russian Chess Union arranged the first the tournament.
post-Revolutionary era of correspondenc�
tournaments. From 1 925 correspondence
events began to be arranged by the All­ White : V.Ragozin
Union Chess Section.
Although correspondence play spread Black: V. Sozin
throughout the country, for a long time it
did not prove possible to organise a USSR Tournament of masters and
championship. Strong over-the-board play­ 1 st category players, 1 937
ers hardly ever participated in postal events.
On the initiative of the master Alexander English Opening A 28
Konstantinopolsky, in the 1 930s two tourna­
ments of masters and first category players 1 c4 e5 2 l2Jf3 ll'ic6 3 ll'ic3 ll'if6 4 d4 exd4
were held; they can be regarded as the fore­ 5 l2Jxd4 Jtb4 6 Jtg5 h6 7 Jth4 Jtxc3+ 8
runners of the official championships, and bxc3 ll'ie5 (D)
their winners as unofficial champions.
In the first tournament of masters and
first category players ( 1 935-1 936) first
place was shared by Vladislav Silich ( 1 906- w
1 943 ), who was soon to become a USSR
master of sport for his results in over-the­
board events, and Alexander Chistyakov
( 1 9 1 4-?), who scored 9 points out of 12.
The other players finished as follows: 3.
N.Zubarev - 8Yz; 4. A.Konstantinopolsky
- 8; 5-6. K.Vygodchikov & S.Slonim
- 7; 7-8. M.Kamyshov & S.Lebedev - 6; 9.
Kh.Baranov - 5 ; A.Kunits & P.Noskov - 4;
1 2. L.Shamaev - 2Yz; 1 3 . Ya.Rokhlin - 2. This is deemed by the theoreticians to
After the first came a second mas­ be inferior to 8 . . . d6 because of the replies
ter tournament, which attracted an even 9 e3 or 9 f4. But this was established later
stronger field. First prize was won by the (regarding 9 e3 - cf. Botvinnik-Levenfish,
outstanding theoretician Veniamin Sozin 1 2th USSR CC Ch, 1 940; regarding 9 f4
( 1 896- 1 956), after whom a popular varia­ - cf. analysis by the Lvov player I.Appel,
tion of the Sicilian Defence is named. In published in 'Shakhmaty v SSSR' in 1 94 1
this correspondence tournament Sozin took and confirmed in the game Tolush-Furman,
first place with a score of 9Yz out of 1 2. In 1 6th USSR Ch, 1 948).
second place, a point behind, was the future 9 ll'ib5
world correspondence champion (and twice This flank sortie, the patent to which be­
a grandmaster - of both FIDE and ICCF) longs to the Belorussian master Manevich,
Vyacheslav Ragozin ( 1 908-1 962). In the brought him success in earlier correspond­
following places were: 3. V.Silich - 8 ; 4. ence games with Ushakov and the same
Ragozin. The latter decided to tum this 17 ...fS ! 18 exf5 (D)
weapon, with which he himself had been This allows an immediate rout. It could
surprised, against his opponent. White's aim still have been avoided by 1 8 Ue 1 although
is obvious: either to double the pawns after this would hardly have changed the result of
i,xf6, or to force the weakening advance the game after 1 8 . . . fxe4 1 9 fxe4 0-0-0.
... g7-g5.
9... a6 10 'iVd4
Not immediately 10 i,xf6 gxf6 1 1 CL:la3
'iV e7, when White loses a pawn. But now B
it is impossible to prevent the doubling of
the pawns.
10 ... d6 11 i,xf6 gxf6 12 CL:Ja3 c5 !
Ushakov replied 12 . . 1Ve7.
. After 1 3
CL:lc2 Ug8 1 4 e3? Ug4 ! 1 5 f4 CL:lc6 White
had to give up a pawn, but 14 CL:le3 would
have given him a reasonable game.
13 'iVd2 'iVaS 14 'iVb2 i,d7 !
Up till now this is as in the Manevich­
Ragozin game, which continued 1 4 ... i,e6 18 ... Uxg2+ ! 19 �xg2 i,xf3+ 20 @gl
15 e3 b5 16 i,e2 ! b4 17 CL:lc2 0-0 18 cxb4 0-0-0 21 tLJc2
cxb4 1 9 1Vxb4 with material and positional Or 2 1 i,h3 .l:l.g8+ 22 �fl i,xh l and
gains for White. Black wins.
Sozin significantly improves Black's 21.. Ug8+ 22 @f2 'iYd8 !
.

play. A master of deep strategic thinking, he Depriving the opponent of his last hope
justified 14 . . . i,d7 as follows: "This move, of a respite, which he would have retained
in my view, is most in accordance with the after the immediate 22 ... i,xhl 23 CL:le3
demands of the position: by posting his 'iVd8 24 @el 'iVh4+25 'iVf2.
bishop at c6, Black exploits the unfavour­ But now mate is threatened from all
able placing of the white pieces with the sides: 23 CL:le3 'iVh4#; 23 CL:lel 'iVh4+ 24
aim of preparing a direct attack on the white @e3 'iVg5+ 25 @f2 CLJg4+! 26 �xf3
king, on whichever side it castles, and at the 1Ve3+ 27 @g2 CL:lf2#; 23 Uel 'iVh4+ 24
same time secures a completely impregnable @e3 'iVg5+ 25 @f2 'iVd2+ 26 Ue2 CL:ld3+
position for his own king (after ... 0-0-0)". 27 @xf3 'iVf4# or 26 i,e2 CL:ld3+ 27 @fl
15 e4 i,xe2+ 28 Uxe2 'iVf4+ 29 Uf21Vxf2#.
After 15 e3 i,c6 16 f3 Ug8 ! the com­ 23 h4 i,xhl 0-1
binative threat of 1 7 ... U xg2! is hanging The success of these tournaments pre­
over White. In the event of 1 5 0-0-0 b5 ! pared the ground for the staging of official
16 Uxd6 �e7 1 7 Ud2 Uhb8 the enemy USSR championships. And a tournament,
pieces again move swiftly into attacking intended as the 1 st USSR Correspondence
positions. Chess Championship, began in January
15 ... i,c6 16 f3 Ug8 1 940. On 6th February 1 940 the chess and
Beware: . . . Uxg2! - the leitmotif of draughts newspaper '64' announced the
Black's entire play. start of the championship.
17 @f2 At the same time entries were invited
Although clumsy, White tries in this to correspondence tournaments for players
way after 1 8 i,e2 to bring up his h l -rook who had achieved first category in over-the­
to the defence. But it is destined to remain board play or second category in a tourna­
a spectator. ment 'without seeing their opponents' . If it
is remembered that at that time there were This was also the course taken by the
far fewer first category players than there game Kan-Yudovich from the 1 937 USSR
are masters at present, one can imagine how Championship. There after 9 ... QJxd4 1 0
significant were the categories conferred for exd4 Qjf5 1 1 d5 Black got into prolonged
successes in competitions by post. difficulties. Ivashin also goes in for the early
Twenty-two players began the cham­ conceding of the centre, but he associates it
pionship ! None of the subsequent with an original plan, which Dubinin admits
USSR championships attracted such a not to have evaluated properly.
number. Among the part1c1pants were 10 h3
the masters A.Konstantinopolsky (Kiev), As the result of such an insipid reaction,
P.Dubinin (Gorky), G.Veresov (Minsk) White comes under heavy pressure on the
and G.Kasparian (Yerevan), as well as queenside.
S.Lebedev (Leningrad) who had made a 10 ...a6 11 tl:lde2 bS 12 cxbS axbS 13 e4 b4
name for himself in previous competi­ 14 tl:ldS �a6 lS .&rel tl:leS 16 tl:lef4 cS
tions, another contemporary of Chigorin - 17 tl:lxe7+ 'fixe7 18 a3 b3 19 .&r bl 'fid7
K.Rozenkrants, Kh.Baranov, V.Zbandutto, 20 ,&re3 (D)
A.Komarov, A.Mukhin and A.Polkvoi
(all Moscow), A.Ivashin (Kuibyshev),
M.Zhudro (Vitebsk), V.Gergenreder (Bez­
hitsa), D.Russo (Odessa), V.Moskalev B
(Michurinsk), D.Gostishchev (Zaporozhe),
S.Krichevtsov (Vinnitsa), P.Komarov (Ufa),
N.Shesterikov (Saratov), V.Nazarevsky
(Kiev) and N.Sidorov (Kirov).
Information in the chess press about the
course of the play was scanty. Only on 2 1 st
May 1 94 1 (in an issue that turned out to be
one of the last) the newspaper '64' reported
that after 1 6 months' play, out of the 23 1
games, one third - 78 - were finished. The 20 ...c4 ?!
leaders were Moskalev - 7Yz/12, Gostish­ The turning point. 20 . . . tl:lc4!? came into
chev - 7/1 0, Lebedev - 7/1 2; Rozenkrants consideration, and if 2 1 .&r xb3 'fia4 22
- 6Yz/8; Dubinin - 619, A.Komarov - 5 Yz/7, .&rd3 'f;xdl + 23 .&r xdl tl:lxb2. Black is
Veresov - 516, Konstantinopolsky - 1 Yz/2 enticed by a tempting move, which is based,
and Kasparian - Yz/2. however, on an incorrect evaluation of the
position. The battle enters its second phase.
Black's initiative on the queenside is halted,
White : P. Dubinin and his c-pawn, the pride of his position, is
transformed into a source of concern. Play
Black : A .lvashin shifts to the kingside, where White holds all
the trumps. His immediate aim is to provoke
USSR CC Ch 1 940-41 the exchange of the dark-square bishops.
21 �fl tlJc6 22 �d2 �d4 23 QjdS fS ?
English Opening A 2 1 Both the previous move, and especially
this opening of the position, play into
1 c4 eS 2 tl:lc3 d6 3 g3 tl:lc6 4 �g2 g6 S e3 White 's hands. Restraint was necessary
�g7 6 tlJge2 tlJge7 7 0-0 0-0 8 d4 exd4 9 - 23 ... f6 or 23 . . . 'f;a7 .
tl:lxd4 .&rb8 ! 24 �c3 !
It would seem that Black did not foresee veloped by Konstantinopolsky in the years
this sacrifice, as a result of which White before the Second World War.
does not simply exchange bishops, but 11...b4 12 cxb4 cxb4 13 h3 0-0 14 b3 �b7
eliminates the enemy bishop, even though at 15 �b2 l:.ac816 �d3 d517 tl)bd2 dxe4
the cost of the exchange, leaving him with 18 l:,cl! Vi'b8
absolute control of the long diagonal. In a game Konstantinopolsky-P�nov
24 �xe3
•.• from a training tournament (1939) Black
A difficult but forced decision. The c4- played 18 ... Vi'd?, but without success.
pawn would not survive long in the event of 19 l:.xc8 l:.xc8 20 l2Jxe4 exd4 21 i:t:Jeg5
25 l2Jxc3. �c5(D)
25 l2Jxe3 Ve6
The power of the unopposed bishop is il­
lustrated by the variation 25 ... fxe4 26 Vi'd5+
l:.f7 (26 ... Vf7?? 27 i2Jg4 !+-) 27 i2Jg4!. w
26 exf5 gxf5 27 �g2 i2Je7 28 Vi'd4 Vi'g6
29 l:.el
White brings up his last reserve and
Black's resistance crumbles.
29... l:. be830 i2Jd5 i2Jc6 31 i:t:Je7+! 1-0
The audacious knight cannot be touched
by either the rook (31... l:.xe? 32
with mate in three moves), or the knight
(31...lbxe? 32 l:.xe?!).
In 1941, the Soviet Union's sudden 22 l2Jxh7! Vi'f4
involvement in the Second World War The acceptance of the sacrifice would
prevented the championship from being have led to a decisive advantage for White:
finished. Only a few games from the tour­ 22 ... lt:Jxh? 23 �xh?+ @xh7 24 tl)g5+
nament have been preserved. This win by @h6 (24... @g6 25 Vi'g4) 25 l2Jxf7+ etc.
Pyotr Dubinin, an outstanding player and 23 tl)fg5 l2Jxh7 24 �xh7+ @f8 25 �cl
later an ICCF grandmaster, was one of the Vi'h4 26 g3 Vi'h6 27 �f51-0
few to be published. Black resigned in view of 27... Vc6 28
Retained in Konstantinopolsky's records �e4 'iid7 29 Vi'h5.
is the score of one of his games from the The first CC tournament in the USSR
uncompleted USSR CC championship. after the war, in which second category
players competed, began on the 15th of
October 1945.
White: A. Konstantinopolsky Then early in the following year the mag­
azine 'Shakhmaty v SSSR' arranged a spe­
Black: D.Russo cial event for candidate masters. This dou­
ble-rcund event of nine players, the majority
USSR CC Ch 1940-41 of whom subsequently became masters, was
won by A.Ivashin (Kuibyshev), who scored
Ruy Lopez C90 10 points out of 16 and finished half a point
ahead of the second-placed Yakov Estrin.
1 e4 e52 i2Jf3 l2Jc6 3 �b5a6 4 �a4 tl)f6 This completes the pre-history of the
50-0 b56 �b3 d6 7 l:.el �e7 8c3 lba5 USSR correspondence chess champion­
9 c510 d4 Vi'c7 11 a4 ships, and we now move on to the champi­
The theory of this sharp variation was de- onships proper.

CJ)
1 st USSR CC Championship ( 1 948- 1 95 1)

N2 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

1 A.Konstantinopolsky Moscow
..;:,:? 0 I 0 y, 1 l 1 l y, 1 1 1 1 1 y, llYz

2 N.Kopaev Chemovtsy 1 1 Y2 y, y, 0 1 1 y, Y2 y, 1 l 1 1 11

3 V.Simagin Moscow 0 0 0 Yi I I 1 I l 1 1 1 y, 1 1 11

4 A.Sokolsky Lvov 1 y, 1 l 0 I y, l 1 0 1 Y2 Y2 1 1 11
...
Moscow ,..
5 L.Abramov y, y, Y2 0 0 1 l l 1 l 1 Y2 0 l 1 10
Alma-A ta if
6 D.Russo 0 y, 0 l l
\
Y2 Y2 0 Y2 l I l % Yz Y2 8Yz �.
!"'­
7 D.Grechkin Stalingrad 0 l 0 0 0 'h A Y2 1 1 1 0 y, 1 1 'h 8 �

Gorky �
8 A.Gilman 0 0 0 y, 0 Y2 Y2 :�:..\� 1 y, y, 1 l 'h 1 y, 7Yz
·Cri
,,..
9 A.Perfiliev Gorky 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Y2 y, �1 1 y, 1 6

10 A.Shifman Kharkov Y2 Y2 0 0 0 y, 0 Yi 0 ' l 0 1 1 0 1 6


Moscow
11 Ya.Estrin 0 y, 0 1 0 0 0 y, y, 0 nw +! 0 I y, 1 I 6
.E•
]2 A.Ivashin Kuibyshev 0 y, 0 0 0 0 l 0 y, 1 1 IE Yi y, 0 y, SYz

13 V.Zbandutto Moscow 0 0 0 'h y, 0 Yi 0 y, 0 0 Y2 1 1 l SYz


....
.,
14 V.Zhukov Kharkov 0 0 y, 'h l Yi 0 y, 0 0 y, Yi 0 ( y, y, 5

15 S.Poletaev Cheliabinsk 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 0 y, l 0 l 0 y,
;m11 y, 4
±+ .+.L.
16 L.Isaev Moscow Yi 0 0 0 0 Yi Yi 'h 0 0 0 Y2 0 Y2 y, [,!' !+.. 3Yz
First Championship (1948-1951)

THE TRADITION of staging individual players, and for the future world champion
USSR Championships, which were to be­ Yakov Estrin it marked his debut in mas­
come the most prestigious competitions in ter correspondence chess, albeit not a very
the country, was e�tablished in 1 948. All the successful one. It should be mentioned that
USSR Championships have been notable for· the participants also included Vladimir
the tenacious and tense nature of the play, Zbandutto ( 1 904- 1 959), who from 1 93 8
like genuinely competitive events. So that was director of the all-union committee for
the reader should sense this, we will endeav­ correspondence tournaments.
our to communicate not only the results, but Most of the players in the 1 st USSR
also the course of the play. Championship combined over-the-board
All grandmasters and masters were per­ and correspondence play. D.Grechkin had
sonally invited to the l st USSR Champion­ won the championships of the Stalingrad
ship. Six accepted: L.Abramov, V.Simagin, Region, N.Kopaev had no equals in the
A.M. Konstantinopolsky (all Moscow), D. championship of the Chernovits Region,
Grechkin (Stalingrad), N.Kopaev (Chernovt­ and in the late 1 940s A.Sokolsky was first
sy) and A.Sokolsky (Lvov). The remaining in the all-Ukrainian championships and in
participants were included for their successes 1 950 was the winner of a USSR Champion­
in pre-war competitions. ship semi-final.
Of the 1 6 participants, only four had Of the participants in the 1 st USSR CC
played in the uncompleted championship Ch, still alive is Lev Abramov, who in June
before the war, and they represented just 2003 celebrated his 92nd birthday. Abramov
three republics - Russia, Ukraine and Kaza­ became a national master in 1 940. He com­
khstan. Moreover, the honour of Kazakhstan peted successfully in Leningrad Champion­
was defended by the Odessa player D.Russo, ships and, after he moved to Moscow, also
who was living there at that time (apparently in the championships of the capital. After
in political exile). the 1 st USSR Championship he gave up
It is hard to explain the absence from the correspondence play for a long time.
championship of players from Leningrad Lev Abramov was the first representative
and the Baltic Republics, where correspond­ of the Soviet chess organisation in the ICCF
ence play was popular. Before the war the administration, and in 1 959- 1 967 he was
famous Estonian grandmaster Paul Keres elected Vice-President of the International
had become European champion, and in Federation of Correspondence Players. Nev­
1 950 he was the organiser and winner of the ertheless in the late 1 960s he was included
first Estonian Championship. in the Championship of Europe, where he
Even so, participating in the champion­ shared 2nd place, and in 1 979 he was award­
ship were several already very well-known ed the ICCF international master title.
The duties of chief arbiter of the 1 st the all-union sports committee.
USSR Championship were undertaken by The future grandmaster Vladimir Sim­
the master N.Zubarev. He did not have agin, who shared second place, gained a
any direct connection with correspondence striking victory over the well-known organ­
chess, but he was a well-known organiser iser of correspondence competitions.
from pre-war times, and after the war he
headed the chess section of the all-union
committee on matters of physical culture White: V.Simagin
and sport, he developed the USSR chess
stattite and he was considered an expert on Black: V.Zbandutto
qualification matters.
The first to finish in the championship 1 st USSR CC Ch , 1 948-51
was the Abramov-Zbandutto game. The
result - a draw. Then decisive results began Ruy Lopez C61
to come in.
By mid- 1 949 the leading group had been Notes by Vladimir Simagin
established: L.Abramov had 71h out of 9,
D.Grechkin 7 out of 9, V.Simagin 5 out 1 e4 es 2 lt:Jf3 lt:Jc6 3 �bS lt:Jd4
of 6 and A.Konstantinopolsky 31h out of 4. It seems to me that in this variation it is
After the passage of a further year Abram­ hard for Black to equalise.
ov' s chances looked very convincing - 1 0 4 lt:Jxd4 exd4 S 0-0 c6
out of 1 2, while Grechkin, who finished the In my view, 5 ... tt:Je7 is preferable.
tournament with 8 points out of 1 5 , was no 6 �a4 lt:Je7 7 d3
longer among the contenders. There is no point in White playing 7 c3,
By the rules of the tournament, play since the d4-pawn is weak.
continued until 1 January 1 95 1 , after which 7... dS
all the unfinished games were adjudicated, After this White advantageously opens
irrespective of their influence on the final the e-file. However, Black's position is al­
outcome. On New Year's Day 1 95 1 the ready inferior.
tournament arbiter, honoured master of sport 8 ctJd2 g6 9 1:. el �e6 10 lt:Jf3 !
Nikolay Mikhailovich Zubarev, died. At this Beginning an attack on the d4-pawn.
point there were 23 unfinished games, and 10 ... �g7 11 exdS lt:JxdS 12 J:, e4 lt:Jc7
the leaders were Abramov - 1 0 out of 1 4, If 12 ... 'i:Yb6 there could have followed
Simagin - 91h out of 12, Konstantinopolsky 1 3 lt:Jg5.
- 81h out of 1 0, Kopaev - 81h out of 1 2 and 13 �gs 'i:Yd7 14 'i:Yd2 h6 ?
Sokolsky 61h out of 9. This leads to insuperable difficulties.
In his five unfinished games Konstanti­ 14 ... 0-0 should have been played, for exam­
nopolsky was awarded 3 points, which gave ple: 1 5 J:i,h4 f5 1 6 �h6 b5 1 7 �b3 �xb3
him a total of 1 1 1.h.. After the adjudications 1 8 axb3 lt:Je6.
Simagin, Sokolsky and Kopaev finished on lS �f4 0-0-0 16 lt:JeS 'IVe7 17 'IV aS ! gS
1 1 points, while Abramov, who finished Black already has no defence. If
badly, remained on 10. 1 7 ... @b8, then 1 8 lt:Jxg6 fxg6 19 �xc7+
It is notable that the top places were oc­ 'i:Yxc7 20 'i:Yxc7+ �xc7 21 l:, xe6 is pos­
cupied by players who had the master title sible. If 17 ... a6 there follows 1 8 'i:Yb6.
for their results in over-the-board competi­ 18 �g3 fS 19 ctJg6 'i:Yd7
tions. At that time there was no provision If 1 9 ... 'i:Yf7, then 20 �xc7 fxe4 21 �g3
for medals for correspondence play and the 1:. hg8 22 'i:Yxa7 'i:Yxg6 23 �xc6 etc.
winners were merely awarded diplomas of 20 �xc7 ! fxe4 (D)
usual. The move made by Black is also good
w enough to equalise.
12 0-0 {jjd7 13 h3 �xf3
This is better than 13 ... �h5 14 �b5
'iVd6 15 I:\.c l followed by �c6.
14 'iVxf3 {jjf6 15 I:\.fel
This move is directed against the imme­
diate 1 5 ... c5. The correct continuation for
Black was 1 5 ... 'iVb4 16 b3 I:\.fe8 1 7 I:\.acl
c5 . After missing this possibility he ends up
with the inferior game.
15 ... cS ? 16 dxcS bxcS 17 e4 ! dxe4
21 �g3 ! a6 After 17 . . . c4 1 8 exd5 'iVb4 1 9 �fl
Or 21 ...b6 22 'iVa6+ 'iVb7 23 CiJe7+, or I:\.fd8 20 I:\.ac 1 I:\.ac8 21 'iV c3 CiJxd5 22
2 1 .. .'iVf7 22 1Vxa7 'iVxg6 23 �xc6. 'iVxb4 CiJxb4 23 j,xc4 White remains a
22 �xc6 ! pawn up.
The concluding stroke. 18 �xe4 CiJxe4 19 I:\.xe4 'iVb7 20 'iV e2
Neither 22 ...bxc6 23 1Vxa6+ nor 22 ...1Vxc6 The battle in the centre has concluded in
23 {jje7+ is possible. White's favour. His subsequent play should
22 ... jVn 23 �xe4 1-0 be aimed at winning the isolated c5-pawn
The experienced masters who finished by tripling pieces on the c-file followed by
second also had some fine wins to their b2-b4.
credit. Black, assuming that it will not be possi­
ble to defend the pawn, tries to make it hard
for White to exploit his advantage.
White: N.Kopaev 20 ... I:\,ad8 21 I:\.cl I:\.d2 22 'iVxd2 'iVxe4
23 jVaS 'iVb4 241Vxa7 'iVxb2 25 I:\.xcS
Black: A.Perfiliev Thus, White has gained a pawn, but the
win is still difficult.
1 st USSR CC Ch , 1 9 48-51 25... I:\.e8 26 I:\.c4 I:\,el+ 27 �h2 I:\.e2 28
I:\.c8+ �h7 29 'iVxf7 'iVeS+
Queen 's Gambit D59 Not 29 . . . 'iVxa2 30 'iVf5+ g6 3 1 jVd7+
with mate in two moves, or 29 . . . I:\.xf2 30
Notes by Nikolay Kopaev 'iVg8+ @g6 31 I:\.c6+ I:\.f6 32 'iVe8+ �g5
(32 . . . �h7 33 'iVe4+ �g8 34 I:\.c8+) 33
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 {jjc3 {jjf6 4 �gs �e7 5 I:\,c5+ �f4 34 I:\.c4+ �g5 35 I:\.g4+ �f5
e3 0-0 6 {jjf3 h6 7 �h4 b6 36 'iVe4 mate.
This defence to the Queen ' s Gambit In playing 29 . . . 'iVe5+ Black was hoping
was analysed in detail and frequently em­ for 30 g3 ; then 30 ... 'iVf6 ! 3 1 'iVxf6 gxf6
ployed in tournament play by Makogonov and he can hardly lose. However, White had
and Bondarevsky. Here the problem of prepared an interesting reply.
the development of Black' s light-square 30 f4 jVe4 31 jVg8+ �g6 32 fS+ 'iVxfS 33
bishop is solved more quickly than in I:\.c6+ �hS (D)
many other variations of the Queen's It appears that B lack has avoided the
Gambit. dangers and is himself threatening to
8 cxdS {jjxdS 9 �xe7 'iVxe7 10 {jjxdS launch an attack by . . . 'iVf4+, but with a
exdS 11 �d3 �g4 far from obvious combination White de­
1 l . ..�e6 followed by . . . c7-c5 is more cides the game.
This is one of the most original varia­
tions of this opening. White' s position looks
w unusual: a far-advanced pawn at b5 and the
central pawns still on their original squares.
With his pressure on the long diagonal
and possible operations on the queenside,
White 's prospects are by no means worse.
7 e3 cS 8 Qjf3 J®bd6 9 c4 Qjbd7 10 d3
Other development plans are also pos­
sible, for example, 1 0 ll:Jc3, 1 0 d4, or 1 0
J®be2, retaining the option o f developing
the knight at c3 or d2 and of advancing the
34 : cs ! : xg2+ pawn to d3 or d4.
This loses by force, but 34... 'ifxcS 3 5 10...0-0 1 1 J®be2 ifc7 12 Qjbd2 b6 13 0-0
'ift7+ g6 3 6 'iff3+ @gs 3 7 'ifxe2 would J®bb7 14 J®bb2
also have given White a certain win. 14 h3 was more prudent, but already White
3S @xg2 ifxcS 36 'iff7+ g6 37 'iff3+ was intending to sacrifice his h2-pawn.
@gs 38 h4+ @xh4 39 'iff2+ 'ifxf2+ 40 14...dxc4 lS ll:Jxc4 ! ?
@xf2 @h3 41 @gl l-0 White ' s pawn sacrifice was based on
Among the wins gained by the master the following considerations: his knight
Aleksey Sokolsky I should mention the foll­ is ideally placed at c4, he gains the bish­
owing one, where he was successful with op pair and the opening of kingside lines
the opening that bears his name. may give him chances of an attack.
1S... J®bxf3
Here White should have recaptured with
White: A.Sokolsky the bishop, but he is playing for a further
sharpening of the position.
Black: A.Shifman 16 gxf3 ! ? J®bxh2+ 17 @g2 J®bd6
Otherwise there follows 1 8 f4. This is the
1 st USSR CC Ch, 1 9 48-51 point of the capture gxf3 .
18 d4 cxd4
Sokolsk y Opening A 00 This exchange should not have been made.
The white queen immediately comes into play.
Notes by Aleksey Sokolsky 19 'ifxd4 J®bcS 20 'ifh4 J®be7 21 J®bd3 h6
2 l . ..g6 was better. Now White creates
1 b4 e6 2 J®bb2 ll:Jf6 3 bS a6 4 a4 axbS S strong threats on the g-file.
axbS .:g, xal 6 J®bxal dS (D) 22 .:g_ gl ll:JdS ?(D)

w w
This leads to an immediate finish! How­
ever, it was no longer easy to parry the attack.
B
Now the white queen is attacked. Neither
23 �g4 jbf6 nor 23 �e4 tlJ7f6 proves
successful. Only the sacrifice of the queen
leads to the goal.
23 @hl ! 1-0
The capture of the queen allows mate in
three moves.
The list of champions was opened by
Aleksandr Markovich Konstantinopolsky
( 1 9 10-1 990). He was born in 1 9 1 0 in Zhito­ jbg2 0-0 8 0-0 '2:Jc6 9 b3 (after 9 '2:Jxc6
mir (Ukraine). In 1 933 he gained the title of bxc6 1 0 e5 dxe5 ! 1 1 jbxc6 l':t b8 Black
USSR Master of Sport. has adequate counter-chances) 9 ... d5 1 0
Then at Tbilisi in 1 93 7 he shared second jbb2 �a5 1 1 exd5 exd5 1 2 �d3 tlJxd4
place with Ragozin (behind Levenfish) in 1 3 �xd4 jbe6 14 �d3 ! l':t fd8 1 5 '2:Je2
the 1 0th USSR Championship. jba3 (unjustified boldness; for the sake of
At the moment when the title of FIDE gaining the two bishops, Black allows the
international master was established, he was pawns guarding his king to be broken up) 1 6
awarded this title and in 1 983 he became a jbxf6 gxf6 1 7 �d4 �c7 1 8 �xf6 �xc2
grandmaster. In his best years Konstantinop­ 1 9 tlJf4 jbb2 20 �g5+ @h8 2 1 l':t ae l
olsky played against outstanding grandmas­ �c6 22 �h5 l':[ d6 23 l':t e2 with advan­
ters and world champions of different times, tage to White.
and on occasion he defeated them. More in accordance with the spirit of
Among the encounters from the 1 st the opening is slow development by 6 . . . a6
USSR Championship I should like to give 7 jbg2 �c7 8 0-0 jbe7. This was the
Konstantinopolsky' s game with Gilman, course taken by another game of mine with
which he included in his book of memorable Rudakovsky, which occurred that same year
games and annotated in detail. in the Kiev semi-final of the 1 2th USSR
Championship. After 9 �d2! tlJbd7 10 b3
l':t b8! 1 1 jbb2 b5 12 a3 jbb7 a sharp posi­
White: A.Konstantinopolsky tion arose.
6...b6
Black : A. Gilman Black wants to place his bishop at b7 as
soon as possible. However, over the next
1 st USSR CC C h , 1 9 48-51 few moves the fact that it is undefended cre­
ates the combinative motif e4-e5.
Sicilian Defence 880 This forces Black to adopt defensive
measures (. . . a7-a6 and ... �c7), so that
Notes by Aleksand r instead of gaining time he achieves the op­
Konstantinopolsky posite result.
7 jbg2 jb b7 8 0-0 a6
1 e4 cS 2 '2:Jf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 '2:Jxd4 tlJf6 5 If 8 ... jbe7, then 9 e5 ! is already unpleas­
'2:Jc3 d6 6 g3 (D) ant. In the meantime, exploiting the retarded
I have frequently achieved good results development of the enemy pieces, White
by employing this variation. The game immediately embarks on a multi-move com­
Konstantinopolsky-Rudakovsky (Ukrainian bination, the aim of which is to prevent the
Championship, Kiev 1 940) went 6 . . . jbe7 7 black king from castling and to mount an
attack on it. The b7-bishop should have been another piece, came into consideration: 1 4
defended by 8 . . . lbbd7 9 : e l 'i¥b8. lbc6! }bxc6 1 5 'i¥e8+ lbxe8 1 6 : xe8+
9 : el ! 'i¥c7 (D) 'i¥d8 17 : xd8+ �c7 1 8 dxc6 : xd8 1 9
9 . . . }be7 (and now also 9 . . . lbbd7) is }bxd8+ �xd8 2 0 cxd7 �xd7 2 1 }bd5 and
again impossible on account of the same White has the advantage in the endgame.
reply 1 0 e5 ! . - S.G.]
14... �b8 1S b4 �a7 16 a4 : es
The king has migrated to the left flank,
and the first impression is that B lack has
w defended successfully.
True, 1 7 'iVxe8 lbxe8 1 8 : xe8 is not
altogether clear, although in this variation
too Black has a difficult position. I gave
preference to another offensive plan,
based on 1 7 }be3, a move which had
attracted my analytical attention much
earlier.
17 }be3
Impending over Black are some very
10 lLJ dS ! dangerous threats: a4-a5, or lbc6+, or,
This combination, which involves a finally, lbb5+, opening up the approaches
real piece sacrifice, gave rise in subse­ to the king.
quent years to numerous variations on the 17 ... lLJeS
same theme. With the counter-threats of . . . 't¥xc4 or
The acceptance of the sacrifice . . . l2Jeg4, but White had foreseen a convinc­
is forced, since after 1 0 . . . }bxd5 or ing rejoinder.
1 0 . . . lb xd5 1 1 exd5 B lack stands badly. 18 lbc6+ ! lbxc6
But he is hoping that his material advan­ 1 8 . . . }bxc6 or 1 8 ... �a8 was inferior in
tage will enable him gradually to repulse view of 1 9 a5 ! .
the threats and to win. 1 9 dxc6 !bxc6 2 0 as : xe3 !
10 ...exdS 11 exdS+ �d8 Undoubtedly Black finds the most ac­
Even more dangerous was l 1 . . .}be7 1 2 tive defence. The play becomes more
lbf5 l2Jg8 1 3 l2Jxg7+ or 1 3 }bf4. complicated.
[It would appear that in this case there 21 'iVxe3 }bxg2 22 �xg2 dS !
is an immediate win by 1 3 }bg5 ! and if Black defends very resourcefully. There
13 . . .'t¥d7 (or 13 . . . �d8) 14 fbxe7 S.G.]
- was the threat of 23 b5, against which there
12 }bgS lLJ bd7 is now the reply 23 . . . }bc5. Even so, White 's
With the intention of playing the king attack increases in strength.
to a7 and providing it there with a safe 23 bS }bes 24 axb6+ }bxb6
shelter. Not 24 ... 't¥xb6 25 : xa6+ 'i¥xa6 26
13 'i¥e2 �c8 14 c4 ! 'i¥xc5+ 'i¥b6 27 : e7+.
.
1 4 'i¥e8+ 'i¥d8 1 5 'iVxf7 was possible, 2S : xa6+ �b7 26 'i¥a3 : ds !
acquiring a second pawn, but continuing the Parrying the unpleasant 27 : e7 lbd7 28
direct attack on the king seemed more effec­ : xd7 ! 'iVxd7 29 c5. Not 26 ... dxc4 in view
tive. The further course of the game justified of 27 'iVf3+.
this decision. 27 ;g_ e7 l2Jd7 (D)
[A forcing variation, based on exact After 27 ... : d7 the rook mvas1on 28
calculation and involving the sacrifice of : a8 is decisive.
tll c3 e6 6 c5 j,e7 7 b4 tll e4 8 'f/c2 0-0 9
Clio rs
w In the Panov Attack, Yakov Estrin be­
lieved in the strength of White's pawn offen­
sive on the queenside, based on his wedge at
c5. By contrast, Aleksandr Konstantinopol­
sky thought that the centralised knight at e4
supported by the f5-pawn secured Black
more effective counter-chances. And he was
proved right in this critical debate.
10 j,d3 b6 11 l:!. bl j,f6 12 h4
Black' s ... g7-g5 has to be prevented.
28 cxd5 ! 12 ... tll c 6 13 tll e2 a5 14 a3 axb4 15 axb4
28 l:!, xd7 ! ? was tempting, but after the bxc5 16 dxc5 e5 17 0-0 'f/e7 18 j,bS tll d8
strong reply 28 . . . l:!, xd7 !, although Black's 19 j,gS Jtxg5 20 hxg5 f4
position remains dangerous, he has drawing 20 ... tt:Jxg5 2 1 tt:Jxg5 'f/xg5 22 f4 !
chances. Therefore I preferred a more pro­ 21 'f/b3 j,e6 22 tlixe5 (D)
saic, but certain way to win.
28...'f/cS
Preventing 29 d6 and 30 'f/f3+.
29 'f/f3 'f/xb5 30 l:!, a3 rJi;c7 B
30 . . . j,c5 3 1 l:!, b3 leads to the loss of the
queen. Black has no defence.
31 l:!, xfi rJi;d6 32 l:!, xg7 tll e5
Or 32 . . . 'f/xd5 33 l:!, d3 j,d4 34 'f/xd5+
@xd5 35 l:!, g4.
33 'f/f6+ @xd5 34 'f/xe5+ ! 1-0
In 1 966 Konstantinopolsky also received
the title of ICCF international master. As
board three of the USSR team, he won
a gold medal in the 3rd ICCF Olympiad To maintain his centre White goes in for
( 1 958-1961). He was also well known as an exchange sacrifice, but this proves to be
an outstanding trainer. As a correspondence a weak argument.
player Konstantinopolsky gave free rein to 22... tll d2 23 'f/d3 tll xbl 24 l:!, xbl 'f/xg5
his great imagination, and most of the postal 25 tll f3 'f/h5 26 tll ed4 j,g4 ! 27 j,c6
games that he won reached the level of crea­ Black's strong 26th move forced White
tive masterpieces. to seek a clear-cut way to win, because 27
l:!, e l could have been met by 27 . . . l:!, a7 !,
while if 27 l:!. c l l:!, f6 28 l:!. el tll fl with
White: Y. Estrin the threat of 29 ... l:!, h6.
27... tt:Jxc6 28 tlixc6 l:!, ae8 29 b5 l:!, f6 30
Black : A.Konstantinopolsky tll b4 l:!, h6 31 'f/xd5+ 'f/xd5 32 tll xd5
j,xf3 33 gxf3 l:!, e5 34 c6 l:!, xd5 35 c7
1 st USSR CC C h , 1 948-51 l:!, g5+ 36 @fl l:!, c5 0-1
Preserved in my home library is a book
Caro-Kann Defence B 1 4 with an inscription by the author - Aleksandr
Markovich Konstantinopolsky: "To dear
1 e4 c 6 2 d 4 d 5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 c4 tll f6 5 Sergey Yakovlevich - in memory of our
joint composing and correspondence work". Aleksandr Markovich judged his colleague;:
The book was published in 1 985, when by their chess qualifications. When I asked
Aleksandr Markovich had already retired, his opinion about Viktor Baturinsky, who
but in the late 1 960s in the Sports Commit­ had been appointed head of the chess sec­
tee he chaired the correspondence chess and tion, his description was laconic: "a solid
chess composition sections, and at that time candidate master with 30 years of service".
the author of these lines was the executive Because Nikolai Krogius was a grand­
secretary of the commission for composi­ master, "Konsky" approved of his appoint­
tion. In connection with this, my contact ment to the post of head of the adminis­
with the chairman, whom everyone, on ac­ tration. However, he soon realised that a
count of his ultra-long surname, called be­ genuine grandmaster can show himself as
hind his back 'Konsky', was fairly regular. an official to be rather more scathing than a
I was impressed by Aleksandr Marko­ 'solid candidate master'.
vich' s self-discipline and good organisation, Together with Konstantinopolsky I up­
and also by his absolute intolerance of the held the interests of correspondence play­
abuse of alcohol and tobacco. One day I ers in the qualification commission of the
shared with him the idea of organising a USSR Chess Federation, and on occasions
correspondence tournament for composing the two of us would successfully oppose the
enthusiasts who had a high chess rating. remaining members of the commission.
Aleksandr Markovich approved of the idea, I remember how after one of our little
adding jokingly that a problem and study victories Aleksandr Markovich remarked:
composing competition should also be or­ "there it is only worth listening to Polu­
ganised among correspondence players. gayevsky - he is a grandmaster and he
That tournament proved to be a turning understands everything, but as for the garr­
point in my own fate: I began it as a quite ulous executive secretary - he is a fourth
experienced composer of chess problems, category player".
and ended it as a novice correspondence While approving my intention of organ­
player. After this I associated with Konstan­ ising a Mirotvorsky Memorial Tournament,
tinopolsky in my capacity as an official of he added: "don't arrange any tournaments in
the correspondence commission, which in my memory - it takes so much effort just to
the early 1 980s was renamed a Council. write my name".
A prominent feature of "Konsky's" char­ Meticulous, principled, but also capable
acter was that he loved chess in himself, and of scheming - this is how this outstanding
not himself in chess. A painstaking analysis trainer, player, and the winner of the first
of a position afforded him pleasure. Being a USSR Correspondence Championship,
man of diverse interests and quite well edu­ Aleksandr Markovich Konstantinopolsky,
cated (irrespective of any documentation), remains in my memory.
Second Championship
(195 2 - 195 5)

WHILE the first event was being organised was serviceman Pyotr Atyashev, who in the
it had already become clear that the USSR early 50s was based in Baku, the capital of
Championship should be conducted in two Azerbaijan. In his semi-final group Atya­
stages. Invited to the final of the 2nd Cham­ shev took first place with 12lh out of 1 5 ,
pionship were grandmasters, masters and going through the tournament undefeated.
the winners of five semi-final groups that Particular interest was provoked by the
were held at the same time as the first final. participation of Vyacheslav Ragozin, who
Organised simultaneously with the final of already held the title of FIDE international
the 2nd Championship were the semi-finals grandmaster and was therefore considered
of the 3rd Championship, to which were one of the main contenders for victory. An­
admitted all candidate masters, participants other future FIDE international grandmas­
in previous semi-finals who had scored at ter, Leonid Shamkovich, was at that time
least 50%, and prize-winners of tournaments not well known, but without dropping out of
organised by the magazine ' Shakhmaty v the USSR Correspondence Championship in
SSSR' for first category players. 1 954 he became champion of the Russian
When the composition of the final was Federation.
complete, it transpired that the great major­ Play in the 2nd Correspondence Champi­
ity of the participants were Russians. Only onship commenced on 1 st September 1 952.
two - Yefremov (Voroshilovgrad) and Twenty players began the event, but soon
Yevdokimov (Zaporozhe ), who had shared after the start three (the masters Kopaev and
first place in one of the semi-finals - were Lyublinsky and the winner of the one of the
representing the Ukraine, while the mas­ semi-finals, Guskov) dropped out. The chief
ter Aleksey Sokolsky, who had moved to arbiter was V.Zbandutto (Moscow).
Minsk, and A.Shumakher from Gomel were Within a few months a leading group
representing Belorussia. One who had bro­ had emerged, and to general surprise it was
ken through the semi-final qualifying sieve headed by the first category players Atya-
""
0)
2nd USSR CC Championship ( 1 952- 1 955)

N2 l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

1 P.Atyashev B aku Y2 l y, Y2 1 1 y, 1 1 y, 1 y, 1 I 1 I 13

2 P.Dubinin Gorky Y2 1 1 y, 1 0 y, 1 I 1 1 y, 1 1 1 y, 1 2 '/z

3 M.Abroshin S aratov 0 0 !:;' 0 Y2 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 l 1 y, 1 l 10

4 A.Konstantinopolsky Moscow Y2 0 l . y, Y2 Y2 y, l 0 l 1 Y2 y, 1 l y, 10
-
5 Moscow r'• ' Y2 I 0 1 l 1 1
A.Sadomsky Y2 Y2 Y2 y,
... Y2 y, y, y, Y2 10

6 A.Sokolsky Minsk 0 0 0 Y2 y, / 0 y, 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 'h 1 10 �



T:i Y,
Vorosh ilovgrad l
7 V.Yefremov 0 1 Y2 y, l
'"'·
0 Y2 l Y2 y, 1 Y2 0 1 91/z
.s;-
1;,
8 N.Aratovsky Saratov y, y, 0 y, y, y, 0 y, y, 0 I I I I Y2 8'1z i�
9 V.Ragozin Moscow 0 0 1 0 0 0 I l ..• l/2 Y2 1 0 1 y, Y2 I 8

Moscow 1 1 l 1
10 L.Shamkovich 0 0 0 0 Y2 y, y, J 0 I 0 1 0 7Y,
Gorky v <
1 1 L.Sitsky Y2 0 0 0 y, 0 0 Y2 y, 1 .... 0 Y2 y, Y2 1 1 6'/i

·
·
12 K. Yevdokimov Zaporozhie 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 1 0 0 1 0 1 y, 1 1 6
13 A.Makovkin Gorky y, y, 0 y, 0 0 Yi 0 1 0 Yi 1 y, 0 1 0 6
Kuibyshev y,
14 Yu.Shaposhnikov 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 0 1 y, 0 i 1 y, I 5
,.
Moscow 0 "'
15 V.Zaitsev 0 0 Y2 0 0 0 y, 0 Y2 0 y, y, 1 .. y, Y2 41/z
Zheleznovodsk ,.,
16 S.Tanin 0 0 0 0 y, Y2 1 0 Y2 0 0 0 0 y, y, hf·· ··· 1 4Y,
. .. .
Gome I 1 1 .
17 A.Shumakher 0 y, 0 Y2 Y2 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 41/z
shev - 3 Yz out of 4 and Sadomsky - 3 out shared first place with A.Shumakher, both
of 4. scoring 1 1 Yz out of 1 5 . Simultaneously
By the end of 1 953 it transpired that with his participation in the final of the 2nd
things were going excellently for FIDE in­ Championship, Zaitsev decided to play in
ternational master Dubinin - 8 out of 9 and the semi-final of the 3rd, after taking on the
grandmaster Ragozin - 4 out of 5. Sadom­ duties of chief administrator.
sky continued to do quite well - 6 out of 8, The great success of Pyotr Atyashev,
while Atyashev was still on 3 Yz out of 4. who also went through the final undefeated,
By the summer of 1 954 the situation was the main sensation of the tournament.
seemed totally confused. Dubinin, who had
reduced speed somewhat, was on 9 out of
12, Sadomsky had 8Yz out of 12, Yefremov White : P.Atyashev
- 8 out of 1 2 and Atyashev - 7 out of 9. As
in the 1 st Championship, Alexander Kon­ Black: Yu .Shaposhnikov
stantinopolsky completed his games more
slowly than his rivals, and had scored 4 out 2nd USSR CC Ch , 1 95 2-55
of 5 . It was decided to extend the champion­
ship to 1 st November 1 954. Ruy Lopez C82
When the allotted time expired, 22 out
of the 136 games remained unfinished and Notes by Pyotr Atyashev
the group of contenders for the champion' s
title looked like this: Dubinin - l OYz out of 1 e4 e5 2 Qjf3 CL:Jc6 3 �b5 a6 4 �a4 CLJf6
14, Abroshin - 10 out of 16 (tournament 5 0-0 CL:Jxe4 6 d4 b5 7 �b3 d5 8 dxe5 �e6
completed), Sadomsky - 9Yz out of 14, Ye­ 9 c3 �cs 10 CLJbd2 0-0 11 �c2 CL:Jxf2 12
fremov - 8Yz out of 1 3 , Konstantinopolsky .:!. xf2 f6 13 exf6 !
- 8Yz out of 14, Atyashev - 8 out of 1 0 and Undoubtedly the strongest continuation.
Sokolsky - 7Yz out of 1 1 . If 1 3 ... e2, then after 1 3 ... fxe5 14 QJb3
The adjudications arranged everyone in �xf2+ 1 5 ...xf2 �g4! Black has good
their place. The battle for the championship counter-chances.
was led by Dubinin and Atyashev. The two 13... �xf2+
Pyotrs were slightly ahead of their pursuers In the game Smyslov-Botvinnik (Moscow
and when the final results of the champion­ Championship 1 943) 1 3 . . ....xf6 was played,
ship were drawn up it transpired that the but after 14 ...fl! �g4 1 5 @hl �xf2 1 6
champion's title had gone to the one with ...xf2 .:!. ae8 1 7 ...g3 CL:Je5 1 8 �dl QJd3
the less senior chess title. 19 h3 ! Smyslov gained the advantage.
On this occasion the future ICCF World True, Black could have played 1 8 . . .h5,
Champion Vyacheslav Ragozin was unable and if 1 9 h4 - 1 9 . . . QJd3 , but, as shown by
to adapt to games with invisible opponents, Keres in his book 'Teoriya Shakhmatnykh
he played somewhat recklessly and he fin­ Debyutov' (Theory of Chess Openings),
ished in the very middle of the table with a White could have most easily consolidated
score of 8 out of 16. his advantage with 1 5 h3 ! , in order after
Aleksandr Konstantinopolsky was also 1 5 . . . �h5 to continue 1 6 ...d3 , while if
unable to repeat his success and had to be i 5 . . . �xf3 1 6 CL:Jxf3 CL:Je5, then 1 7 CLJd4.
satisfied with a share of 3rd place with the It should also be mentioned that 15 ...d3
master Sokolsky and the successful debu­ cannot be recommended for White in view
tants Abroshin and Sadomsky. of 1 5 . . . �xf2+ 1 6 @xf2 ...h4+ 17 @gl
In the semi-final of the 2nd Champion­ ...h5, when Black's position is preferable.
ship the ICCF international master V.Zaitsev 14 @xf2 ...xf6 15 @gl g5 (D)
when he devised his combination.
24... �xh6 25 .l: xdl 1-0
w Pyotr lvanovich Atyashev ( 1 9 1 8- 1 984)
learned to play chess in 1 934, when he was
already 1 6 years old. At an early age he
enlisted in the army and due to the nature
of his work he was unable to play much
in tournaments. His fascination with chess
took the form of collecting chess mas­
terpieces, which he lovingly transcribed.
This work by the officer from Baku was
described in the first post-war year of the
16 'iVel ! magazine 'Shakhmaty v SSSR', 1 946, No.3
The only way! The manoeuvre of the (P.Romanovsky: 'The manuscript of Cap­
queen to g3 discloses the drawbacks to tain Atyashev').
Black' s plan. 1 6 lll b3 would have been a In two thick, bulky, 3 50-page exercise
mistake, since after 1 6 . . .g4 Black's attack books in small, copy-book handwriting
could have become dangerous, for exam­ (without a single correction) more than 200
ple: 1 7 'iVd3 .l: f7 1 8 �g5 'iVg7 1 9 tll fd4 games with detailed notes were recorded.
tll xd4 20 tll xd4 'iVxg5 2 1 tll xe6 'iVf6 ! . The manuscript was also accompanied by
16... .l: ae8 chess diagrams and portraits of the stars
[The immediate 16 ... g4 !? came into con­ from the past.
sideration, with the possible variation 1 7 "Only a highly cultured player could
'iVg3 (dangerous i s 1 7 lll g 5 �f5 1 8 �xf5 have so well and so lovingly produced this
'iVxf5 1 9 'iVe6+ �h8 20 'iVxf5 .l: xf5 with difficult material, as Captain Atyashev was
the better chances for Black; the recom­ able to", wrote international master and in­
mended 1 8 �b3 is also dubious in view of ternational arbiter Pyotr Romanovsky.
1 8 . . . .l: ad8 1 9 lll ge4 'iVe6 20 'iVe2 .l: fe8, For his victory in the USSR Correspond­
when White faces a gruelling struggle for ence Championship, it was decided by a
equality) 1 7 . . . 'iVg7 1 8 lll e l b4. - S.G.] special decision of the All-Union Sports
17 'i¥g3 g4 18 h3 Committee that Atyashev, who finished
[Nothing would have been achieved by 1 8 ahead of grandmaster Ragozin and a whole
'iVxc7?! �f5 ! 1 9 �xf5 'iVxf5, when White cohort of strong masters, should be awarded
does best to return his queen to its former the rank of candidate master. After retiring
square by 20 'iVg3, since after 20 'iVxc6? with the title of Engineer-Colonel, Atyashev
.l: e l + 2 1 @f2 'iVe5 22 'iVxd5+ (other­ settled in Moscow but hardly ever took part
wise things are completely bad for him) in competitions. However, when in 1 958
22 . . . 'iVxd5 23 �xe l gxf3 he clearly does the USSR made its debut in the World Cor­
not have enough for the queen. - S.G.] respondence Olympiad, the former USSR
18 ...'i¥g7 19 hxg4 �xg4 20 tll h2 �dl Champion was included in the team which
Black embarks on a faulty combination, won the gold medals. Atyashev's result was
which loses quickly. However, also after 5 points out of 9 on board five.
other bishop moves White, after exchanging In the history of correspondence chess,
queens, could have gradually converted his Pyotr lvanovich Atyashev went down as the
advantage. winner of the 2nd USSR Correspondence
21 'iVxg7+ @xg7 22 �xdl .l: el+ 23 Championship.
tll dfl ! .l: xdl 24 �h6+ ! Among the games of Pyotr Dubinin, who
This simple move was missed by Black, on this occasion finished second, I should
like to single out his encounter with the fu­ 14 ...h5 ! ?
ture well-known FIDE grandmaster Leonid A clever reply! Now Black begills to dic­
Shamkovich. tate his conditions to the opponent.
15 g5 l2Jxd5 16 exd5 j,f5 17 j,e4
White goes onto the defensive.
White: P.Dubinin 17... j,xe4 18 Vxe4 lbb8 19 c3 l::l, c4 20
Vi'd3 ctJd7 21 j,e3 Vc8 22 0-0-0 0-0 23
Black : L .Shamkovich �bl Vi'b7 24 l:! hfl a5 25 @a2 l:! b8 26
l:! cl l2Jc5 27 j,xc5 l:! xc5 28 l:! fdl b4 29
2nd USSR CC Ch, 1 9 52-55 cxb4 l:! xcl 30 l:! xcl axb4 31 a4 ! b3+ 32
�bl l:! a8 33 l:! c4 �h7 ?! (D)
Sicilian Defence 89 1 Black plans 34 . . . e6 35 dxe6 d5 ! , but
Dubinin resolutely suppresses this attempt.
1 e4 c5 2 l2Jf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 l2Jxd4 ctJf6 5 Meanwhile Shamkovich had available the
lbc3 a6 6 g3 j,g4 7 Vi'd3 interesting continuation 33 . . . l::l, a5 34 l2Jc3
The usual continuation here is 7 f3 j,d7 Vi'a6, when White' s position is restricted.
8 j,e3 lbc6 9 j,g2 g6 10 0-0 j,g7 1 1
l2Jd5 0-0 1 2 a4 with a minimal advantage
for White. Dubinin follows the fashion of
that time. 7 Vi'd3 occurred in the game Re­ w
shevsky-Najdorf, Amsterdam 1 950.
7...lbc6 8 h3
The afore-mentioned game went 8 ct:lxc6
bxc6 9 j,g2 e5 10 f4 j,d7 1 1 h3 j,e7 1 2
g4 0-0 1 3 f5 d 5 with unclear play.
8... j,d7 9 j,g2 g6 10 lbde2 j,g7 11 f4
l:! c8
The plans of the two sides have taken
shape. As happens almost always in the
Sicilian Defence, White is attacking on the 34 f5 !
kingside, and Black on the queenside. It is a The picture changes, as White launches a
question of who gets there first. counter-attack.
12 a3 b5 13 g4 j,e6 (D) 34 ... Vi'b6 35 lbd4 l:! a5 36 lbxb3 Vi'gl+
37 �a2 Vi'g2
Threatening 38 ...Vxb2 mate.
38 f6 ! l::l, xd5 39 Vc3 j,h8
w Not 39 ... exf6 40 gxf6 j,f8 41 l::l, c8
@g8 42 l::l, xf8+ with inevitable mate in a
few moves.
40 l::l, c8 exf6 41 l::l, f8 ! 1-0
After 4 1 . . .Vi'xg5 42 l::l, xf7+ j,g7
43 Vc7 Vi'h6 44 a5 Black's position is
completely hopeless. He cannot . stop the
a-pawn.
Four players shared third place, and they
included the first USSR Champion, who
14 ctJd5 defeated the future World Champion in fine
Otherwise Black will play 14 . . . j,c4. style.
White: A. Konstantinopolsky 20 ...'iffS 21 l:, cS tt:Jes
2 1 ... 'ifxc5 22 dxc5 l:. xd 1+ came into
Black: V. Ragozin consideration, although in this case too after
23 �h2 l:, d5 24 'ifxf6 l:, xc5 25 tt:Jg5
2nd USSR C C Ch, 1 9 5 2 - 5 5 Black's defence becomes increasingly dif­
ficult with every move.
Queen 's Gambit Accepted 22 tt:JxeS fxeS (D)
D26

1 d4 dS 2 c4 dxc4 3 t2Jf3 tL'if6 4 e3 e6 S


Jtxc4 cS 6 t2Jc3 Jte7 7 0-0 cxd4 w
The theme of this game will be a debate
about the strength and weakness of the iso­
lated d4-pawn. This debate has not ceased
since the time of the first official match for
the world championship (1 886) .
8 exd4 a 6 9 'if e2 b S 10 Jtb3 0-0 1 1 JtgS !
b4 (D)
The alternative l l . . . tL'ibd7 1 2 l:. fe l Jtb7
( l 2 . . .b4 13 t2Jd5 ! ) 13 d5 ! t2Jxd5 1 4 Jtxd5
Jtxd5 1 5 Jtxe7 Jtxf3 16 Jtxd8 Jtxe2 1 7 23 'ifcl 1-0
Jte7 l:, fe8 1 8 l:, xe2 l:, xe7 1 9 t2Jd5 l:, ee8 Black resigned in view of the forced vari­
20 tt:Jc7 is clearly in White' s favour. ation 23 ... l:, xc5 24 dxc5 l:, xdl+ 25 'ifxd l
'ife4 26 'if cl 'ifc6 27 'if g5+ �f8 28
'ifxe5 and then h4-h5 .

w
White: A.Sokolsky

Black: L .Shamkovich

2 n d USSR C C C h , 1 9 5 2 - 5 5

Grunfeld Defence D87

Notes by Aleksey Sokolsky


12 Jtxf6 ! Jtxf6 13 t2Je4 Jth7 14 l:, fdl
Jtds 1 d4 tL'if6 2 c4 g6 3 tL'ic3 dS 4 cxdS tL'ixdS S
1 4 ... tL'id7 1 5 d5 ! . e4 tt:Jxc3 6 bxc3 cS 7 Jtc4 Jtg7 8 tL'ie2 0-0
lS t2Jxf6+ gxf6 9 0-0 tL'ic6 10 Jte3 'ifc7
The doubling of the pawns is forced, 1 0 . . .cxd4 1 1 cxd4 Jtg4 1 2 f3 l2Ja5 is
�ince after 1 5 ... 'ifxf6 16 l:, ac l it is difficult usually played. Shamkovich chooses a new
for Black to develop his knight on b8. continuation. Black's idea is not to open the
16 l:, acl t2Jc6 17 JtxdS 'ifxdS 18 'ifd2 c-file, which can be used by White, but to
l:. fd8 19 'ifh6 l:. ac8 20 h4 ! continue the pressure on the pawn centre.
Not 20 'ifxf6? t2Jxd4! 2 1 tt:Jg5 'iff5 ! or Now 1 1 dxc5 is bad in view of l l . . . tL'ie5 1 2
2 1 tL'ie5 l:, xc l ! 22 l:, xc l t2Je2+ 23 �fl Jtb3 l2Jg4.
tt:Jxcl 24 'ifxf7+ with a draw. 11 l:. cl Jtd7 12 f4 e6
White was threatening to launch an of­ the c-file gives him counter-chances. White
fensive with 1 3 f5 ! . Even so, as the course therefore decides to sacrifice a pawn, to
of the game shows, the pawn sacrifice is block the c-file.
faulty. 1 2 . . . tba5 followed by ... f7-f5 was 30 c4 ! bxc4 31 �xc6 : bxc6 32 tlJf3 h6
correct. The best chance. 32 ... c3 33 tlJd4 �f7
13 dxcS tlJaS 14 �b3 : fe8 34 tt:Jxc6 : xc6 35 �d3 etc. was bad for
Preparing 1 5 ... �f8. 14 ... : fd8 was Black, while if 32 ... : e8 there follows 33
weaker on account of 15 �d6 : ac8 1 6 tlJd4 : a6 (33 ... : cs 34 d7) 34 : xc4 and
: cd l � f8 1 7 �xc7 : xc7 1 8 f5 ! exf5 1 9 then : c7, winning easily. [In. my view,
exf5 gxf5 2 0 : xf5 . after 34 . . . : a3+ 35 tlJb3 : ds the win for
lS �d6 ! : ac8 16 : rdl �c6 17 eS bS White would still have been a long way off
18 �xc7 - S.G.]
If 1 8 cxb6 Black could have replied 33 tlJd4 : a6 (D)
1 8 ... �b7 ! , gaining counterplay on the light
squares.
18 ... : xc7 19 : d6 �f8 20 tlJd4 ! (D)
A positional exchange sacrifice. After its w
acceptance the strong, protected d6-pawn
will be more than sufficient compensation.

If now White takes the e6-pawn, then


after 34 tt:Jxe6 : a3+ 35 �f2 : xa2+ 36
�g3 : a3+ 37 �h4 �f7 3 8 d7 : gs ! 39
dStlJ+ �e7 the chances are with Black.
However, by sacrificing his rook, White
wms.
20 ... �d7 21 �f2 �xd6 22 cxd6 : b7 23 34 : xc4 ! : a3+
�dl tbc4 24 �f3 : b6 2S tlJb3 tt:Jxe3 26 The main variation 34... : xc4 35 d7 !
�xe3 : c8 27 tlJd2 rs : xd4! 36 �xd4 : a4+ 37 �c5 : as+ 38
A clever defence. Black could not allow �d6 �f7! 39 d8� : ds+ 40 �c7 : xd8
the manoeuvre of the white knight to f6. 4 1 �xd8 would have led to a pawn ending
Of course, it is unfavourable for White to in which, despite the material equality, the
capture en passant, since then he loses his strong position of the white king would have
d6-pawn. decided the outcome.
28 g4 � c6 29 gxfS gxfS 3S tlJb3 1-0
At first sight Black has defended against [It would seem that Black conceded de­
the threats and does not stand badly. Both in feat prematurely. After 35 ... : d8 !, it would
the event of 30 ttJ b3 �xf3 3 1 �xf3 : bc6 still have demanded considerable efforts by
and after 30 �xc6 : bxc6 his pressure on White to reach his goal. S.G.]
-

3rd USSR CC Championship ( 1 955- 1 957)

N2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 G.Borisenko Leningrad . l Y2 Yz 1 1 0 1 l 1h 1 Yz 1 9
"'' .,.
2 P.Dubinin Gorky 0 bf•..• ..• , •• +; Yz 0 1 1 1 1 1 Yz 1 1 1 9
3 V.Zagorovsky Voronezh Yz Yz t��:li Yz Yz Y2 1 0 1 1 Yz Yz 1 71h.
4 M.Abramson Simferopol Yz 1 Yz ' 1h Yz 0 Y2 Yz 1 Y2 Yz 1 7
Moscow �
5 A.Konstantinopolsky 0 0 Yz Y2 ·· · 1 Yz 1 Yz Y2 Yz l l 7 Q...

6 M.Abroshin Saratov 0 0 Yz Y2 0 �ll[ !iil� 1 Yz Yz 1 1 1 Yz 6 1h. �


....

7 I.Veltmander Izhevsk 1 0 0 1 Y2 0 1fi t'·m 1 0 11:z 1 1 Yz 6 1h. �



.....
8 Yu.Shaposhnikov Kuibyshev 0 0 1 Yz 0 Y2 0 0 1 1 1 Y2 51h.
\5·••·•..J. •

9 V.Bibikov Moscow 0 0 0 Yz Y2 Yz 1 1 0 Y2 0 1 5
..,.
1 0 A.Sadomsky Moscow Yz Yz 0 0 Yz 0 1h 0 1 Y2 Y2 1 5
1 1 N.Aratovsky Saratov 0 0 Yz Y2 Yz 0 0 0 Y2 Yz I 1 41h.
Ivanovo le?
1 2 G.Lapin Yz 0 Yz Y2 0 0 0 0 1 Y2 0 Yz 31h.
Stalingrad ••••••
1 3 D.Grechkin 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 Yz Y2 0 0 0 Y2 . 2

N.Kozlov (Vyska) and Y. Zhdarsky (Bugulma) withdrew; their games were cancelled.
Third Championship (1955-1957)

THE FINAL of the Third Championship first began playing in correspondence


was preceded by a tough struggle in the events.
semi-final groups, which included some Vladimir Zagorovsky became a USSR
subsequently well-known masters, and master of sport in 1 948, three years later
among the participants we meet the names won the USSR Armed Forces Champion­
of two well-known organisers - the future ship, and in 1 952 became Moscow Cham­
director of Soviet correspondence players pion. As Professor Zagorovsky recalls, in
Yakov Eventov (ICCF Vice-President) and 1 952 he was elected on to the Presidium
Boris Rozinov, an outstanding organiser of of the All-Union Chess Section, where he
correspondence tournaments. was entrusted with the ' curatorship' of corr­
Fifteen players - masters and the winners espondence players. In 1 954 Zagorovsky
of the semi-finals - were admitted into the moved from Moscow to Voronezh and
final of the 3rd USSR Championship. But decided to try his hand at playing against
only thirteen reached the finish - Kozlov his 'wards' .
from Vyksa and Zhdyarsky from Bugulma On this occasion the championship was
dropped out in mid-tournament, unable to even more Russian than the previous ones.
withstand the tension. The tournament arbi­ Among the 1 3 players in the final table,
ter, who on this occasion too was Vladimir the only non-Russian representative was
Zbandutto, decided to exclude them and to Abramson from Simferopol, who had be­
discount the results of the games they had come a Ukrainian resident. (The town of
finished. Simferopol was the capital of the Crimean
For the sake of historical accuracy, I Republic, which in 1 954, in honour of
should mention that Kozlov had already the 300th anniversary of the union of the
lost to Shaposhnikov, while Zhdyarsky had Ukraine with Russia, was transferred from
to his credit two draws with Abroshin and Russia to the Ukraine. So that if the tourna­
Lapin. ment had begun a year earlier, it would have
Great interest was provoked by the par­ been a purely Russian event.)
ticipation of the masters Georgy Borisenko In one of the first games of the tourna­
and Vladimir Zagorovsky. Borisenko, a ment to finish, Borisenko defeated Pyotr
native of Chuguev who was then living in Dubinin. The result of this game, as it later
Leningrad, was successful in the champion­ transpired, was virtually decisive in deter­
ships of the city on the Neva, twice finished mining the winner. Soon Borisenko suffered
in the top five in the championship of the his first defeat at the hands of the master
Russian Federation, and eight times earned Veltmander and Dubinin drew level with
the right to play in the final of the USSR him. In the first half of 1 956 it had already
Championship. become clear that the battle for the cham­
In 1 950, making his debut in the main pionship would be between Borisenko and
tournament of the country, the then Lenin­ Dubinin, who each had 4Yz points out of 6.
grad master gained a convincing win over By the start of 1 957 Dubinin was the
the celebrated grandmaster Vasily Smyslov. first to complete the event with an excel­
In the same year, 1 950, Georgy Borisenko lent result 9 points out of 12. At this point
-
Borisenko had Th points out of 10 and his 6...e5 ?(D)
games with Bibikov and Zagorovsky were This committing move demanded an
still in progress. In the end he managed to extremely accurate calculation of the re­
overcome the resistance of the Muscovite, sulting complications, which tum out to
while with the player from Voronezh he favour White. The pawn should have been
shared the point. As a result he, like, Dubi­ advanced only one square - 6 . . . e6.
nin, finished on 9 points.
The Sonneborn-Berger coefficient and the
result of their individual meeting were both
in Borisenko's favour, but the regulations w
concerning the USSR Championship did not
provide for a share of first place. Therefore
both these outstanding players were named
champion of the country. I should mention
that on this occasion only three unfinished
games had to be adjudicated.
An excellent example of 'calculating'
play was given by Borisenko in the follow­
ing game.
7 'ifa4+ !
7 'iVb3 is less promising on account of
White: G .Borise nko 7 . . . 'ifc7 ! . It is extremely dangerous to ac­
cept the piece sacrifice with 7 . . . 'ifxd4 on
Black: D .Grechkin account of 8 @d8 9 0-0! and White
has a strategically won position.
3 rd USSR C C C h , 1 95 5-5 7 7 ...1Vd7
The following variations favour White:
Queen 's Gambit Accepted (a) 7 . . . b5 8 j&xb5+ (8 lLixb5 llJc6 9
D2 1 llJ5c3 I 0 llJd5 etc. is also pretty
convincing.) 8 ... axb5 9 'ifxa8 'ifxd4 1 0
1 d4 d5 2 c4 dxc4 3 llJf3 a6 4 e4 'iVxb8;
Borisenko 's patent. In his inexhaustible (b) 7 ... llJc6 8 llJxc6 bxc6 (8 ... 'ifd7 9
arsenal of opening novelties, after the rec­ Jtxt7+) 9 'ifxc6+ and wins;
ommended 4 ... b5 5 a4 j&b7 he had prepared (c) 8 V/ib3 V/ic7 9 i&xf7+
6 b3 . In the same tournament, this pawn sac­ 1 0 j&g5+ llJf6 I 1 llJe6+ and wins.
rifice for the initiative, which transforms a (d) 7 ... llJd7 ! ? came into consideration:
pseudo-gambit into a real one, was accepted 8 llJfS g6 9 Jtxt7+ @xf7 1 0 @f6
by Aratovsky. But... he stumbled. We 1 1 h4 and now 1 L.'iVa5+, rather than the
should not forget that the original meaning line in various commentaries 1 1 . . .h6
of the Italian 'il gambetto' is ' trip' . Grechkin 12 hxg5 1 3 hxg5+ @xg5 14 :i xh8
avoids this continuation, but the reply cho­ gxf5 1 5 1ffxg8+ @f6 1 6 :i h6+ winning
sen by him has a significant defect Black the queen.
falls greatly behind in development. 8 j&b5 axb5 9 V/ixa8 tfxd4 10 tfxb8
4 ... c5 5 Jtxc4 cxd4 6 llJxd4 j&b4+ 1 1 lLic3 !
The exchange of queens would have al­ An unexpected refutation. After 1 1 j&d2
lowed Black to complete his development or 1 1 tfxe4+ White would have had
successfully by 6 'if xd4 7 llJxd4 e6 problems.
and 8 ... Jtd7. 1 1 ... V/ixe4+
After l l .. . .i,xc3+ 1 2 bxc3 'ifxc3+ 1 3 10 .i,c2 c6 !
.i,d2! 'ifxal+ 1 4 �e2 'ifd4 ( 1 4 ... 'ifxh l ?? Black immediately begins undermining
1 5 'if xc8+ �e7 1 6 .i,b4+ �f6 17 'iff5 White 's centre.
mate) 1 5 'ifxc8+ 'ifd8 1 6 'ifxb7 the out­ 1 1 dxc6
come is not in doubt. The attempt to maintain the outpost in
12 .i,e3 {ije7 13 'if c7 ! the centre would have led to simplification
This prevents castling, since after and a probable draw: 1 1 c4 cxd5 ( 1 1 . . . .i,g4
1 3 . . . 0-0 1 4 0-0 .i_xc3 1 5 'ifxe7 White 12 h3 .i,h5 is possible) 1 2 cxd5 .i,b5 1 3
has a great advantage. .i,d3 .i,xd3 1 4 'ifxd3 tiJbd7. Meanwhile,
13 ... .i,xc3+ 14 bxc3 'ifc6 White' s chief aim is to maintain the tension,
1 4 . . . 'ifxg2 1 5 0-0-0 ! with the threat of even at the cost of allowing the opponent
1 6 'ifd8 mate, against which there is no counter-chances.
satisfactory defence. 1 1 ... bxc6
15 'ifxe5 1-0 Of course, 1 1 ... tiJxc6 or 1 1 .. . .i,xc6 was
If l 5 ... f6 there could have followed 16 'ifc5 possible, but the move in the game gives
'ifxg2 17 0-0-0 and White's threats become Black the possibility of later creating a flex­
increasingly dangerous with every move. ible centre.
One of Pyotr Dubinin's best creative. 12 a4
achievements in the tournament was his If 12 c4 Black could have invaded with
game with Iogannes Veltmander. his knight on d4 after 1 2 ... c5.
12... tiJeS 13 {ija3 f5 (D)
1 3 . .. g6 followed by ... tiJg7 and ... f7-f5
White: P. D ubinin was more accurate.

Black: l .Veltmander

3 rd USSR CC C h , 1 955-57 w

Ruy Lopez C 75

Notes by Pyotr Du binin

1 e4 e5 2 {ijf3 tiJc6 3 .i,b5 a6 4 .i,a4 d6 5


c3 .i,d7 6 d4 {ijf6
Another good continuation here is
6 ... tLJge7 7 .i,b3 h6 and then, according to
circumstances, 8 ... tiJg6 or even 8 ... g5. 14 exf5 .i,xf5 15 .i,xf5 : xf5 16 {ijc4 : n
7 'ife2 1 7 : dl 'ifc7 18 a5 tiJd7
White made this move with the aim of I thought that the congestion of Black's
avoiding the well-known variations that pieces ('ifc7; : n, tiJd7, tiJe8 and .i,e7)
arise after 7 tiJbd2 or 7 0-0. The opening and also the weakness of his pawns (c6,
phase takes an original course. d6 and e5) would give White some posi­
7 ... .i,e7 8 0-0 0-0 9 d5 tiJhS tional advantage. However, over the next
9 ... tiJd4 is bad on account of 10 cxd4 few moves Black is able to show that his
.i,xa4 1 1 tiJc3 ( 1 1 dxe5 .i,b5 1 2 'ifc2 chances are better.
dxe5) l 1 .. .exd4 1 2 tiJxa4 b5 1 3 tiJxd4 19 b4 .i,f6 20 : a2 d5 21 {ij b2 e4 22 tiJd4
bxa4 1 4 tiJc6 with very strong pressure for .i,e5 23 h3
White. [23 'ifh5 !? came into consideration, and
if 23 . . . C2Jdf6 24 'lth4, leaving Black with 33 'lies : rs 34 'lth2 !
only an insignificant advantage. - S.G.] The idea of White' s manoeuvre. Here the
23... Jlxd4 queen not only defends the king, but it also
If 23 ... cS White was intending to con­ creates pressure along the h2-b8 diagonal.
tinue 24 CLie6! 'ltc6 2S ctJgS l::!. f8 [Af­ 34 ... l::!, gf6 ?
ter 2S ... l::!, e7 or 2S . . . l::!. fS the two sides' Veltmander fails to withstand the tension
chances can be considered roughly equal. and he relaxes his vigilance. Black prevents
- S.G.] 26 c4! Jld4 27 Jle3 with the bet­ the manoeuvre of the bishop to f4, but he
ter position, for example: 27 ... h6 28 Jlxd4 overlooks White' s combination.
cxd4 29 cxdS 'ltxdS 30 'lfxe4 and Black He should have played 34 ... 'ltf8 ! . If
stands badly (30 ... 'ltxa2?? 3 1 'lth7 mate, or 34 . . . 'lfh4 White was proposing to play 3S
30 . . . 'lf xgS 3 1 'lfxa8). C2Jb7 CLixb7 36 'ltxb8+ l::!, f8 37 'lth2 ! .
24 cxd4 [After the obvious 3 7 'ltxb7 Black
After 24 l::!, xd4 ctJ d6 2S c4 ctJfS 26 would have forced a draw by 37 . . . 'ltxh3
l::!, dl 'lies Black would have gained a very 3 8 g3 l::!, xg3+ 39 fxg3 'lfxg3+ with per­
strong position in the centre and an attack petual check, but also after 37 'lth2? !
on the king. C2Jd8 ! ? Black' s position is still not worse.
24 ... ctJ d6 25 Jle3 tLlb5 26 l::!, cl 'ltd6 27 - S.G.]
'ltd2 l::!, af8 28 CLia4 l::!. f6 29 CLic5 ctJb8 35 g4 !
(D) Although this move weakens White' s po­
sition, it brings him a material advantage.
35... l::!, g6
If 3S ... l::!, f3 36 JlgS winning the ex­
w change. The following exchange sacrifice
shows that Black's 'fortress' on the queen­
side is by no means as impregnable as it
appears.
36 CLixa6 ! (D)
After defending his kingside, White de­
cides the game with a combination on the
queenside. The attempt by Black to obtain
an attack with 36 ... 'lfh4 is unsuccessful. For
example: 3 7 CLixb8 l::!, f3 3 8 l::!, xc6 [Simpler
Black has a clear plan: his knight at b8 is is 38 CLixc6 and Black must resign. - S.G.]
defending the weak a6- and c6-pawns, and 38 . . . l::!, xh3 39 l::!, c8+ �t7 40 l::!, l c7+ �e6
in the meantime his heavy pieces should be 41 'lies mate.
able to attack the white king' s position, with
the knight at bS coming to their aid.
To defend against Black' s attack,
White carries out the curious queen ma­ B
noeuvre 'ltd2-e2-hS-eS-h2, which simul­
taneously serves defensive and offensive
aims.
30 'lte2 ! l::!, g6 31 'lth5 'ltd8 32 l::!, ac2
ctJ d6
After 32 ... CLia3 3 3 l::!, c3 CLic4 White
would, of course, have sacrificed the ex­
change on c4.
36 ... tLixa6 37 : xc6 '2ixb4 38 : xd6 became attracted by correspondence play,
'iVxd6 in which he achieved outstanding results,
With 38 ... : xd6 Black could have avoid­ thanks to his knowledge of theory, his abil­
ed the exchange of queens, but after 39 gxf5 ity to analyse deeply and comprehensively,
his position would have remained difficult. and the possibility of considering each move
39 'iVxd6 : xd6 40 gxf5 : a6 41 : b l ! for a long time, without thinking about the
'2ic2 clock. In correspondence play he achieved
After 4 1 ... '2ic6 42 : b6 : xb6 43 axb6 impressive results and had practically no
ctJd8 44 i,g5 '2ib7 (44 ... t2Jc6? 45 b7 and disappointing performances.
46 i,f4) 45 @g2 @fl 46 �g3 g6 47 �f4 ICCF grandmaster, World Championship
the endgame is hopeless for Black. silver medal winner and several times a
42 : b5 '2ia3 43 : xd5 '2ic4 44 : c5 prize-winner in USSR Championships - this
'2ixa5 45 @h2 : as 46 �g3 '2ib7 47 is a far from complete list of his victories. I
: d5 : f8 48 @g4 : f7 49 i,f4 @f8 50 should also mention that Pyotr Dubinin had
i,e5 l-O a particularly responsible approach to team
Pyotr Vasilievich Dubinin ( 1 909- 1 983) tournaments. Three times as a member of
was born in Warsaw into the family of Vas­ the USSR team he won the ICCF Olympiad,
ily Dubinin, a labourer in a metallurgy fac­ and twice, playing for the Russian Federa­
tory. Dubinin's mother, Maria Leontevna, tion team, he was a winner of the all-union
was Polish by nationality. After the start championship.
of the First World War the Dubinin family All his life Pyotr Dubinin played at the
moved to Nizhny Novgorod. The father, very highest level both over the board, and
worn out by the constant search for work by correspondence. Among his opponents in
and the struggle to make a living, died of over-the-board play were world champions
exhaustion in 1 92 1 . At the age of 14 Pyotr Botvinnik, Smyslov and Petrosian, and can­
Dubinin was forced to become a dock hand, didates for the world championship Keres,
beginning life as a labourer. Kotov and others.
On the advice of a school friend Dubinin And among his ' invisible opponents' it
joined the Nizhny Novgorod chess club, a is sufficient to mention five ICCF world
branch of the former All-Russian chess un­ champions: Ragozin, O'Kelly, Estrin, Pal­
ion. Regularly attending lessons at the club, ciauskas and Zagorovsky.
Petya kept a diary, which he later called 'My For Vladimir Zagorovsky, his participa­
chess career' . tion in the final of the USSR CC Ch, to
Soon he became one o f the strongest which, as an over-the-board master, he was
in the club and at the end of 1 924 he also admitted without having to qualify, marked
tried his hand at composing chess problems his debut in correspondence play. After fin­
and studies. In 1 930 Pyotr Dubinin became ishing third, Zagorovsky did not participate
champion of Nizhny Novgorod for the first in any more USSR Championships, but
time. switched completely to ICCF competitions,
In 1 934 the representative of Gorky (as in which he achieved splendid results (vic­
Nizhny Novgorod was now called) took sec­ tory in the individual world championship,
ond place in the championship of the Rus­ twice winner in the world team champion­
sian Federation, not losing a single game, ship and others), a description of which lies
and in the same year he made his debut in outside the scope of the present book.
the final of the USSR Championship. In One of the games from the USSR
1 93 8 Pyotr Dubinin was awarded the title of Championship was included by Vladimir
USSR Master of Sport. Zagorovsky in the book of his best corre­
In the post-war years Pyotr Dubinin spondence games.
White : V.Zagorovsky

Black: I . Ve ltmander
w

3rd USSR C C C h , 1 9 5 5- 5 7

Ruy Lop ez C 73

Notes by Vlad imir


Zagorovsky

1 e4 e5 2 CLJf3 l2Jc6 3 �b5 a6 4 �a4 d6 18 ... � d8 19 l2J a4 @e6 20 � d3 Vi'c7 21


5 �xc6+ Vi'e2 g6
In over-the-board play in the 40s and 50s I The variation 2 1 . ..Vi'a5 22 Vi'xh5 Vi'xa4
usually played 5 �xc6+ against the Steinitz 23 � xd6+ � xd6 ends in mate - 24 Vi'e8.
Defence Deferred. I remained faithful to this 22 Vi'd2 !
move in this, one of my first correspondence The manoeuvres of the white queen on
games. Later I switched to 5 c3 . the two adjacent squares have led to an
5... bxc6 6 d4 f6 7 �e3 l2Je7 8 l2Jc3 CLJg6 even greater weakening of Black' s position.
9 Vi'd2 �e7 10 0-0-0 � b8 11 h4 h5 12 To avoid the worst he decides to give up a
dxe5 l2Jxe5 13 l2Jxe5 dxe5 ? pawn.
A mistake; correct was 1 3 . . . fxe5, when I 22 ... cS 23 � d5 @e7
was intending to play 14 �g5. 23 . . . c4 24 � c5 was no better.
14 Vi'e2 �d6 (D) 24 l2Jxc5 � b5 25 l2Ja4 � xd5 26 Vi'xd5
(See the diagram in the next column.) �e6 27 Vi'd3 Vi'c4 28 Vi'xc4 �xc4 29
15 �c5 ! CLJb6 �e6 30 CLJd5+ �xd5 31 � xd5
Black has unexpectedly ended up in a I was in no doubt that the rook endgame
difficult position. If 1 5 . . .0-0 there follows was won for White, and the further course of
1 6 Vi'd3, when White wins material. After the game confirmed my conclusion.
1 5 . . . Vi'd7 he has the strong reply 1 6 Vi'c4. 31...gS 32 hxg5 fxg5 33 @d2 h4 34 @e3
15...Vi'e7 16 �xd6 cxd6 17 Vi'd2 �d7 18 g4 35 f4 ! h3 36 gxh3 gxh3 37 fxe5 � h8 38
� h3 ! exd6+ @d7 39 � dl h2 40 � hl @xd6 41
Events develop by force. �f4 @e6 42 b3 as 43 @g3 1-0
Fourth Championship
(1957-1960)

ON THE 1 5th of December 1 957, sixteen masters to confirm their rank in correspond­
competitors, among whom were seven ence events, and in general taking seriously
masters, five candidate masters and four the ranking of correspondence players. The
first category players, began play in the proposal was not ignored, and the very next
4th USSR Correspondence Championship. year the sports authorities confirmed the
The non-Russians were Leon Maseev, a awarding of medals to the top three in the
candidate master from Odessa, who had correspondence championship. A memo­
won one of the semi-finals, and two Latvian randum, that was to play an historic role in
representatives: Alexander Koblencs, who the fate of our correspondence players, was
had been personally invited, and a semi-fi­ also published - to obtain the title of chess
nal qualifier Igor Zhdanov. The tournament master of sport it was sufficient to occupy
arbiter was the Muscovite G. Klompus. one of the top three places in the final of the
When the tournament was in full swing, correspondence chess championship.
an observation by Vladimir Nevsky ( 1 903- The press made practically no reports on
1 960), secretary of the USSR Chess Federa­ the course of the play, which continued for
tion Commission for correspondent events, about two and a half years. Only the Riga
was published in the magazine 'Shakhmaty magazine ' S ahs' ( 1 960, No 8) gave a brief
.

v SSSR', reflecting on the attitude of the report, saying that things were not going
sports authorities to correspondence play. too well for the Latvian representatives.
In this article, written not long before his Koblencs had 2Yz out of 5 and Zhdanov 4
death, Vladimir Viktorovich Nevsky, a corr­ out of 9.
espondence play propagandist, remarked The leader, meanwhile, was the first
sadly that the correspondence championship category player Anatoly Sadomsky with
was the only one in which the winner was 9 points out of 12. Pyotr Dubinin had the
not recognised in any way. same number of points, but after 1 4 games.
Nevsky suggested awarding medals to Also in contention for a high place was the
the winners of the correspondence cham­ Odessa player Leon Maseev, who at that
pionship, establishing the master norm in moment had 8 points out of 1 3.
the championship final, allowing candidate When the magazine ' Shakhmaty v SSSR'

0
4th USSR CC Championship ( 1 957- 1 960)

NQ l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

l A.Sadomsky Moscow
rn., Vi y, y, 1 Y2 y, 1 Y2 0 1 1 1 1 1 Vi l O ':h

2 P.Dubinin Gorky Yi 1 y, 1 Y2 I Yi 0 Y2 Y2 l Y2 I y, 1 10

3 L.Maseev Odessa y, 0 l y, Y2 1 1 1 Y2 1 Y2 Y2 0 I Yi 9':h


r 1;,
4 L.Aronin Moscow Y2 y, 0 Y2 I 1 Y2 Y2 y, Y2 Y2 Y2 1 I 9

5 A.Konstantinopolsky Moscow 0 0 Y2 Yi ·•.


1 0 Yi Y2 1 Yz y, Y2 1 1 1 S'h
Moscow
- >
l S'h

Q.
6 Ya.Estrin Yi Yi Y2 0 0 •• 1 0 0 Yi 1 y, l 1 1
,..
Kuibyshev 1;, ·7·7
('I)
7 Yu.Shaposhnikov Y2 0 0 I 0 il• Y2 0 0 l I 1 1 y, 1 8 ....
'{ ...::: Cb
Moscow ..
. 71/z
8 R.Altshuler 0 Y2 0 0 Y2 I Y2 . Yz Y2 1 Yi Yi Yi Y2 1
c;i
9 V.Baturinsky Moscow y, 1 0 Yi y, 0 1 Yi 1 Yi I Yi 0 0 Y2 7'h
lO I.Zhdanov Riga 1 Y2 Yi Yz 0 1 1 Yi 0 0 0 l 0 y, 1 7'h
1.:J
Kuibyshev ::
11 L.Fink 0 Y2 0 Y2 Yi Yi 0 0 y, 1 y, y, Yi 1 1 7
Nizhny Tagil ••%"·
12 G.Ovchinkin 0 0 y, Yz Yz 0 0 Y2 0 1 Yz y, I Y2 y, 6
.
Izhevsk
13 I. Veltmander 0 Yi Yi Y2 Yi Yi 0 Y2 Y2 0 y, Yi /t l 0 0 SY:z
Saratov . . ..
14 M.Abroshin 0 0 1 Y2 0 0 0 y, l l Yi 0 0 •••
'h 0 5

15 A.Koblencs Riga 0 'Ii 0 0 0 0 y, 1;, 1 y, 0 Yi l Yi 0 5


�··

16 V.Kryukov Cheliabinsk y, 0 y, 0 0 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 Yi 1 1 1 5
(1961 No. I) published the final table, it White: L . Maseev
turned out that, although Dubinin won his
last game, he finished half a point behind Black: L . Aronin
Sadomsky. Thus, together with the famous
player from Nizhy Novgorod, the leading 4th USSR CC Ch, 1 9 5 7 - 6 0
trio included two players who did not have
the master title - Sadomsky and Maseev. Hungarian Defence C50
One striking result was the failure of the
master Aleksandrs Koblencs, several times 1 e4 e5 2 tbt3 t2Jc6 3 j,c4 d6 4 tbc3 j,e7
champion of Latvia and Riga, and a par­ 5 h3 j,f6 ?
ticipant in the USSR Championship final of 5 ... j,e6 or 5 ... t2Jf6 is more natural.
1 945. However, Koblencs was best known 6 d3 tba5 7 j,b3 t2Jxb3 8 axb3 tbe7 9
as the trainer and second for many years j,e3 d5 10 d4 exd4 11 j,xd4 j,xd4 ?
(from 1955 to 1 979) of Mikhail Tal. An oversight. It was better to go into
The championship showed that over-the­ the variation l l . . .dxe4 1 2 j,xf6 exf3 1 3
board players were not always able to con­ 'iVxd8+ @xd8 1 4 0-0-0+ j,d7 1 5 j,xg7
firm their class in correspondence play. The fxg2 1 6 j,xh8 gxh 1 'iV 1 7 � xh 1 , when
unofficial match between the four first cat­ Black has a defensible position.
egory players and the seven masters ended 12 'iVxd4 0-0 13 0-0-0 c6 14 exd5 cxd5 15
in a 1 5 - 1 3 victory for the former. Anatoly t2Jxd5 t2Jxd5 16 'iVxd5 (D)
Sadomsky and Leon Maseev became the
first masters in the history of USSR chess to
gain this title as the result of a correspond­
ence event. B
In his youth Leon Iosifovich Maseev
(1 909-1 972) played in minor tournaments in
Odessa, reaching the second category. His
best achievement in the pre-war years was
second place in the 1 939 Odessa Champi­
onship. Back in the 1 930s Maseev became
interested in correspondence play, and he
scored some victories in local tournaments.
In 1 934 in a strong tournament in which
the masters Konstantinopolsky, Manevich 16... 'iVf6
and Rauzer participated, Leon Maseev took The exchange of queens 16 ... 'iVxd5 1 7
third place, winning an interesting game � xd5 b6 1 8 � hd l j,b7 was the lesser evil.
against Rauzer. 17 � hel h6 18 'iVeS 'iVa6 19 @bl b5 20
Maseev's participation in the war, in � d6 'iVaS 21 t2Jd4 j,b7 22 tLirs f6 23
which he was seriously wounded, forced t2Je7+ 1-0
him for a long time to give up chess, even by After gaining the master title for his result
post. Only in the 1 950s did he again begin in the 4th OSSR CC Ch, Leon Maseev con­
taking part in correspondence events. After firmed his ranking by winning the bronze
victories in qualifying events there followed medal in the following 5th Championship.
first places in the semi-finals of the 4th and Then, as a member of the USSR team, he
5th USSR Championships. And in the final won a gold medal in the 4th Correspondence
of the 4th Championship he led for a long Olympiad. In 1 964 the player from Odessa
time, after defeating several masters. Here is was awarded the title of international master
one of these wins. in correspondence play.
The chief hero of the fourth USSR move Black's lead in development becomes
Championship was the epidemiologist Ana­ evident.
toly Mikhailovich Sadomsky ( 1 9 1 0- 1 989). 17 ... tt:Jf4 ! 18 g3 ?
He was born in Orenburg and became inter­ This leads to a rapid debacle. 1 8 �b3
ested in chess at the time of the first Mos­ also gives nothing because of 1 8 . . . : f6.
cow International Tournament in 1 925. Like White should have admitted the faultiness
many others, he fell ill with 'chess fever'. of his strategy and withdrawn his knight
The 'illness' proved protracted. He played to fl , in order then to bring his queenside
in many tournaments in his youth, reaching pieces into play.
first category status. 18...hS 19 'ifdl t2Jh3+ 20 i;t>g2 t2Jxf2 21
It was as a first category player that Ana­ 'ifxh5 (D)
toly Sadomsky began playing in correspond­
ence tournaments. He won the USSR Cham­
pionship semi-final, shared 3rd-6th places in
the final of the 2nd Championship, 1 st-2nd B
places in the semi-final of the 4th, and in
the main tournament he was completely tri­
umphant. l OYz points out of 1 5 brought him
victory, and against the seven masters the
first category player scored 5 points!

White: M .Abroshin

Black: A.Sadomsky 21...tLlb4 !


The decisive blow. Against the threats of
4th USSR CC Ch , 1 9 5 7-60 22 ...'ifc6+ and 22 ... tt:Jxc2 there is no defence.
22 �dl
Ruy Lopez CBB After 22 cxb4 'ifc6+ 23 i;t>fl t2Jh3+ 24
i;t>e2 : f2+ 25 i;t>dl : xh2 White loses his
Notes by Anatoly Sadomsky queen or is mated.
22 ... tLibxd3 23 : n tLlxdl 24 : xdl t2Jf2
1 e4 eS 2 t2Jf3 tLlc6 3 �bS a6 4 �a4 tLlf6 0-1
S 0-0 �e7 6 : el bS 7 �b3 0-0 8 d3 d6 Anatoly Sadomsky gained a striking win
9 c3 tLlaS 10 �c2 cS 11 t2Jhd2 tLlc6 12
·
against the first USSR Champion in corre­
tt:Jn �e6 spondence play.
After 1 2. . . . : e8 1 3 tt:Je3 d5 14 exd5
tt:Jxd5 1 5 tt:Jxd5 'ifxd5 possible is 1 6 d4 !,
with the initiative for White, Alekhine­ White: A.Konstantinopolsky
Eliskases, 1 936.
13 tt:Je3 'ifc7 14 tt:Jgs Black: A.Sadomsky
14 d4 was preferable.
14...dS lS exdS tLlxdS 16 tt:Jxe6 fxe6 17 4th USSR C C Ch, 1 9 5 7 -60
'ifg4
In his 'Teoriya Shakhmatnykh Debyu­ Reti Opening A 06
tov' (Theory of Chess Openings) Paul Keres
suggests that after 1 7 'if g4 Black has some 1 t2Jf3 dS 2 e3 t2Jf6 3 c4 e6 4 b3 �e7 S
difficulties. However, after the very next �b2 0-0 6 �e2 b6 7 0-0 cS 8 d4 cxd4 9
tll xd4 Jth7 10 cxd5 tll xd5 1 1 Cll d2 Cll d7 the queenside he also needs to acquire one
12 .&!. cl tll c5 13 tll c4 .&!. c8 on the kingside.
Black has sensibly developed his forces 20 .&!. xc6 tll xb4 21 .&!. c2 tll xc2 22 'iVxc2
and achieved a good game. Now 14 a3 tll xb2 23 'iVxb2 'iVb6 24 .&!. cl .&!. d8 25 g3
suggests itself for White, in order to drive 'iYa5 26 \t>g2 Jtf6 27 'iYb3 g6 28 h4 @g7
the knight from its comfortable post by the 29 h5 .&i, d2 30 .&i, c2 .&i, xc2 31 'iVxc2 'iVc3
advance of the b-pawn. In the game it is the 32 'iVxc3 Jtxc3 33 hxg6 fxg6 ! 34 Jtb7 a5
opponent who first succeeds in doing this. 35 f4 \t>f6 36 g4 h5 ! (D)
14 Jtn a6 15 'iYd2 b5 16 lll a 5
16 tll e5 was preferable.
16 ... Jta8 17 b4 lll a4 (D)
w

37 g5+ \t>f7
Avoiding a transparent trap: after
37 ... @f5?? Black would have been mated
18 tll d c6 ? in two moves!
This is what White had in mind, when he 38 e4 Jtd2 39 \t>t'3 e5 ! 40 Jtd5+ \t>g7 41
undertook his 'cavalry' operation. The im­ fxe5 @f8 42 e6 Jtxg5 43 e5 Jtd2 44 @e4
pression is that it is advantageous for him. @e7 45 \t>d4 g5 46 \t>d3 Jtcl 47 Jte4 g4
In the event of 1 8 . . . Jtxc6 1 9 tll xc6 'iVd7 48 Jtf5 Jth2 0-1
20 Jtxd5 tll xb2 2 1 'iVxb2 exd5 22 tll xe7+ In later years Anatoly Sadomsky took
'iVxe7 23 .&!. cd l White's positional advan­ part in matches against teams from various
tage would have been obvious. But he has countries, at times achieving good results.
not taken everything into account. The author remembers with pleasure that in
18... Jtxc6 19 tll xc6 .&!. xc6 ! the last years of his life Sadomsky respond­
Thanks to this combinative reply, based ed to the invitation of the author to play in a
on a double attack, Black wins a pawn. Kon­ thematic tournament.
stantinopolsky tries to exploit the drawing Anatoly Sadomsky enjoyed some local
potential of opposite-colour bishops, but in successes, but his main achievement re­
the technical phase too Sadomsky is equal to mained his victory in the 4th USSR Cham­
the task. In addition to the passed pawn on pionship.
t
5th USSR CC Championship ( 1 960"." 1 963)

N2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

1 G.Borisenko Sverdlovsk Y1 l 1 l 1 Yi l Yi 1 l l Yi Y1 1 0 l l Yz
.
.

Moscow
2 Ya.Estrin Yi •• q;j.•. lfu Y2 Yi l 1 Y2 1 Yi Yi 1 Y1 1 1 1 1 l l Yz
.
•..
3 L.Maseev Odessa 0 Yi 1 Y2 1 Yi Y1 Yi I Y2 Y2 I I I 1 10112

4 V.Kryukov Cheliabinsk 0 Y2 0 1 1 1 0 Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 I Y2 1 9

5 A.Sokolsky Minsk 0 0 Y2 0 1 Y2 1 1 0 l y, y, Y2 1 1 8 Yz
; ·····
6 N.Andreyev Moscow

Volgograd
0 0 0 0 0 Fc c• cc
I>
0 1 Y2 l 1 l 'lz l l l 8

,....
7 D.Grechkin Yi Yi Yi 0 Yi 1 •• Yi I 0 0 1 Yi 0 1 I 8 Cb
....
'*1

8 A.Sadomsky Moscow 0 0 Yi I 0 0 Yi 1·m%m•'-'


r; l I l Y2 0 y, 1 l 8 �
L ••

l lf;2
t;l
9 I.Kramar' Ufa Y2 Y2 Y2 Yi 0 l/2 0 0 I Yi l Yi I Y2 7'12
;
IO K. Yevdokimov Zaporozhie 0 Y2 0 Yi l 0 l 0 Yi 0 Yi 1 I 0 l 7

11 O.Bogatyryov Moscow 0 0 Y2 y, 0 0 J 0 0 I y, l I 0 I 6Yz


[+ L
12 A.Kuznetsov Moscow 0 Yi Y2 Yi Y2 0 0 y, y, y, Y2 v y, Y2 Y2 I 6Yz

13 R.Gorenshtein Yalta Yi 0 0 0 y, Y2 Yi. I 0 0 0 Y2 Y2 I y, 5 Yz

14 N.Golovko Moscow Y2 0 0 0 Yi 0 l y, Y2 0 0 Y2 Y2 0 Yi 4Yz


Sverdlovsk region '
15 A.Rubezov 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 0 0 0 l l y, 0 I ·•···...... y, 4 Yz

16 A.Lukin Osh l 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 0 0 y, Yi y,. 3


;;
, i•Li
Fifth Championship ( 1960-1963)

SIXTEEN players, including nine masters, tion (1 949) and of the USSR Armed Forces
contested the final of the 5th USSR Cham­ ( 1 950).
pionship. After moving from Leningrad to
Sverdlovsk, Georgy Borisenko - who was
one of the winners of the 3rd Championship White: L . M aseev
but had missed the 4th - decided to fight
again for the top title in USSR correspond­ Black: N . Golovko
ence chess. Anatoly Kuznetsov ( 1 932-2000),
who held the master title in over-the-board 5 th USSR C C C h , 1 9 60- 6 3
play and in chess composition, decided to
test his strength in correspondence play. The Ruy Lopez C73
participation of A.Lukin from the town of
Osh (Kyrgyzstan) extended the geography Notes by Leon Maseev
of the championship.
The tournament arbiter was Lev Garku­ 1 e4 e5 2 ll:lf3 ll:lc6 3 �b5 a6 4 �a4 d6 5
nov ( 1 90 1 - 1 963). For this well-known �xc6+ bxc6 6 d4 f6 7 �e3 !:!. b8
USSR organiser and FIDE international Golovko played this many times and
arbiter, the supervision of this event was to usually he was able to win the b2-pawn un­
become his ' swan-song' . punished. The game Walther-Keres (Zurich
On this occasion the masters confirmed 1 959) went 7 ... CL:ie7 8 c4 ll:lg6 9 ll:lc3 �e7
their class, as indicated by their win in the 10 h4 h5 1 1 'i¥a4 �d7 12 c5 'i¥b8 I J
'match' against the first category players by 0-0-0 a5 1 4 dxe5 fxe5 1 5 a3 with the better
29Yz- 1 5Yz. game for White.
The play was quite lively, the masters 8 ll:lc3 !:!. xb2 9 'i¥d3
Georgy Borisenko and Yakov Estrin emerg­ A new move. In the game Gusev­
ing as the clear leaders. The tournament Golovko (Moscow Championship Semi­
intrigue was heightened by the fact that by Final 1 960) there followed 9 dxe5 fxe5 I 0
15th October 1 962 the game between the ll:lxe5 'iVf6 1 1 �d4 dxe5 12 'iVh5+ 'i¥g6
favourites was the only one unfinished. The 1 3 'iVxe5+ ll:l e7 14 'iVxc7 !:!. xc2 and Black
two rivals had both scored 1 1 points out of repelled the attack.
1 4 and it was decided to suggest that they ...
9 �d7
finish the game by telegram. Forestalling the combination 10 dxe5
Whereas the question of the champion fxe5 1 1 ll:lxe5 dxe5 12 'iVxd8+ �xd8 1 3
was not yet finally decided, everything was 0-0-0+ ! .
clear as regards the bronze medal winner 10 0-0 'i¥c8
- for the second time this was Leon Maseev. A mistake. However, if 10 . . . ll:le7 there
Again, on this occasion now ranked a mas­ could have followed not only 1 1 dxe5 fxe5
ter, he finished ahead of several famous 1 2 ll:ld2 and 1 3 f4, similar to the variation
over-the-board players. One of his 'victims' in the game, but also 1 1 dxe5 fxe5 1 2 !:!. ab I
was Nikolai Golovko ( 1 9 1 7- 1 988), who had !:!. xb l 1 3 !:!. xb l ll:lg6 14 'iVxa6 �e7 1 5
to his credit victories in the championships 'iV c4 (or 1 4 'iV c4 immediately). In both
of the 'Medik' Voluntary Sports Organisa- cases White' s position is better.
1 1 dxeS fxeS 12 ll:ld2 fl, b8 13 f4 exf4 14 White: Ya .Estrin
�xf4 ll:Je7 lS eS dS (D)
Black: G .Borisenko

5th USSR CC C h , 1 9 60- 6 3


w
The battle in this endgame, which decid­
ed the fate of the gold medal, was annotated
by Yakov Estrin. He remarked that the cause
of White' s difficulties was a combination
involving a pawn sacrifice, which turned
out to be incorrect. As a result White had
to conduct a gruelling defence, and he man­
aged to restore material equality, but Black
still had a positional advantage.
16 e6 ! �xe6 17 fl, ael �fS 18 'i¥ e3 h6 19 68 ... .&!, c4+ 69 @bl
ll:Jb3 g6 20 ll:Jd4 .&l, b6 21 'iVeS .&l, h7 22 Not a very comfortable square for the
�cl °i¥d7 23 �a3 as king, but there is no alternative.
23 . . .h5 24 ll:lxf5 gxf5 25 .&l, xf5 was bad 69...e4 70 fl, d8+ @e6 71 ll:lgS+ @f6 !
for Black, while if 23 . . . �g7 there would Of course, not 7 1 .. . @f5? in view of 72
have followed 24 'i¥xe7+ 'i¥xe7 25 fl, xe7+ .&!, d5+ and 73 ll:lxe4 with a draw.
@d8 26 ll:lxf5 gxf5 27 @hl c5 28 �xc5 72 h4 ! e3 73 fl, c8 !
.&!, c6 29 ll:la4 fl, xc5 30 fl, xg7 fl, xg7 3 1 The only defence, preventing the im­
ll:lxc5 and White wins. mediate advance of the pawn - 73 ... e2, on
24 g4 1-0 which there would have followed 74 fl, c6+
The decisive sacrifice of a third pawn. and .&!, e6. 73 .&!, e8 would have lost to
Black resigned, since after 24 . . . �xg4 73 . . . �e7 ! ; when White has no defence.
there follows 25 °i¥f6 �f5 26 ll:Jxf5 and if 73 ... @fS 74 ll:Jf3 e2 ! (D)
26 ... .&!, f7 (or 26 ... c5), then 27 ll:ld6+. Equal­ But not 74 . . . @e4 75 ll:l e l and Black
ly hopeless is 24 ... �e4 25 ll:lxe4 dxe4 26 himself has to reckon with the advance of
'i¥xe4 c5 27 °i¥a8+ 'i¥d8 28 .&l, xf8+. the h-pawn.
In the decisive game Estrin-Borisenko,
the following position was reached after
White's 68th move. Black's pieces are
somewhat more actively placed, but how w
can he win?

I have to admit that when I went in for


this position I had been intending to play 75
ll:lel here, assuming that the worst for White
was over. I did not imagine how Borisenko
would be able to strengthen his position, but (the black bishop is unable to reach the c l -
I had missed the fact that after 75 l2iel the h6 diagonal, and 82 ... il,h4 does not achieve
unexpected reply 75 ... @e6! followed by anything due to 83 g6 il,f6 84 h6) 83 �b3
76 . . . @d7 (or 76 .l::l, e8+ il,e7) would free �c6 84 h6 il,f8 85 @c4! @b6 86 �d5
Black's hands, and the passed e2-pawn a4 87 @e6 a3 88 h7 il,g7 89 �f7 a2 (or
would again become formidably strong. I 89 ... il,h8 90 g6 a2 91 g7 al 'IV 92 g8'iV) 90
was forced to choose a different way. �xg7 al 'IV+ 9 1 @g8 with a draw.
75 h5 .l::l, c3 ? I thought that I had already saved my­
Borisenko' s conduct of this ending was self and that the game was over, since after
exceptionally resourceful and subtle, and he 78 ... @e4 79 @c2 White has nothing to fear,
was guilty of only this one mistake. On the but Borisenko unexpectedly found some new
other hand, it was hard for Black to foresee and interesting possibilities, and the position
that his opponent would find such an un­ turned out to be by no means so simple.
expected, study-like possibility. Instead of 78 ... il,d2 !
the text move, Black should have played This is the point! The bishop is switched
75 ... @g4! 76 l2iel .l::l, b4+ 77 �c2 il,f2, to the c l -h6 diagonal, where it prevents the
forcing White to give up the piece in a less advance of the white pawns and does not
favourable situation. allow the opponent's king to approach the
76 l2iel il,b4 77 .l::l, xc3 ! e2-pawn.
White would have lost after 77 .l::l, e8 79 �c2 il,h6 80 12iel @e4 81 �c3 !
.l::l, xg3 78 .l::l, xe2 .l::l, g l . White must keep control of the d2-square,
77 ... il,xc3 78 l2id3 (D) not allowing Black's bishop there. After 8 1
@b3? il,d2 8 2 l2ic2 @d3 the advance of
the a-pawn is decisive.
81...il,g5 82 l2ic2 il,e3 83 g4
8
The dangers lying in wait for White are
illustrated by the following variation: 83
l2i e l il,f2 84 l2ic2 a4 85 h6 a3 86 h7 a2
87 h8'iV? e l 'iV+ 88 @c4 'iVfl+ 89 @b3
'iVb l + 90 'iVb2 il,d4 ! ! and Black wins.
83 ... il,cl 84 l2iel a4 85 l2ic2 a3 86 @b3
@d3
Black has strengthened his position to the
maximum and now White can move only
his knight from c2 to e l and back again.
This was the position for which my oppo­ 87 i2iel+ @d4 88 12ic2+ @e4
nent had aimed, assuming that after 78 ... el 'IV+ What should White play now? If 89 l2i e l
79 12ixel il,xel he would win easily, since it (without check!) there follows 89 . . . il,d2!
would seem that Black's king and bishop will 23 l2ic2 �d3 24 h6 a2! and Black wins.
easily eliminate both white pawns, while suc­ 89 g5 !
ceeding in defending their own. However, in The only move; as will be seen from
this case White would have gained a study-like what follows, 89 h6 would have lost.
draw with 80 g4+!, for example: 89 ... il,xg5 90 @xa3 il,d2 ! 91 @h3 !
(a) 80 ... �xg4 8 1 h6 @h5 82 h7 il,c3 Another important subtlety! 9 1 �b2?
83 @c2! (here it is, the decisive tempo!) would have lost, as after 9 l . . . �d3 92 @b3
83 . . . il,f6 84 �b3 @g6 85 @a4 with a (92 �b l @c3 !) 92 ... il,c3 93 h6 �d2 ! 94
draw. Just in time! h7 il,f6 White is in zugzwang.
(b) 80 . . . �e4 8 1 �c2 �d5 82 g5 il,b4 91...�d3 92 h6 ! (D)
Again the only move! After 92 @b2 Yakov Estrin was born in Moscow in
@c4 93 tba3+ @d4 94 tbc2+ @d3 95 1 923 into the family of a doctor. In the chess
@b3 �c3 Black wins, as shown in the club of the Moscow Palace of Pioneers and
previous note. Schoolchildren he achieved his first ' suc­
cesses. Immediately after the war he threw
himself wholeheartedly into a variety of
chess work. His activity in the field of chess
B
was many-sided: outstanding correspond­
ence player, strong over-the-board master,
highly prominent theoretician and writer,
and acknowledged trainer and teacher.
Estrin became known in chess circles
in 1 946, when he shared 2nd place in the
championship of the Russian Federation. In
the post-war years he regularly competed
in the championships of the capital, twice
(in 1 949 and 1 967) standing on the ' bronze
92 ... �xh6 step' of the victory podium.
After 92 . . . �c3 White would have gained Yakov Estrin's correspondence career
a draw by 93 h7 @d2 94 tb e l ! . Now it was marked by many successes, which in­
becomes clear that if on the 89th move cluded his shared victory in the 5th USSR
White had played 89 h6 (instead of 89 g5), Championship. In this competition he
his pawn would have been not at h7, but at fought, as they say, to the last pawn. He
g6, and Black, by playing 94 . . . @xel 95 saved that difficult endgame with Borisenko
@xc3 @dl 96 g7 el 'iV+, would have won on the 96th move, and his win against
immediately. Golovko lasted 97 moves.
93 tbel+ @e3 94 tbc2+ ! Estrin was the only player to go through
The final subtlety. It is not hard to see undefeated, and one of his wins, over the
that White must check the enemy king until master Aleksey Sokolsky, was annotated in
it moves away from its pawn and goes to detail by him immediately afterwards.
e4. Then, by playing @c3, he gains a draw,
since he prevents Black from switching his
bishop to the 'winning diagonal' e l -a5 . White: Ya .Estrin
94 ... @d3
If 94 . . . @d2 95 t2Jd4 ! , forcing a draw. Black: A.So kolsky
95 tbel + @d2 96 t2Jg2 Yz-Yz
Thus, despite all Borisenko' s efforts, the 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 0-63
decisive game produced a draw, and with it
a share of the champion's title (for the sec­ French Defence C 1 7
ond time !) between him and Estrin.
By profession Yakov Borisovich Estrin N otes by Ya kov Estr i n
°
( 1 923-1 987) was a chess player, but his life
was devoted not only to chess. He was a 1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 tbc3 �b4 4 e5 tbe7 5
great master both in chess, and in the ability 'iVg4 c5 6 dxc5
to live in style. Therefore his company was A good continuation, which has been
sought even by the greats of the chess world successfully employed by grandmaster
- people who were usually very discriminat­ Boris Spassky. White agrees to the spoiling
ing in their acquaintances. of his pawns, in return for gaining freedom
of action for his bishops and the prospect of though tripled pawn. However, on the basis
an attack on the opponent' s king. of the game Diickstein-Uhlmann (Vienna
6... j,xc3+ 1 957), Euwe thinks that Black has some ad­
6 ... d4? is insufficient in view of 7 a3 vantage. As will be seen from what follows,
i&a5 (or 7 ... i&xc5 8 tLle4) 8 b4 j,c7 9 this evaluation is incorrect.
ttJ b5 i&xe5 1 0 ttJ f3 with advantage to 13 .l::!, el 'lixc2
White. In the game between Shamkovich [Is this capture not the initial cause
and Shaposhnikov (20th Russian Federation of Black' s defeat? After 1 3 ... .l::!, ab8 or
Championship, Perm 1 960) there followed 1 3 . . . .l::!, fc8 the position can be evaluated as
10 ... fs 1 1 'lih5+ g6 12 'lih4 'lids 1 3 c4! equal. - S.G.]
and Black resigned, since after 1 3 ...dxc3 1 4 14 'lixb7 j, a4 15 j,e3 'i'Vxc3 ?
j,c4 he would have lost a piece. A serious mistake. 1 5 ... .l::!, fb8 was essen­
7 bxc3 ctJd7 tial. Although Black now restores material
In the game Spassky v. Melik-Pashaev equality, he hands the initiative to his op­
(Leningrad 1 954) Black chose 7 ... tt:Jbc6 8 ponent. White occupies both open files with
ctJf3 0-0, but after 9 j,d3 tt:Jg6 10 'lih5 his heavy pieces, which in combination with
tt:Jce7 1 1 h4! he came under a strong attack. the strong passed c5-pawn secures him a
8 ctJf3 serious advantage.
8 'i'Vxg7 is dubious, since after 8 ... .l::!, g8 16 .l::!, ecl 'iVaS 17 c6 j,bS
9 'i'Vxh7 tt:Jxe5 1 0 i&e2 'lia5 Black gains After 17 . . . .l::!, ab8 there would have fol­
a strong initiative. The game Reshevsky­ lowed 1 8 .l::!, abl , and if 1 8 ... .l::!, xb7, then
Botvinnik (USSR-USA, Moscow 1 946), 1 9 cxb7 .l::!, b8 20 .l::!, c8+ with a winning
with the inclusion of the moves 5 a3 j,a5, position for White. Black tries to block the
went 1 2 j,d2 'i'Vxc5 13 tlJf3 tt:Jxf3+ 14 b-file, intending if 1 8 .l::!, ab l to reply l 8 ... a6.
j,xf3 e5 1 5 j,h5 j,f5 ! + . However, with his next move White gains a
8... ctJ g6 clear advantage.
This move was recommended by Euwe. 18 .l::!, c5 ! .l::!, ab8 19 a4 'lia6
Black can also consider 8 . . . 'lic7, after If 1 9 ... a6 White was intending 20 j,d2!
which White has two possibilities: 'lid8 (or 20 ... .l::!, xb7 21 j,xa5) 21 c7 .l::!, xb7
(a) 9 'i'Vxg7 .l::!, g8 1 0 'i'Vxh7 tt:Jxe5 22 cxd8'i¥ .l::!, xd8 23 axb5, winning a piece.
1 1 'i'Vh5 tt:Jxf3+ 1 2 'i'Vxf3 j,d7 13 j,f4 20 .l::!, xb5 .l::!, xb7 21 cxb7 .l::!, b8 22 .l::!, abl
(Shamkovich-Gipslis, 29th USSR CC Ch, (D)
Baku 1 96 1 ), and now by playing 1 3 . . . 'lixc5
(instead of 1 3 . . . e5) Black would have
achieved a good game.
(b) 9 j,b5 'i'Vxc5 10 'lib4! tLlc6 1 1 B
'i'Vxc5 tt:Jxc5 1 2 j,a3 tLle4 1 3 c4 a6 1 4
i&xc6+ bxc6 1 5 ctJ d2 ! ± (Estrin-Lobanov,
Khanti-Mansisk 1 961).
9 j,bS
In the game Spassky-Mititelu (Leningrad
1 960) White chose 9 j,e3 and after 9 ...0-0
1 0 j,d3 'i'Va5 1 1 0-0 tt:Jxc5 1 2 i&xc5 !
'iVxc5 1 3 ttJ g5 ! 'iVxc3 14 .l::!, ae 1 he gained
a strong attack for the sacrificed pawn.
9 0-0 10 i&xd7 i&xd7 11 0-0 'lia5 12
... After sacrificing his queen White has
'lib4 'lia4 gained good winning chances thanks to his
For the moment White has an extra, al- dangerous passed pawn.
22...f6 7 ... �c5 !, after which White normally plays
The only way of defending against the 8 �e3 (instead of getting into a mess with
threatened invasion of the white bishop 8 tllxc6? �xf2+ 9 �fl 'li1h4, when one
(�c5-d6). unpleasant line is 1 0 Q:id4+ c6 1 1 Q:if3
23 �d4 Q:if4 24 �hl tll e2 2S �al "iVxa4 li:Jg3+! 12 �xf2 tll e4+ 1 3 @e2 'li1f2+ 1 4
26 exf6 d4 @ d 3 �f5 .).
B lack defends very inventively and re­ 8 �xc6 bxc6 9 0-0 cS
sourcefully. After the natural 27 tll e5?, there White's centralised ttJ remains unper­
can follow 28 . . .gxf6 28 Q:id7 d3 ! 29 tll xb8 turbed after 9 . . . �c5.
d2 · when it is Black who wins, since 30 g3 10 tll b3 ! c6
fails to 30 . . . 'li1e4+ and mate next move. 10 . . .c4 simply loses a pawn to 1 1 "iVxd5 !.
27 : sb4 'li1d7 28 tll eS 'li1c7 29 f7+ @f8 1 1 c4 !
30 f4 ! Effectively fixing Black' s c-pawns where
A curious position has been reached. they stand, so that they can later be attacked
White now has two far-advanced passed and (very possibly) won.
pawns, but the battle is not yet over, since 1 1 ...dxc4
the black knight and passed d-pawn create l l . ..d4 12 f3 Q:ig5 1 3 f4 tll e6 14 f5 is
certain difficulties in the conversion of his horrible for Black.
advantage. 12 QJ3d2 tll xd2 13 tll xd2 �e6 14 'li1a4
With his last move White consolidates 'li1b6 lS "iVc2 !
his hold on e5, the battle for control of 1 5 tll xc4? would throw away White 's
which has now lasted for eight moves. positional advantage, because Black then
30 ... Q:ic3 has 1 5 ... 'li1b5.
Of course, 30 . . . Q:ixf4 is bad because of 1S...'li1a6 16 tll e4 0-0-0 17 �e3 "iVbS 18
3 1 �xd4. Q:igS �dS (D)
31 : lb3 QjbS 32 �b2 'li1c2
32 . . . : xb7 would also have lost in view
of 33 fl: xb5 : xb5 34 �a3+ etc. There
followed: w
33 h3 Qjd6 34 �xd4 as 3S : b6 "iV cl+ 36
�gl Q:ie4 37 : xe6 1-0
Against the threat of 3 8 : e8+ there is no
satisfactory defence.

White : Ya . Estrin

Black : A.Sadomsky
19 tll x f7 !
5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 60-63 A perfectly-timed tactical shot from
Estrin.
· Two Knights Defence C55 19 ... �xf7 20 "iVfS+ : d7 21 e6 : dS 22
'li1xf7 'li1b7 23 "iVe8+ : d8 24 "iVhS �e7
N otes by GM Pa ul M otwa ni If 24 . . . : d5 25 "iVg4 then White simulta­
neously threatens 26 "iVxc4 or 26 e7+.
1 e4 eS 2 Q:if3 tll c6 3 �c4 Q:if6 4 d4 exd4 S 2S 'li1g4 g6 26 'li1xc4
eS dS 6 �bS Q:ie4 7 Q:ixd4 �d7 The first of Black's three weaklings
Nowadays, the major alternative is drops off on the c-file.
26 ... �b5 27 �c3
Maintaining the pressure, while prevent­ B
ing 27 ... : d3 because of 28 �xh8+.
27... :hgS 28 : adl : d5 29 : xd5 cxd5
30 : ct
Simple, strong chess.
30... �b7 31 i,xc5 i,xc5 32 �xc5 �xc5
33 : xc5 : es 34 : xd5 : xe6 35 g3 @c6
36 : a5 1-0.
Black lost on time according to 'Shak­
matny Byulleten' 5/1 962, but of course his
two-pawn deficit would have been fatal in
any case. 12 ... hxg5 ! 13 �xh8+ i,f8 14 i,g3 tt:Jxd4
Yakov Estrin' s best achievement in the 15 0-0-0 c5 16 tLle4 �a5 ! 17 tLld6+ @e7
5th USSR Championship was perhaps the 18 �g8
following win. A position in the style of the 1 9th century
chess romantics. Both kings are under fire.
Which will be the first to fall?
White: R .Gorenshtein 18 ... �xa2 ! 19 �xg5+
The series of checks 1 9 �xf7+ �d8
Black : Ya .Estrin 20 �xf8+ �c7 21 tlJxb5+ i,xb5 22
�xc5+ �b7 23 �xd4 leads to a position
5th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 0-63 in which White wins a rook and - is forced
to capitulate in view of 23 . . . : c8 !, with the
Queen 's Gambit D39 irresistible threat of 24 . . . c3. After the game
continuation Black again succeeds, by giv­
1 d4 tLlf6 2 c4 e6 3 tLlc3 i,b4 4 tLlf3 d5 5 ing up material, in removing his king to a
i,g5 dxc4 6 �a4+ safe place, whereas the leader of the hostile
The point of this check is to deprive the forces remains in the danger zone and meets
opponent of the move ... c7-c5 and its associ­ its end there.
ated counterplay. But this costs two tempi. 19 ... f6 20 exf6+ @d8 21 f7+ �c7 22
Is this not too high a price? tt:Jxc4+ @b7 23 tLla3 �al+ 24 tLlbl
6... tt:Jc6 7 e4 i,d7 8 �dl tLlb4 ! 25 @d2 �xb2+ 26 �el tLlbc2+ 27
In Estrin' s opinion, it would have been @d2 c4 28 : ct tLle3+ ! 0-1
better to retreat the queen to c2, when after In the international Ragozin Memo­
8 . . .h6 9 i,d2 i,xc3 1 0 i,xc3 b5 1 1 a4 rial tournament Yakov Estrin shared second
White gains an active position for the sac­ place. In 1 966 he was awarded the title of
rificed pawn. ICCF grandmaster, and from then on he was
8 ... b5 ! 9 e5 h6 10 i,h4 g5 1 1 tt:Jxg5 tLld5 ! constantly in the arena of world correspond­
12 �h5 (D) ence chess, achieving his greatest success
This variation is analysed in Lipnitsky' s in the 7th World Championship, in which
book 'Voprosy Sovremennoy Shakhmatnoy 1 2 points out of 1 6 brought him the title of
Teorii' (Problems of Modem Chess Theo­ 'king of correspondence chess' .
ry), where on the basis of the continuation The author made the acquaintance of
12 ... �e7 13 tt:Jge4 it is considered diffi­ Yakov Estrin in the early 1 970s, as a result
cult for Black. However, Estrin had found of my interest in the ' opening novelties' col­
another possibility, which gave the game umn that Estrin used to write in the monthly
theoretical significance. bulletin of the USSR Central Chess Club.
Estrin began citing my games and made
some complimentary remark about me, w
on noticing the similarity of our opening
inclinations. I was impressed by Estrin' s
romanticism, and by his adherence to the
Two Knights Defence (especially the Trax­
ler Counterattack), the Italian Game, and the
Open Variation of the Ruy Lopez. And on
one occasion he used a recommendation of
mine, employing the then completely for­
gotten M0ller Defence to the Ruy Lopez.
Yakov Estrin was everywhere appreci­
ated for his diplomacy, tact and excellent For both players a prototype was pro­
organisational capabilities. He was a wel­ vided by the game Padevsky-Botvinnik
come guest in many countries, where his from the Alekhine Memorial tournament
opening guides enjoyed great success (they (Moscow 1 956). Therefore it is instructive
ran to dozens of editions in all the 'chess' to read the evaluation by the originator of
languages). this method of development.
The title ofUSSR champion was awarded "This manoeuvre", explained Botvinnik,
to both players - additional tie-breaks were "allows Black to develop his bishop at b7
not taken into account. But if the widely­ in the quickest way possible. In addition,
accepted Sonneborn-Berger coefficient had at the appropriate moment he can exchange
been used, first would have been Georgy his knight for the bishop at b3 . Even so, the
Borisenko, because he gained the greater diverting of the knight to the edge of the
number of wins and lost his only game to board causes serious doubts, and probably
the player at the bottom of the tournament gives White the better prospects."
table! 10 f4 b6 l l g4
The quality ofBorisenko's wins was very This is the critical point of the opening
high, and the following game was officially battle. The chances of the two sides must
judged the best in the tournament. be weighed up on the basis of the variation
1 1 e5 ! tt::l e8 1 2 f5 dxe5 1 3 . fxe6 ! , in which
White initiates active play.
White : A. Rubezov Vatnikov lasted just four more moves in
a game against Geller ( 1 8th USSR Cham­
Black: G . Borisenko pionship Semi-Final, Kiev 1 950): 1 3 . . .f6?
1 4 ctJf5 tt::l xb3 1 5 tt::l d5 ! ctJd4 1 6 ctJdxe7+
5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 60- 6 3 c;t>h8 17 4Jg6+!. Such an opening catastro­
phe can be avoided by playing 1 3 . . . tt::l xb3
Sicilian Defence 888 1 4 tt::l c 6! 'i'Vd6 1 5 '{ixd6 ! j,xd6 1 6 axb3
j,xe6 1 7 tt::l xa7 . Experience (for example,
1. e4 c5 2 tt::l f3 tt::l c6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tt::l xd4 Kostro-Doda, Polish Championship 1 957)
ctJf6 5 tt::l c3 d6 6 j,c4 has shown that in the resulting ending Black
This variation, which bears the name of faces a difficult struggle for a draw.
the master Veniamin Sozin, was first em­ 1 1 ... j,b7 12 '{if3 � c8 13 g5 � xc3 !
ployed by him in two games from the 7th The same sacrifice, with its deep stra­
USSR CC Ch, 1 93 1 , against Kan and Ilyin­ tegic and tactical basis, was employed in
Genevsky. the source game Padevsky-Botvinnik. The
6 e6 7 0--0 j,e7 8 j,e3 0--0 9 j,b3 tt::la5 (D)
... Bulgarian player continued 14 bxc3, which
led to the loss of his important central pawn,
the uncovering of the hl -a8 diagonal and a
quick defeat. w
In his comments Botvinnik acknowl­
edged that definitely better was 14 gxf6
!:l, xe3 l S iVxe3 (of course, not l S fxe7
!:l, xf3 16 exd8'ii' !:l, xfl+ 17 !:l, xfl !:l, xd8)
1S . . . �xf6, but he added that "here too the
insecure position of the white king makes
Black's game preferable, since his two bish­
ops are very strong".
The present game confirms this evalua­
tion by the Patriarch of Soviet chess. A position abounding in combinative pos­
14 gxf6 !:!, xe3 15 iVxe3 �xf6 (D) sibilities. Black is not worried about his ma­
terial deficit (which has grown to a rook and
the exchange!). Relying on the power of his
bishops, he trains his fire on the enemy king.
w How can the threat of 24 ... 'ii'g l + be
parried? Rubezov decides to flee with his
king, losing his material advantage on the
way, merely to avoid ending up in a mating
net. This could have happened, for example,
after 28 iVxe4 �f6+ 29 �c4 bS+ 30 @cs
�e7+ 3 1 @c6 'ii'c8+ 32 @b6 �cs+ 33
�as 'ii'c7+ 34 @xa6 'ii'b 6 mate. The
concluding pursuit demands the utmost
composure.
16 !:!. ad l cuxb3 17 axb3 a6 18 e5? 24 !:l, d8 ! 'ii' gl+ 25 @d2 'ii' d l+ 26 �c3
An incorrect evaluation of the position. 'ii'xd8 27 !:!. xf3 e4! 28 !:!. h3 �f6+ 29 @c4
With the opening of the game, the power 'ii'c7+! 30 �d5 'ii'b7+ 31 �d6 @xf8 32
of the two bishops increases still further. !:!. xh7 �e7+ 33 �e5 f6+ 34 �e6 'ii' c6+
Rubezov hopes to exploit the opposition of 35 �f5 'ii'c8+ 36 @xe4 'ii'xc2+ 37 @d5
queen and rook, but as usual tactics go in iVxh7 0-1
harmony with sound strategy. Georgy Konstantinovich Borisenko
18 ... dxe5! 19 cuxe6 began playing by correspondence when
Apart from this obvious move, 1 9 fxeS he was already a well-known master. He
�gS 20 'ii'g3 'ii'e7 2 1 h3 also came into received the master title in 1 9SO. He per­
consideration with chances for both sides, formed successfully in the championships
although Black's position is nevertheless of Leningrad, the Russian Federation and
preferable. Uzbekistan, and participated in seven USSR
19... 'ii'c8 20 CUxf8 'ii'c6 21 @f2 Championships. Apart from twice winning
If 21 'ii'g3 White runs into the murder­ the USSR Correspondence Championship,
ous 2 1 . . . �h4 ! . He should have played 2 1 he had to his credit a silver medal from the
!:l, d2 ! , and if 2 1 . ..�h4 - 22 !:!, f3! , when 4th ICCF World Championship. As a mem­
it is hard for Black to count on more than ber of the USSR team he won gold medals
a draw. in the 3rd and 4th Correspondence Olympi­
21...'ii'g2+ 22 @el �h4+ 23 !:!. f2 �f3! ads, and in l 96S he was awarded the title of
(D) correspondence grandmaster.
Find the finish ( I}

From Championships 1 -V. See the solutions on page 1 5 7 .

1 . Konstantinopolsky-Perfiliev, 1st 4. Borisenko-Dubinin, 3rd


Championship Championship

2. Ragozin-Abroshin, 2nd Championship 5. Kryukov-Estrin, 4th Championship

3. Shamkovich-Yevdokimov, 2nd 6. Bogatyryov-Yevdokimov, 5th


Championship Championship
Sixth Championship ( 1963-1964)

IN THE list of participants in the semi-finals FIDE grandmasters Alexander Konstanti­


of the 5th Championship the names of rep­ nopolsky and Alexander Zaitsev, plus nine
resentatives from the three Baltic Republics very strong candidate masters who had got
were already to be found. Postal play had through to the main tournament from the
also expanded in some of the other repub­ semi-finals. The latter included the future
lics, in which associations of correspond­ ICCF world champion Grigory Sanakoev,
ence chess enthusiasts had been set up. who in the early 1 960s was one of the
In view of this, the Commission for cor­ strongest candidate masters in Voronezh.
respondence events decided to allow into the Boris Rozinov was appointed chief arbi­
semi-final stage the winners of the republic ter of the tournament. Later he became an
championships. There was no longer a place ICCF international arbiter and he played a
in the final for all the masters. Therefore prominent role in the history of Soviet (and,
masters could join in at the semi-final stage, at the end of his life, also Russian) corre­
together with candidate masters who had spondence chess, especially in connection
won qualifying events. with the participation of home players in
The result was that when it came to ICCF competitions.
organise the semi-finals of the 7th Champi­ The tournament began on 1 st January
onship, twelve groups were needed. In this 1 963, and by 1 5th October the leading
case only the winner of each would qualify group had . emerged: Yakov Neishtadt - 31h
for the final. Therefore it was decided to out of 5, Simagin and Estrin - 3 out of 4,
play the championship in three stages, be­ Anatoly Bannik and Roman Altshuler - 21h
ginning with quarter-finals. Moreover, into out of 3. At the start of 1 964 the leader was
the quarter-finals it was decided to admit grandmaster Vladimir Simagin with 61h out
candidate masters and first category players of 9, while half a point behind (also after
who had won one of the tournaments cur­ 9 completed games) were the master Estrin
rently being organised by the USSR Central and the then little-known candidate master
Chess Club. Grigory Sanakoev. By the middle of the
The right to participate directly in the year it had become clear that Yakov Estrin
final was granted only to grandmasters and would not avoid the prefix 'ex' to the title
prize-winners in the previous championship of champion of the country, and seriously in
(initially the first five players were admitted, contention for first place were Simagin - 9
then the right was granted only to the three out of 13 and Sanakoev - 8 out of 1 1 .
medal winners). By 1 st October 1 964, of the 1 5 3 games,
Players from Russia, Ukraine and Be­ 1 3 5 were completed, and of the 1 8 unfin­
lorussia competed in the final of the 6'h ished games, 12 involved the candidate
Championship. It turned out to be a sim­ master L.Konovalov from trans-polar No­
ply outstanding tournament. Grandmaster rilsk. The outcome of the tournament was
Vladimir Simagin made use of his right. obvious, and so all the unfinished games
Also playing, apart from him, were eight were adjudicated. The result: champion
masters, among who we find the future - grandmaster Vladimir Simagin, second
6th USSR CC Championship ( 1 963- 1 964) �

N2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ll 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

1 V.Simagin Moscow
m�a.it y, 1 I y, y, 'h y, 1 y, 1 1 l I 0 1 1 1 13

2 G.Sanakoev Voronezh Yi ' ..:::: 1 0 Yi 0 y, 1 I 1 1 1 1 y, 'h y, 1 1 12

3 V.Milyutin Yaroslavl 0 0 !f'! l y, 1 Y2 Y2 0 1 1 l y, 1 1 Y2 I I l l 'h


., .
.
4 Moscow 0 1 0 0 0 y, 1 I l l y, 1 1 y, l
H y,
R.Altshuler l 11

5 A.Gilman Gorky y, y, y, 1 0 l y, I y, y, 0 1 y, y, y, I l JOY,

6 A.Zaitsev Vladivostok y, l 0 l 1 0 y, y, 0 1 Yz y, Yz 1 \?.., Vz 1 10



7 A.Konstantinopolsky Moscow y, y, Yz Vz 0 1 t ..;:j 1 Y2 Vz 0 Vz 0 1 1 Y2 1 Vz 9\1, Q..
'""'
(!)
8 A.Sokolsky Minsk Yi 0 Yi 0 y, Vz 0 ��ic!Cli@' Vz y, 1 l 'lz 1 Yi l 1 y, 9'h ....


9 A.Bannik Kiev 0 0 1 './, 0 y, Y2 Y2 l�!li! �t l 1 Y2 Y2 0 Y2 Vz Y2 I 8'h ;;;
10 Ya.Estrin Moscow Yi 0 0 0 y, 1 Y2 Y2 0 l y, y, l 0 l 1 Y2 8%
Ii"''
,
11 V.Dragunov Torez 0 0 0 0 y, 0 1 0 0 0 y, 1 Y2 I I l l 7'h
"�

12 Ya.Neishtadt Moscow 0 0 0 0 l Vz y, 0 y, Yi I•
Vz IM c Yi 0 Vz 1 1 1 7%
+cc+:021
13 I.Shapovalov Yaroslavl 0 0 y, Yz 0 y, I y, y, y, 0 y, . �� !.�.�,:, l 'h I 0 Vz 7%

14 A.Gurvich Chernovitsy 0 y, 0 0 y, y, 0 0 I 0 './, l 0 • y, Vz I Yz 6llz

15 A.Sadomsky Moscow 1 y, 0 0 y, 0 0 Vz Vz 1 0 y, y, y, • y, 0 y, 6%

16 V.Bobkov Mogilyov 0 y, Y2 0 Y2 y, 'h 0 y, 0 0 0 0 Y2 y, ii�i�fJil 1 0 5

17 Yu.Shaposhnikov Kuibyshev 0 0 0 y, 0 y, 0 0 y, 0 0 0 I 0 1 O�l 4Y,

18 L.Konovalov Norilsk 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, y, 0 y, 0 0 y, Yz Vz 1 0 • 4
- Grigory Sanakoev, third (and, like Sana­ against the invasion of the knight. For ex­
koev, awarded for this result the title of ample, 2 1 . . . ctJb3 22 j,xb3 cxb3 23 'i/h4
national master) - V.Milyutin. h5 24 g4 f6 25 tbe6 and White wins.
One of the best creative achievements of 22 'i/h4 hS 23 f4 lb b3 24 �xb3 cxb3 2S
the bronze medal winner was his win over 'i/g3
the future international master R.Altshuler. Not allowing the rook to go to d3 .
2S...exf4 26 j,xf4 'i/c4 27 <iJf3 � d3 28
�eS b4
White : R .Altshule r The aim of this move is not so much to
get rid of the weak pawn, as to prevent the
Black: V. Milyutin white pieces from creating a base at d4. Also
with the bishop at c3 Black has the possibil­
6th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 3-64 ity of giving up the exchange, obtaining a
far-advanced passed pawn.
Ruy Lopez C9 7 29 cxb4 'i/xb4 30 'i/f4
Black appears to have no defence. 30 ... f6
N otes by V.M i l yutin is bad because of 3 1 �c3 'i/b5 32 'i/h6
'ffe8 33 ctJg5 ! . However, he went in for this
1 e4 eS 2 tbf3 tbc6 3 �bS a6 4 �a4 ctJf6 position with his following move in mind.
S 0-0 �e7 6 � el bS 7 �b3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9 30... gS! 31 ltJxgS
h3 <iJaS 10 �c2 cS 11 d4 'i/c7 12 ctJbd2 3 1 'ffc 1 would seem to be better. The
j,e6 13 dxeS dxeS 14 <iJgS � ad8 black king' s position is weakened and
Until now this is the same as Neishtadt­ this should gradually tell. [Although, after
Milyutin from the same tournament. 3 1 . ..f6 the position of the white king looks
lS 'i/e2 weaker, for example 32 �c3 'i/c5+ 33
White prefers not to force events and he @hl j,xh3 . - S.G.]
prepares combined play on the flanks. 31. ..f6 32 <iJf3 fxeS 33 'i/h6 (D)
1S ... �c8 16 ctJfl g6 17 tbe3 �b7 18 a4! An obvious move, but, as the further
Signalling the start of the attack! course of the game shows, it is incorrect.
18 ... c4 19 axbS axbS 20 ctJg4 (D) 33 'i/xe5 'i/c5+ [Here too 33 . . . �xh3 looks
very strong. - S.G.] 34 @hl 'i/xe5 35
tbxe5 should have been played.

White's pressure intensifies. He is threat­


ening 2 1 <iJh6+ @ g7 22 <iJhxf7 � xf7 23
tbe6+. 33 ... � d6! 34 'i/xhS 'i/b6+ 3S @hl � h6
20... tbxg4 21 'i/xg4 �c8 36 'i/xeS � xf3! 37 gxf3 � xh3+ 38 @g2
Now the bishop defends the e6-square 'i/g6+ 39 @f2 j,h4+ 40 @e3 'i/b6+ .41
�d2 �xel + 42 : xel : xf3 give Black anything and it allows White to
The result is that Black has a piece for a embark on a kingside pawn storm.
pawn, but his exposed king and the limited 14 g4 bS ls gs tt:Jes 16 rs b4 (D)
amount of material remaining on the board
make the win difficult. He subsequently
takes his king into safety and wins.
43 �cl �e6 44 'ifgS+ �f8 4S 'ith6+ w
�e7 46 'ifgS+ �d7 47 �bl : n �.s 'iteS
�cs 49 : d1 �b7 so 'itc3 'itbS 0-1
For the style of Grigory Sanakoev the
following game became a kind of visiting
card.

White : G .Sanakoev

Black: Yu .Shaposhnikov 17 fxe6!


The first piece sacrifice, enabling the
6th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 3- 6 4 f-file to be opened for the attack. Black can­
not accept the knight sacrifice, since after
Sicilian Defen ce 84 7 1 7. . . bxc3 1 8 exf7+ �xf7 1 9 �h5+ �g8
20 �f7+ �h8 2 1 'ith5 there is no defence
N otes by G r i g o ry S a n a koev against the threat of g5-g6.
17...fxe6 18 �hS! g6 19 'itf2!
1 e4 cS 2 ft:Jf3 ft:Jc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 ft:Jxd4 e6 S A second piece is left en prise, but again
ft:Jc3 'itc7 6 g3 a6 7 �g2 ctJf6 8 0-0 �e7 it cannot be taken on account of the fairly
9 �e3 0-0 10 �hl : ds 11 f4 d6 12 �f3 obvious 1 9 . . . gxh5 20 'itf7+ �h8 2 1 ft:Jxe6.
White is planning after g3-g4-g5 to drive But why does 19 'itf2 deserve an exclama­
the knight from f6, in order to then play tion mark?
f4-f5 and, after opening a-file, to begin an After 1 9 'itf3 �f6! 20 gxf6 'itf7 Black
attack against the opponent' s king. The im­ would have blocked the f-file and regained
mediate 1 2 g4 would have been premature the piece with chances of a successful de­
because of 1 2 . . . ft:Jxd4 13 �xd4 e5, when fence. Now this defence does not work on
White loses material. account of the variation 1 9 ... �f6 20 gxf6
12 ... : b8 13 'ite2?! 'itf7 21 �g4 ft:Jc7 (if 2 1 .. .bxc3, then 22
Possibly an inaccuracy. White vacates ft:Jxe6 �xe6 23 �xe6 'itxe6 24 f7+ and
the d i -square for his queen's rook in the White wins) 22 ft:Jce2 e5 23 ftjf3! �xg4
event of the manoeuvre 1 3 ... ft:Ja5 1 4 : ad l 24 ft:Jg5 and then f6-f7+ with a winning
ft:Jc4 1 5 � c l and observes the e4-pawn in attack.
the variation 13 ... ft:Jxd4 14 �xd4 b5 1 5 a3 19 ... ft:Jg7 20 'itf7+ �h8 21 �xg6!
�b7. However, it would have been more The white bishop persistently offers
logical to play g3-g4 immediately, begin­ itself and again Black is obliged to refrain
ning an attack. True, subsequently it tran­ from either capture ! If he takes the bishop
spires that at e2 the queen is better placed by 2 1 . . .hxg6, there follows 22 : f4 ! : f8
than at d l . 23 : h4+ ft:Jh5 24 'if xg6, while in the
13 ... ft:JaS? event of the knight capture 2 1 . . .bxc3 White
An incorrect evaluation of the position: continues 22 ft:Jf5 ! exf5 23 �d4 : gs 24
the manoeuvre of the knight to c4 does not �xh7 with the threats of 'ith5 and 'ifxg8+.
[After 24 i,xh7 Keilhack pointed out that his book ' The Most Amazing Chess Moves
24 ... 'iVc4! is a good defence, but that earlier of all Time'.) 24 l:!, f7 and now:
22 l:!, f4 ! (instead of 22 Clif5) is winning. (b l ) 24 ... 'iVe8 25 'iVf6 'iVg8 26 i,xh7
- S.G.] In both cases White forces mate in a 'iVxh7 27 g6 with a mating attack;
few moves. Black finds a defence that sets (b2) 24 ... l:!, g8 25 i,xh7 Clie5 (25 ...
the attacker a very difficult problem. @xh7 26 'iVf6 and 'iVh6 mate) 26 i,d4
21...C2Jc4! (D) Clixf7 27 'iVxf7 @xh7 28 g6+ c:J;; h6
(28 ... c:J;; h8 29 'iVf4 and wins) 29 i,e3+
@h5 30 'iVf3+ c:J;; xg6 31 l:\. gl + @h7 32
'iVh3+ Clih5 33 'iVxh5 mate.
w
(c) 22 ...hxg6 23 l:!, f4 with the threat of
24 l:!, g4+ Clih5 25 'iVxg6 and inevitable
mate.
(d) 22 ... l:!, f8? 23 'iVxf8+ i,xf8 24 l:\. xf8
mate.
(e) 22 ... bxc3 23 Clixe7 with the threats of
24 'iVxg7+! and 24 'iVf8+.
Since it transpires that not one of the four
white pieces can be taken, Black tries his
last chance.
White now has three pieces en prise and, 22... ClieS 23 Clixe5 i,b7
most importantly, Black is threatening by White would have won prettily in the
22 ... Clie5 to evict the queen from its menac­ event of 23 ... dxe5 24 i,xh7, for example:
ing position, after which White's attack may 24 ... i,d6 25 'iVg6 l:\. b7 26 'iVh6 Clie8
come to a halt. Does this mean that White's 27 l:!, f8+ i,xf8 28 'iVxf8+ @xh7 29 g6+
swift attack was unfounded? @xg6 30 l:\. gl +, or 24 ... 'iVd7 25 'iVg6
That cannot be! The attack has followed · 'iVe8 26 l:!, f7 i,f8 27 'iVh6 Clif5 28 'tih5
the logic of the position, and already my and both variations conclude in mate to the
pieces have almost surrounded the oppo­ black king.
nent's king. For the moment Black's heavy 24 'iVxg7+!
pieces are not taking part in the battle. The final sacrifice, which concludes the
Something must be found! The black knight game. As usual, the beauty and depth of the
wants to go to e5? Then we won't allow it sacrifice is not determined by the 'weight'
there and at the same time we will strength­ of the sacrificed piece. In the given instance
en the attack. For this a fourth piece has to after the queen sacrifice the contours of the
be placed en prise? Well, why not? ! mating constructions are fairly distinct.
22 Clic6!! 24 ... @xg7 25 l:\. f7+ @h8
The variations confirming the reality of If 25 ... @g8, then 26 i,xh7+ @h8 27
White's rather fantastic idea seem to me to Cll g6 mate.
be rather instructive. 26 l:\. xh7+ @g8 27 Clig4! 1-0
(a) 22 ... Clixe3 23 Clixe7 Clixfl 24 l:\. xfl A quiet move, concluding White's daring
i,b7 25 'iVxg7+! c:J;;xg7 26 l:!, f7+ c:J;; h8 27 attack. Against the threat of 28 Clih6+ there
l:\. xh7 mate. is no satisfactory defence. The final mat­
(b) 22 . . . 'iVxc6 23 'iVxe7 i,b7 (TH: If ing construction arises after 27 . . . i,xg5 28
instead 23 . . . l:!, g8, White wins brilliantly by l:!, xc7 i,xe3 29 Clif6+ @f8 30 l:!, f7 mate.
24 l:!, f4 hxg6 25 Clid5 ! ! e.g. 25 ... exd5 26 Ahead of Grigory Sanakoev were new
i,d4 Clie5 27 l:\. h4+ Clih5 28 'iVf6+ l:\. g7 and striking victories, the chief of which
29 i,xe5, as analysed by GM John Emms in was the winning of the World Correspond-
ence Championship, but the first time that
he made a name for himself was in the
B
course of the 6th USSR Championship.
The convincing winner of the tourna­
ment was grandmaster Vladimir Simagin.
Together with the champion's gold medal
he was awarded the best game prize, for his
win over the third prize-winner V.Milyutin.

White: V.Milyutin

Black: V.Simagin 18...h4!


It is not White, but Black who attacks the
6th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 3 - 6 4 enemy king position with the h-pawn - an
unusual picture for the Sicilian Defence.
Sicilian Defence 892 19 h3 'iid8!
'This move was not easy to find', com­
1 e4 cS 2 tll f3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tll x d4 tll f6 mented Simagin. In combination with
5 tll c3 a6 6 dte2 tll b d7 7 0-0 e6 8 f4 bS 9 the next move, this manoeuvre completes
dt f3 dtb7 10 a3 Black's idea.
Simagin considered the strongest to be 1 0 20 Viel tll h S! 21 dtxe7
e5 dtxf3 1 1 tll xf3 b4 1 2 exf6 bxc3 1 3 fxg7 No relief is promised by 2 1 dtxh5 1: xh5
'iib6+ 14 @h l Jtxg7 15 b3, as Gligoric 22 dtxe7 Vixe7 23 'iie2 .l: h6 ! .
played against him in the 1 964 Moscow 21...'iixe7 2 2 .l: f2 tll g3+ 23 @gl tll f6 24
International tournament. 'iie3 0-0 25 'ii gS (D)
10 ... 'ii c7 1 1 @hl hS!? This attempt at a counter-attack is the
The '! ?' mark accompanying this move best defensive resource. However, Black
belongs to Simagin. In the 'classical' in­ parries it by demolishing the opponent's
terpretation of the Scheveningen Variation position in the centre.
White can support his attack with g2-g4.
This suggested to Simagin the idea of im­
proving the variation for Black with a new
strategic set-up . B
Black first develops his queenside pieces,
his knight occupying a less active post at
d7, and the enemy pawn storm on the king­
side is radically prevented by ...h7-h5. The
counter-plan adopted by Milyutin proves
unsuccessful.
12 fS?
· Simagin criticised this move. 1 2 dtd2,
12 dte3 or 1 2 1: el looks more natural.
12 ... eS 13 tll b3 dte7 14 Jtgs .l: c8 15 25...'iia 7! 26 'iix h4 J: xc3! 27 bxc3 tll fxe4
'ii d2 tll b6 16 tll aS dtaS 17 .l: adl tll bd7 28 dtxe4 tlixe4 29 @fl 'iixf2+ 30 'iixf2
18 tll b3 (D) tll xf2 31 @xf2 dS
This is a tacit offer of a draw by repetition As a result of his lengthy combination
of moves: 1 8 . . . tll b6 1 9 tll a5 tllb d7 etc. Black has achieved a strategically won end-
ing. But to win he still needs to demonstrate 14... ctJg6 lS ctJfS CLie7
both technique and imagination. Black does not obj ect to a draw.
32 : d3 : c8 33 ctJd2 �f8 34 g4 �e7 3S 16 ctJh4 ltJg6 17 ltJg2 : e7 18 g4 h6?
@g3 @f6 36 h4 as 37 ltJb3 a4 38 ctJd2 The weakening of the kingside later
j,b7! proves fatal for Black. The threat of g4-
Black vacates the a-file for his rook and g5 was not especially dangerous and he
prepares an elegant finish. should not have delayed his counterplay
39 : e3 b4! 40 axb4 a3 41 c4 a2 42 : el on the queenside. Black should have played
: as 43 : at : a3+ 44 @f2 e4! 4S ctJfl 1 8 ... : c8 with the possible variation 1 9
d4! 46 @e2 @eS! 47 ctJd2 : h3 0-1 j,d2 a6 20 a4 b5, when he has scime chanc­
White's resignation was by no means es of a counter-attack on the queenside.
premature. After 48 : xa2 : h2+ 49 @ e l 19 'ff el : c8 20 j,d2
e3 50 ltJfl : h l 5 1 @e2 @ f4 Black would This move is necessary, to avoid the vari­
have woven a mating net with his small ation 20 ... cxd4 2 1 cxd4 'ftc3.
army. 20... ctJf8 21 'fih4 ctJg6 22 'fif2 ctJf8
The winner of the championship had an Passive play with the aim of awaiting
interesting game with an experienced over­ mistakes by the opponent rarely proves
the-board master. successful even in an over-the-board game.
Such a method is even less acceptable in
correspondence play.
White: V.Simagin 23 ctJh4 g6
The unpleasant 24 ctJf5 was threatened.
Black : A. Bannik Black no longer has any satisfactory de­
fence. It turns out that, even in USSR Cor­
6th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 3- 6 4 respondence Championships, quite short
games are possible.
Nimzo-lndian Defence £58 24 ltJg2 @g7 (D)

N otes by Vlad i m i r S i m a g i n

1 d4 ctJf6 2 �4 e 6 3 tbc3 j,b4 4 e3 0-0 S w


j,d3 dS 6 ctJf3 cS 7 0-0 tbc6 8 a3 j,xc3
9 bxc3 'ii c7
Bannik avoids the popular variation
9 . . .dxc4 10 j,xc4 'fic7 and decides to try a
less well-studied line.
10 cxdS exdS 11 CDh4
Opening monographs also consider other
continuations here: 1 1 a4 and 1 1 j,b2.
1 1 ... j,d7
A new system of development, which, Outwardly Black' s position looks quite
however, proves unsuccessful in the present defensible. However, after a brief and swift
game. This method of play is too aggres­ attack Black capitulates within just 6(!)
sive. [The move usually recommended is moves !
l l .. . : e8 or 1 1 ... ltJe7. - S.G.] 2S e4! dxe4
12 f3 : fe8 13 : a2 CLie7 14 g3 If25 . . . cxd4 there also follows 26 j,xh6+.
The immediate 14 g4 is also possible. Yet Black cannot allow 26 e5.
Black was threatening 14 ... g5. 26 j,xh6+! �g8
Black loses immediately after 26 ... @xh6 reply he was, naturally, forced to resign im­
27 g5+ @xg5 28 �h4+ etc. mediately. It turned out that in his analysis
27 �h4 tlJ8h7 28 fxe4 � xe4 he had absent-mindedly returned the h3-
An attempt to confuse matters. pawn to its initial square.
29 � xf6 � xg4 30 � xf7! 1-0 The price of this mistake was that in the
After this queen sacrifice Black' s resist­ final table Konstantinopolsky, who became
ance terminates. Possible variations are: the winner of the tournament, was separated
(a) 30 ... � xh4 3 1 � g7+ @h8 32 !:Lixh4 from Simagin by a half point. A half point
tl:Jf8 33 � f2, when Black has no satisfac­ that ruled out his hopes of opening the list of
tory defence against the threat of 34 � xf8+ USSR correspondence champions.
and 3 5 tl:Jxg6 mate. A new contact with correspondence play­
(b) 30 ... @xf7 3 1 i!,c4+ @e8 32 � e2+. ers, this time for the whole of his remain­
(c) Also 30 . . . � xg2+ 3 1 � xg2 @xf7 32 ing life, began early in 1 963. By this time
i!,c4+ does not help. Vladimir Simagin had become a famous
Simagin's first encounter with corre­ grandmaster, and an outstanding researcher,
spondence chess occurred in 1 948, when trainer and writer (that same year his book
he took part in the 1 st USSR Championship of best games was published).
and became a prize-winner, sharing 2nd-4th Simagin saw the value of correspondence
places. But then for 1 5 years he gave up play as being the possibility of concentrat­
correspondence play. In the opinion of the ing entirely on the creative element. "Clas­
chess historian Isaak Romanov, the reason sical chess skill," he wrote, "is also retained
for this may have been an incident that oc­ in correspondence play, which even has
curred in his game with Aleksandr Konstan­ some advantages over normal chess, where
tinopolsky (Black). the creative element is often affected by the
tension of the competitive situation."
After winning the 6th USSR CC Ch, the
outstanding grandmaster Vladimir Simagin
w ( 1 9 1 9- 1 968) finished second in the fol­
lowing championship. In the final of the
5th World Correspondence Olympiad he
defended the colours of the Soviet team
on the second board. In 1 968 he became a
participant in the final of the 6th World Cor­
respondence Championship.
However, soon after the start of this
event Vladimir Simagin passed away. A
chess player died during a tournament. His
Black has the initiative, but with the untimely death cut short the chapter on the
simple 22 � d2 it would have been quite glorious career of grandmaster Simagin in
possible to hold the position. Wishing at correspondence chess. "Not only in Soviet,
one stroke to get rid of the pins in view of but also in world correspondence chess,
the threat of 22 . . . tl:Jf4, Simagin played 22 Simagin will never be forgotten," wrote the
@fl ?? and after receiving 22 . . . tl:Jg3+ in ICCF President Hans-Werner von Massow.
Seventh Championship ( 196 5-1966)

IN THE 7th Championship there were 20 � dl exd4 11 cxd4 dS! 12 eS ll:le4 13 ll:lc3
players from Russia, Ukraine and Belorus­ ll:lxc3 14 bxc3 ll:laS lS j,c2 li'd7
sia. The participation of the well-known This move would appear to lead to
FIDE grandmaster Alexander Zaitsev should some difficulties for Black. In my opinion,
be mentioned. N.P.Andreyev (Moscow) was 1 5 ... j,h5 was better.
appointed arbiter. 16 li'd3 g6 17 j,h6 j,fS 18 li'e2 � fb8 19
By 1 st October 1 965, 39 of the 1 90 j,xfS li'xfS 20 � d3 � b6 21 h3 ll:lc4 22
games had finished, roughly one fifth. A g4 'ifd7 23 ltJgS
feature of the tournament was that there was After Black' s inaccuracy White has
no obvious leader. A large group of players achieved a threatening position. He is
had '+ I ' , and the winner of the previous intending f2-f4-f5 with a decisive attack.
championship, grandmaster Vladimir Sim­ Black is required to defend with exceptional
agin, had not yet completed a single game. accuracy.
But by mid-February 1 966 it became 23 ... j,f8! 24 j,xf8 � xf8 2S � el li'e7
clear that the fastest pace had been set by 26 h4 b4!
the master Mikhail Yudovich - 7 out of 9. Counter-attack is the only possibility of
The only player who could rival him was saving the game. 26 ... h6 was tempting, but
Simagin - 3 out of 4. Roughly two thirds of after 27 ll:lh3 ! ifxh4 28 ll:lf4! Black would
the games completed by that time had ended have been in a difficult position.
in draws, and so most of the players, includ­ 27 cxb4 � xb4 28 � b3 aS 29 f4 (D)
ing Dubinin and Zaitsev, were on 50%.
Of importance for the final outcome was
the game between the tournament favourites.
B

White: V.Simagin

Black : M . Yudovich

7th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 5 - 6 6

Ruy Lopez C86

N otes by V l ad i m i r S i m a g i n 29...f6!
The only rejoinder against White's at­
1 e4 eS 2 ll:l f3 ll:lc6 3 j,bS a 6 4 j,a4 ll:lf6 tack, but quite adequate.
S 0-0 j,e7 6 li'e2 30 exf6 ifxf6 31 li'e6+ lfxe6 32 ll:lxe6
This is an attempt to deviate from the � e8! Yi-Yi
well-trodden paths. However, in the Ruy The last precise move, after which White
Lopez it is hard to find new ways. gave up playing for a win and offered a
6 ... bS 7 j,b3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9 d4 j,g4 10 draw. This result is obvious after 33 f5 gxf5
The f!!SSR CC Champion:$.bips: P/?otographs i

The first two USSR Correspondence


Chess Champions.
Above; Aleksandr Konstantinopolsky
and left: Pyotr Atyashev

Many top USSR postal players were also masters at over-the-board play. Above, the young
Igor Kopylov is seen in action. Later he was the 1 7th USSR CC Champion.
ii Red Letters

Vladimir Semenyuk (left) won the 1 2th


USSR Championship.
Alik Zilberberg (above) did well in the 8th
Championship. After emigrating, he soon
became a GM and one of the top corres­
pondence players in the United States.

ABOVE: the theoretician Anatoly


Ufimtsev, who played in five
USSR CC Finals late in his long
chess career.
RIGHT: Vladimir Yarkov, who
won the 1 8th Championship and
was second in the 1 9th.
The USSR CC Championships: Photographs iii

Vladimir Simagin (left) won the


6th USSR Championship and came
close in two others. For Vyacheslav
Ragozin (above) the 2nd USSR
Championship was valuable expe­
rience towards winning the world
title a few years later.

The 1 5th USSR CC Champion, Ale­ Grigory Sanakoev in the 1 990s; he took second
ksandr Lipiridi, who died young; the place in the 6th USSR Championship and later
1 9th Championship was his memorial. won the 1 2th CC World Championship.
iv Red Letters

LEFT: famous chess writer


Yakov Estrin, who was
co-holder of the 5th USSR
CC Championship and later
won the 7th CC World
Championship.

BELOW: Mikhail
Arkhangelsky, the runner­
up in the 1 4th USSR CC
Championship.

RIGHT: another well­


known chess writer, Ya­
kov Neishtadt, with 4th CC
World Champion Professor
Vladimir Zagorovsky and
Pyotr Dubinin (far right)
at Novogorsk (Moscow re­
gion) in 1 973.
The USSR CC Championships: Photographs v

RIGHT:
Grandmaster Lev
Omelchenko, who
was the only man to
win two consecutive
USSR CC Champi­
onships.

BELOW:
Yury Zelinsky,
1 9th Champion and
the player with the
best overall result
in the whole series.

BOTTOM RIGHT:
Aleksandr
Lutovinov, who
was runner-up in the
1 5th Championship.
vi Red Letters

LEFT: Sergey Khlusevich won


the USSR CC title at his third
attempt, in the 20th Champion­
ship. He is now competing in a
World Championship final.

ABOVE: IM Dmitry Lybin


who played in the 20th Champ­
ionship. His piano recitals have
been a popular feature at sev­
eral ICCF Congresses.

Aleksandr Yakimenko came 6th in the 15th Ukrainian master Alexandr Serebriisky
USSR CC Championship. who played in the 9th Championship.
The USSR CC Championships: Photographs vii

LEFT and BELOW:


Mikhail Umansky won the
13th USSR CC Championship
with the highest percentage
score achieved by any player in
the whole series.

Left, a rare photograph of


Umansky as a 14-year-old in
Stavropol, 1 966, and (below) a
more recent picture of him from
the 1 990s after he won the 1 3th
World CC Championship.
In 200 1-2003 Umansky deci­
sively won an ICCF jubilee
email tournament in which all
the living correspondence world
champions participated.

ABOVE: Grandmaster
Vsevolod Kosenkov
who came second in the
9th Championship.
viii Red Letters

RIGHT: the last CC Champion of


the former USSR, Vasily Malinin

De;vis Godes, second in the 1 7th


Championship.

CC-grandmaster Sergey Yakovlevich


Grodzensky, co-author of this book,
who was both a player and organiser
in the USSR CC Championships
Ilia Kitaigorodsky, third in the 1 5th USSR CC series. With I.Romanov, he wrote
Championship, was one of Tim Harding 's op­ 'Khod v Konverte', the standard Rus­
ponents in a World Ch. Semifinal in the 1 980s. sian history book about CC.
34 gxf5 : xb3 35 axb3 or 33 : xb4 axb4 White has gradually built up danger­
34 f5 gxf5 35 gxf5. ous pressure on the queenside. Here Black
This draw benefited Mikhail Yudovich, should have played 2 1 ... '¥i/b6, retaining pos­
who, by not losing a single game and by not sibilities of a tenacious defence.
dropping any half points in games with the 21 ...fS? (D)
outsiders, confidently took first place. The decisive mistake. After this natural
move White gains a significant positional
advantage.
White: M . Yudovich

Black: A.Sychyov
w
7th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 5 - 6 6

Ruy Lopez C96

N otes by M i k h a i l Yu d ov ic h

1 e4 eS 2 lt:Jf3 lt:Jc6 3 �bS a6 4 �a4 ctJf6


S 0-0 �e7 6 : et bS 7 �b3 0-0 8 c3 d6
Black wanted to 'frighten' his opponent
with the Marshall Attack. 22 ctJ b7! '¥i/b6 23 �aS! '¥i/xb7 24 : c7
9 h3 lt:JaS 10 �c2 cS 11 d4 ctJd7 12 '¥i/b8 2S : xd7 : a7
ctJbd2 The white rook that has penetrated so far,
Other possibilities are 12 dxc5 dxc5 1 3 needs to be exchanged, of course.
ctJbd2 '¥i/c7 14 lt:Jfl ctJb6 1 5 lt:Je3, as in 26 : xa7 '¥i/xa7 27 '¥i/d2
the well-known games Fischer-Keres (Can­ The threat to the f2-square has to be par­
didates Tournament, Curacao 1 962) and ried: if 27 lt:Jg5 Black would have replied
Gligoric-Unzicker (Olympiad, Varna 1 962), 27 ... fxe4.
or 12 d5. 27...fxe4 28 �xe4 ctJb6
12 ... cxd4 13 cxd4 lt:Jc6 14 ctJb3 �f6 If 28 ... ctJf5, then 29 g4 is good. [In my
Black does everything possible to sup­ opinion, to 28 ... ctJf5 the simplest reply is
port his centre, but in so doing he ends up 29 �xf5 : xf5 30 : c l '¥i/a8 3 1 : c7,
in a cramped, although solid position. Here retaining a slight advantage. Whereas after
1 4 . . . a5 is usually played. 29 g4 !?, there can follow 29 . . . ctJg3 30 @g2
lS dS lt:Jxe4 3 1 : xe4 '¥i/f7 and then, for exam­
The game Altshuler-Sychyov from the ple, 32 '¥i/d3 lt:Je7 33 �c7 ctJf5 ! ? with the
same tournament went 1 5 �e3 exd4 1 6 better chances now for Black. - S.G.]
ctJfxd4 lt:Jde5 1 7 a4 �d7 1 8 axb5 tl:Jxd4 29 '¥i/e3 : b8 30 : cl : c8
1 9 �xd4 �xb5 20 �c3 lt:Jc6 2 1 ctJd4 If 30 . . . : b7, then 3 1 '¥i/g5, intending 32
lt:Jxd4 22 �xd4 �e5 with equal chances. '¥i/g4, was very strong.
1S ... ctJe7 31 : c6! : xc6
But not 1 5 ... CLJb4 1 6 �b l a5 17 �d2 Or 3 1 . . . lt:Jxc6 32 �xb6 etc.
when Black is in serious difficulties. 32 dxc6 ctJbc8 33 '¥i/d2!
16 �d3 ctJb6 17 �d2 �d7 Suppressing any active attempt by Black:
l 7 . . . ctJa4 came into consideration. 33 . . . '¥i/c5 is very strongly met by 34 �b4.
18 lt:JaS g6 19 b3 �g7 20 �b4 ctJbc8 21 33 ... �f6 34 h4
: ct A classical rule of chess strategy - after
cramping the opponent on one flank, attack in the following game was a Caro-Kann
on the other. Defence, which Simagin called the ' silver
34 . c:t;fl
.. defence', intending that the 'gold' should
If 34 . . . cJ;;; g7, then 35 g4 is highly un­ be the Sicilian, and the 'bronze' the French
pleasant. Defence...
35 '{i'h6 �g8 36 h5 '{i'c5
Black has no other way of extricating his
queen, but even on c5 it proves to be out of White: V.Simagin
play.
37 hxg6 hxg6 38 �d2! Black: P.Dubinin
The most accurate, since the black queen
continues to remain off-side. 7th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 5 - 6 6
38 ... �g7 39 '{i'h3 d5 40 �xg6 '{i'd6
If 40 . . .'{i'xc6, then 41 ltJxe5 ! is quickly Caro-Kann Defence B 1 8
decisive.
41 �h7+ �f8 42 CLJg5 '{i'f6 N otes b y Vlad i m i r S i m a g i n
42 . . . '{i'xc6 43 QJe6+ also leads to cata­
strophic loss of material. 1 e4 c 6 2 d4 d 5 3 Qjc3 dxe4 4 ltJxe4 �f5 5
43 �e4 1-0 Qjg3 �g6 6 �c4
If now 43 . . . '{i'xc6, then 44 '{i'h5 . This is a very popular continuation,
Already in the early 1 930s Mikhail which in recent years has been played in
Mikhailovich Yudovich ( 1 9 1 1 - 1 987) was numerous games. It has been impossible to
acknowledged to be one of the strongest establish exactly the name of the author of
players in Moscow, time after time finishing this opening variation. Generally speaking,
in the first five in the championship of the in the naming of openings and variations
capital. Six times he played in the champi­ complete confusion reigns. One often comes
onship of the country, where his best result across variations that were popular even be­
- a share of 3rd-6th places - came in 1 93 1 , fore the birth of their 'authors' .
when he was 20 years old. H e was a FIDE 6...e 6 7 CLJh3
international master from the moment that 7 ltJ l e2 is more usual. The move made
the title was established. by White is no worse, since it leaves his
Mikhail Yudovich is also remembered queen with greater freedom.
as a trainer, theoretician and writer. From 7... CLJf6 8 0-0 �d6 9 �b3 CLJbd7
1 945 and to the end of his life he worked as If 9 . . . '{i'c7 there could have followed 1 0
deputy chief editor of the magazine 'Sha­ '{i'f3.
khmaty v SSSR'. In the 1 950s he switched 10 CLJf4 '{i'c7 11 '{i'f3 e5
to correspondence play. A constant member The most topical variation, after which
of the Soviet team in the 3rd-7th Corre­ the game acquires theoretical interest. The
spondence Olympiads, he won four gold exchange of knight for bishop is now obvi­
medals and one silver. Certainly no one else ous, since after 1 2 dxe5 ltJxe5 Black has no
!}as achieved this. problems in developing his pieces.
Vladimir Simagin again played splendid­ 12 CLJxg6 hxg6 13 c3 c5?!
ly and, had it not been for a couple of draws However, after this move White gains a
against opponents of inferior standard, he clear positional advantage and the correct­
would have had chances of repeating his ness of Black's 1 1 th move is not confirmed.
success in the 7th Championship. In several There was still a choice between 1 3 . . . 0-0
of his games the famous grandmaster was and the problematic pawn sacrifice after
able to demonstrate his class. The opening 1 3 . . . 0-0-0.
14 �gs 0-0 lS dxcS! �xcS 16 !::!, adl A new phase of this interesting ending
'iYc6 has arisen. White is a pawn up, but Black
This leads to an inferior ending, but has managed to relieve somewhat the situa­
Black had nothing better. 1 6 . . . !::!, ad8 1 7 tion on his kingside.
lt:Je4! was bad for him. 38 ... !::!, d8 39 !::!, b7 !::!, d6 40 �g8!
17 ltxc6 bxc6 18 : fel as 19 lt:Je4 �a7 Again White is threatening mate.. If
20 �xf6! lt:Jxf6 21 lt:Jxf6+ gxf6 22 !::!, d7 40 . . . @h5 there can follow 4 1 @f3.
(D) 40...gS 41 !::!, h7+ �g6 42 hS+ �f6 43
The resulting ending is advantageous to !::!, h6+ �es 44 !::!, xd6 @xd6
White. His active rook restricts the black White's advantage has finally assumed
pieces. However, it is not at all easy for real proportions. After the exchange of
White to convert his slight advantage. His rooks he has two passed pawns on opposite
correct plan is an attack on the enemy king! wings. These are obvious grounds for a de­
cisive advantage, but the play is still very
complicated.
4S @f3 @es (D)
8

22 ... �cS 23 !::!. edl !::!. ab8!


White's plan is obvious (the doubling of
rooks on the seventh rank), but Black has
counterplay on the b-file.
24 !::!, ld2 e4! 2S �n e3 26 fxe3 �xe3 27 46 g4!
!::!, e2 �cs 28 !::!, c7 !::!, b6 29 !::!, d2 �g7 In order to win, the white king must
Now it is clear that Black is losing a break through into Black's queenside. The
pawn, but will this be sufficient for White to last move is the only way of carrying out
win? For example, the variation 30 !::!, dd7 this plan.
a4 3 1 �xf7 !::!, xb2 is unclear. White' s next 46 ... f4 47 �b3 �cs 48 �e2 �f8 49 @d3
move is an important link in the preparation �g7 so �dl �h6 Sl �f3 �g7 S2 �b7
of an attack on the black king. �h6 S3 @c4!
30 g3! �e3 31 !::!, dd7 fS 32 @e2 �cl 33 The decisive breakthrough!
�xf7 !::i. xb2+ 34 �dl �e3 3S h4 @ h6! S3 ... �g7 S4 @bS! 1-0
There was a threat of mate. For example, In this position Black resigned. For the
35 ... �f2? 36 �d5+ �f6 37 !::!, xc6+ �e5 saving of the game he is short of just one
38 !::!. e6 mate. Now the point of White's tempo. For example: 54 ... f3 55 �xf3 �f4
30th move becomes clear. However, Black 56 c4 @xf3 57 c5 �xg4 58 h6 �e5 59 c6
avoids the threats, losing only one pawn in �f5 60 h7 @e6 6 1 �b6! and one of the
the process. white pawns queens. A highly interesting
36 !::!. xc6 !::!. b6 37 !::!. xb6 �xb6 38 �e2 ending!
8th USSR CC Championship ( 1 967- 1 968) 8J

NQ I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Pts

1 S. Sokolov Moscow Y2 I Y2 0 I 1 Yz Yz I Yz Y2 I Yz J 0 1 l 1 Y2 13

2 l. Morozov Gorky Y2 Yi 1 '/2 0 0 Y2 Y2 Yz l Y2 Y2 l y, 1 1 I 1 1 1 2 1/z

3 A. Zilberberg Odessa 0 Y2 0 I 'lz. 'lz Y2 Y2 1 Y2 l I Yz y, Y2 1 1 1 1 1 2 Yz

4 N. Andreyev Moscow Y2 0 I I 0 I I 0 0 0 Yz J I Y2 I l 'h l I 12

5 Yu. Zarubin Moscow I Y2 0 0 0 Y2 0 Y2 l I 'lz l Yz 1 Yz 1 I 1 y, 1 1 1/z

6 I. Tilrn Tallinn 0 1 Y2 1 I Yz Yz 0 Y2 Y2 Y2 Y2 0 y, 1 Yz y, J 1 11

7 M. Zagorovsky Moscow 0 1 Yz 0 Y2 Y2 � y, Y2 1 Y2 Yz Y2 Yz Y2 1 1 0 l Yz I O Yz

8 I. Shapovalov Yaroslavl 1;2 '!2 Yz 0 l Y2 Yz 'h Y2 y, Yz l Y2 Y2 l Yz Y2 0 I I OYz �


Q.
l J 9Yz
Sirnferopol I '!2 y,
......
9 M. Abramson Yz y, Yz Y2 Y2 Yz Y2 Y2 0 Y2 Yz 0 0 Yz

1 0 N. Pokrovsky Chelyabinsk 0 Y2 0 l 0 Y2 0 Yz Y2 Y2 'h 0 I Yz 'h I l l Y2 9Yz �


11 A. Sadomsky Moscow Yz 0 Y2 l 0 Y2 Yz Y2 'h Y2 1 0 Y2 I 'h Y2 Y2 y, Yz 9Yz
Cit

1 2 V. Skotorenko Kemerovo Yz Yz 0 Y2 Yz Y2 Y2 Yz 'h Yz 0 y, Yz 'h Yz Yz 'lz 1 Yz 9

1 3 L. Kitayev Yaroslavl 0 y, 0 0 0 Yz Y2 0 I I 1 Yz l y, 0 0 l 0 l 8Yz

J 1;, 8
14 V. Dragunov Torez y, 0 Yz 0 Y2 Y2 Yz 0 Yz Yz 0 y, 0 'lz Yz l Yz

15 A. Tolush Leningrad 0 'h '/, 1/2 0 y, y, Yz Yz 1/2 0 Yz Y2 y, Yz Yz 1/2 0 l 8

16 A.P. Sokolsky Minsk 1 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 0 0 1/2 Yz y, y, I J y, Yz 1/2 0 0 7'/z

1 7 V. Yershov Dnepropetrovsk 0 0 0 0 0 1/2 0 1/z I 0 1/2 Y2 J 1/2 Y2 1/2 I 0 Yz 7

18 Yu. Smolensky Odessa 0 0 0 Yi 0 y, 1 Yz I 0 y, Yz 0 1/2 Yz Yz 0 1/2 1/2 7


'!!!
1 9 G. Chumichyov Kolomna 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 Yz 0 l 0 1 1 1 1/2 � 1 7

20 A. Koblencs Riga 1/2 0 0 0 1/2 0 Yz 0 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 0 1/2 0 l '/, '/, 0 6

G.N. Veresov (Minsk) dropped out after a year and his games were cancelled.
Eighth C·hampionship ( 196 7 -1968)

TWENTY-ONE players began the final of - 9 out of 1 6. The Correspondence Com­


the 8th Championship: grandmaster Alexan­ mission decided to extend play to l 0th De­
der Tolush, eight masters and 12 ' selected' cember 1 968, after which unfinished games
candidate masters, representing five of the were to be adjudicated, after selecting from
Republics (Russia, Ukraine, Belorussia, them the eight most important, which were
Latvia and Estonia). The chief arbiter was to be continued by telegraph.
Ya.Eventov. When all the results were in, the gold
Play began simultaneously in four semi­ medal went to the over-the-board master
finals of the 9th championship, where 72 Sergey Sokolov - a Muscovite, and at that
players, including four masters and 40 time a serviceman. At the end of the USSR
candidate masters, were striving to qualify Championship Sergey Mironovich Sokolov
for the main tournament. Finally, 23 quar­ ( 1 937- 1 992) was 32 years old. He had be­
ter-finals of the 10th championship attracted fore him successes both at the board (best
392 players, of whom 1 1 8 were candidate result - third place in the Moscow Champi­
masters. A two-year cycle in the champion­ onship of 1 974) and in ICCF tournaments,
ships was established. the obtaining of the title of correspondence
The first result in the 8th Championship international master in 1 982, qualification
was recorded soon after the start: Andreyev for the Three-Quarter-Final of the world
won against Kitayev. By the end of the year championship, and a tragic death in 1 992.
80 of the 2 1 0 games had finished. Mikhail
Zagorovsky had the best score - 71.h out of
1 2, while the well-known FIDE grandmaster White : L .Kitayev
Aleksandr Tolush was on 6 out of 1 1 . The
future winner, the master Sergey Sokolov, Black: S .Sokolov
had finished only two games, scoring one
and a half points. By that time the Belorus­ 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 7 - 6 8
sian master Gavril V eresov had dropped out
of the tournament, and it was decided not to Scotch Game C45
count his games.
Six months later Sokolov's leading po­ N otes by Sergey S o ko l ov
sition - 5 points out of 7 - was no longer
in doubt. Andreyev was also looking quite 1 e4 e5 2 i{Jf3 i{Jc6 3 d4 exd4 4 i{Jxd4
good on 8 out of 12, while Morozov and Jtc5 5 i{J b3 Jtb6 6 a4 a5 7 i{Jc3 'i'Yf6 8
Zagorovsky had 91.h out of 16. j¥e2
When there were just two months remain­ By forcing this move, shutting in the
ing to the specified completion date, it tran­ bishop on fl , Black has gained at least equal
spired that 33 games were still in progress. chances.
Sokolov's lead was undisputed ( 1 0 points ...
8 i{Jge7 9 i{Jd5
out of 1 3). Also in the leading group were An unfortunate sortie. The opening
Morozov - l O Yz out of 1 7, Zilberberg and of the e-file is advantageous to Black,
Andreyev - 10 out of 1 5 , Tum - 1 0 out of and also the b2-pawn is deprived of its
18, Zagorovsky - 91.h out of 1 8, and Zaburin natural protection. More in keeping with
the demands of the position is the plan White: M .Zagorovsky
of completing White' s development by
�e3, 0-0-0, g2-g3 and �g2 etc., as in Black : S .Sokolov
the game Benko-Smyslov from the 1 964
Interzonal tournament. 8th U S SR CC C h , 1 9 6 7 - 6 8
9... lt:Jxd5 10 exd5+ lt:Je7 11 h4 h6
Theory recommends l l . ..d6 1 2 �g5 Queen 's Indian Defence £ 1 9
'i!e5 13 'i!xe5 dxe5 14 �xe7 cJ;; xe7 1 5
c4 �d6 with a good game for Black. How­ 1 d4 lt:Jf6 2 lt:Jf3 b6 3 c4 e6 4 g3
ever, in this variation White is by no means White chooses the variation with the fi­
obliged to exchange on e7; 1 4 c4 is prefer­ anchetto of his king' s bishop. In top-level
able, and if 14 . . . �d7 1 5 c5. events it has been supplanted somewhat
12 c4? by the method of development with e2-
At the cost of an important tempo, White e3 , which is outwardly unpretentious, but,
defends his b2- and d5-pawns. 1 2 g3 fol­ as shown by Karpov, Petrosian and other
lowed by �g2 was essential. grandmasters, full of venom.
12 ... d6 13 g4? (D) 4... �b7 5 �g2 �e7 6 0-0 0-0 7 lt:Jc3
This unfounded attacking attempt finally lt:Je4 8 'i!c2 lt:Jxc3 9 'i!xc3 f5 10 d5
compromises White's position. Black seizes If White desired, he could have followed
the initiative. the well-trodden path ( 1 0 lt:Jel etc.) of pro­
voking global exchanges and approaching
the haven of a draw. His attempt to sharpen
the play proves unsuccessful. The opening
B
of the position allows his opponent to gain
the initiative on the queenside.
10...�f6 11 'i!c2 exd5 12 lt:Jel lt:Jc6 13
�xd5+ cJef h8 14 �d2 lt:Jd4 15 'i!d3 c6
16 �g2 d5 17 e3 dxc4 18 'i!xc4 lt:Jb5 19
�b4 � e8 20 'i!b3 a5
The pawns begin advancing, finally con­
solidating Black's advantage on the queen's
wing. White is unable to mount any counter­
action against this.
13 ... 'ifg6 14 �h3 h5 15 g5 21 � dl 'i!c7 22 �d2 lt:Jd6 23 lt:Jd3 lt:Je4
White's strategy has failed. 24 � fel c5 25 f4 c4 26 'i!c2 b5 27 �cl b4
1 5 � g 1 would have been refuted by 28 lt:Jf2 a4 29 �xe4 b3 ! (D)
15 ... �f8 16 �fl hxg4 17 �xg4 �xg4
1 8 � xg4 'i!f5 when Black has a strong
attack.
15 ... 0-0 16 �e3 'i!e4 17 �d2 w
After 1 7 0-0-0 the reply l 7 . . . lt:Jf5 is
unpleasant.
17 ... �xe3+ 18 fxe3 �xh3 19 � xh3 c6!
The opening of the position is obviously
to Black's advantage.
20 dxc6 bxc6 21 lt:Jd4 c5 22 lt:Jb5 d5 23
lt:Jc3 'i!e6 24 � ahl � ab8 25 �cl � b4
0-1
Black succeeds in first opening the a-file 13 a4 j,b7 14 a5 : res 15 dxe5 ll:Jxe5 16
and then occupying it with his rook. There 'iVc2 ctJh5 17 ll:Jxe5 dxe5
is a striking contrast between his bishop, White faces a crisis because a weak point
raking the long diagonal, and its opponent, at f4 has appeared near his king position,
helplessly shut in at c 1 . while on the queenside he must take care
30 axb3 axb3 3 1 'iVe2 Jtxe4 32 ll:Jxe4 fxe4 not to lose his a-pawn.
33 g4 g6 34 g5 j,g7 35 : d5 c3! 36 : b5 1S ll:Jf3
: ebS 37 : xbS+ : xbS 3S : dt : as 39 1 8 c5 is White's other reasonable option.
'iVg2 'iVcS 0-1 1S ... j,b4 19 j,d2
The Gorky player Igor Morozov played This leads to long-term problems on the
strongly and evenly throughout the tourna­ dark-squares, so White should have consid­
ment. He scored the same number of points ered 1 9 : d l ! ?. Black would be ill-advised
as Zilberberg, but a superior tie-break gave to accept the offer of the a-pawn because his
the future grandmaster the silver medal. The bishop could be shut out of play for a long
decisive game, which brought him second time after 1 9 ... Jtxa5 20 c5.
place, was the following. 19... j,xd2 20 'iVxd2 : adS
Black has achieved his aim of uncontest­
ed control of f4, but before occupying it he
White: N .Andreyev improves the position of another piece.
21 'iVc3 ctJf4 22 j,c2
Black: l . Morozov 22 cxb5 (hoping for 22 . . .axb5? 23 a6),
had to be rejected because Black would jus­
8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 7 - 6 8 tify his play tactically by 22 ... : d3 23 'IVc2
(23 'iVc4? allows 23 ... axb5 with tempo.)
Ruy Lopez C95 23 ... : xf3 24 gxf3 'IV d8 and the white king
is in serious danger. There could follow 25
N otes by Tim H a rd i n g : edl 'iVg5+ 26 �fl cxb5 when 27 o/iic7
fails to 27 ... : c8 ! 28 Jtxf7+ �h8 and now
1 e4 e5 2 ctJ f3 ll:Jc6 3 j,b5 a6 4 j,a4 ctJf6 29 'iVxb7 allows mate in 3 while 29 'iVb6
5 0-0 j,e7 6 : el b5 7 j,b3 d6 S c3 0-0 (to protect f2) is of no avail because of the
9 h3 ltJbS crushing blow 29 ... Jtxe4 ! .
This variation, attributed to the Hun­ 2 2... '1Ve7 23 c5 j,cS 24 'iVe3 'iVf6 2 5 � h2
garian hypermodem master Gyula Breyer 'iVg6 26 : gt
( 1 894-192 1 ), became very popular in the White does his best to construct a robust
1 960s and supplanted the old move 9. . . ll:Ja5 defence for his king but Black's pressure is
in popularity for several years. too strong to be withstood for long.
10 d4 ctJbd7 11 c4 c6 26 ... 'iVh5 27 ct:Jel (D)
This is one of several lines that were
being tested intensively by masters in: the
mid-60s.
12 ctJbd2 8
This move was apparently first proposed
by Ravinsky in 1 955 but may have received
its first important test in this game.
12 ... '1Vc7
Later 12 . . . c5 was played in Poleshchuk­
Umansky, from the 1 3th Championship, and
1 2 ... j,b7 has been seen too.
27 ... l:l, d2 28 l! fl these games Black achieved good play.
28 'i,Vxd2 fails to 28 . . . �xh3 ! . Therefore it was natural that White should
28 ... l:l, ed8 2 9 l! c l gS 3 0 �b3 l! 8d3 3 1 aim for a different plan.
cuxd3 l! xd3 3 2 �dl 'i,Vh6 33 'i,Vxd3 12 ...c6
The queen cannot be saved because of 33 Grandmaster Shtein' s idea in a similar
'i,Vel l:l, xh3+ with forced mate. position: Black aims to maintain the tension
33 ... cuxd3 34 l! c2 �e6 3S f3 'i,Vh4 36 in the centre and on the kingside. Clearly in­
�e2 ctJf4 37 �dl hS 0-1 ferior is 12 . . . f4, after which Black's tempo­
With . . . g4 imminent, White ' s resignation rary initiative on the kingside quickly evap­
comes not a moment too soon. orates, whereas on the queenside White 's
By profession Igor Morozov was a me­ chances are preferable. For example: 1 2 ... f4
chanical engineer. He was a winner of the 1 3 �f2 g5 14 cud3 h5 1 5 h3 l! f7 1 6 c5
fourth USSR Team Championship ( 1 973- �f8 11 @g2 cug6 18 b4 l! h7 19 l! h 1
1 975) as a member of the Russian Federa­ 'i,Ve7 20 l! c l cuh4+ 2 1 �gl �d7 22 c6 !,
tion team, and of the first European Team with a great advantage to White, as shown
Championship (1 973-1 983) as a member of by the game Zilberberg-Zarubin from the
the USSR team. same tournament.
But the Gorky player's chief success 13 l:l, bl cxdS 14 cxdS �d7 lS @hl a6 16
came in an international tournament, dedi­ a4 l! c8 17 l:l, gl fxg4
cated to the l OOth anniversary of Lenin's In my opinion, this exchange is necessary
birthday ( 1 970-1 973), in which he took third sooner or later, since it forces White to con­
place, achieving the grandmaster norm. sider constantly the defence of the g4- and
Alik Zilberberg, an engineer from Odes­ e4-pawns.
sa, went through the entire cycle - from the 18 fxg4 bS 19 axbS axbS (D)
quarter-final, where he first tried his hand at
correspondence play, to the bronze medal.
Over the entire six years he lost only two
games. w

White : A.Zilberberg

Black : V.Skotorenko

8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 7 - 6 8

King 's Indian Defence £99


20 'i,Vd3!
N otes by A l i k Z i l berb erg This was one of the most difficult moves
in the game. 20 'i,Vb3 was tempting, but by
1 d4 Clif6 2 c4 g6 3 Clic3 �g7 4 e4 d6 S the exchange sacrifice on c3 Black would
�e2 0-0 6 CUf3 es 7 0-0 Clic6 8 dS cue7 9 have gained more than sufficient compensa­
Cliel cud7 10 f3 rs 11 g4 cur6 12 �e3 tion. With his last move White vacates the
When these moves were made (at the di-square for the essential knight manoeu­
start of the tournament, i.e. in 1 967) I knew vre Clic3-dl -f2.
of two games in which White had tried 1 2 20 ...b4
CUg2: Portisch-Shtein (Yerevan 1 968) and This activity is forced, since otherwise
Nikitin-Shtein (Kislovodsk 1 966). In both after the knight manoeuvre and b2-b4 Black
would have had a constant weakness on b5. terial equality, but it is too late.
21 tlJdl 'i/c7 22 tt:Jf2 � h8 23 .i,f3 'i/b7 44 .&!, fl! 1-0
24 h3 .i, b5 25 'ii d2 There is no satisfactory defence against
A clear advantage for White has emerged. the invasion of the seventh rank by the
His pieces are harmoniously placed, and it rook.
will be hard for Black to hold his b4-pawn. The FIDE grandmaster Aleksandr Tolush
25 .&!, c4 26 b3 .&!, c3 27 ctJdl tt:Jfxd5!
..• died shortly after the event ended; his very
Despite his difficult position, Black finds last game, with Zilberberg, was adjudicated
a way of sharpening the play. Now the battle drawn. The following unclear position had
again flares up with renewed strength. arisen (Tolush, White, to move) with the
28 exd5 .&!, xf3 29 tt:Jxf3 .&!, d3 30 'i/f2 white king taking a walk in the park. If the
'i/xd5 31 � h2 h6 game could have been played to a finish,
After 3 1 . .. .&!, xb3 32 .&!, xb3 'i/xb3 33 maybe Zilberberg might have won it and
tt:Jg5 Black loses quickly. shared the title.
32 ctJd2 e4 33 tt:Jc4 (D)

w
B

About this event, Zilberberg also remarks


33 ...'i/e6? that "Smolensky and I used to live for many
Black wrongly aims for the rapid advance years in the city of Odessa, just a few blocks
of his d6-pawn: 33 ... tt:Jc6! was clearly from each other. So I got a move from him
stronger, for example: 34 tt:Jdb2 .&!, xb3 35 almost every other day, like electronic
.&!, bdl 'i/e6 36 .i,xh6 (3 6 .&!, xd6 .i,e5+!) mail!"
36 ... .i,xh6 37 .&i, xd6 'i/e7 and Black's A prize-winner in the 8th USSR CC Ch,
chances are no worse. After 33 ... tt:Jc6 there the Odessa player Alik Zilberberg then emi­
would have followed 34 �g2! 'i/e6 35 grated to the USA. On becoming an Ameri­
'i/f4 with good chances of converting the can citizen he performed successfully in
material advantage, but there would still correspondence events, obtaining the ICCF
have been much play in prospect. grandmaster title.
34 ctJdb2 .&i, xb3 35 .i,d4 .&i, f3 36 .i,xg7+ It appeared that correspondence chess
�xg7 37 'i/d4+ @h7 38 ctJd2! .&i, f4 39 was becoming younger - all three prize­
tt:Jbc4 .i,xc4 40 tt:Jxc4 tt:Jc6 41 'i/xd6 winners in the 8th USSR Championship
.&!, f2+ 42 .&!, g2 .&!, xg2+ 43 �xg2 'i/xc4 achieved their successes at an age of little
Black has finally managed to restore ma- more than 30.
N2 9th USSR CC Ch. (1969-70) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Pts

1 L.Omelchenko Pyatigorsk 1 0 1 y, y, y, y, 1 1 1 y, y, 1 1 1 1 1 1 14

2 V.Kosenkov Kuibyshev o· y, 0 1 0 1 1 y, 1 1 1 1 y, 1 1 1 1 1 13Y,

3 G.Sorokin Gorky 1 y, 1 0 1 1 y, y, y, y, 0 1 1 1 1 y, 1 1 13

4 V.Shadchnev Penza 0 1 0 y, 0 1 0 y, 1 1 1 1 y, 1 1 1 1 1 12 Yz

5 M.Govbinder Dushanbe y, ·o 1 y, 0 0 y, 1 0 1 1 1 1 y, 1 1 1 1 12

6 V.Baturinsky Moscow y, 1 0 1 1 Y2 y, 0 y, 0 1 1 y, 1 1 1 1 y, 12


'

7 B.Petrov Odessa Y2 0 0 0 1 y, 0 1 y, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 y, 1 12

8 A.Mikhailov Leningrad y, 0 y, 1 y, y, 1 0 y, 0 y, 1 1 y, y, 1 1 1 11

9 I.Morozov Gorky 0 y, y, y, 0 1 0 1 1 y, 1 1 y, y, 0 y, 1 1 JOY,


1 0 N.Andreyev Moscow 0 0 y, 0 1 y, y, y, 0
11
y, 1 1 y, 1 y, 1 1 1 lOYz
1 1 V.Mikenas Vilnius 0 0 y, 0 0 1 0 1 y, y, 1 y, 1 y, y, 1 1 1 10

12 A.Korelov Leningrad y, 0 1 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 1 0 1 y, 1 1 1 7 Yz

1 3 E.Kuuskmaa Tartu y, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 1 y, 1 1 1 1 6 Yz

1 4 V.Yudin Sebastopol 0 y, 0 y, 0 y, 0 0 y, Yz 0 1 0 y, y, y, 1 y, 6Yz

1 5 A.Serebriisky Harkov 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 y, y, 0 y, 0 y, y, y, y, y, 1 SYz


1 6 A.Pchyolkin Nikolaevsk-Amur o. 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 1 y, y, y, 0 y, y, i . 0 y, 1 SYz
1 7 G.Shagapov Bugulma 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 y, y, 1 0 y, 31/z

1 8 P.Sadurskis Riga 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, y, 1 1 31/z

1 9 B.Polyansky Saratov 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 y, 0 11/z


Ninth Championship (1969-197 0)

THE 9th USSR Championship began on 1 st i,d7 13 fljg3 flJa5 14 i,c2 c5 15 b3 fljc6
February 1 969. Geographically, the tourna­ 16 d5 flJe7 17 c4
ment was very widely spread - the players The usual 1 7 i,e3 is better.
represented 1 6 towns from Russia, Ukraine, 17 ... fljg6 18 fljf5 ClJf4 19 i,xf4 exf4 (D)
the three Baltic Republics and Tadzhikistan.
The chess honour of the Central Asian Re­
public was defended by Mikhail Govbinder,
who subsequently obtained the international w
master title. Boris Rozinov, who already
held the title of ICCF International Arbiter,
was appointed arbiter.
A confident start to the tournament was
made by th.e Muscovite Viktor Baturin­
sky, who won game after game, and after
a year's play had 1012 out of 1 3 . At that
point Vladas Mikenas (Vilnius), a former
opponent of Alekhine and a future FIDE
grandmaster, was doing not at all badly 20 flJxd6 i,xd6 21 e5 i,f8 22 'i¥d3 g6 23
- 412 out of 5 . Also in the leading group exf6 'iVxf6 24 'iV d2 i,g7 25 .i::!, xe8+ .i::!, xe8
were Omelchenko (Pyatigorsk) - 6 out of 8, 26 .i::!, el .i::!, xel+ 27 'iVxel b4 28 'iVe2 @f8
Andreyev (Moscow) - 5 Yi out of 7 , Sorokin 29 i,d3 a5 30 @h2 g5 31 g4 h5 32 fljgl
(Gorky) - 5 out of 6, and Govbinder (Dush­ hxg4 33 hxg4 'i¥h6+ 34 @g2 'i¥h4 35 d6
anbe) - 412 out of 7 . i,d4 36 ClJh3 f3+! 0-1
When the allotted time was drawing to Omelchenko considered his most memo­
a close, it became clear that the main con­ rable game from this tournament to be the
tender for victory was candidate master Lev one with Vladas Mikenas from Lithuania.
Omelchenko from Pyatigorsk, who had 1 3
points out of 1 7 and the advantage in his last
remaining game. All his rivals, Kosenkov, White: L . Omelchenko
Sorokin, Govbinder and Baturinsky, could
hope for 1 3 12 points at best. A miracle did Black : V. Mikenas
not occur - Lev Omelchenko won his last
game. This is how it happened. 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 9 - 7 0

White: A.Pchyolkin English Opening A 1 9

Black: L . Omelchenko Notes b y Lev O me l c h e n ko

9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 9 - 7 0 Studying the starting list of the 9th


USSR CC Ch, I came to the conclusion
Ruy Lopez C93 that the most famous participant was L-SSR
honoured master of sport and international
1 e4 e5 2 fljf3 flJc6 3 i,b5 a6 4 i,a4 fljf6 master Vladas Ionovich Mikenas, a com;:::: ­
5 0-0 i,e7 6 .l::!, el b5 7 i,b3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9 porary of Alekhine who played him seY;:::-;:. :
h3 h6 10 d4 .i::!. e8 11 fljbd2 i,f8 12 fljfl times. In choosing my first moYe. I opted :o:-
1 c4, since the Lithuanian master was reput­ 22 .l::l, xc8 ! !
ed to be an expert on the Alekhine Defence, A stunning exchange sacrifice, tip­
an opening that he employed with success. ping the scales in favour of White, whose
1 c4 lt:Jf6 2 lt:Jc3 e6 3 e4 c5 4 e5 lt:Jg8 5 d4 bishops, supported by the pawns, become
cxd4 6 'i¥xd4 lt:Jc6 7 'i¥e4 f5 8 'i¥e2 tt:Jge7 formidably strong.
9 lt:Jf3 lt:Jg6 10 i,d2 a6 11 0-0-0 'i¥c7 12 22 ... .l::l, axc8 23 bxa6 lt:Jd5 24 i,d4 lt:Jb4
.l::\. el i,c5 13 �bl! 25 i, b5 tt:J c2
An important refinement in this, compli­ This knight raid poses the question:
cated variation, which promises a gripping 'Where now is the white bishop going to
struggle. The game Aronin-Smyslov ( 1 8th move? '
USSR CC Ch, 1 950) went 13 h4?, but 26 i,a7! lt:Jb4 27 .l::\. dl .l::\. a8 28 i,c5
this move did not justify itself, since after .l::l, fb8 29 i,xd7 lt:Jd3
13 ... lt:Jd4 14 lt:Jxd4 i,xd4 1 5 f4 b5 ! 1 6 h5 This looks strong, since after 30 i,xe6+
lt:Je7 17 'i¥d3 i,f2 1 8 .l::\. dl i,b7 1 9 'i¥d6 @h8 3 1 i,a3 .l::\. xa6 32 i,b3 .l::\. xa3 33
'i¥c8 20 .l::\. h3 i,c5 2 1 'i¥d3 bxc4 22 'i¥xc4 bxa3 lt:Jxe5 34 .l::l. el lt:Jc4 Black has his
lt:Jd5 23 lt:Jxd5 i,xd5 24 'i¥c2 'i¥b7 it play, but. . .
proved to be a loss of time. 3 0 .l::\. xd3!
13 ... lt:Jd4 14 lt:Jxd4 i,xd4 15 f4 b5!? This further sacrifice suppresses any pos­
Black sensibly avoids the win of a sibility of resistance.
pawn by 1 5 ... i,xc3 1 6 i,xc3 lt:Jxf4 1 7 30 ... exd3 31 a7 .l::l, b7
'i¥d2 lt:Jg6 1 8 i,b4 lt:Jxe5 on account of 3 1 .. . .l::\. eS 32 i,xe8 .l::\. xe8 33 b4 was
1 9 'i¥d4. The move in the game offers a hopeless for Black.
counter-sacrifice with the aim of mounting 32 i,xe6+ @ h8 33 i,d5 d2 34 @c2
a counter-attack on the white king. dl 'i¥+ 35 @xdl .l::l, d7 36 i,d6 .l::l, axa7 37
16 cxb5 0-0 17 i,e3 i,xc3 b4 g5 38 @c2 .l::\. a6 39 b5 .l::\. a5 40 e6! 1-0
Avoiding the trap 1 7 . . . 'i¥b6 1 8 i,xd4 After 40. . . .l::\. xd6 41 e7 .l::\. a8 42 i,xa8
'i¥xd4 1 9 'i¥f3 .l::\. b8 ( 1 9 . . . .l::\. a7 is stronger) .l::l, e6 43 b6 .l::l, xe7 44 b7 .l::l, e8 45 a4 Black
20 bxa6 'i¥d2 2 1 i,b5 i,xa6 22 .l::\. e2. is three whole tempi late in reaching the sav­
18 .l::\. cl 'i¥b7 19 .l::\. xc3 'i¥e4+ 20 'i¥c2 ing b6-square.
lt:Jxf4 The silver medal in the 9th Champion­
The pawn has been regained and every­ ship went to the experienced over-the-board
thing seems to be all right, but. . . master and future ICCF grandmaster V sevo­
21 'i¥xe4 fxe4 (D) lod Kosenkov (Kuibyshev), an excellent
finish enabling him to secure second place
with 1 3 Vi points. In the following game he
was able to create a miniature.
w

White: V.Kosenkov

Black: A.Serebriisky

9th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 6 9 - 7 0

Scandinavian Defen ce 80 1

Black had aimed for the diagram posi­ 1 e4 d5 2 exd5 'i¥xd5 3 lt:Jc3 'i¥a5 4 d4 c6
tion. However, there followed: 4 ... lt:Jf6 or 4 ... i,f5 is more often played.
The once popular plan with 4 ... e5 is now the winner of the 1 st championship of the
considered too risky. Russian Federation, in which he finished
5 �e2 ahead of the future ICCF grandmaster Lev
The main continuations are 5 CZJD and Omelchenko.
5 �c4. Later Sorokin became an international
5 CLJf6 6 tlJf3 �g4 7 CZJe5
•.. master in correspondence play and qualified
7 0-0 was also possible. for the final of the ICCF World Champion­
7... �xe2 8 'iVxe2 e6 9 �d2 'iVc7 10 shp, but then he gave up chess, devoting
0-0-0 himself to scientific work.
The resulting position resembles a Caro­ It should also be remembered that Ga­
Kann Defence, but Black is seriously behind rald Sorokin was one of the initiators of
in development. the introduction of individual ratings for
10 ... CLJbd7 11 f4 tLixe5 correspondence players, long before they
l l .. .�d6 is more natural. were brought in by ICCF. In the battle for
12 fxe5 CLJd7 13 � hfl c5? the 'bronze' in the 9th USSR Championship
Had Black played 1 3 ... �b4 or 13 . . . CZJb6, the following game proved decisive.
he could have hoped to put up a lengthy re­
sistance. Now, however, White gains a great
advantage. White: V.Baturinsky
14 d5
1 4 'iff2 was more convincing, with di­ Black: G .Sorokin
rect threats to the black king, for example
14 ... f6 1 5 exf6 tlJxf6 16 �f4 etc. 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 6 9 - 7 0
14 ... 'ifxe5 .15 'iVb5 'ifc7
In the event of 1 5 ... 0-0-0 White had 1 6 Modern Benoni Defence A 6 1
�f4 and 1 7 CZJe4 with an easy win.
16 dxe6 fxe6 17 �g5 a6 (D) N otes b y G ara l d S o ro k i n

1 d 4 CLJf6 2 c4 c 5 3 d5 e 6 4 tLic3 exd5 5


cxd5 d6 6 CLJf3 g6 7 �g5 h6 8 �h4 g5 9
w �g3 CLJh5 10 CLJd2 CZJxg3 11 hxg3 �g7
12 CLic4 0-0 13 e3 'ife7 14 �e2 � d8
The same opening moves, but in a
slightly different order, were made in the
second game of the Botvinnik-Tal match
( 1 960), which continued 1 5 0-0 tlJd7 1 6
a4 CZJe5 1 7 CZJxe5. Now, i n Tal's opin­
ion, 1 7 . . . �xe5 (instead of 1 7 . . . 'ifxe5, as
played in the game) would have led to
equal play.
18 CLJd5! 'if e5 15 'ifd3 CLJd7 16 �dl CZJe5 17 CZJxe5
1 8 ... 'ifd8 was the lesser evil, although in 'ifxe5 18 �c2 f5 19 f4 'iVe7 20 0-0-0 c4
this case too after 1 9 �xd8 axb5 20 CZJc7+ 21 'iVd2
things are bad for Black. If 21 'ifxc4, then 2 1 . . .'iVxe3+. In view
19 CLJf6+ 1-0 of this, White should have chosen a differ­
The third prize-winner was Garald So­ ent move order: 1 9 0-0-0 (instead of 1 9 f4)
rokin, an engineer from Gorky. He was 1 9 ... 'ife7 20 � de l .
admitted into the championship final as 21...a6 2 2 � del b5 (D)
29 ... cxb2+ 30 �bl
Possibly White expected that his king
w (like the opponent's king) would be securely
defended by the enemy pawn. But he did not
take account of the fact that Black has the
possibility of invading on the a-file. After
30 lbxb2 'ii' e7 3 1 "ii'h5 ! the position would
have remained tense (3 1 . . .bxa3 32 tlJd3 a2
3 3 �d2 �d7 34 tlJf4 etc.).
30 ... �g7 31 "ii'g5 1: f8 32 exf5 (D)

23 a3!
8
The strength of Black's attack in the
event of 23 e4 is illustrated by the fantasy
variation 23 . . . b4 24 tlJa4 b3 ! ? 25 axb3 cxb3
26 �xb3 "ii'b7 27 �c2 1: b8 28 �d3
�d7 29 tbc3 1: dc8 30 fxg5 fxe4 3 1 �xe4
�xc3 32 bxc3 "ii'b3 3 3 1: e3? 'ii'a3+ 34
� d l �g4+ and Black wins.
[However, by playing 33 �h7+! ! @xh7
34 "ii'd3+ �g7 3 5 gxh6+ White forces
mate in a few moves, so probably 24 . . . c3
would be the correct choice for Black. Both 33 1: e7 and 33 f6 are threatened.
- S. G./T.H.] 32...b3! 33 �e4
23 ... "ii'b7 24 fxg5 a5! 25 gxh6 If 33 �d3, then 33 . . . "ii'xd5 34 "ii'e3
White does not sense the danger, other­ �xf5. White's attack comes to a halt - the
wise he would have preferred 25 1: xh6 with e-file is blocked by his own bishop.
the possible continuation 25 ...b4 26 tlJa4 c3 33 ... "ii'c7!
27 "ii'd3 b3 28 �dl cxb2+ 29 tlJxb2 �d7 Threatening . . . 'ii' c 5 and . . . "ii'x a3, as well
30 1: g6 �e8 etc. After the capture on h6 as . . . �xf5 (the white queen is obliged to
with the pawn, the dark-square bishop be­ defend the c l -square in view of the mate
comes the most important piece, achieving threat).
both defence and attack. 34 l: hfl �xf5 35 l: xf5 "ii'c5 0-1
25 ... �f6 26 h7+ @h8 27 e4 White resigned, after agreeing with the
Here too 27 1: h6 �g7 28 1: g6 was proposed variations:
possible. (a) 36 1: e2 "ii'xa3 37 1: xb2 �xb2
27 ...b4 28 tlJdl c3 29 'ii'h 6 3 8 lbxb2 'ii' a2+ 39 @ c l "ii' a l+ 40 �d2
29 "ii'e3 was more prudent. After 29 bxc3 "ii'xb2+;
bxa3 30 �bl 1: b8 Black's threats are dan­ (b) 36 lbxb2 "ii'xa3 3 7 �cl 'ii'xb2+ 38
gerous, but now he has a very strong attack. �dl a4.
Tenth Championship ( 1971 -197 2)

ON THE 5th of February 1 9 7 1 a start was 1 1 . The number of pursuers had thinned: Za­
made to the 1 0th USSR Championship. vernyaev had 7Yi out of 1 1 , Govbinder - 6Yi
Among the 2 1 participants were ICCF out of 9, and Estrin - 6 Yi out of 1 0.
grandmaster Yakov Estrin, eight masters, By the summer of 1 972 the tournament
including the future grandmasters Vsevolod table was two thirds full, but things were
Kosenkov and Lev Omelchenko, and some still not clear. Those in contention for the
very strong candidate masters - winners prizes were: Omelchenko - 1 0 out of 14,
of the U.SSR Championship semi-finals, Govbinder - 8 out of 1 1 , Voitsekh and
among whom we meet some prestigious Prokofiev - 7Yi out of 1 0, and Sychyov - 7
names in the world of correspondence chess out of 1 1 . And here Lev Omelchenko put
- Anatoly Sychyov, Yury Zelinsky, Anatoly on a spurt, winning four games in a row
Voitsekh and S.Prokofiev. An interesting to reach 14 points out of 1 8 , effectively
fact is that in the pairings the future winner leaving his rivals to fight it out for second
of the tournament, Lev Omelchenko, was place. At this point those in contention were
given No.2 1 . Prokofiev - 1 1 Yi out of 1 5 , Govbinder - 1 1
Apart from Russians, there were corre­ out of 1 5 , and Voitsekh, who had finished
spondence players from Ukraine, Belorus­ fewer games than the others - 1 0 out of 1 3 .
sia, Latvia, Lithuania and Tadzhikistan. Just before the conclusion of the playing
Viktor Yurgenson (Moscow), subsequently period at the end of 1 972, fifteen games re­
an ICCF international arbiter, was appointed mained unfinished. After another win (this
arbiter of the tournament. From the infor­ time over Estrin) Omelchenko had 1 5 points
mation by Yurgenson, given every three out of 1 9 with one unfinished game in an
months in the Riga magazine ' Sahs' , one equal position. Prokofiev had 1 3 Yi out of
can gain an impression of the course of the 1 8, and Voitsekh - 1 2 out of 1 5 . The final
play. results confirmed the claims of this trio to
The first result was recorded quite soon - the championship awards, arranging them
on the 1 4th move in a double-edged position on the podium in this order.
Zelinsky (Riga) and Govbinder (Dushanbe) Thus Lev Omelchenko became USSR
agreed a draw. By the end of 1 97 1 the lead­ Champion for the second time! He was born
ing group was headed by ICCF grandmaster in 1 922 in the Ukraine in the small town of
Yakov Estrin - 4Yi out of 6, with three Zhashkov in the Cherkass Region. He spent
players half a point behind: Omelchenko, his youth in Tyumen. Here in his school
Sadomsky and Voitsekh. years his interest in chess was aroused and
After another three months it became he achieved his first successes. But service
clear that the only ICCF grandmaster in the in the army, participation in the war and be­
tournament was not in contention for first ing seriously wounded prevented him from
place and preferred to agree draws. Lev progressing in chess.
Omelchenko, on the other hand, was not After returning to civilian life,
averse to retaining his title. By April the Omelchenko completed a course in the Law
master from Pyatigorsk had 8 points out of Faculty of Leningrad University and was
Co
N2 10th USSR CC Ch ( 1 9 7 1 -72) I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ') 10 I I 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 c:::i

l L. Omelchenko Pyatigorsk .' Yz y, y, I y, Yz y, 1 I 1 y, Y2 I I y, I l 1 I 1 l S Y,

2 S. Prokofiev Leningrad Y2 y, I y, Y2 Y2 Y2 I 'h y, I I I l y, Y2 I l 1 1 lS

3 A. Voitsekh Bobruisk y, 'h 0 0 I I I I I y, y, J Yz y, y, I J I 1 I 1 4 '/z


-
4 M. Govbinder Dushanbe y, 0 I 0 y, Y2 I I I I I Y2 'h I y, I 0 I 1 I 14
5 A. Sychyov Novosibirsk 0 y, I I 1;2 y, 0 y, 1 I y, Y2 1 'lz Yz l I Yz 1 I 13'h
6 Yu. Zelinsky Riga y, l/2 0 Yz Yz Y1 Yz y, 0 1 I I 1 Yz Yz I I 1 I l 13'/z
7 A. Ivanov Chemigov y, Yz 0 Y1 y, Y2 0 0 I I I 0 l/2 y, I 1 y, 1 I 1 12
8 B. Kogan Lvov 'lz Yz 0 0 I Y2 1 0 0 'h y, 1 0 l I 1 0 I Yz I 11
y, I 1
9 V. Zavernyaev Severodvinsk 0 0 0 0 y, y, 1 1 Yz y, 'h I y, Yz Yz Y2 1 11

Q..
lOYz
"""'
10 Ya. Estrin Moscow 0 y, 0 0 0 I 0 I Yz 0 Y2 1 0 1 '12 I 1 Yz 1 l
Cl>
I 1 V. Shadchnev Penza 0 Yz Yz 0 0 0 0 y, y, 1 Yz I 0 I 1 0 l I I Yz 10 "to


12 A. Sadomsky Moscow Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 0 Yz Yz Yz y, 0 Yz J Yz Yz I 1 1 I 10 ;;;
13 G. Sorokin Gorky Yz 0 0 y, y, 0 1 0 0 0 0 I l 0 1 y, 1 l y, l 91;2

14 N. Kopylov Voronezh 0 0 Yz Yz 0 0 Y1 I y, I I Yz 0 Yz y, J Yz Y1 Yz Y1 9'h

15 A . Bakharev Riga 0 0 Yz 0 y, y, Yz 0 Y2 0 0 0 I y, I I I y, 0 I 8'/z

16 V. Zhuravlyov Liepaya Yz Yz 1/2 y, y, 1/2 0 0 y, Y2 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 ' 0 Y2 0 0 l 6'h


1 7 I. Voitik Yoroshilovgrad region 0 Yz 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yz 0 1 y, Yz 0 0 1 1 Yz Yz - 6
1 8 N. Andreyev Moscow 0 0 0 1 0 0 Yz I Yz 0 0 0 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 I Yz 0 SY,

19 V. Kosenkov Kuibyshev 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 Yz 0 0 0 Yz Yz 1 Yz 0 J;l 1 I 5Y,

20 Yu. Shapran Stavropol 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 0 0 0 y, Yz l I y, Yz 0 I SY,

21 A. Kuntsevich Moscow region 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yz 0 0 Yz 0 0 - I 0 0 2


sent to work as a notary in the Stavropol The subsequent moves, right up to the 1 7th,
Territory. In his spare time he took part in demanded not so much inventiveness on the
a variety of chess events, became champion part of the players, as a knowledge of the
of the Stavropol Territory and progressed to books. The game was played at a time when
all-Russian tournaments. But he had little the 'Internet' had not even been heard of.
free time, the opportunities for getting away Apparently, Bakharev was not averse to act­
from work for the sake of trips to tourna­ ing further in the same fashion, being aware
ments in other towns became even fewer, of the game Gligoric-Keres (Hastings 1 964-
and it was then that his interest in corre­ 65), in which Black seized the initiative
spondence play began. after 1 8 l:t c l 'f/b8 1 9 j,d3 b4 20 d5 ltd7
Lev Omelchenko successively became 2 1 tLlc4 tLJxc4 22 l:t xc4 bxa3 23 bxa3
champion of the Russian Federation and 'f/b3. However, Omelchenko had discerned
twice USSR champion, and he was twice a weakness in Black's kingside set-up and
a winner of the World Correspondence he trained his pieces on this.
Olympiads in the USSR team. I should 18 lLJgS! l:t fc8 19 l:t cl j,d7 20 f4 exf4
also mention this d.etail - both times Lev 20 ... 'f/b8 appears to be more accurate.
Omelchenko took first place on his board, 21 j,xf4 'f/b6
not losing a single game! Now an acknowl­ Black continues to concentrate his forces
edged expert in the world of correspondence for an offensive on the queenside, but things
chess, Omelchenko was included in an inter­ do not come to that. The king 's fortress,
national tournament - the Kurt Klar Memo­ abandoned by its defenders, collapses
rial, in which he won first prize, on the way sooner.
exceeding the grandmaster norm. 22 j,e3 h6 (D)

White: L . Omelchenko
w
Black: A.Bakharev

1 0th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 1 - 7 2

Ruy Lopez C99

1 e4 eS 2 tLlf3 tL:lc6 3 j,bS a6 4 j,a4 tLlf6


S 0-0 lte7 6 l:t el bS 7 j,b3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9
h3 tL:i as 10 iic2 cs 11 d4 'f/c7 12 tLlbd2
cxd4 13 cxd4 tL:lc6 14 tLlb3 aS lS lte3 a4 This defence against the threat of 23 e5
16 tLlbd2 lte6 17 a3 tL:l aS allows a combinative outcome. However,
In our time theoretical opening develop­ the following knight sacrifice was highly
ments have become so deep, that the cus­ camouflaged� and it was not hard to over­
tomary boundaries between the initial and look.
middle stages of the game have been eroded. 23 lLJxf7! @ xf7 24 eS dxeS 2S dxeS j,c5
Often the two players rush headlong along 26 ltxcS l:t xcS 27 @hl tL:ie8
well-trodden paths, and only in the region of 27 ... tLldS 28 tL:le4 makes things no easier
the 20th move or perhaps even later do they for Black. Here are the variations, polished
find themselves in unfamiliar territory. in the Omelchenko workshop:
The 'tabiya' of the classical Chigorin (a) 28 . . . tL:lc4 29 'f/h5+ @g8 30 tL:ixc5
Variation is the position after 12 tLlbd2. 'f/xc5 3 1 l:t fl , or 29 ... @e7 30 'f/h4+ g5
3 1 CL\xg5 � c6 (3 1 ... hxg5 32 'li'xg5+ @e8 White: L . Omelchenko
33 j,g6+) 32 CL\h7+ �e8 33 � fl j,c8 34
� f8+ @d7 35 � f7+ �e8 36 � cfl ; Black: A.Kuntsevich
(b) 28 . . . � ac8 29 CL\xc5 � xc5 30 j,e4
j,e6 3 1 'li'h5+ @e7 32 'li'g6 CL\c4 33 1 0th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 1 -72
'li'xg7+ @d8 34 � fl j,d7 35 � f8+.
28 CL\e4 � c7 Sicilian Defence 894
Black avoids 28 . . . � xe5 because of 29
'li'xd7+ �g8 30 CL\g5 ! � xel+ 3 1 � xe l Notes by Lev O m e l c h e n ko
CL\f6 32 'li'f7+ @h8 3 3 � e7 � g8 34
'li'h5 ! CL\xh5 35 CL\f7 mate. 1 e4 c5 2 CL\f3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 CL\xd4 CL\f6 5
29 'li'dS+ @e7 (D) CL\c3 a6 6 j,gS CL\bd7
The variation with the early develop­
ment of the knight at d7 occurred in the
1 9th game of the 1 969 world championship
w match between Spassky and Petrosian.
7 j,c4 g6? (D)
A faulty plan. However, it is not easy for
Black to find a reliable continuation: 7 ... e6
is dangerous because of the bishop sacrifice,
7 ... h6 involves a loss of time, which was
convincingly demonstrated by Tal in 1 964 in
a game with Bilek - 8 j,xf6 CL\xf6 9 'iV e2
e6 1 0 0-0-0 'li'c7 1 1 f4 e5 12 CL\d5 CL\xd5
13 exd5 j,e7 14 fxe5 dxe5 15 CL\e6 ! .
30 CL\d6! 7 . . . 'iVa5 also does not promise an easy
The culmination of White's brilliant at­ life. For example, Spassky-Polugayevsky
tack. Black can hardly have been so simple­ (25th USSR Ch, 1 958) went 8 'li'd2 e6 9
minded as to hope for 30 'li'xa8? j,c6, but 0-0-0 b5 1 0 j,b3 j,b7 1 1 � he l j,e7 1 2
strange things happen, even in CC play. f4 CL\c5 1 3 e 5 dxe5 1 4 j,xf6 j,xf6 1 5 fxe5
30 ... 'li'f2 j,h4 16 g3 j,e7 17 j,xe6! .
The ways to win against other defences Petrosian also failed to equalise in the
were also worked out by Omelchenko: afore-mentioned game. He chose 8 ...h6 9
(a) 30 . . . CL\c6 3 1 e6 j,c8 32 CL\f5+ �f8 j,xf6 CL\xf6 1 0 0-0-0 e6 1 1 � he l j,e7 12
33 e7+ CL\xe7 34 CL\xe7 � xe7 35 'li'f3+ f4 0-0 1 3 j,b3 � e8 1 4 @b l j,f8 15 g4
CL\f6 36 'li'xa8; CL\xg4 1 6 'li'g2 CL\f6 1 7 � g l j,d7 1 8 f5 ! .
(b) 30 . . . 'li'c6 3 1 'li'f7+ @d8 32 � cd l ;
(c) 3 0. . . j,c6 3 1 'li'f7+ @d8 3 2 'li'f8
� e7 33 � cd l ;
(d) 30 . . . � aa7 3 1 'li'f7+ @d8 32 � ed l w
CL\xd6 3 3 exd6 � c6 34 'li'f8+ j,e8 3 5
j,g6.
31 j,fS CL\c4
After 3 1 ... j,c6 Omelchenko was intend­
ing a new sacrifice for the sake of a mating
finish - 32 � xc6 ! 'li'xel + 33 �h2 CL\xc6
34 'li'f7+ @d8 35 'li'xe8 mate.
32 j,xd7 � xd7 33 'li'xa8 1-0
8 'iYe2 'jya5 9 f4 .i,g7 10 0-0-0 0-0 11 h4 Second place in the 1 0th Champion­
Beginning an immediate assault. ship was taken by the Leningrad player
1 1 ... : es S.Prokofiev, whose success in this tourna­
The rook defends the e7-pawn. If l l ...h6 ment became his main achievement.
there could have followed 12 f5 .
12 h5 b5
1 2. . . tt:JxhS would have been refuted by White: S.Prokofiev
13 : xh5 ! .
13 .i,b3 .i,b7 1 4 hxg6 hxg6 (D) Blac k : V.Zavernyaev

1 0th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 1 -7 2

w Ruy Lopez C 78

1 e4 e5 2 ctJf3 tbc6 3 .i, b5 a6 4 .i,a4


tbf6 5 0-0 b5 6 .i,b3 .i,b7 7 : et .i,c5
8 c3 d6 9 d4 .i,b6 10 .i,g5 h6 11 .i,h4
'iVe7 1 2 a4 g5 13 .i, g3 h5 14 axb5 axb5
15 : xa8+ .i,xa8 16 h4 g4 17 tt:Jg5 0.,...0
18 'jyd3 b4 19 ctJd2 tb a5 20 .i,a2 tbh7
(D)

15 e5!
The decisive breakthrough.
15 ... tt:Jc5 16 f5 !. w
White does not deviate from his course.
There is no defence against the numerous
threats. He wants to win a piece by exf6 and
.i,e3 .
1 6...dxe5
A pretty variation with a queen sacrifice
would have occurred after l 6 ...b4 1 7 .i,xf6
exf6 1 8 .i,xf7+! @xf7 1 9 fxg6+ @g8 20
;g, h7! : xe5 2 1 ctJf5 ! ! : xe2 22 : xg7+
@ f8 23 ;g, f7+ @e8 24 tbxd6+ @d8 25 21 tbxf7!
tbxb7+ and wins. White sacrifices two pieces for a rook,
[S.G./T.H.: Much stronger is l 9 . . . @ f8 ! obtaining several pawns as a 'make­
2 0 'iYc4 d 5 when Black defends success­ weight'.
fully. Probably the correct path to victory 21... : xn 22 cxb4 tbc6 23 'iYa6 'jyd8 24
for White would be 1 7 .i,xf7+! \t>xf7 1 8 ;g, al tt:Ja7 25 .i,xf7+ @xf7 26 dxe5 d5
exf6 exf6 1 9 'iYc4+ @ f8 20 fxg6 d5 2 1 27 'jyd3 @e8 28 exd5 'iVxd5 29 'jyg6+
'jyfl 'jyb6 22 tt:Jce2 when White has an @f8 30 t2Jf3 'iYf7 31 'iVxf7+ @xf7 32 e6+
extra pawn and a powerful attack.] @xe6 33 .i,xc7 .i,xc7 34 ;g, xa7 gxf3 35
17 .i,xf7+! @xf7 18 fxg6+ @g8 19 .i,xf6 ;g, xc7 ctJf6 36 b5 tbe4 37 b6 ctJd6 38 g4
1-0 hxg4 39 h5 1-0
Some miniatures from the US S R
CC Championships ( I )

A. Sokolsky - V. Zaitsev, (20 ... @g8 2 1 �c4+) 21 tL.le6+ @g8 22


2nd USSR CC Championship, 1952-55 'iVh6 @f7 23 tt:Jg5+ @e8 24 'if'xg6+ and
Dutch Defence A84 wms.
1 d4 f5 2 c4 e6 3 tL.lc3 d5 4 e3 c6 5 tL.lf3 16 h5 g5 17 exf6+ exf6 18 tL.lxgS fxg5 19
ctJf6 6 �d3 tL.l e4 7 g4 �b4 8 �d2 �xc3 'if'xg5+ @h8 20 l:, xd7 �xd7 21 'iVeS+
9 �xc3 tt:Jxc3 10 bxc3 0-0 11 0-0 fxg4 @g8 22 �c4+ 1-0
12 tt:J es 'if'h4 13 f4!? g3 14 tt:Jf3 'if'h3 15
l:, bl l:, f6? 16 l:, b2 (White brings up the D. Grechkin I. Kramar,
-

reserves.) 16 ... l:, h6 (D) 5th USSR CC Championship, 1960-63


Richter-Veresov Opening DO l
1 d4 ctJf6 2 tL.lc3 d5 3 �gs �rs 4 f3 ttJ bd7
5 tL.lxdS (5 g4 !? �g6 6 h4 Benediktsson­
Hecht, Reykjavik 1 970) 5... tt:Jxd5 6 e4 h6
7 �h4 (D)

17 l:, g2! gxh2+ 18 @ bl ! (White now


threatens 1 9 l:, xh2 'if'g4 20 l:, xh6 gxh6
2 1 l:, g l .) 18 ...eS 19 tt:Jgs 'if'h4 20 fxe5
�h3 21 tt:Jxh3 'if'xh3 22 �f5 1-0 for if
22 . . . 'if'xe3 (22 . . . 'if'h4 23 'if'f3) 23 'if'g4.
7 ... �xe4? !
A. Konstantinopolsky - M. Abroshin, If 7 ... tL.le3 8 'iVd3; best is 7 ... tt:J7b6 ! 8
4th USSR CC Championship, 1957-60 exf5 tL.le3 9 'iVe2 tL.lxfl e.g. 1 0 0-0-0 'if'd5
Pirc-Ufimtsev Defence BOS 1 1 @bl tL.lc4! 1 2 �f2 ctJfd2+ + Lotzwick­
1 e4 d6 2 d4 ctJf6 3 tL.lc3 g6 4 tL.lf3 �g7 Heemsoth, Bremen 1 962; not 1 2 'iVxfl ?
5 �gs c6 6 h3 as 7 'iVd2 a4 8 a3 'iVaS 9 'iVb5 1 3 b3 ctJd2+.
0-0-0 ! b5 10 e5! (White had to calculate 8 fxe4 tL.le3 9 'iVd3 tL.lxfl 10 0-0-0!
this up to the 20th move.) 10 ... dxeS l l dxe5 This gambit is probably better than 1 0
ctJfd7 12 �h6 0-0 13 �xg7 @xg7 14 'if'xfl .
'iVf4 tL.la6 15 h4! f6 10 ... gS?! 1 1 �f2 tL.lxh2 12 l:, xh2 �g7
1 5 ... b4 was the main line analysed by 13 tL.le2 ctJf6 14 l:. h3 'iVd7 15 d5 tL.lg4
Konstantinopolsky: 1 6 h5 ! bxc3 17 hxg6 16 �d4 �xd4 17 'iVxd4 eS 18 'iVcS l:, g8
cxb2+ 1 8 @b l fxg6 1 9 l:, xh7+! ( 1 9 'if'h6+ 19 l:, c3 @d8 20 l:, f3 'iVe7 21 d6 cxd6 22
@f7 is weaker) 1 9 ... @xh7 20 ctJg5+ @g7 l:, xd6+ @es 23 'iVbS+ @f8 24 l:, d7 l-O
Eleventh Championship
(197 3-1975)

THE eleventh championship expanded had considerable over-the-board experience.


the geography of correspondence chess in He was champion of Bobruisk in the Mogi­
the USSR. Among the sixteen participants lev Region and competed three times in the
were representatives of Russia, Ukraine, Belorussian Championship. And when it
Belorussia, Lithuania, Latvia, Kazakhstan became difficult to combine over-the-board
and Tadzhikistan. Moreover, for the first play with his intensive work as a production
time not a single Muscovite got through to engineer, Voitsekh switched to correspond­
the final. ence chess.
The tournament arbiter was the then Anatoly Voitsekh proceeded along the
President of the all-Russian commission entire long and thorny 'path to the top '
for correspondence competitions (now an - from a USSR Championship quarter-fi­
honorary member of the Russian association nal, through a semi-final to the final. In the
of correspondence chess) Vladimir Filippov. previous, 1 0th Championship, he finished in
Alas, there was practically no information the top three and became a master.
either about the course of the tournament, or Voitsekh's first point in the tournament
its conclusion. was recorded in his game with ICCF grand­
Appeals by the author to the surviving master Igor Morozov.
participants for a long time had no effect:
some had not preserved their records, while
for others the tournament was a firmly White: A. Voitsekh
forgotten episode of their biography. It app­
eared that the 1 1th Championship had been Black: l . Morozov
lost to history. So I am extremely grateful
to Anatoly Sychyov (now a very strong 1 1 t h U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 3 - 7 5
international master in correspondence
chess), who sent the final table and shared Ruy Lopez C93
his memories.
An assured victory in the championship 1 e4 e5 2 tll f3 tll c6 3 JthS a6 4 Jt a4 tll f6
was gained by Anatoly Voitsekh (Bobru­ 5 0-0 Jte7 6 .&!. el bS 7 Jth3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9
ysk). His score of 1 1 Yz points was made h3 h6 10 d4 .&!. e8 11 tll b d2 Jtf8 12 tll fl
up of eight wins and seven draws. Only he Jtb7 13 tll g3 tll a S 14 Jtc2 tll c4 15 b3
completed the event without losing a single tll h6 16 a4
game. After him, a point behind, were the When this game was played, the latest
winner of one of the European Champion­ word of theory was considered to be the
ships Mikhail Govbinder (Dushanbe), Evg­ game Kurajica-Messing (Pula 1 97 1 ), which
eny Nadezhdin (Alma Ata) and Vladimir continued 1 6 . . .bxa4! 1 7 bxa4 a5 ! 1 8 Jtd3
Semenyuk (Tula). d5 ! 1 9 tll xe5 dxe4 20 Jtb5 .&!. e6 21 tll f5
The tournament winner Anatoly Pav­ c5 22 Jtd2 cxd4 and Black was not worse.
lovich Voitsekh was born in 1 937. He came However, theoreticians often hurry to draw
into correspondence chess when he already conclusions, based on a single game.
1 1 th USSR CC Championship ( 1 973 - 1 975)

N2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

A. Voitsekh Bobruisk Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 1 1 Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 1 llYz


2 M. Govbinder Dushanbe Y2 1 0 Yz 1 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 1 1 1 lOYz
3 E. Nadezhdin Almalyk Yz 0 Yz 1 1 Yz Yz 1 1 Yz 1 1 lOYz
4 V. Semenyuk Tula Yz Yz Yz 1 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 " 1 1 lOYz
5 Yu. Butkus Vilnius Yz 0 Yz 1 0 1 1 1 1 Y2 1 1 10

6 A. Kashlyak Semipalatinsk 0 1 1 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz 1 1 10

7 A. Sychyov Novosibirsk Y2 Yz Yz 0 Yz 1 1 1 1 Yz 1 '1 10

8 A. Nosovsky Anadoir 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8Yz

9 A. Kirshanov V oroshilovgrad 0 0 0 Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 1 1 7Yz

10 I. Morozov Gorky 0 Yz Yz 0 0 Yz 0 0 Yz Yz 1 1 1 7

11 V. Pulkis Liepaya Yz 0 Yz Yz 0 Yz 0 0 1 Yz 1 1 6
12 I. Shapiro Kiev Yz Yz 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yz 1 1 0 5Yz

13 D. Ivanov Leningrad 0 0 0 Y2 0 Yz 0 0 Yz Yz 0 0 1 4Yz


14 A. Shershnyov Riga Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz 0 0 0 Yz 0 1 4Yz
15 R. Barstatis Klaipeda 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 rn

16 A. Bershadsky Novosibirsk 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
16 ...bxa4 17 bxa4 a5 1S i,d3 d5 19 exd5! Alas, lying in wait for him are two combina­
Now it transpires that it is not easy tive blows.
for Black to defend. Thus in the event of 22 L2Jxh6+! gxh6 23 fj'g4+ @ hS 24
19 ... exd4 20 ll: xe8 iVxe8 2 1 i,b5 and 22 i,xh6! ll: e7
c4 he is simply in danger of remaining a The second piece sacrifice has to be de­
pawn down. clined - 24 ... i,xh6 25 fj'g6.
In a game from the 1 3th USSR Corres­ 25 i,xf8 fj'xf8 26 fj'h5+ @gS 27 ll: xe7
pondence Championship, Kutyanin replied iVxe7 2S ctJf5 fj'd7 29 fj'g6+ @f8
20 ... RJxe8 against Aronson, but after 2 1 29 ... @h8 30 ll: e l .
c4 c6 22 dxc6 i,xc6 2 3 l2Je5 i,b7 24 30 fj'xf6+ fj'f7 3 1 fj'h6+ �es 32 ll: el+
fj'h5 fj'f6 25 L2Jxf7! L2Jd6 (25 . . . fj'xf7 26 White's last piece is included in the at­
i,h7+) 26 L2Jxh6+ gxh6 27 c5 L2Jbc4 28 tack.
cxd6 L2Jxd6 29 i,b2 ll: b8 30 fj'g4+ he 32 ... @d7 33 ll: e7+ iVxe7 34 l2Jxe7 �xe7
ended up in a lost position. 35 fj'g7+ 1-0
19... ctJfxd5 20 l2Jxe5 f6 And Black conceded defeat in view of
20 . . . L2Jxc3 !? . came into consideration, the inevitable 35 ... @d6 36 iVe5+ @d7 37
and if 2 1 fj'c2 fj' d5 ! , with chances for both i,f5+ @d8 3 8 fj'f6+ @e8 39 i,e6, when
sides, although White' s are nevertheless White wins.
slightly better. [TH: Note that after 22 L2Je4, 'Knowledge is light, ignorance is dark­
suggested by GM John Nunn, Black must ness' runs the Russian proverb, and this also
not reply 22 ... fj'xd4?? because of the pretty applies to chess. All the moves up to the
forced mate starting 23 L2J f6+! . ] 24th in the above game were reproduced a
21 ctJg4 l2Jxc3 (D) few years later in the game Dokshin-Kozo­
doyev (Liepaya 1977). Dokshin was obvi­
ously 'educated ', and knew of the precursor,
w whereas his opponent was ' in the dark'.
White required only a few more moves
(24 . . . fj'd5 25 f3 L2Je4 26 i,xe4 ll: xe4 27
fxe4 fj'xd4+ 28 i,e3 fj'e5 29 fj'g6) to
convince Black of the hopelessness of his
resistance.
One noticeable failure was that of the
only grandmaster participating in the tour­
nament, Igor Morozov. The 1 1 th Champion­
ship also demonstrated the fact that masters,
successful in over-the-board chess, are often
It now appears that Black has restored the not capable of conducting a lengthy corre­
balance and is ready to continue the fight. spondence tournament.
N2 1 2th USSR Ch (1 975-77) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 JO 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

I V. Semenyuk Tula I '/, I \12 \12 I I 0 \12 Yi I \12 1 I y, I y, I 13
,
2 G. Nesis Leningrad 0 , I 0 y, I 1 1 y, \12 y, I 1 y, I \12 I 1 1 1 2 Yz
"'
3 N. Krivun Tagangor \12 \12 1 \12 \12 1 y, I I \12 I 0 y, y,,, I 1 I \12 1 2 Yz
It
4 M. Govbinder Dushanbe 0 1 0 \12 \12 y, I y, y, I I y, \12 \12 I I 1 1 12

5 B. Kogan Lvov y, y, y, \12 \12 I y, y, y, I Yi I y, '/2 l \12 I 1 12


.
6 Yu. Zelinsky Riga \12 0 \12 \12 \12 Yz Yi I 1 1 1 Y,, I \12 y, I y, y, l l Yz

7 V. Solodovnikov Zhdanov 0 0 0 '/, 0 y, \12 I Yi Yi I I I I \12 y, I l J O Y,

Yi Yi
8 V. Vorobiyov lvanovo 0 0 \12 0 \12 I I \12 I '/, 1 0 1 I 0 1 10


9 M. Y eryomin Stavropol 1 \12 0 Yi Yi 0 0 0 l 1 0 1 I y, y, l 1 \12 10 ,....
Cb
.....
1 0 B. Persits Moscow \12 Yi 0 \12 \12 0 \12 0 0 I Yi '/, 0 \12 l l I 1 9
(ti'
1 1 A. Bangiev Sevastopol '/, Yi Yi 0 0 0 \12 Yi 0 0 0 '/, \12 l y, I 1 1 8 ;;;
1 2 G. Pivovarov Chelyabinsk 0 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 0 I Yi 1 1 l \12 \12 Yi 0 1 7Yz

1 3 N. Kopylov Voronezh '/, 0 1 Yi 0 Y2 0 \12 0 Yi Yi 0 '12 1 l 0 Yi Yi 7'/z

14 E. Nadezhdin Almalyk 0 Yi Yi y, y, 0 0 0 0 1 Yi 0 y, \12 y, Yi l I 7Yz

1 5 A . Kornilov Kalin in 0 0 \12 Yi Yi \12 0 I y, y, 0 y, 0 y, y, \12 \12 1 7Yz

1 6 F. Filtser Moscow \12 \12 0 0 0 \12 \12 0 '/, 0 y, Yi 0 y, \12 \12 \12 l 6 Yz

1 7 N. Andreyev Moscow 0 0 0 0 'lz 0 1/, 0 0 0 0 \12 1 y, Y2 y, 1 l 6

1 8 N . Galdanov B arguzin 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1;, 0 Yi \12 0 f,\ 1 SY,


Yi \12

1 9 Yu. Ryabikin Dzerzhinsk 0 0 '/, 0 0 0 '/, 0 0 y, 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 0 I 2


Twelfth Championship
(197 5-197 7)

SIMULTANEOUSLY with the final of the White: Yu .Zelinsky


1 1 th Championship, in six semi-final groups
1 5 masters, 67 candidate masters and a cou­ Black: N . Andreyev
ple of dozen first category players (who
largely had not had time to register their Semi- Final 1 2th U S S R C C
candidate master title) strove to qualify for C h , 1 9 73 -74
the main tournament.
The previous few cycles had shown that Queen 's Gambit D48
the masters could not withstand the com­
petition of candidate masters and that they 1 d4 dS 2 c4 c6 3 CLJf3 CLJf6 4 CLJc3 e6 S e3
rarely reached the final through success in Qjbd7 6 �d3 dxc4 7 �xc4 bS 8 �d3 a6
the preliminary stage. In setting up the semi­ 9 e4 cS 10 dS c4 11 dxe6 fxe6?
final groups for the 1 2th Championship, it After this imprudent move Black has a
was decided to assemble all the masters who difficult game on account of his numerous
had applied into a special semi-final group, pawn weaknesses and the insecure position
from which the top five would be allowed of his king.
into the final. Since 14 masters indicated He should have played l 1 ...cxd3.
their desire to play, to them were added two 12 �c2 �cs 13 °ii' e2 �b7 14 0-0 °ii'b6
candidate masters who had made the best lS eS CLJdS 16 QjgS ct:Jxc3 17 bxc3 0-0-0
showing in previous USSR Championships. 18 a4! (D)
In this tournament, a unique one in its way, It is dangerous to accept the exchange
the winner was the Riga candidate master (!) sacrifice. After 1 8 Qjf7 there could have
Yury Zelinsky, who thus achieved the master followed 1 8 ... 'ii'c6 1 9 °ii' g4 f[ df8 20
norm. At the finish the first five looked as ct:Jxh8 ct:Jxe5 2 1 °ii'h3 f[ f3 ! .
follows: 1 . Yury Zelinsky (Riga) - 1 1 , 2-3.
N.Andreyev (Moscow) and Boris Kogan
(Lvov) - 1 01h, 4-5 ltzhak Veinger (Lenin­
B
grad) and Feliks Filtser (Moscow) - 10.
Behind them finished the former USSR
champion Anatoly Sadomsky, the future
ICCF grandmaster Vsevolod Kosenkov and
other famous players. In this semi-final,
which on a formal classification was supe­
rior to several of the preceding finals, it was
the following game that was decisive in the
battle for first place.
18 .1:. de8 19 i,e4 i,dS 20 axbS axbS 21
... were Gennady Nesis - 5 Yz out of 8 and
i,e3 (D) Nikolai Kopylov - 6 out of 1 0. The tour­
nament was notable for the players being
well-disciplined and equally matched. After
a year and a halfs play 1 2 out of the 1 9
B participants had a result between ' + l ' and
'-1 .
'

Two players broke away from their


. pursuers - Gennady Nesis and Vladimir Se­
menyuk, who each had 7Yz points after ten
completed games. After 20 months' play, 40
games remained unfinished, mainly those
of players who were not in contention for
a high place. It was decided to adjudicate
them.
21... .l:, hf8? Although there were seven masters
This loses quickly. 2 1 .. . tl:JxeS was more among the participants, the victory podium
tenacious. was occupied exclusively by candidate mas­
22 i,xdS exdS 23 e6 tl:Jb8 24 tl:Jxh7 .1:. h8 ters. The gold medal was won by Vladimir
25 tl:JgS .l:, e7 26 i,xcS 'iVxcS 27 'iie3 Semenyuk (Tula), the silver (on number of
d4 28 cxd4 'ii' dS 29 'ii'f4 .1:. he8 30 tl:Je4! wins) by the Leningrad player Gennady Ne­
.l:. xe6 31 .l:, a7 .l:, 8e7 32 tl:Jc3 'ii'c6 33 dS sis, and the bronze by Nikolay Krivun from
1-0 Taganrog. All three achieved the norm of
In one of the semi-finals the winner was USSR master of sport.
one of the strongest players in the USSR Vladimir Semenyuk, a signal engineer
at that time, and later twice the women's from the town of Tula, was born in 1 935.
World Correspondence Champion, Luba He developed and achieved his mastery by
Kristol. In another semi-final her husband, playing in correspondence events . He began
the Leningrad master Itzhak Veinger, had in all-Russian tournaments, climbed step by
every chance of qualifying for the final. step, not missing a single one, and in 1 972
But at precisely that time the matter of their became champion of the Russian Federa­
emigration to Israel was being considered, tion.
and the question of the married couple's In the 1 1 th USSR Championship Se­
participation in the final fell away of its own menyuk was close to victory, but he fin­
accord. ished one point short. At the conclusion of
Nineteen players, among whom were the 1 1 th Championship he explained this as
seven masters, largely Russians, contested being due to bad luck, but when some time
the final of the 1 2th USSR Championship. had passed, enabling the tournament to be
The chief arbiter of the tournament was objectively evaluated, he admitted that he
Dmitry Ivanovich Kruglov ( 1 899-1 978), had lacked class. It was this self-critical at­
who at that time headed the tournament titude that enabled him to achieve complete
committee of the commission for corre­ success at the second attempt.
_spondence events. Vladimir Semenyuk is distinguished by
The first result was recorded in the game his well thought-out theoretical preparation,
Bangiev-Nesis - a draw after an interesting accurate calculation of variations, and will­
struggle. Vladimir Semenyuk began the to-win. All these qualities are conspicuous
event actively and a year after the start he in the following short games, which are of
had 6Yz out of 9. Also in the leading group theoretical significance.
12th USSR CC Championship 1975- 77 91

White: V.Semenyuk l§c3 tLlf7 19 'ifg7!


The decisive blow.
Black: E . Nadezhdin 19...exd5 20 .l:t fel+ @d8 21 1§xf7 a5 22
i.xd5 � a6 23 .: adl 1-0
1 2th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 5 - 7 7

Modern Defence A 4 1 White : V.Semenyuk

N otes by Vlad i m i r Semenyuk Black: B.Kogan

1 d4 d6 2 tt:Jf3 g6 3 c4 i,g7 4 tLlc3 .i,g4 5 l 2th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 5 - 7 7


g3 'iVc8 6 h3 .i,d7 7 .i,g2 tLlh6 8 e4 f6 9
.i,e3 tt:Jf7 10 'iVd2 c5 1 1 dxcS dxc5 (D) King 's Indian Defence £64
Up till now this is as in the game Pomar­
Petrosian (Olympiad, Siegen 1 970), where N otes by Vla d i m i r Semenyu k
White continued 1 2 0-0-0, but then in a
complicated struggle he conceded the initia­ 1 d4 tLlf6 2 l2Jf3 g6 3 c4 �g7 4 g3 c5 5 dS
tive and lost. d6 6 tLlc3 0-0 7 .i,g2 e5 8 0-0 tLle8 9 e4
�g4
Black has chosen an unexplored and
rarely employed set-up.
w 10 h3 .i,xf3 ll 'iVxf3 l2Jd7 12 'ife2 QJc7 13
i,d2 'ii e7 14 l:, abl l'l ae8 15 J: Jel (D)

12 e5!
An improvement for White, involving a
pawn sacrifice.
12 ...f5
After other replies too White gains dan­
gerous pressure: 1 2 .. 0-0 1 3 exf6 exf6 1 4
. White's plan is as follows: against pas­
l2Jd5 l:!'. e8 1 5 0-0 or 1 2 . . . tt:Jxe5 1 3 tt:Jxe5 sive play by Black to prepare and carry out
fxe5 14 l§d5 or 12 ... tt:Jc6 1 3 exf6 exf6 1 4 b2-b4, or, after Black's thematic advance
.i,xc5 or 1 2 . . .fxe5 1 3 tt:Jgs. . .. f7-f5, to seize control of the important
13 0-0 tt:JxeS e4-square. It is the latter that occurred in
After 1 3 . . 0-0 14 l2Jd5 .lJ, e8 15 .i,f4
. the game.
White has an obvious advantage. 15 ... fS 16 exf5 gxfS 17 g4! @h8
14 tt:JxeS i,xeS 15 QJdS! Intending to use the g-file for an attack.
White has a marked lead in development However, the rook will be badly placed at f5.
over his opponent and is ready to begin a 18 gxf5 � xf5 19 l2Je4 kl g8 20 c;ti h2 'i!1f8
crushing offensive. (D)
15...e6 16 �f4 tt:Jc6 17 i,xeS tt:JxeS 18 20 . . . .ll ff8 was better.
of books and articles on questions of theory
w and the teaching of chess.

White: G . Nesis

Black: V.Solodovnikov

1 2th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 5- 7 7

English Opening A 30

21 "i¥g4! Notes by Gennady Nesis


A very strong move, after which Black
can no longer coordinate his pieces. 1 ll:lf3 cS 2 c4 ll:lf6 3 g3 e6 4 �g2 "i¥c7 S
21...ll:Je8 0-0 a6 6 ll:lc3 �e7 7 b3 0-0 8 �b2 d6 9
If 2 1 . . . J:r f7 there can follow 22 ll:Jg5 ! d4 ll:lbd7
l:r e7 23 ll:Jxh7 with a decisive advantage. 9 ... cxd4 was essential. After the knight
22 �e3 ll:lb6 23 b3 ll:lc8 move, White gains a serious space advantage.
By sacrificing the exchange, Black tries 10 e4 l:r b8 11 dS eS 12 a4 ll:l e8
to activate his forces. Other continuations A typical opening metamorphosis has
would have been similarly ineffective: thus occurred: from an English Opening an ad­
if 23 . . . 'iVf7 or 23 . . . J:r f7 there would have vantageous version for White of the Benoni
followed 24 ll:Jg5. has been reached.
24 ll:Jg3 ll:Je7 2S ll:lxfS ll:JxfS 26 l:r fl e4 13 ll:lel g6 14 ll:ld3 ll:Jg7 lS f4 exf4
27 "i¥xe4 �es+ 28 �f4 l:r xg2+ 29 �xg2 The only way to hold the important e5-
42J h4+ 30 �hl 'iVxf4 31 'iVxf4 1-0 point was by 1 5 ... f6, but after 16 f5 Black
The second prize-winner was the Len­ would have been completely squeezed on
ingrad candidate master Gennady Nesis, both wings.
who achieved the master norm for the first 16 gxf4 l:r e8 17 "i¥d2 ll:Jf8 18 fS "i¥d8!
time. Nesis trained as an electrochemical The strongest reply. After 1 8 . . . gxf5 1 9
engineer. Now he holds all the highest 'iVh6 with the threat o f 20 ll:lb5 White's
chess titles: honoured Russian trainer, ICCF attack becomes dangerous.
grandmaster, FIDE international arbiter and 19 fxg6 ll:Jxg6
in 1 997 he was awarded the supreme sports An interesting decision: the knight is
title - Russian honoured master of sport. transferred to e5, to cover its king against the
Gennady Nesis has achieved outstanding threats of the enemy dark-square bishop.
successes in correspondence play: he has 20 ll:le2 �gs 21 "i¥c3 f6 22 �hl �g4
twice been the second prize-winner in USSR Black appears to have activated his mi­
championships, he finished second in the nor pieces and somehow cover his kingside.
world championship, and he was the holder However, the defects of his set-up are of a
of the ICCF World Cup. As a member of static nature and they fairly quickly tell.
the USSR team he has won gold medals in 23 ll:lef4 ll:leS 24 ll:lf2 �d7 2S "i¥g3 bS 26
world championships and in Europe. In the cxbS axbS 27 aS!
historic match 'Russia against the Rest of White has included his queenside forces
the World' he won both his games. in the offensive, in order to divert Black's
He has shown himself to be a lively chess army from the defence of their king.
journalist, and he is the author of a number 27 ... l:r a8 28 ll:l2h3 h6
Black has no time to eliminate the auda­ This is a perceptible inaccuracy. 5 ... �e6
cious passed a-pawn: 28 ... J:. xa5 29 J:. xa5 is better.
�xa5 30 Clixg5 fxg5 3 1 �xg5. 6 �c4 ctJd7 7 c3 b5
29 a6 J:. a7 30 b4 ! �e7 8 �b3 was threatened.
After 30 ... cxb4 3 1 �d4 the a-pawn be­ 8 �b3 ctJgf6 9 0-0 �b6
comes formidably strong. 9 ... Clixe4? 10 �xf7+. .
31 bxc5 dxc5 32 C2Jxg5 hxg5 (D) 10 @hl �e7 11 �e3 0-0 12 ctJbd2 J:, ae8
13 �el �xf3
By 1 3 ... �c7 Black would have held the
e5-point and retained chances of a success­
w ful defence.
14 dxe5 �cs 15 �xc5 Clixc5 16 exf6
�xe4 17 Clixe4 Clixe4 18 �h4
Transposing moves by 1 8 �c2 Clixf6 1 9
�h4 does not work on account o f 1 9 ... J:. e2
20 J:. xf6 J:. xc2.
18 ... �e3 19 J:, f3 �e2 20 fxg7 � xg7 21
�gl !
Threatening 22 J:. e 1 , which was unsuit­
able earlier because of . . . Cli f2+.
33 C2Jg6! 21...fS 22 J:. el �xb2 23 J:. d3 (D)
This piece sacrifice is quickly decisive.
33 ... Clixg6 34 �xf6 �f7 35 �xg5 Clih8
36 �f3 �g6 37 J:!, gl ! 1-0
The queen exchange does not bring any B
relief: 37 ... �xg5 3 8 J:!, xg5 �c8 39 J:, ag l
J:!, ee7 40 �xe7 J:. xe7 4 1 d6 l:. a7 42 e5 .
Third place in the USSR Championship
became Nikolay Krivun's highest achieve­
ment in CC, although later he performed
successfully in international events and
gained the international master title.

White : N .Krivun The black queen is out of play, and with­


out it the. defence is difficult. If 23 ... ctJf6
Black: B.Persits there follows 24 �g5+ @h8 25 �xf6+.
23 ... h6
1 2t h U S S R C C C h , 1 9 7 5 - 7 7 Black invites his opponent to sacrifice
the exchange, which would have been good
Caro-Kann Defence B 1 2 for White in all variations, apart from one:
24 J:!, xe4 �c l +! 25 J:!, d l J:!, xe4 26 �g3+
N otes by N i ko lay Krivun �g5.
24 J:, d7+ @g6 25 �dl ctJf6 26 �g3+
1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 f3 dxe4 4 fxe4 e5 5 Clif3 Clig4 27 J:. xe8 J:. xe8 28 �xg4 fxg4 29
�g4?! �xg4+ 1-0
N2 13th USSR Ch (1 977-78) I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9, 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

I M. Umansky Pyatigorsk y, y, y, y, 1 0 Y2 I I I I I I I I I I I I 15'/z

2 G. Nesis Leningrad y, I y, y, I y, y, y, y, I 1 I y, I I y, I I I 14'/z

3 V. Shishlov Sorsk y, 0 y, Y2 y, I 1 I y, 1 I I t I y, I I y, y, 14

4 B. Kogan Lvov y, y, y, 0 Y2 I I I y, y, 1 I I y, I I I y, y, 13'/z

5 B. Kolker Moscow y, y, y, I I I y, y, y, y, y, I y, y, y, y, I y, I 12'/z

6 Yu. Kutyanin Moscow region 0 0 y, y, 0 y, 0 I I y, 0 y, I I y, I I I I 11

7 V. Semenyuk Tula I y, 0 0 0 y, 0 1 y, y, y, I I I y, y, y, I I 11

8 0. Shuvalov Nakhodka y, y, 0 0 Y2 1 I 0 0 I 1 y, 'Ii y, 0 0 I I 1 10

9 N. Poleshchuk Leningrad 0 y, 0 0 y, 0 0 I I Y2 y, 0 y, I 0 I 1 1 1 9'/z

10 I. Foigel Kiev 0 y, y, y, y, 0 Y2 I 0 Y2 1 y, y, Y2 Y2 y, y, Y2 1 9'/z

11 E. Balendo Minsk 0 0 0 y, y, y, y, 0 y, y, y, y, y, y, I I I 0 I 9

12 V. Aronson Moscow 0 0 0 0 y, I y, 0 y, 0 y, y, y, y, I y, y, I I 8'/z

13 V. Yershov Dneprodzerdzinsk 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 y, I y, y, y, Y2 Y2 I 1 I 1 0 8'/z

14 R. Zborovsky Grodno 0 y, 0 0 y, 0 0 y, y, y, y, y, y, 0 I y, Y2 I I 8

15 D . Veytsel
Petropavlovsk-
0 0 0 y, Y2 0 0 y, 0 y, y, y, y, I 0 I y, y, I 7y,
Kamchatskv

16 G . Kotenko Kiev 0 0 . ¥, 0 y, y, y, I 1 y, 0 0 0 0 I 0 1 y, y, 7y,

17 A . Podolsky Kiev 0 y, 0 0 y, 0 y, I 0 y, 0 y, 0 y, 0 I 0 I y, 6'/z

18 A . Vasilyev Karaganda 0 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 0 y, 0 Y2 0 Y2 y, 0 I I I 5'/z

19 Ya. Konoval Orenburg 0 0 y, y, y, 0 0 0 0 Y2 I 0 0 0 y, y, 0 0 0 4

20 I. Kudinov Leningrad 0 0 y, y, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 y, y, 0 I 4
Thirteenth Championship
(197 7 -1978)

AS IN the preceding championship, the 1 5 and Kogan - 8Yz out of 13, as well as
final was contested by 1 9 players, among Kolker - l O Yz out of 1 6 and Shishlov - 7Yz
whom were seven masters. On this occasion out of l O.
the tournament director was ICCF interna­ The final table shows a high number of
tional arbiter Isaak Romanov. The finalists decisive games - 5 8%. On the whole, the
represented Russia, Ukraine, Belorussia and masters maintained their reputation: of the
Kazakhstan. Some strong representatives of eight, six of them took places in the top half
the Baltic Republics were eliminated at the of the table, including first. Mikhail Uman­
semi-final stage. sky won with a score which, in percentage
One of the quarter-finals consisted of terms (8 1 .6), is a record.
composers of problems and studies, and The tournament winner did not endeav­
winners of composition-solving competi­ our to build new strategic plans, but on al­
tions. The author of these lines was a partici­ ready familiar paths he found unusual turns,
pant in and the organiser of this tournament, advantageously changing the evaluation of
and he qualified for the semi-finals, where the position. The variations in the notes to
he played without success. the following game are based on Umansky's
In the final a clear favourite emerged contemporary analysis.
from the very start. He was the Pyatigorsk
master Mikhail Umansky. Whereas other
contenders had '+ l ' and the winner of the White : V.Aronson
previous championship had to be content
with four draws, the future winner had Black : M . Umansky
scored 6Yz points out of 8.
A few more months passed, and from 1 3th U S S R C C Ch , 1 9 7 7 - 7 8
information provided by the arbiter we learn
that Umansky already had 10 points out of Evans Gambit C5 1
12, and the group of pursuers comprised:
Boris Kogan - 7 out of 1 0, Yury Kutyanin 1 e4 es 2 tbf3 tbc6 3 �c4 �cs 4 b4
and B.Kolker - 6 out of 9, Gennady Nesis �xb4 S c3 �e7 6 'ii' b3
- 5Yz out of 8 and V.Shishlov - 4 out of 5. The alternative is 6 d4.
By the start of 1 978 Umansky's victory 6... tbh6 7 d4 t{jaS 8 'ii'a4 tbxc4 9 'ii'xc4
was not in doubt - 1 3 points out of 1 5 . A Until not long before, this continuation,
real contender for second place was Nesis the 'copyright' on which dates back to La
- 1 1 Yi out of 1 5 , while those still fighting Bourdonnais, had been considered to favour
for the 'bronze' were Kutyanin - 9Yz out of White.
9...dS! After 22 . . . � b8 White consolidates his
As the further course of the game shows, position by 23 4Jc5+ @xe5 24 CLJb3 .
this continuation allows Black to count on 23 � bl � xeS 24 c4 � d3 25 tlJ aS cS 26
an obvious advantage. 9 . . . 4Jg4 1 0 h3 CLJf6 � bS �g4!
1 1 dxe5 d5 , a variation suggested by Ravin­ Sacrificing a pawn, Black breaks through
sky, also gives Black a good game. with his king deep into the opponent's rear.
10 exdS 27 � xcS+ @d4 28 � dS+ @c3 (D)
In the endgame after 10 �xd5 Vi'xd5
1 1 exd5 exd4 Black's two bishops and su­
perior pawn formation give him the better
chances. w
10 ...e4 11 ct:Jes f6!? (D)

Despite his extra pawn, White has no


defence. Here are a few variations:
(a) 29 CLJb3 a5 and now:
(al) 30 4Jxa5 � a8 3 1 f3 � xd5 32 cxd5
� xa5 33 fxg4 � xa2;
12 �xh6 (a2) 30 CLJ d2 � xd5 3 1 cxd5 @d3 32 f3
After 12 Vj'b5+ @f8 1 3 4Jc4 a6 White e3 33 4J b3 � c8 34 fxg4 a4;
loses his d5-pawn without any compensation. (a3) 30 f3 �xf3 3 1 �f2 a4 32 4Jc5
The transition into the endgame is full of � d2+ 33 � xd2 @xd2 34 h3 (34 a3 � c8
tactics. If 12 d6 there follows 12 . . . �xd6! 35 4Jxa4 �dl) 34 . . . � c8 35 4Jxa4 �e2;
( 1 2 . . . fxe5 13 dxe7 Vi'xe7 14 �a3 is bad for (b) 29 4Jc6 � g6 30 4Jxa7 (30 4Je5
Black) 1 3 �xh6 fxe5 1 4 �xg7 ( 1 4 dxe5 � b6) 30. . . � a6 3 1 Cl:Jb5+ @xc4 32 � xd3
gxh6 1 5 exd6 Vi'xd6 1 6 Vi'xe4+ �e6 fa­ exd3.
vours Black) 1 4 ... Vj'g5 1 5 �xh8 Vie l + 1 6 29 f3 �xf3 30 @f2 �g4 31 � cl+ �b2
@el �g4+ 1 7 f3 exf3+ 1 8 gxf3 �xf3+ 1 9 32 � el e3+ 33 �gl
@xf3 Vi'xhl+ 20 @e3 0-0-0 and White, Also after 33 � xe3 � f8+ 34 � f3
despite his extra piece, is helpless. �xf3 3 5 � xd3 �e4+ White cannot save
12 ...gxh6 13 d6 fxeS the game.
The attempt to play by analogy with the 33 ... @c2 34 4Jb3 � xdS 35 cxdS @d3
previous variation - 1 3 ... Vi'xd6 1 4 4J f7? 0-1
Vi'f4! - encounters a refutation: 1 4 Vj'f7+ In reply to 36 d6, 36 . . . e2 is a mistake
@d8 1 5 Vj'g7 �f8 1 6 Vi'xf8+. because of 37 �f2, but by playing 36 . . .h5 !
14 dxe7 Vi'xe7 15 Vi'bS+ c6 16 Vi'xeS Black wins without difficulty (37 d7 e2 3 8
Vi'xeS 17 dxeS � gS 18 CLJd2 �fS 19 � gl � f2 � f8+ 39 @g3 @e3).
� d8 20 4Jc4 @e7 The following game by Mikhail Uman­
Black is aiming for the maximum centralisa­ sky is an example of play on opposite wings.
tion of his pieces and in particular his king. Black's offensive on the kingside proved to
21 CLJd6 @e6 22 4Jxb7 � dS be more purposeful and menacing.
White : V. Ye rshov temational events, achieved the grandmaster
norm and finally, in the 1 3th World Cham­
Black: M . Umansky pionship, he won the world correspondence
chess crown.
1 3th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 7 - 7 8 Becoming champion is honourable, but
to win ' silver' two times in succession is
Nimzo-lndian Defence £42 hardly any easier. This was achieved by
Gennady Nesis. Compared with the previ­
1 d4 tl:lf6 2 c4 e6 3 tl:lc3 ltb4 4 e3 c5 5 ous championship he played more confi­
tt:Jge2 cxd4 6 exd4 d5 7 c5 tl:le4 8 itd2 dently, deeply and powerfully. This was
tl:lxd2 9 'i¥xd2 tl:lc6 10 a3 lta5 11 b4 assisted by his work as a chess trainer, in
ltc7 12 f4?! which in those years he was very active.
The normal 12 g3 would neverth�less Gennady Nesis has his own preparations in
appear to be better. various opening lines and he has a heroic
12 ...0-0 13 g3 b6 14 itg2 bxc5 15 dxc5 devotion to the Dragon Variation of the Si­
: b8 16 0-0 lta6 17 : fel 'i¥f6 18 : ab l cilian Defence.
itc4 19 : eel : fd8 20 �hl h5 21 b5
tt:Je7 22 tlJd4 h4 23 b6 (D)
White: Yu .Kutyanin

Black: G . Nesis
B
1 3th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 7 7- 7 8

Sicilian Defen ce 8 7 7

1 e4 c5 2 tl:l f3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tl:lxd4 tl:lf6 5


tl:l c3 g6 6 lte3 llg7 7 f3 0-0 8 'i¥d2 tl:lc6
9 ltc4 lld7 10 h4 : c8 11 llb3 tl:le5 12
0-0-0 tl:lc4 13 itxc4 : xc4 14 h5 tl:lxh5
15 g4 tl:lf6 16 tl:lde2 : e8
White does not manage to achieve any­ During the Karpov-Korchnoi final candi­
thing real on the queenside, whereas in the dates match in 1 974, many prestigious ana­
meantime Black methodically builds up his lysts had already written off this variation. In
threats on the kingside. the second game of that match Black played
23 ... axb6 24 tl:ldb5 : dc8 25 tl:le4 dxe4 26 1 6 ... 'i¥a5 (which Nesis had employed in the
: xc4 hxg3 27 tl:lxc7 : xc7 28 : cc1 tl:lf5 1 2th Championship) and was crushed.
29 cxb6 : xcl+ 30 'iVxcl gxh2 31 'i¥c7 17 llh6
: f8 32 ith3 tlJg3+ 33 �xh2 tl:le2 34 This bishop manoeuvre is included, since
'i¥e5 'i¥h4 35 'i¥g5 'i¥f2+ 36 'i¥g2 'i¥xf4+ after the immediate 1 7 e5 tl:lxg4 1 8 fxg4
37 �hl tlJg3+ 38 �gl e3 39 b7 : b8 40 itxg4 1 9 exd6 exd6 the d6-pawn is invul­
'i¥c2 e2 41 llg2 'i¥e3+ 42 �h2 'i¥e5 43 nerable in view of the 'hanging' position of
'iVcl tl:lfl+ 44 �gl 'i¥h2+ 45 �f2 'i¥g3+ the bishop at e3.
46 �xe2 'i¥xg2+ 47 �el tl:lg3 0-1 17 ... lth8 18 e5 tt:Jxg4 19 fxg4 itxe5 (D)
Before his victory in the USSR Cham­ Previously 1 9 . . . ltxg4 20 exd6 'i¥xd6
pionship, Mikhail Umansky had also won 2 1 'i¥xd6 exd6 22 : xd6 llg7 23 ltxg7
a very strong championship of the Russian �xg7 was played (Beliavsky-Filguth, Ca­
Federation, Subsequently he took part in in- racas 1 976).
served reward was the 'bronze' .
In the following game he inflicted a
w
heavy defeat on the holder of the title, who
incorrectly accepted a pawn sacrifice, fell
behind in development and could no longer
repair the position.
Long before the end of the tournament
it became clear that Vladimir Semenyuk' s
term of office was about to expire. O n this
occasion he was unable to cope with the
problems of the black pieces.

The improvement 1 9 . . . j,xe5 was em­


ployed by Klovans against Beliavsky (Len­ White: V.Shishlov
ingrad 1 977) with the continuation 20 j,f4
'iVa5 21 j,xe5 'iVxe5 22 i{Jd5 . Both in this Black : V.Semenyuk
case, and after 22 'iVh6, which occurred in
the game Zborovsky-Nesis from the same 1 3th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 7 - 7 8
championship, Black obtained active play,
although both games ended in a draw. Kuty­ Sicilian Defence 849
anin takes the play in a new direction.
20 i{J dS j,xg4 21 i{Je3 : a4 22 i{Jxg4 N otes by Ti m H a rd i n g
: xg4 23 : dfl 'iVb6 24 c3 'iVc6 2S j,e3
hS 26 : hgl : xgl 27 : xgl a6 28 'i!1d3 1 e4 cS 2 i{Jf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 i{Jxd4 a6 S
j,g7 29 i{Jr4 i{Jc3 i{Jc6 6 j,e3 'iVc7 7 j,e2 i{Jr6 8 0-0
The white pieces are trained on the g6- j,b4 9 i{J a4 (D)
pawn, but they are not in fact able to 'fire' .
O n the 30th move White should possibly
have decided on the exchange of queens,
B
but then the four black pawns would have
outweighed the sacrificed piece.
29 ... 'iVbS 30 'iVc2 'iVeS 31 j,d2 'iVcS 32
: g2 'iVc4 33 b3 'iVfl + 34 \t> b2 'i!1f3 3S
: h2 j,es 36 'iV cl gS 37 'iVgl j,xr4 38
j,xr4 'iVxr4 39 : xhS r6 40 'iVhl \t>f7 41
: h7+ \t>e6 42 : h2 dS 43 : e2+ �d6 44
'iVgl \t>c6 4S : e6+ \t>d7 46 : b6 'iVc7
47 'iVg4+ e6 48 'iVa4+ \t>d8 49 'i!1d4 �c8
so : b4 rs Sl c4 \t> b8 S2 cs : c8 0-1
V.Shishlov was a revelation of the 1 3th 9... i{Je7
Championship. A geologist by profession, This has been the most popular move in
he lived and worked in the Siberian town of practice for many years but modem theoreti­
Sorsk in the distant Khakasia Region. Be­ . cians seem to prefer 9 . . . j,e7.
ginning the tournament with a modest first 9 . . . i{Jxe4? is unplayable because of 1 0
category ranking, Shishlov played fearlessly i{Jxc6 followed by 1 1 i{Jb6 and 12 'i!1d4.
against the most famous opponents. He not 10 c4 llJxe4 11 'i!1c2 rs 12 j,f3!? (D)
only maintained the tempo he set at the start, This move has received less attention
but even increased it at the finish. The de- from theory than 1 2 c5, which was played
�xc5 20 CL:Jxc5 �c6 "is rather an unclear
w mess" says Burgess. He points out that
White must avoid 2 1 'ii'xe4?? (suggested in
a contemporary note that was cited on early
editions of my Megacorr CD) because of the
tactic 2 1 ...CL:lc3 ! 22 'ii'e3 (22 'ii'xf5 CL:le2#)
22 . . . 'ii'd5 23 f3 'ii'xd4 and Black wins.
12 ... CL:Jc5?!
No doubt Shishlov had some improve­
ment in mind if his opponent had followed
(Position after 12 �f3!?) GM Furman's precedent 12 ... �d6, which
threatens to grab a second pawn. Probably
in the unclear Kolker-Semenyuk, from the he was going to test either 13 g3 or 13
same event. White eventually won after @hl !?. Instead Kapengut-Furman, 40th
Black missed some middle-game opportuni­ USSR ch, Baku 1 972, had gone 1 3 �xe4?
ties to complicate: 12 ... CL:ld5 1 3 �f3 'ii'e5 fxe4 14 'ii'xe4 �xh2+ 1 5 @hl �e5 1 6
14 �xe4 fxe4 1 5 CLJb3 b5 1 6 cxb6 �d6 CL:l f3 �f6 ::;::: (but eventually drawn).
( 1 6 ... �b7 1 7 CL:Jac5) 1 7 g3 and now: 13 a3 CL:Jxa4 14 axb4 f4 15 �d2 CL:lb6 16
(a) The game actually went 1 7 ... CL:lxe3 1 8 c5 CL:lbd5 17 CL:lb5 axb5 18 � xa8 0-0 19
fxe3 �b7 1 9 CL:lac5 ! and 1-0 in 36 moves. �c3 CL:Jxc3 20 'ii'xc3 b6 21 cxb6 'ii'xb6 22
(b) 17 ... �b7 is better, when 1 8 �d4 'ii'c5 'ii'xc5 23 bxc5 b4 24 � cl CL:Jc6 25
'ii'f5 ( 1 8 ... 'ii'h5 ! ? oo - FM Graham Bur- � c4 g5 26 �xc6 dxc6 27 � xb4 �d7 28
gess in 'The Taimanov Sicilian') 1 9 CL:lac5 � bb8 l-O.
1 4th USSR CC Championship ( 1 979- 1 980)

N2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

1 B. Postovsky Moscow Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 1 1 1 Yz 11

2 M. Arkhangelsky Moscow Yz 0 0 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 1 1 1 Yz 10

3 A. Tsamryuk Samarkand Yz 1 1 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 1 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 10
'

4 A. Bodisko Moscow Yz 1 0 Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 Yz 0 1 0 1 Yz 1 Yz 9Yz

5 I. Kopylov Ufa Yz 0 1 Yz 0 Yz Yz 1 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 1 Yz Yz . 9Yz

6 Ya. Rusakov Omsk Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 0 Y2 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 1 1 9Yz

7 V. Nikitin Kalinin Yz Yz Yz 0 Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz ' 0 1 Yz 1 9

8 R. Altshuler Moscow 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 0 Yz 1 Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 8Yz

9 F. Filtser Moscow Yz 0 Yz 0 0 Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz 7Yz

10 L. Remenyuk Voroshilovgrad Yz Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 7Yz

11 M. Pukshansky Leningrad 0 Yz 0 1 Yz Yz Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz 0 0 1 7

12 Yu. Zelinsky Riga Yz Yz 0 0 Yz Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 7


, '
13 B. Persits Moscow O 0 Yz 1 Yz Yz Y2 0 Yz Yz 0 Yz Yz 0 Yz 1 6Yz

14 V. Antonov Leningrad 0 0 Yz 0 0 Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz y, Yz Yz 6Yz

Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz
,.

15 P. Bragin Voronezh 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 . 6

16 A. Ufimtsev Kustanay 0 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz 0 6

17 A. Smetanin Ryazan Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 0 0 0 Yz 0 0 0 0 Yz Yz 1 5
Fourteenth Championship
(1979-1980)

AS HAD occurred previously, the final of were just a few months remaining, only 75
the 14th USSR Championship was preceded of the 136 results had been entered into the
by semi-finals, in which on this occasion tournament table. Moreover, two thirds of
quite a large number of masters expressed a the completed games had ended in draws.
desire to take part. In one of the semi-finals Understandably; it was hard to determine
the first two places, giving the right to par­ the contenders not only for the prizes, but
ticipate in the final, were shared by the mas­ even for the leading group. Of note were
ter Yury Zelinsky and the candidate master the showings by the candidate masters Pos­
Aleksandr Tsamryuk. tovsky - 7 points out of 1 1 and Bodisko - 6
In the other semi-final the winners were out of 1 0, as well as by the masters Rusakov
Igor Kopylov (a future grandmaster) and - 4 out of 7, Altshuler - 6 out of 1 0 and
A.Bodisko (a future international master), Kopylov 8 out of 14.
-

and half a point behind them was Yakov When the allotted time expired, the deci­
Rusakov, an over-the-board master who was sion (a highly contentious one by present­
well known in Russia. Taking account of his day standards) was taken to adjudicate all
third place in the semi-final and his suc­ the unfinished games. The results of the
cess in a strong correspondence tournament adjudication, naturally, could not satisfy
dedicated to the memory of Sergey Y esenin all parties, protests were made, and a long
(the well-known Russian poet from the early time was spent considering them. Finally the
20th century), Rusakov was also admitted results were affirmed, but for a long time
into the final of the 14th Championship. afterwards various complaints and protests
The final began in January 1 979 and was were made, and the championship went
due to finish in December of the following down in the history of correspondence chess
year. Playing in the tournament were nine as the most scandalous.
masters and eight candidate masters. Apart All the places on the winning podium
from Russians, there was one representative were taken by candidate masters. After the
each from Ukraine, Latvia, Kazakhstan and prize-winners came the well-known masters
Uzbekistan. The arbiter was Nikolay An­ Bodisko, Kopylov and Rusakov, while other
dreyev, who himself had the experience of famous players faltered. Especially strange
participating in several of the finals. was the result of the legendary chess theore­
When at the end of the allotted time there tician Anatoly Ufimtsev, who continued ap-
pearing in the following USSR Champion­ cxd5 a6 10 a4 J:b.g4
ships, where his results were much better. If Black had preferred the usual 3 ... e6 4
The outcome of the 14th Championship t2Jc3 exd5 5 cxd5 d6, then apart from the
is associated with the name of Boris Pos­ sharp 6 e4 g6 7 f4 White would also have
tovsky, who for his result in the tournament had the possibility of 6 Qjf3 g6 7 Qjd2
was awarded the title of USSR Master of t2Jbd7 8 e4 J:b.g7 9 i:b.e2 0-0 1 0 0-0, avoid­
Sport, · but who much earlier had already ing . . . J:b.g4. True, with the chosen move
shown himself to be a splendid chess or­ order Black has to reckon with the variation
ganiser. In his student years (he graduated 7 h3 e6 8 Jld3 exd5 9 exd5.
from the prestigious Rauman Technical Col­ 11 i:b.f4 � es
lege in Moscow) Postovsky played for the Here I I .. . i:b.xf3 12 i:b.xf3 'i/e7 is more
college team alongside several later well­ often played.
known masters. 12 QJd2
In the 1 970s Postovsky became a popu­ It is well known that 12 h3 is bad because
lar trainer, the coordinator of the Smyslov of 1 2 ... t2Jxe4! 1 3 hxg4 i:b.xc3 (Uhlmann­
Chess School, and the inspiration behind the Fischer, Palma de Mallorca 1 97 1 ).
main successes of the 'Burevestnik' Sports 12 ... Jlxe2 13 'i/xe2 QJhS 14 i:b.e3 t2Jd7
Society. In his crowded chess biography, (D)
his participation in correspondence tourna­
ments was merely an episode. After the
USSR Championship he competed in the
team championship of the country, but this w
did not bring him any laurels.
On the other hand, the respectful atti­
tude to him of many leading grandmasters,
including Kasparov himself, assisted his
appointment to the post of Russian State
Coach. When Boris Postovsky was in
charge of the Russian team in his capacity
as trainer, his team invariably finished up
the winners, irrespective of how things had
gone at the start. At the tum of the century 15 g4! ?
Boris Postovsky emigrated permanently to The preparatory 1 5 a5 gives White
the USA. the advantage in the event of the passive
1 5 ... 'i/c7 16 g4! QJhf6 17 f3 l2Je5 1 8 @hl
� ac8 1 9 � a4 h5 20 g5 QJh7 2 1 f4 QJd7
White: B.Postovsky 22 e5 dxe5 23 f5 ! (Gligoric-Miles, Hastings
1 973/74).
Black: M .Pukshansky However, in the game Beliavsky­
Kasparov (47th USSR Championship,
1 4th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 7 9 - 8 0 Minsk 1 979) after 1 5 . . . 'i/h4! 1 6 t2Jc4
Qjf4 17 'i/f3 l2Je5 ! 1 8 l2Jxe5 J:b.xe5 1 9 g3
Modern Benoni Defence A 7 5 'i/h5 ! 20 'i/xh5 t2Jxh5 2 1 t2Ja4 J:b.g7 Black
solved all his problems.
N otes by Boris Po stovsky 15 ... QJhf6 16 h3
Portisch chose 16 f3 against Kasparov
1 d4 Qjf6 2 c4 cS 3 d5 g6 4 t2Jc3 d6 5 e4 (Moscow 1 9 8 1 ) and after 1 6 . . . h6 1 7 @h l
J:b.g7 6 Qjf3 0-0 7 i:b.e2 e6 8 0-0 exd5 9 l2Je5 1 8 � g l b5 ! 1 9 g5 hxg5 20 Jlxg5 c4
2 1 axb5 axb5 22 � xa8 'iVxa8 23 l2Jxb5 2 7 c:i;; h l! l2Je5 28 l2Jf5
'iVb8 24 l2Ja3 'iVxb2 25 l2Jaxc4 l2Jxc4 26 In such formations a knight on f5 is a
'iVxc4 l2Jh5 Black gained an initiative that precursor of victory. It is interesting to fol­
compensated for his material deficit. low how over the next few moves the black
16 ...b6 knight is unable to reach d3 .
If 16 ... ttJ b6, then 17 � acl followed by 28 ... f6 29 l2Jxh6+ c:i;; h 8 30 � xf4 .� a8 31
b2-b3 is strong, forestalling Black's play on g5 'iVa7 32 gxf6 'iVa3 33 lLJbl!
the queenside. This strong move, forcing the exchange
17 f4 h6 of queens, quickly leads to a technically
Planning by . . . l2Jh7 and ... g6-g5 to se­ straightforward win.
cure a post for his pieces at e5. 33 ... 'iVxc3 34 l2Jxc3 � f8 35 l2Jxb5 � xf6
18 � ael?! 36 � xf6 l2Jxf6 37 l2Jxd6 c3 38 � cl � a3
18 'iVd3 was preferable; now Black car­ 39 l2Jhf7+ l2Jxf7 40 l2Jxf7+ c:i;; g7 41 l2Jd6
ries out his traditional counter-blow. � b3 42 c:i;; g2 � xb4 43 � xc3 l2Jxe4 44
18... b5! 19 °iVf3 l2Jxe4 � xe4 45 � d3 c:i;; f7 46 �g3 l-O
The pawn cannot be taken: 19 axb5 axb5 Of course, a notable item in his biog­
20 'iVxb S � b8 2 1 'iVc6 � xb2 22 l2J c4 raphy is the following game, in which he
� c2 23 i,d2 l2Jxg4!, or 20 l2Jxb5 l2Jxe4 outplayed an experienced master playing
2 1 l2Jxe4 � xe4 22 l2Jxd6 � xe3 ! and the opening that bears his name.
Black wins.
19 .. � b8 20 axb5 axb5 21 i,f2 c4 22 b4!
.

White blocks the queenside pawns and White: B.Postovsky


gains control of the c5-square.
22 . l2Jh7
.. Black: A.Ufimtsev
22 ... cxb3 23 l2Jxb3 b4 24 lLJ b l would
also have left White with some advantage. 1 4th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 9-80
23 l2J e2!
The start of a promising plan. 23 h4 Pirc-Ufimtsev Defen ce 80 7
would have led to unclear complications.
23 ...g5 24 i,d4 i,xd4+ 1 e4 d6 2 d4 l2Jf6 3 l2Jc3 c6
24 . . . gxf4 25 i,xg7 c:i;; xg7 26 'iVxf4 The veteran master, one of the co-authors
l2Je5 27 l2Jg3 favours White. of this opening, used to tirelessly try new
25 l2Jxd4 °iVb6 (D) methods of development. From the very
first moves, before even mobilising his
forces, Black plays actively on the queen­
side. Is this not too early, and with too small
w a force?
4 f4 'iVa5 5 i,d3 e5 6 dxe5 dxe5 7 f5!
This energetic plan casts doubts on
Black's strategy. Now 7 ... b5 would have
made the play double-edged. The course
chosen by Black proves passive, allowing
White to completely dominate the position.
7 l2Ja6? 8 l2Jf3 l2Jc5 9 0-0 l2Jxd3 10 cxd3
..•

i,d7
Afraid of subj ecting his king to threats on
26 'iVc3 gxf4 the right wing, Black hopes to shelter it on
Or 26 ... l2Je5 27 �hl l2Jd3 28 l2Jf5 ! . the other side of the board, but here too it
comes under a very strong attack. The only White: M .Arkhangelsky
alternative was 1 0 ... Jtc5+ 1 1 @hl ll:Jg4
and then ... h7-h5, attempting to initiate Black: B.Pe rsits
counterplay on the kingside.
1 1 Jtg5 0-0-0 12 a3 !:l, e8 13 @hl (D) 1 4th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 7 9-80

Queen 's Gambit D43

B N otes by M i k h a i l
Arkh angel sky

1 c4 c6 2 ll:Jf3 d5 3 d4 llJf6 4 ll:Jc3 e6 5


Jtg5 h6
This continuation has become fashion­
able in recent years. Black falls behind
somewhat in development, but relies on the
potential strength of his bishops. Besides,
the double-edged positions arising in the
After Black' s preventive measure (the e5- Botvinnik Variation - 5 ... dxc4 6 e4 b5 - are
pawn might have proved vulnerable) White not to everyone's taste.
has the right to allow himself a prophylactic 6 Jtxf6 'iVxf6 7 e3 ll:Jd7 8 Jtd3 dxc4
move. The opponent has no counterplay. Such an early conceding of the centre
13 ... Jtd6 14 b4 'li'b6 15 ll:Ja4 'li'b5 16 is frowned upon by theory. However, my
'iVc2 @b8 17 ll:Jc5 Jtc8 18 a4 'iVb6 19 opponent, an experienced correspondence
ll:Jd2 ll:Jd7 20 ll:Jc4 'iVc7 21 Jte3 ll:Jf6 player with his own analyses, had prepared
Combinative possibilities are already in an improvement on a well-known variation.
the air. For example, 2 l . ..b6 22 ll:Jxd7+ There is not even any point in White devi­
Jtxd7 23 a5 b5 24 Jtb6 ! . ating from the familiar path, as otherwise
2 2 b5 b 6 23 llJb3 llJdS he may lose his main trump - his lead in
Having lost the battle strategically, Black development.
hopes to provoke tactical complications, 9 Jtxc4 e5 10 0-0 exd4 11 exd4 Jte7 12
even at the cost of a piece. The sacrifice !:I. el lLlb6 13 lLle4 'iVf4 14 g3 'iVc7
could have been accepted, of course, but All this occurred in the game Pirc-Euwe
White decides not to deviate from his at­ (Amsterdam 1 950).
tacking course. And indeed, this is the 15 d5!
quickest way to win. It is this move that theory regards as the
24 exd5 cxd5 25 a5 dxc4 26 axb6 axb6 27 refutation of Black's entire plan. Now both
'iVa2 Jth7 28 dxc4 1-0 1 5 . . . ll:Jxc4 1 6 d6 ll:Jxd6 1 7 ll:Jxd6+ @f8
Faced with the unavoidable threat of 29 1 8 ll:Jxf7 @xf7 1 9 'iVb3+ and 1 5 ... ll:Jxd5
!:!. fcl and 30 c5, Black resigned. 1 6 Jtxd5 cxd5 17 ll:Jc3 ! Jte6 1 8 ll:Jxd5
Second and third place, a point be­ Jtxd5 1 9 'iVxd5 0-0 20 !:l, acl lead to a
hind the winner, were shared by Mikhail clear advantage for White.
Arkhangelsky, who in those years was 15... cxd5!
working as technical editor of chess litera­ But here is the improvement! Black
ture for the publishing house 'Fizkultura i voluntarily gives up the right to castle, but
Sport' , and Aleksandr Tsamryuk, who was retains certain pluses in his position.
senior trainer of a junior chess school in 16 Jtb5+ @f8!
Samarkand. After 16 ... Jtd7 White could have replied
1 7 .i::i. c l , and if l 7 ... �c6 1 8 ltJcS ! 0-0 1 9 26 as ctJd7 27 .i::i. xdS tt:JxcS 28 .i::i. dxcS
tt:Jxb7. .l::i, xcS
17 .i::!, cl 'i¥d8 18 tt:Jcs a6 19 �fl hS (D) If 28 . . . �d7, then 29 �g2 is unpleasant.
29 .l::i, xcS �g4
The bishop has at last emerged, but the
resulting endgame is difficult for Black.
w 30 .l::i, c7 .i::i. b8
30 ... �f3 would have been met by the
same reply.
31 �c4! �e6 32 �xe6 fxe6 33 b4 bS
The best chance. After passive defence,
the march of the white king into the centre
would have been quickly decisive.
34 .l::i, a7 .l::i, d8 3S .l::i, xa6 .l::i, d4 36 .l::i, xe6
.l::i, xb4 37 .l::i, b6 �f7 38 @g2 .l::i, b2 39
@f3 b4
The resulting position is not easy to eval­ The rest is a matter of technique. The
uate. Of course, White has a great lead in a-pawn is bound to decide the outcome,
development and the knight at cS is restrict­ but for this the king must immediately stop
ing the opponent' s forces on the queenside. Black's passed pawn, disregarding possible
But Black has retained the two bishops and losses on the kingside.
is ready to bring his rook into play via h6. 40 �e3! b3 41 a6 .i::i. a2 42 @d3 .i::i, xf2 43
In addition, for the moment he has an extra �c3 h4
pawn, even though it is isolated. Energetic 43 . . . .l::i, fl 44 @b2 ! or 43 ... .l::i, xh2 44
action is now demanded of White, as oth­ @xb3 .l::i, h l 4S @a2 does not help.
erwise Black's potential advantages may be 44 �xb3 hxg3 4S hxg3 .i::i, f3+ 46 �a4
transformed into real ones. .l::i, t1 47 .i::!, b3 .l::i, a1+ 48 .l::i, a3 1-0
20 ltJeS! .i::i, h6 21 'iVf3
The scope of the black rook along the
sixth rank needs to be restricted. White : M .Arkhangelsky
21. .. �f6 22 a4!
Since 22 . . . as is bad on account of 23 Black : A.Tsamryuk
�bS, the knight at b6 and, moreover, the
dS-pawn begin to feel uncomfortable. 1 4th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 7 9- 8 0
22 ... 'i¥d6 23 'i¥f4 �xeS
This exchange is forced, since 24 tt:Jg6+ English Opening A 30
was threatened, and there is no time for
23 ... �g8, if only because of 24 aS. N otes by A l e ksand r
24 'iVxeS Tsa m ry u k
Going into an ending is the only way
of retaining the initiative. After 24 .i::!, xeS 1 c4 c S 2 tt:Jf3 ctJf6 3 tt:Jc3 d S 4 cxdS ltJxdS
ctJd7 ! Black would have solved all his S g3 g6 6 �g2 �g7 7 'iVa4+ CLic6 8 'i¥c4
problems. ltJ db4 9 0-0 'iYaS 10 'i¥h4
24 ... 'iVxeS 2S .i::i. xeS .i::i. c6 White is aiming to exploit the withdrawal
Here too 2S ... ctJd7 was preferable. After of the black pieces from the kingside, plan­
26 .i::i. xdS tLixcS 27 .i::i. cxcS �g4 the white ning an attack on the future residence of the
rooks are significantly more active, but enemy king. Now 10 ... 0-0 is dangerous in
Biack has drawing chances. view of the possible variation 1 1 d3 �d7
12 j&h6 with the threat of 1 3 tlJg5 and 1 4
j&xg7.
B
10...h6!
For the moment Black delays castling,
trying, in tum, to exploit the 'over-active'
position of the white queen. At the same
time the development of the bishop at e6
is ensured.
1 1 d3 j&e6 12 j&d2 1i'd8 13 l:, fcl 1i'd7
Black has prepared the encirclement of
the white queen and is ready to begin pursu­
ing it with 14 ... g5. hoping that his lead in development and
14 a3 g5 15 1i'e4? the insecure position of the black king will
White avoids the draw that was pos­ compensate for his material deficit.
sible after 15 tt:Jxg5 hxg5 1 6 1i'xg5 j&h6 The play remains sharp to the very end.
( 1 6 ... j&f6 is dangerous because of l 7 1i'xc5 17 axb4 j&xe3 18 j&xe3 cxb4 19 t2J a4
t2Ja6 1 8 1i'b5.) 1 7 1i'h4 j&g7 1 8 1i'g5 l:, b8
j&h6, but he overlooks a tactical stroke. 1 9 . . . l:, c8 20 l2Jc5 1i'd6 21 C2Jxb7 1i'b8
15 ...f5 16 1i'e3 22 CLJc5 j&d5 was more accurate.
(See diagram in the next column.) 20 tt:Jc5 1i'd6 21 C2Jxg5 hxg5 22 C2Jxb7
16 j&d4!
.•. l:, xb7 23 j&xc6+ l:, d7 24 l:, xa7 f4 25
This is the whole point. It turns out that j&d2 0-0 26 j&xd7 j&xd7 27 l:, cc7 l:, d8
1 7 t2Jxd4 cxd4 1 8 1i'f3 dxc3 1 9 j&xc3 28 l:t cb7 f3!
.QJd5 20 j&xh8 g4 is not possible, as the White's threats are parried, and Black
queen is nevertheless lost. Therefore White himself launches a counter-attack.
gives up his queen for two minor pieces, 29 exf3 g4 30 j&xb4 1:Vxd3 0-1
Fifteenth Championship
(1981 -1983)

BY THE mid- 1 970s the number of play­ Sergey Grodzensky was appointed arbiter
ers wanting to participate in the USSR of the 1 5th Championship. I remember very
Championships had grown so significantly, well how the players began grumbling about
that to the initial, quarter-final stage it was the fact that some had to play two more
decided to admit only players who had the games with Black. Reporting on the situa­
candidate master rank. (Prior to this, first tion at a meeting of the Council for corre­
category players could also qualify from spondence events, I tried to speak ironically.
tournaments organised by the USSR Central (Those who had to play a majority of games
Chess Club.) with Black reacted calmly to what had hap­
In the semi-finals, apart from those who pened - what can be done, and in the end
had qualified from the quarter-final stage, what difference does it make? Whereas for
invitations were sent to over-the-board and some reason those to whom fate had granted
correspondence masters, and also to the two games more with White began to be­
winners of the championships of the USSR come agitated. . . )
republics, Moscow and Leningrad. Finally, In fact it was no laughing matter - the
to the final were invited USSR, FIDE and very tournament was in danger of collaps­
ICCF grandmasters, the winners of the ing, since some of the proteste:s were
semi-finals (two from each), the champions threatening to drop out if a new set of pair­
of the Russian Federation and the Central ings wasn't made. Fortunately, I was able
Chess Club, and the prize-winners in the to quell their passions, but I was left with a
previous final. feeling of vexation at the attitude of certain
The fifteenth championship was preceded participants to this prestigious event. Thus
by four semi-finals, in each of which sev­ the FIDE grandmaster Miron Sher played as
eral masters competed. As has already been though he was doing his military service.
mentioned, year after year the masters were The first decisive game was a fight­
largely unable to withstand the fierce com­ ing one, with the champion of the Central
petition of lower-ranked players. Chess Club, candidate master M.Volchikin,
One of the exceptions was the only wom­ defeating the experienced Leningrad master
an competing in the semi-final stage - the V.Varlamov. When one third of the games
Leningrad master Filippova, who earned were completed, the contenders for the prize
the right to participate in the men's USSR places had emerged.
Championship. Personal circumstances pre­ The leading group comprised . the mas­
vented her from taking up this opportunity. ters T.Koshil (Ryazan) - 5 out of 7, Ana­
However, when the composition of the tour­ toly Ufimtsev (Kustanay) - 3 out of 4,
nament was complete, it transpired that 2 1 NikolayKopylov (Voronezh) - 7 out of 1 3 ,
players were ready to take part. True, after Igor Kopylov (Ufa) - 5 out of 9 and Mikhail
the pairings had been made and the starting Arkhangelsky (Moscow) - 3 out of 5, and
list distributed, two dropped out. the candidate masters Aleksandr Lipiridi
N2 1 5th USSR Ch (1981-83) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

1 A.Lipiridi Kislovodsk 1 0 Yi 1 Yi Yi 1 1 y, 1 Yi y, y, y, 1 Yi 1 1 12'/z

2 A.Lutovinov Leningrad 0 Yi Yi Yi 0 1 0 Yi 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12

3 I.Kitaigorodsky Moscow 1 Yi Yi Yi 0 Yi 1 1 1 Yi Yi Yi y, 1 1 0 1 1 12

4 A.Ufimtsev Kustanay y, Yi y, 0 Yi y, 1 Yi 1 y, 0 y, 1 1 1 1 1 Yi 11'/z

5 N.Razvalyaev Tashkent 0 Yi y, 1 Yi Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 1 Yi Yi 1 'y, y, 1 1 11'/z


I ' .

6 A.Yakimenko Donetsk region Yi 1 1 Yi Yi Yi Yi 0 1 Yi 0 y, Yi 1 0 Yi 1 1 10'/z

7 I.Kopylov Ufa Yi 0 Yi y, y, Yi Yi Yi 1 Yi 1 0 Yi 1 Yi 1 Yi 1 10'/z


;

8 V.Demidenko Kuyboishev 0 1 0 0 Yi y, Yi 0 Yi Yi y, 1 0 Yi 1 1 1 . 1 91/z

9 Ya.Rusakov Omsk 0 Yi 0 Yi Yi 1 Yi 1 0 1 Yi y, Yi y, 0 1 Yi 1 91/z

10 T.Koshil Ryazan Yi 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 Yi 1 y, Yi 1 1 y, 1 y, 1 Yi 9

11 L.Levin Moscow 0 1 Yi Yi 0 y, Yi y, 0 Yi y, Yi Yi 1 0 1 Yi 1 9

12 V.Varlamov Leningrad Yi 0 Yi 1 0 1 0 Yi Yi Yi Yi
I
0 Yi 0 1 Yi Yi 1 81/z

13 M.Arkhangelsky Moscow y, 0 Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 0 Yi 0 Yi 1 Yi 0 Yi Yi 1 Yi 81/z

14 N.Kopylov Voronezh y, 0 Yi 0 Yi Yi Yi 1 Yi 0 Yi Yi Yi y, Yi y, 1 Yi 81/z


'
15 M.Volchikhin Shadrinsk y, a 0 0 0 0 0 Yi Yi y, 0 1 1 Yi 1 1 y, Yi 71/z

16 Yu.Rumyantsev Moscow region 0 0 0 0 Yi 1 Yi 0 1 0 1 0 Yi y, 0 1 y, Yi 7

17 V.Semenyuk Tula Yi 0 1 0 Yi Yi 0 0 0 Yi 0 Yi y, Yi 0 0 Yi 1 6

18 N.Mishuchkov Leningrad region 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yi 0 Yi 0 Yi y, 0 0 Yi Yi Yi t� y, 4

19 M.Sher Belgorod 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 Yi y, Yi Yi 0 y, 31/z


(Kislovodsk) - 6Yi out of 9 and Aleksandr 6...exd4 7 'Llxd4 'iVb6 8 'Llf3 �g4 9 b3 !?
Lutovinov (Leningrad) - 2 out of 2. (D)
A confident start was made by Aleksandr
Lipiridi, alternating full-blooded wins with
draws. In mid-tournament Nikolay Razvaly­
aev made a spurt, enabling him to challenge B
the leader. Two years after the start Lipiridi
had l OYi out of 14, and Razvalyaev l OYi out
of 1 5 .
By that time Igor Kopylov, who as usual
played very quickly, had already completed
his tournament with lOYi points. His final
score could have been even better, had he
not been let down by some vexing 'slips of
the pen'. In the leading group were Koshil
(Ryazan) - 7 out of 1 1 , Lutovinov (Lenin­ A non-routine continuation.
grad) - 6Yi out of 9, and the oldest partici­ 9 ... d5 10 'Lla4
pant, the master Ufimtsev - 8Yi out of 14. The only move that parries Black's
Any game by Anatoly Ufimtsev, in numerous threats. After 1 0 exd5 �b4 1 1
which he employs the opening that bears his 'ife2+ @d8 White loses. 1 0 e5 is also not
name, is of interest. good - 1 0 . . . 'Lle4 1 1 'Llxe4? dxe4 1 2 �xe4
'iVb4+, winning a piece, while after 1 1
�xe4 �b4 loss of material is inevitable.
White: V.Demidenko Weak is 1 0 'ife2 �b4 1 1 �d2 0-0 with
advantage to Black.
Black: A. U fimtsev 10 ... 'if c7 11 es 'Ll e4 12 'iVe2 b5 13 'Llb2
�b4+
1 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 1 -83 Preventing White from castling - this
is already an achievement by Black in the
Pirc-Ufimtsev Defence 80 7 opening.
14 �fl 'Llc5 15 �e3 'Llbd7 16 'Lldl
N otes by Anatoly Ufimtsev 'Llxd3
Not 1 6 ... 0-0 on account of 17 �xh7+
1 e4 d6 2 d4 'Llf6 3 'Llc3 c6 4 f4 'if as @xh7 1 8 'Llg5+ etc.
The aim of this move is to initiate active 17 cxd3 0-0 18 d4 � ae8
play both in the centre and on the queen­ Black begins carrying a deeply-con­
side. ceived plan, involving the destruction of the
5 �d3 opponent' s pawn centre.
The natural and strongest reply. It is 19 h3 �xf3 20 gxf3
unfavourable to defend the e4-pawn in any 20 'ifxf3 is worse, as after 20 ... f6 White
other way. If 5 �d2 there follows 5 ... 'ifb6 cannot use his f4-pawn for the defence of
with a simultaneous attack on two pawns. his e5, since he does not have time to re­
5...e5 move both his king and his queen from the
Preventing White from establishing firm f-file.
control in the centre. 20 ...f6 21 �f2
6 'Llf3 The sacrifice of the knight on e5 was
After 6 dxe5 dxe5 7 fxe5 'Llg4 Black re­ threatened, with a very strong attack.
gains the pawn and achieves a good game. 21...fxeS 22 fxe5 (D)
My first meeting with him springs to
B mind. The last summer before my final
school year was spent at a children' s sana­
torium in the spa town of Essentuki in the
Northern Caucasus. My friends and I spent
all our free time playing chess (I then had
second category rating).
In the evenings we visited the local chess
club, where at that time the Championship
of the Stavropol Region was being held.
Virtually the youngest participant, twenty­
year-old candidate master Alik Lipiridi, was
22 ... ctJf6! impossible to ignore.
The knight is transferred to f4, and from With his luxuriant head of j et-black hair,
being a backward piece it is transformed he drew attention not only by his appear­
into a decisive force. ance, but also his sharp (I would call it
23 � cl 'lid7 24 Clib2 counter-attacking) style. To our delight, he
White tries to exchange his passive in fact became champion.
knight for the bishop, but even this does not That same year the young player per­
bring him any relief. formed successfully in the zonal tournament
24 ... Jta3 2S � c3 Jtxb2 26 'lixb2 ClihS of the Russian Federation Championship
27 'lic2 b4 28 � e3 and qualified for the semi-final of the USSR
Bad is 28 � xc6 � xf3 29 � d6 'lib5+ Championship. He won the championship of
30 �g2 � ef8 3 1 Jth4 � c3 with an ir­ Stavropol about ten times and by the 1 960s
resistible attack. he was close to master ranking.
28 ... aS 29 @e2 ctJf4+ 30 @fl For Aleksandr Lipiridi, 1 967 was a
30 @ d l was comparatively better, al­ memorable year when, as champion of the
though even in this case after 30 ... Cli e6 3 1 Moscow Burevestnik sports society, he was
� d3 � f4 3 2 'lie2 � ef8 Black's position admitted into a master tournament, dedicated
is won in view of the threats of . . . Clig5 and to the 50th anniversary of the October Revo­
... 'lifl. lution. To reach the master norm, in his last
30...'lia7 31 'lidl cS 32 @gl two games it was sufficient for him to score
If 32 dxc5 there follows 32 ... 'lia6+ 33 half a point against two outsiders, but at the
�el ctJg2+ and wins. decisive moment fortune deserted him.
32 ... cxd4 33 � el 'lif7 34 � h2 d3 3S In subsequent years Lipiridi also had
Jtcs 'lig6+ 36 @hl � rs 37 � gl 'lihS some good results, but even so his play be­
38 Jtd6 Clie2 39 'lixd3 Clixgl 40 'iVxdS+ gan to show a decline. A way out was found
�h8 41 @xgl � xf3 0-1 in 1 977 when he tested his strength in a cor­
In the 1 5th Championship the highest respondence event. After gaining successive
award was won by Aleksandr Lipiridi, who victories in the quarter-final, semi-final and
at that time was a chess instructor in the final of the USSR CC Ch, the representative
Spartak junior sports society in Kislovodsk. from the Stavropol District gained, along
Aleksandr learned to play chess rather late with the gold medal, the master title and his
in life - at the age of 16. first grandmaster norm.
Then, after rapidly moving up the initial Of Lipiridi's wins I should like to men­
rungs of the qualification system, in 1 960 he tion one gained over an experienced master
became a candidate master, and a year later and at the same time a well-known corre­
he won the regional championship. spondence player.
White: A. Lipiridi 2 1 : cl tt::J xe4 22 b4 l-O
When all the spaces in the tournament
Black: Ya . Rusakov table had been filled, it transpired that the
following game was decisive in the battle
1 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 1 - 8 3 for the title of champion.

Queen 's Gambit Accep ted


D25 White : A. Lipiridi

1 d4 dS 2 l2Jf3 tt::J r6 3 c4 dxc4 4 e3 S �xc4 Black: A. Lutovinov


e6 6 l2lc3 ctJbd7 7 h3 �hS 8 0-0 �d6 9
e4 eS 10 g4! 1 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 81 - 8 3
Earlier 10 �e2 was played. In the game
Hort-Kavalek (Montreal 1979) after 1 0 ... Queen 's Gambit D44
0-0 1 1 dxe5 tt::J xe5 12 ctJd4 �c5 ! 1 3 l2lb3
'iVxdl .14 �xdl �b6 Black equalised. 1 0 N otes by Ti m Ha rd i n g
g4 occurred in the game P.Littlewood-Muir
(British Championship 1 979), in which after 1 d4 dS 2 l2J f3 tt::J r6 3 c4 e6 4 l2lc3 c6 S �gs
1 0 . . . �g6 1 1 dxe5 l2Jxe5 1 2 tt::J xe5 �xe5 dxc4 6 e4 bS 7 eS h6 8 �h4 gS 9 ltJxgS
1 3 f4 'iVd4+ 14 'iVxd4 �xd4+ 15 @h2 hxgS 10 �xgS ctJbd7 1 1 g3 b4?! (D)
�xc3 1 6 bxc3 �xe4 1 7 g5 ! Black ended
up in a difficult position.
10 ... �g6 11 dxeS ltJxeS 12 ltJxeS �xeS
13 r4 �d4+ 14 @h2 hS lS rs hxg4 16 rxg6 w
rxg6 (D)

This move, proposed by L.Radchenko


in 'Shakhmatny Byulleten' (October 1 955,
page 299), is rarely played. The main line
nowadays ( 1 1 exf6) avoids it. Black sacri­
fices his queen for three minor pieces, but
White obtains too many pawns. Instead
In the opening Black has · sacrificed a l l ...�b7 and 1 1 ... : gs are playable.
piece for two pawns and an attack. 12 l2le4 tt::J xe4 13 �xd8 @ xd8 14 �g2
17 h4! rs lS exr6
A strong move, enabling White to launch After 1 5 f3 (which is recommended in
a counter-attack. several books) Radchenko reckoned that
17 ... 'iVd6+ 18 @g2 : xh4 Black could set up a blockade of the pawns
Practically forced, since 1 9 �g5 was by 1 5 ... tt::J g5 but this seems implausible.
threatened. 1S ... tt::J exr6
19 �r4 'iVcS 20 ctJdS! 0-0-0 1 5 . . . tt::J dxf6 was Radchenko 's idea but it
If 20 . . . 'iVxc4, then 2 1 : c l . is refuted by 1 6 �xe4! tt::J xe4 1 7 'iVf3 as in
several games in 1 979-80. White: N . Mishuchkov
16 �e2 tLldS 17 �xc4 � b8
1 7 . . . �c7! ? was suggested in M.Arkhan­ Black: A.Lutovinov
gelsky's 1 985 booklet on CC.
18 0-0 � b6 19 � fel tLl7f6 20 h4 �d6 21 1 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 1 - 8 3
�h3 � e8 22 �c2 (D)
Queen 's Gambit D30

1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 tLlf3 ctJf6 4 g3 c5 5 �g2


B tLic6 6 0-0 �e7 7 cxd5 exd5 8 CLic3 0-0 9
<�g5 cxd4 10 tLlxd4 h6 11 �e3 � e8 12
�a4 �d7 13 � adl �f8 14 tt"Jxd5 tLlxdS
15 �xd5 tLlb4 16 �xf7+ �xf7 17 �b3+
�g6 18 a3 �h3 19 axb4 �xfl 20 �c2+
�f7 21 �b3+ @g6 22 @xfl �e7 23
tLlf3 �xb4 24 �g8 � ad8 25 tt"Je5+ (D)

B
22 ... � e7?
Also after V.Agrinsky' s suggestion 22 ...
c5 23 dxc5 � c6 it seems probable that
White should win in the end.
23 � e2 tLlh7 24 � ael tLlf8 25 h5 �d7
26 � e4 @c7 27 h6 tLlf6 28 � h4 tLl8h7 29
�fl � b8 30 �g2 � b5 31 �a4 @b8 32
� cl tLldS 33 � g4 tLlhf6 34 �xd5 t2Jxd5
35 �a6 tLlf6 36 � g6 CLie8 37 � xc6
�xc6 38 �xc6 � b6 39 �bl b3 40 axb3
� bb7 41 � g8 � bc7 42 �h5 1-0 25 ... � xeS 26 � xd8 �e4 27 �el??
The silver medal was awarded to the Len­ An example of chess bl indness, which in
ingrad player Aleksandr Lutovinov, whose the 'pre-computer era' sometimes occurred
length of service as a correspondence player even in high-level correspondence events.
exceeds twenty years. Initially he combined After 27 @gl Black would have had to
participation in correspondence tournaments force a draw by perpetual check: 27 ... �b l +
with active over-the-board appearances. 28 @g2 �e4+ etc.
Indeed, he gained the candidate master 27 ... �bl+ 28 � dl �b4+ 29 �d2
title for over-the-board play. He was three �xd2+ 30 @xd2 �xb2+ 0-1
times winner of the championship of the After winning the USSR championship
Leningrad Region. His deep interest in chess silver medal, Aleksandr Lutovinov was in­
even forced him to change profession. cluded in the Konstantinopolsky Memorial
· A geological engineer by training, Al­ Tournament, which brought him the title of
exander Lutovinov worked for many years ICCF international master.
as senior trainer for the Trud Junior Sports The Muscovite Ilya Kitaigorodsky, who
Society of the Leningrad Regional Council. long before had shown himself to be one
Then he began focusing on correspondence of the strongest candidate masters, worked
play, since he thought that this form of chess persistently towards the goal he had sent
was of most benefit to a trainer. himself - the achievement of the master
norm. When pressure of work (at that time
he was an executive in the USSR Finance B
Ministry) left him with increasingly fewer
opportunities to participate in tournaments,
'correspondence' came to the rescue.
Whereas the champion demonstrated a
universal style, and the play of the second
prize-winner was notable for its uncompro­
mising and rather risky nature, the bronze
medal winner was highly tenacious both
in attack, and in defence. In some cases he (Position after 41 h3)
was able to gain points in positions where
it appeared that all the resources were ex- @h2 gxh3 46 @xh3
hausted. This is better than 46 gxh3, which would
have allowed Black to activate his king by
playing it to f5 or f4.
White: M .Volchikhin 46 ... : h4+ 47 @g3 : g4+ 48 @ h3
If 48 @f3, then 48 ... @h4 would have
Black: I . K itaigorodsky won.
48 ... : gs 49 : a6 : bS so g4+ @gs st
1 5th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 1 -83 @g3 : b3+ S2 @f2 : a3 S3 : a7 g6 S4
: a6 : a4 SS @e3 : r4!
Queen 's Gambit 036 The advance of the a-pawn would not
have led to a win. Therefore Black pins his
1 d4 e6 2 c4 dS 3 ll:ic3 ll:if6 4 cxdS exdS S hopes on his g-pawn.
�gs c6 6 'iic 2 ll:ibd7 7 e3 �e7 8 �d3 S6 : xaS+ �xg4 S7 : al : f3+ SS @e2
0-0 9 ll:if3 : e8 10 0-0 ll:if8 11 : ael gS S9 : gt+
�g4 12 ll:ieS �hS 13 f4 ll:i6d7 14 �xe7 After 59 : h 1 or 59 : a8 Black would
: xe7 lS �fS �g6 16 �xg6 hxg6 17 b4 have cut off the white king by 59 ... : f5 and
'ii e8 18 bS ll:ib6 19 bxc6 bxc6 20 e4 ll:ie6 ensured the advance of his g-pawn.
21 : dt : cs 22 'iif2 : ds 23 : d3 f6 24 S9 ... : g3 60 : at @h3 61 @f2
ll:ixg6 'ij1xg6 2S fS 'ii e8 26 fxe6 : xe6 27 More tenacious was 61 : h l + @g2 62
exdS ll:ixdS 28 ll:ixdS : xdS 29 : b3 : e4 : hs g4 63 : gs @h2 64 : g6 : g 1 etc.
30 : g3 �f7 31 'ii c2 as 32 : c3 : e2 33 6t... : g2+ 62 �fl g4 63 : a3+ �h2 0-1
'ij1b3 'ii e4 34 'ij1b7+ @g6 3S : g3+ : gs Again, as in the preceding championship,
36 : xgS+ fxgS 37 'iif7+ @h6 38 'ij1f3 the entire victory podium was occupied
'iVxd4+ 39 @hl 'iie4 40 'iVxe4 : xe4 41 by candidate masters. The organisers had
h3 (D) hoped that, with the introduction of a new
The winning plan that suggests itself in­ qualifying system that envisaged the award­
volves the activation of Black's king. ing of the grandmaster title to a two-times
4t... : c4 42 a4! winner of the USSR Correspondence Cham­
White exchanges a pair of pawns and pionship, this would break the tradition of
aims to penetrate with his rook to a6. masters missing out in the distribution of
42... : xa4 43 : ct g4 44 : xc6+ @hS 4S awards.
1 74 Red Letters: Tactical Exercises

Find the finish ( II}

From Championships VI-XV. See the solutions on page 1 5 7 .

1 . A. Zaitsev-Gilman, 6th Championship 4. Smolensky-Zilberberg, 8th Champ.

2. Yershov-Altshuler, 5. Kuntsevich-Estrin,
7th Championship 10th Championship

3. Yershov-Romanov, 6. Poleshchuk-Foigel,
7th Championship 15th Championship
Sixteenth Championship
(1983-1986)

THE FINAL of the 1 6th USSR Champi­ of importance for the distribution of the
onship again comprised 1 9 participants, medals, and the arbiters granted the players
including 1 0 masters. On this occasion the the opportunity to play on to the end and
representation of the Republics was quite themselves resolve their tournament fate,
wide: three from Latvia, two from Ukraine, without resorting to adjudication. The fol­
and one each from Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, lowing game proved decisive in the battle
Estonia and Azerbaijan. for the championship.
By that time a rating system had been
introduced for USSR correspondence play­
ers, which enabled the average rating of the White: R .Akopov
participants to be determined - 2380. The
tournament arbiter was B.Bulgin, who was Black: D .Barash
later to receive the title of international arbi­
ter of both FIDE and ICCF. 1 6th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 3 - 8 6
A year after the start of play, the first
leaders had emerged. They were the winner King 's Indian Defence £8 1
of the previous championship Aleksandr Li­
piridi - 6 points out of 1 0, A.Volchok - 3Yi 1 d4 Qjf6 2 c4 g6 3 CLic3 il,g7 4 e4 d6 5
out of 6 and Yury Zelinsky - 3 out of 5 . f3 0-0 6 il,e3 a6 7 il, d3 cS 8 dxcS dxcS 9
By the middle of the tournament Vol­ il,xcS?! (D)
chok had shown his ambitions by winning 9 e5 Qjfd7 10 f4 is better, for example
five games in a row, and with 1 0 points 10 ... QJc6 1 1 QJf3 Qjd4 12 0-0 f6 13 e6!
out of 1 3 he was leading the race. At this QJb6 14 f5 lLJ xf5 1 5 il,xf5 gxf5 1 6 il,xc5.
point Lipiridi had 9Yi out of 14. Also in Now Black gains a dangerous initiative for
the leading group were S.Kastarnov - 9 out the pawn.
of 1 5, Dmitry Barash - 7 out of 1 0, Yury
Zelinsky - 7 out of 1 1 and Igor Kopylov
- 7 out of 12.
B
Long before the finish, the failure of a
prize-winner in the 14th USSR CC Ch, the
Uzbekistan master Aleksandr Tsamryuk,
became evident. He committed a breach
of discipline and then altogether stopped
playing.
When the playing time had expired the
arbiters' commission extended the event by
several months - six unfinished games were
.....
.....
NQ 1 6th USSR Ch. (1983-86) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ' �

1 D. Barash Leningrad ±J '12 1 '12 'h '12 'h 'h I I l 1 I I 0 l I 'h I 13'h
I

2 A. Volchok Nikolaev 'h 'h 0 '12 'h I 1 I I l 'h 1 '12 1 I 'h 1 l· 13


3 R. Akopov Baku 0 '12 1 '12 'h 0 'lz 'lz '12 l 1 1 l 1 1 1 I I 13
4 Yu. Zelinsky Riga '12 l 0 'h 1 '12 I '12 'h 'h I Yi 1 1 'h 'h 1 'h 12
I

5 I. Kopylov Ufa '12 '12 '12 'h 'h '12 I l 1 '12 1 Yi 'h 'h '12 1 '12 1 12

6 A. Lipiridi Kislovodsk 'h 'h '12 0 'h 'h '12 '12 y, I 'h I 1 1 'h 1 I I 1 1 '/z
7 S. Kastarnov Grozny /
'2 '12 1 '12 'h '12 '12 'h 1 0 '12 '12 '12 '12 l 1 '12 I 11

8 A. Korolev Moscow '12 0 'h 0 0 'h 'h 'h l 0 '12 1 1 1 I 'h 'h I IO

9 J. Markauss Riga 0 0 'h 'h 0 V2 Yz 'h 0 I '12 'h 'Ii 'h l I I 1 9 '/z Q.

S-
-

10 L . Peleshev Narva 0 0 '12 'h 0 '12 0 0 1 'h 1 1 '12 l I 'h I 'h 9Yz
eti
11 L. Levin Moscow 0 0 0 'h 'h 0 1 1 0 y, 0 y, I I y, 'h y, 1 8'/z �
12 A. Ufimtsev Kustanay 0 '12 0 0 0 'h Yz Yz y, 0 1 1 y, '12 I y, l '12 8'/z
13 0. Batakovs Riga 0 0 0 y, Yz '12 y, 0 y, 0 y, 0 y, '12 I 'h 1 1 7'/z
14 A. Pchyolkin Nikolaevsk-Amur 0 'h 0 0 'h 0 y, 0 y, '11 0 '12 y, I 0 I Yz I 7

15 V. Borisov Moscow region 1 0 0 0 'h 0 'h 0 '12 0 0 y, Yi 0 1 Yz y, 1 6'/z


c

16 I. Kitaigorodsky Moscow 0 0 0 'h Yi Yi 0 0 0 0 Yi 0 0 1 0 I 1 I 6


17 G . Kotenko Kiev 0 'h 0 'h 0 0 0 Yi 0 'h 'h '12 y, 0 y, 0 'lz I 5'h
18 A. Lutovinov Leningrad '12 0 0 0 'lz 0 Yi y, 0 0 'lz 0 0 'lz 'lz 0 'lz 1 5
19 A. Tsamryuk Samarkand 0 0 0 '12 0 0 0 0 0 'lz 0 'lz 0 0 0 0 0 0 11/z
9 ... lt:Jc6 10 i,e3 lt:J d7 l l f4 'iYa5 12 lt:Jge2 his subsequent results, which included third
lt:Jc5 13 i,c2 i,g4 14 'iYd2 e6 15 e5 l! fd8 place in the next championship and the con­
16 lt:Jd4 l! xd4! 17 i,xd4 l! d8 18 h3 fident gaining of the ICCF grandmaster title.
l! xd4 19 'iVf2 i,f5 20 i,xf5 gxf5 Here is a game in which the winner of the
As a result Black has two pieces for a 1 6th Championship defeated a prize-winner
rook, and the rest, as they say, is a matter from the 1 5th Championship.
of technique.
21 0-0 lt:J d3 22 'iVg3 lt:Jxb2 23 lt:J e2 l! d2
24 lt:Jcl lt:Jxc4 25 QJb3 'iYa3 26 l! f2 l! d5 White: D . Barash
27 l! cl Qjd2 28 'iVe3 lt:Je4 29 l! fc2 a5
30 'iVb6 a4 31 'iVxb7 axb3 32 l! xc6 b2 33 Black: I . K itaigorodsky
l! c8+ i,f8 34 l! el l! d2 35 'iYb3 'iVa7+
36 �hl 'iVf2 37 l! gl 'iVxf4 0-1 1 6th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 83-86
By winning this game, Dmitry Barash
from Leningrad gained the title of cham­ French Defence C06
pion. The path to the highest titles in cor­
respondence chess is not only difficult, but 1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Qjd2 lt:Jf6 4 e5 Qjfd7
also long. It can be shortened by overcoming 5 i,d3 c5 6 c3 lt:Jc6 7 lt:Je2 cxd4 8 cxd4
all the qualifying stages at the first attempt, lt:Jh6 9 0-0 i,d7 10 a3 a6 1 1 f4 g6 12 l! f3
occupying first places in tournaments with­ h5 13 lt:Jfl lt:Ja7
out any mishaps. That is how Dmitry Barash This variation is considered difficult for
began his ' correspondence career'. Success Black. The subsequent events confirm this
in the main tournament of the USSR Cham­ evaluation.
pionship brought the 27-year-old mathema­ 14 l! h3 i,g7 15 a4 lt:Jc6 16 i,d2 lt:Jc8
tician the gold medal, the master title and a 17 lt:Je3 'iVb6 18 a5 'iVa7 19 i,c3 lt:J8e7
grandmaster norm. 20 'iYel f5! ? 21 exf6 i,xf6 22 �hl �f7
Dmitry began playing chess at rather a 23 g4 (D)
late age. When in 1 972 he first joined the
chess club in the Pioneers' Palace, few
would have risked rating the thirteen-year­
old schoolboy - who then had fourth cate­ B
gory rating - as showing much promise. But
the youth quickly became a first category
player, and in his years as a student at Len­
ingrad University he gained the candidate
master title.
Then he was helped by an accident. In
1 978 Dmitry noticed that his colleague on
the university team Kolya Poleshchuk (now
a correspondence international master and
international arbiter, and a participant in 23 ... QJxd4?
major tournaments, including finals of the Better was 23 . . .hxg4 24 l! xh8 l! xh8 25
USSR championship) would spend hours lt:Jxg4.
at the board, carefully analysing positions 24 lt:Jxd4 i,xd4 25 f5 gxf5 26 gxf5 e5 27
from correspondence games. lt:Jc2! i,xc3 28 bxc3 lt:Jc6 29 c4 d4 30
So Dmitry himself caught the 'disease '. i,e4 'iYc5 31 i,d5+ �e7 32 l! b3 l! ab8
The fact that his success in the USSR Cham­ 33 l! b6 �d8 34 lt:Jb4 �c8 35 lt:Jxc6
pionship final was no accident was shown by i,xc6 36 'iYe4
36 �xe5 � e8 37 � xc6+ �xc6 3 8 The start of an unfortunate experiment,
�xd4 was also convincing enough. which proves to be a loss of time. The
36... ii,xd5 37 cxd5 � d8 38 f6 (D) system of development that occurred in the
game Tseshkovsky-Velikov (Frunze 1 983)
came into consideration: 7 ... ii,e7 8 tl'ic3
0-0 9 ii,e3 b6 1 0 �e2 ii,b7 1 1 � fd l
B
tl'ibd7 1 2 � ac l �c7 1 3 ii,b l � ac8 1 4 b3
� fe8 with equality.
8 tl'ic3 ii,b7 9 ii,e3 tl'ibd7 10 f4 tl'ic5 (D)

38... � xd5
Of course, not 3 8 ... �xd5? on account of
39 � c l +.
39 17 � d8 40 � bbl! @d7 41 � cl �e7
42 � abl �xf7
Despite Black's three extra pawns, he
loses by force. 1 1 e5!
43 � fl ! �c4 44 �h7+ �d6 45 � b6+ White switches to vigorous action, aim­
@c5 46 �e7+ @d5 47 � el ing to expose the black king that is caught
Here the 'curtain' could have been low­ in the centre.
ered, but Black plays on and receives 'mate 1 1 ...dxe5
by post': l l . . . tl'ixd3? is unsatisfactory on account
47...�c3 48 �e6+ @c5 49 � xe5+ � d5 of 1 2 exf6 tl'ic5 1 3 b4 tl'id7 ( 1 3 . . . tl'ie4 1 4
50 �xd5 mate 1-0 tl'ixe4 ii,xe4 1 5 f5 ! e 5 1 6 �g4) 1 4 f5 ! e5
Alexandr Volchok, the international 1 5 tl'ie6! fxe6 1 6 fxg7 ii,xg7 1 7 �h5+
master from Nikolaev, won the silver @e7 1 8 fxe6 and White wins.
medal thanks to having a superior tie-break 12 fxe5 tl'ifd7
coefficient to the Baku player R.Akopov. Here too the capture of the white bishop
would have led to disaster, for example:
12 . . . tl'ixd3 13 exf6 and now:
White : A. Volchok (a) 13 ... tl'ic5 14 b4! tl'id7 1 5 tl'ixe6 fxe6
1 6 fxg7 ii,xg7 1 7 �h5+, or 14 . . . tl'ie4 1 5
Blac k : J . Markauss tl'ixe4 ii,xe4 1 6 �g4! - i n both cases
White is assured of a win.
1 6th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 3 - 8 6 (b) 13 . . . tl'ie5 14 �h5 tl'ig6 (If 1 4 ... �c7
1 5 fxg7 ii,xg7 1 6 tl'ixe6 or 14 ... �d6 1 5
Sicilian Defence 842 � ad l g 6 16 �h3) 1 5 tl'ixe6 fxe6 1 6 f7+
@d7 1 7 � adl+ ii,d6 1 8 c5 ! bxc5 1 9
N otes by Alexa n d r Vo l c h o k � xd6+! @xd6 20 �xc5+ @d7 2 1 � d l +
ii,d5 22 tl'ixd5 exd5 2 3 �xd5+! with a
1 e4 c 5 2 tl'if3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tl'ixd4 a 6 5 rapid mate.
ii,d3 tl'if6 6 0-0 d6 7 c4 b6 13 ii,c2 !
The bishop has to be retained. It goes way, to refute 20 ... �xb4 - 2 1 �g5 'li'e8
without saying that White will have more 22 �xd8 'li'xd8 23 � xf7 ! ! CLixfl 24
than sufficient compensation for the pawn. C2Jxe6 'li'e8 25 � xd7+ ! .
13 ... CLixe5 14 'li'h5 �d6 15 � adl g6 16 S.G./T.H.: Instead of Volchok's line,
'ii h3 'ii e7 2 1 ...f6 ! ? came into consideration, and after
Castling is bad: 1 6 ...0-0 1 7 b4 C2Jcd7 1 8 22 C2Jxf6 h6 the outcome is hard to predict.
C2Jxe6 ! etc. However, 22 � xf6 ! is stronger, with some
17 b4 C2Jcd7 18 �e4! 0-0-0 19 �xb7+ advantage to White, but clearly this is the
@xb7 20 C2Je4 (D) defence that Black should have tried.
Now Black is bound to lose material, 21 C2Jxe6 'li'xe6 22 C2Jxd6+ @c7 23 C2Jxf7
since there is no defence against the two 'li'xh3 24 gxh3 C2Jxc4
threats (2 1 �g5 or 2 1 CLixe6 followed by There was also little comfort in 24 ... QJxfl
C2Jxd6). 25 � xfl.
25 �f4+ @c6
Black avoids an amusing trap: 25 ... @c8?
B
26 � c l b5 27 Qjd6+ and 28 C2Jxc4+, win­
ning the knight, but all the same his position
is hopeless.
26 � d4 b5 27 4Jxh8 � xh8 28 � el � h7
29 � e6+ @b7 30 � xg6 C2Jde5 31 �xe5
CLixe5 32 � f6 1-0
Good results in the tournament were
achieved by the experienced masters Yury
Zelinsky, Igor Kopylov and the winner of
the previous championship Aleksandr Li­
piridi, but at the start they made rather a
20 ... h6 lot of draws and this prevented them from
There 1s only one, highly spectacular occupying higher places.
1 7th USSR CC Championship ( 1 986- 1 988)

N2 I I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

I. Kopylov Ufa Y2 1 0 Yz 1 1 1 1 Yz 1 1 Yz Yz 10
'
2 D. Godes Ryazan 1 Yz 1 0 Yz 1 1 0 1 1 y, Yz 9Yz

3 D. Barash Leningrad Yz Yz Y2 Yz Yz Yz 1 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 9

4 V. Yarmolik Saratov 0 0 Yz 1 Yz 1 0 Yz 1 1 1 1 8Yz

5 S. Korolev Leningrad 1 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz Yz 0 1 1 8

6 L.Rubinchik Kremenchug Yz 0 Yz Yz y, y, 1 y, Yz 1 Yz Yz 8

7 Yu. Zelinsky Riga 0 1 Yz 0 Yz Yz Yz 1 1 Yz 1 y, 7Yz

8 N.Andrianov Moscow 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz Yz 1 y, y, 1 Yz 7

9 Ya. Rusakov Omsk 0 0 Y2 0 Yz Y2 y, Yz 1 Yz y, Yz 6Yz

10 R. Akopov Baku 0 0 0 1 0 0 Yz Yz 1 0 Yz 1 6

11 A. Ufimtsev Kustanay Yz 1 . ; 0 Yz Yz Y2 0 0 y, 1 Yz Yz 6

12 A. Korolev Moscow 0 0 Yz 0 Yz Yz 0 Yz 0 0 1 1 5Yz

13 I. Glek Moscow 0 0 0 0 1 0 Y2 Yz Yz 1 0 1 5

14 S. Kastarnov Grozny Yz Yz Y2 0 0 Yz 0 0 Yz Yz Yz 0

15 N. Monin Leningrad Yz Yz 0 0 0 Yz Yz Yz Yz 0 Yz 0
Seventeenth Championship
(1986-1988)

IN ORDER to raise still higher the standard Kopylov with 5 points out of 8 and the win­
of the main competition for correspondence ner of the previous championship, Dmitry
players - the final of the USSR Champion­ Barash, who had 4Yz out of 7.
ship - it was decided to stage the final of In all his correspondence tournaments,
these events in two Leagues, Premier and Igor Kopylov from Ufa played very quickly,
First. The new arrangement began with the leading on the number of completed games.
1 7th Championship. In the 1 7th Championship too, a little more
The only players admitted into the Pre­ than a year after the start he already had 9
mier League, in which the title of champion points out of 1 3 , with only his remaining
was actually contested, were grandmasters, game with Andrianov to finish. His main
the prize-winners from the previous cham­ rivals - the winner of the previous champi­
pionship, and masters with the highest onship Dmitry Barash, the only grandmaster
individual ratings. The winners of the semi­ in the tournament, D. Godes, and one of the
finals (who were mainly very strong candi­ strongest masters, S.Korolev - tried to catch
date masters) qualified for the First League, him, but did not succeed.
in which the master norm was established. Igor Aleksandrovich Kopylov was born
At the cost of violating the rights of the in 1 939. After graduating from Bashkir
semi-final winners, the goal was achieved University he worked in the department
- from the formal viewpoint the 1 7th of scientific and technical information at a
USSR CC Ch, which consisted entirely of factory in Ufa. Then for many years he was
grandmasters (including some future ones) editor of the factory newspaper.
and masters, became the strongest in the Igor learned to play chess at about the
entire history of these championships. It age of ten - rather late by present-day
also proved possible to reduce the overall conceptions. But he was fortunate with his
number of players in the Premier League - it first trainer, the then Bashkir champion
was contested by 1 5 players. L.K.Frolov - an ardent 'Chigorinite' , who
In this championship, the first to be called aimed for sharp combinative play. In 1 957
the Premier League, apart from Russians Kopylov won the Junior Championship of
there were representatives from Ukraine, the . Russian Federation, and was twice a
Latvia, Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan. The member of the junior republic team that won
average rating of 2439 demonstrated a the championship of the country.
qualitative leap compared with the previ­ In 1 966 he played in a tournament with
ous championship. The arbiter was Evgeny the master norm and at the very first attempt
Karelin. he achieved it. That was the championship
One year after the start of play, when a of the Russian Federation. Kopylov even
quarter of the results had been recorded, had chances of becoming a prize-winner,
the first leaders appeared. These were Igor but he lost in the last round. Later too on
several occasions he was let down by a poor White : l . Kopylov
finish.
One remembers the 1 970 Russian Cham­ Black: V.Yarmolik
pionship, in which the winner was the rap­
idly ascending Anatoly Karpov. Kopylov 1 7th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 8 6 - 8 8
drew with the future world champion, and
two rounds before the finish he was in the Philidor Defence C4 1
top three, but in the end he shared 6th-8th
places, although ahead of a whole group of 1 e4 es 2 tt:Jn d6 3 d4 tlJd7 4 �c4 c6 s
masters who later became grandmasters. tlJgS ctJh6 6 a4
For the first chess master from Bashkir Now 6 . . . �e7? is bad on account of 7
it became increasingly difficult to take part �xf7+! tt:Jxf7 8 t2Je6 'iVa5+ 9 �d2 'iVb6
in over-the-board tournaments. It was the 1 0 a5 'iVxb2 1 1 �c3 ! and White wins.
usual reason - a serious attitude to his main 6 ... jVf6?!
profession and a constant mass of social The doubtfulness of this move becomes
responsibilities. evident later, when White employs a suc­
Igor Kopylov first tested his strength cessful novelty.
in correspondence events in the 1 960s, 7 c3 �e7?! 8 0-0 ctJb6 9 �e2!
three times leading the Bashkir team in the In the game Leonhardt-Nimzowitsch
championships of the Russian Federation, (match, 1 9 1 1) White retreated his bishop
and each time achieving the best result on to a2, and after 9 �a2 jVg6 10 a5 �xg5
top board. Since 1 974 Kopylov has been a he ended up in an inferior position. In the
constant participant in correspondence tour­ present game White prevents the manoeuvre
naments of the highest rank, achieving good of the black queen to g6.
and stable results. He has to his credit victo­ 9...aS 10 f4 exd4
ries in grandmaster tournaments, participa­ This conceding of the centre is forced.
tion for the USSR team in the final of the 1 1 cxd4 dS
European Championship, and qualification 1 1 . . .g6 came into consideration, enabling
for the final of the World Championship. the queen to retreat.
Grandmaster Igor Kopylov is an advo­ 12 es jVg6 13 �hS
cate of 'rapid' correspondence. He almost By pursuing the en�my queen, White has
always replies to moves on the day that the gained time for his attack.
letter arrives and up till now not one of his 13 ... jVfS (D)
games has been sent for adjudication. Play­
ing quickly, he completes an event ahead of
schedule, and it can happen that he himself
suffers because of this, since his final score w
is known to his rivals and serves as a marker
for them. Even so, usually his rivals, observ­
ing the sprinter-like speed of the grandmas­
ter from Ufa, realise that they can only strive
for second place, as happened in the final of
the 1 7th USSR Championship.
In this event the play of Igor Aleksan­
drovich Kopylov was characterised by a
subtle positional understanding and good
technique, enabling him to transform a mini­ 14 tt:Jxf7! tt:Jxf7 lS g4 jVd7 16 fS 'iVc7 17
mal advantage into something tangible. e6 �xe6 18 fxe6 g6 19 exf7+ @d7 20 iVe2
'ifd6 21 $bf4 'ife6
Simplification does not bring Black any
relief. w
22 Vxe6+ @xe6 23 t2Jd2 gxh5 24 t2Jb3
: hf8 25 : ael + @d7 26 tt:Jc5+
Now Black cannot avoid loss of mate­
rial.
26... $bxc5 27 dxc5 : xf7
Or 27 ... tt:Jc8 (if 27 ... tt:Jxa4, then 28 $bd6
is decisive) 28 $bh6 tt:Je7 29 $bxf8 : xf8
30 gxh5 and wins.
28 cxb6 hxg4 29 $bh6 : xn+ 30 : xn
@e6 31 : f8! : xf8 32 $bxf8 d4 33 b4 16 : dl a5
axb4 34 $bxb4 h5 35 a5 This activity merely plays into White 's
Threatening 36 a6 ! . hands. Better is 16 ... $bg5, preparing coun­
35 ... @d7 36 $bc5 d3 37 @ f2 h4 38 @e3 terplay on the kingside.
h3 39 @xd3 g3 40 ltgl 1-0 17 t2Jd5 b4 18 cxb4 $bxd5 19 'ifxd5
Igor Kopylov gained his last, decisive : xb4 20 b3
point in the following game, which is also Intending 2 1 $bc4, after which White 's
of theoretical significance. chances of an attack - with opposite-colour
bishops - will be clearly better. Therefore
Black forces exchanges.
White : l . Kopylov 20... : d4 21 : xd4 exd4 22 $bc4 Vas 23
Vxa8 : xa8 24 @e2
Black: N .Andrianov The resulting endgame position is ad­
vantageous to White, whose plan can be
1 7th U S S R C C C h , 1 9 8 6- 8 8 divided into three stages: tie Blac!c down
to the defence of the d4-pawn, create a
Sicilian Defence 833 passed pawn on the queenside and, finally,
open the position in the centre or on the
1 e4 c5 2 t2Jf3 t2Jc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 t2Jxd4 t2Jf6 kingside. However, the opposite-colour
5 t2Jc3 e5 6 t2Jdb5 d6 7 $bg5 a6 8 tLla3 b5 bishops significantly hinder the realisation
9 t2Jd5 $be7 10 $bxf6 $bxf6 11 c3 tt:Je7 of this plan.
Kopylov admitted that he anticipated his 24 ... $bd8 25 : bl : b8 26 @d3 $bb6 27
opponent choosing the Chelyabinsk Varia­ b4! $ba7 28 b5 $bb6 29 : cl @f8 30 $bd5
tion: Andrianov had published an article on $bc5 31 a4 f6 32 f4 @e7 33 e5? !
this topic. White forces events, but the further
12 t2Jc2 t2Jxd5 course of the game shows the doubtfulness
12 . . . $bb7 came into consideration. of this decision.
13 'ifxd5 : b8 14 tLlb4 $bb7 15 'if d3 0-0 33 ... fxe5 34 fxe5 : f8 35 ltf3 : b8 36
(D) : el $bb6 37 $bg4 : b7!
In an article in ' Shakhmatny Byulleten' Now nothing is achieved by 38 exd6+
( 1 986, No.7) Andrianov and Krasenkov @xd6 39 : e6+ @c5 40 : c6+ @b4,
wrote that after this continuation Black has while after other continuations Black's sev­
no serious problems and can hope for equal­ enth rank is defended. White has to start all
ity. Grandmaster Evgeny Sveshnikov in his over again.
monograph ( 1 987) simply states that 'Black 38 e6 : c7 39 : n d5! 40 : n+ @d6 41
has a good game' . $bf5 g6
Better chances of a defence were offered From his early years Dmitry Godes en­
by the seemingly passive 4 1 . ..h6. deavoured not to copy anyone. While still a
42 �h3 �cs (D) young candidate master he was able to de­
velop his own style of play. This was aided
by his fascination for chess composition.
He created several excellent studies that
w enriched the theory of chess.
In the 1 960s the author of these lines got
to know Dmitry Godes. The point was that
I had a long-standing dream - to organise
a correspondence tournament that would
bring together all the strongest players from
the town of Ryazan. In this tournament,
which was dedicated to the memory of the
Russian poet Sergey Y esenin, a native of
those parts, Dmitry Godes, at that time the
43 e7! strongest player in the town, also took part.
This new breakthrough involves a sac­ Godes's analytical capabilities became
rifice of two pawns, but the White pieces evident in his next correspondence event
become extremely active. - the Mirotvorsky Memorial, in which he
43 . :!. xe7 44 :!. f6+ @es 4S :!. a6 @f4
. . achieved in succession the master and then
Otherwise 46 g3 , and the black king will the grandmaster norm. After gaining the
not escape from the mating net without great grandmaster title, Godes took part in the
loss of material. final of the USSR Championship. A vivid
46 �e6 @eS impression was made not only by his fine
If 46. . . @gS, then 47 g3 h5 48 h4+. result, but also by the creative content of his
47 �c8 @f4 48 g3+ @f3 49 �e6 @g2 games, played in the style of the old Russian
SO .l::!, c6 @xh2 Sl g4! �a7 S2 b6 �b8 S3 masters.
@xd4
At last the white king has joined the
play. Wh ite : D . G odes
S3 ... hS S4 gxhS gxhS SS @xdS h4 S6 @c4
h3 S7 �bS �es S8 �xaS @g3 S9 �xh3 Black : L . Rubinchik
@xh3 60 @bS �d4 61 aS �f2 62 :!. cS!
1-0 1 7th U S S R CC Ch, 1 9 8 6- 8 8
Second place was taken by Dmitry Godes,
who finished half a point behind the winner. French Defence C0 7
At the start of the tournament he was the
only holder of the grandmaster title and his 1 e4 e6 2 d4 dS 3 C2J d2 cS 4 exdS 'iVxdS S
opponents fought against him with redoubled dxcS! ?
energy. Dmitry Godes showed himself to be This move was fashionable i n the late
one of the strongest over-the-board masters 1 930s. It leads to a little-studied position
in Russia. Three times, and not without suc­ with a minimal advantage for White.
cess, he took part in qualifying tournaments S... �xcS 6 ct:Jgf3 ctJf6 7 �c4 'i¥d6
for the USSR championship. If you were to A loss of time. 7 ... 'i¥d8 8 0-0 0-0 9
take together all the FIDE grandmasters de­ Cllb3 �b6 came into consideration, with
feated by him, the result would be the equal chances of equalising.
of an Olympiad team. 8 0-0 0-0 9 Cll b3 !
Black's imperceptible mistake on the 23 a7 l2J a4 24 ib,f3 1-0
seventh move allows White to go directly After 24 . . . l2Jab6 25 b3 l2Je7 26 ib,xc6
from the opening into the endgame and to White has a decisive advantage.
seize the initiative. After winning the silver medal in the
9 'ii'x dl 10 : xdl ib,e7 11 l2Jhd4 a6 12
... USSR Correspondence Championship,
a4 : d8 ICCF grandmaster and FIDE intemati<;mal
1 2 . . .b6 came into consideration, and after master Dmitry Godes gave up postal play.
13 ib,f4 ib,b7 1 4 ib,c7 l2Jbd7 White cannot After his emigration to Israel he continued
play 1 5 l2Jxe6? in view of 1 5 ... : fc8 ! , with to perform successfully in over-the-board
a material advantage for Black. events and he also achieved success as a
13 ib,f4 ib,d7 14 l2Je5 ib,e8 15 as l2Jbd7? chess trainer.
(D) The winner of the previous champion­
This last move is a mistake in a difficult ship, Dmitry Barash, on this occasion oc­
position, to which White responds with a cupied the 'bronze step ' on the winners'
tactical blow. Black should have played podium. He confirmed his high class in a
1 5 ... l2Jfd7 ! , aiming for simplification. In number of games, but especially noteworthy
the opinion of Godes, 1 5 ... �f8 ! ? came into was the one in which Anatoly Ufimtsev em­
consideration. ployed the defence that bears his name.

White : D . Barash
w
Blac k : A . U fimtsev

1 7th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 6- 8 8

Pirc-Ufimtsev Defence 809

1 e4 d6 2 d4 lbf6 3 l2Jc3 g6
The game between these same players
from the previous championship went 3 . . . c6
16 l2Jec6! bxc6 17 l2Jxc6 ib,f8 4 f4 'ii'a5 5 ib,d2 'ii'b6 6 l2Jf3 ! ? . Although
After 1 7 . . . @f8 1 8 l2Jxe7 e5 1 9 ib,d2 ! Black sensibly declined the offered pawn,
White is a pawn up with the better position. he was unable to gain full· equality.
If 1 7 . . . l2Jc5 he retains the advantage by 1 8 4 f4 ib,g7 5 l2Jf3 c6 6 ib,d3 0-0 7 0-0 l2Ja6
l2Jxd8. 8 e5!
18 l2Jxd8 : xd8 19 ib,xa6 llJdS 20 ib,g3 White succeeds in activating his pieces.
l2Jc5 21 ib,e2! : a8 22 a6! 8... l2Jd5 9 l2Jxd5! cxd5 10 'ii'el f5?
The following line is insufficient for a An unjustified weakening of the king­
win: 22 ib,f3 ib,c6 23 c4 l2Jb4 24 ib,xc6 side. LO . . . ib,f5 ! ? 1 1 ib,xf5 gxf5 12 'ii'h4 e6
l2Jxc6 25 ib,d6 l2Jb3 ! . 1 3 'ii'h5 : c8 1 4 c3 b5 1 5 a3 l2Jb8 came
22... ib,c6 into consideration.
In his notes Godes commented that Black 11 ib,d2 l2Jc7 12 'ii'h 4 l2Je6 13 h3 : f7 14
should have combated the a-pawn not with g4 'ii'b6 15 �bl ib,d7
his bishop, but with his knight from c6, and With the idea of exchanging bishops by
therefore better was 22 ... l2Je4 23 ib,f3 f5 ! 1 6 . . . ib,b5, but White prevents this.
24 ib,e5 ib,c6 25 a7 or 24. . . l2Jb4 25 c3 l2Jc6 16 gxf5 gxfS 17 a4 � h8 18 'ii'h S ib,e8
26 ib,g3 with a complicated game. If 1 8 . . . : af8 there follows 19 l2Jh4.
19 a5 'i¥c6 As a member of the Council I was the initia­
Not 1 9 . . . 'i¥xb2 on account of 20 J:, fb l , tor of this tournament and I felt obliged to
when the queen i s trapped. take part in it.
20 �xf5 (D) Not long before this I had obtained the
Striving to change the unfortunate course title of USSR master of sport and this led
of events, Black decides on an exchange to a relaxed state, which will be familiar
sacrifice, but even this does not help. to many, arising when a goal has been
achieved.
When at a meeting of the Council I
reported on the results of setting up the
B
First League, I joked that the other masters
had agreed to participate, only after learn­
ing that I would also play - after all, it is
pleasant to enrol for a tournament, know­
ing beforehand that the last place is already
occupied. As in any joke, in this there was
a dose of truth. . .
The First League was dominated by can­
didate masters, who were as though collec­
tively angered by the fact that they had been
20... J:, xf5 21 'i¥xf5 dxe5 22 fxe5 �g6 23 deprived of their lawful right to play in the
'i¥g4 �e4 main tournament. The first six achieved the
23 . . . �xc2 is bad in view of 24 J:, ac l . master norm.
24 c3 J:, f8 25 J:, ael �f5 2 6 'i¥g3 �e4 27 Here are the results of the 1 7th USSR
J:, f2 'i¥b5 28 �e3 'i¥xa5 29 @ h2 'i¥b6 Championship First League:
30 J:, gl 1-0 1 . M.Yeryomin (Stavropol) - 12Yz; 2-
After his second success in the final of 4. V.Yarkov (Moscow Region), O.Lykhin
the USSR CC Ch, Dmitry Barash took part (Krasnoyarsk District), A.Vikulov (Vo­
in an international tournament dedicated logod Region) - 1 1 Yz; 5. E.Shevelevich
to the 1 OOth anniversary of the Lithuanian (Rostov-on-Don) - l OYz; 6. M.Klimenok
Chess Union, in which he confidently (Vitebsk) - 10; 7-8. A.Belinkov (Moscow),
achieved the grandmaster norm. N.Razvalyaev (Tashkent Region) - 9; 9-1 1 .
Simultaneously with the Premier League, B.Maryasin (Bobruysk), F.Feldmus (Riga),
the First League, which was also called a S.Yuferov (Moscow) - 8; 1 2. V.Varlamov
final, was organised for the first time. The (Leningrad) - 7; 1 3 . G.Zhivodov (Sara­
Council for Correspondence Events was tov) - 5 Yz; 14. A.Lutovinov (Leningrad)
obliged to ensure a master norm in the tour­ - 5; 1 5 . S.Grodzensky (Moscow) - 3Yz; 1 6 .
nament, for which the participation of the P.Yashelin (Bryansk) - 3 ; 1 7 . V.Borisov
required number of masters was necessary. (Moscow Region) - 2�.
Eighteenth Championship
(1988-1991)

THE PREMIER League of the 1 8th USSR Zelinsky - 2 out of 4 and Akopov - 1 Yz out
Championship started on 1 st October 1 988. of 2. It was hard to imagine that the former
The Muscovite A.Latash was confirmed as would end up as one of the winners, whereas
the chief arbiter. Play began with 15 partici­ the latter would remain in last place with the
pants, but after the starting list had already same one and a half points.
been sent out it transpired that it had been By the stipulated finishing date - 30th
forgotten to invite the winner of the previ­ December 1 990 - 30 games remained unfin­
ous championship, Igor Kopylov . . . He had ished, on the results of which the allocation
to be included as No. 16. of the top places depended. It was decided
Apart from ten Russians, there were to extend the tournament to 1 5th August
Valery Neverov, Alexandr Volchok and 1 99 1 . By April 1991 Yarkov and Lykhin
L.Rubinchik representing the Ukraine, had reached l O Yz out of 1 4, Rubinchik had
Anatoly Ufimtsev - Kazakhstan, R.Akopov completed the tournament with 9Yz out of
- Azerbaijan and Yury Zelinsky - Latvia. 15, Khlusevich, on 7 Yz out of 1 1 , was in
The first results were entered in the table contention for a good result, and Zelinsky
in mid-summer 1 989. After six draws came had closed on the leaders - 7 out of 10.
the first decisive result: Kopylov defeated Then came a finishing spurt by Zelinsky,
Korolev. In early 1 990 the leading group who scored 4Yz points from his last five
comprised Volchok and Rubinchik with 3Yz games, ending the tournament undefeated
out of 5, and Kopylov, who had half a point with 1 1 Y2 points out of 1 5 . Lykhin finished
less. The debut in correspondence chess by half a point behind, while Yarkov had I O Y2
FIDE international master Valery Neverov, points and one continuing game.
the 1 985 Ukrainian champion and winner When the added time had also expired,
of the USSR young masters tournament of it turned out that the two main contenders
1 989, clearly did not work out. By that point for victory, Zelinsky from Riga and Yarkov
he had completed his tournament, making from near Moscow, had finished the tourna­
about ten short draws and losing on time in ment with 1 1 Yz points out of 1 5 . It became
the remaining games. clear that the question of the champion
By the middle of the year the serious would have to be resolved by a compari­
intentions of the following players had be­ son of their additional coefficients. Both
come evident: Yarkov - 6 points out of 9, contenders for the gold medal had gone
ahead of Rubinchik (5 out of 7) and Naivelt through the tournament undefeated, winning
(5Yz out of 1 0). By the end of the summer an identical number of games.
Yarkov was still leading with 7 out of 1 0, The two contenders' Sonneborn-Berger
ahead of Rubinchik (6Yz out of 9), Lykhin coefficients were very close. The role of
(5 out of 7) and Kopylov (4 out of 7). In 'photo-finish' was played by the unfinished
October 1 990, two years after the start of game Khlusevich-Koltsov: if Koltsov were
play, there were three players in the lead: to make at least a draw, then the champion
Yarkov - 8Yz out of 12, Rubinchik - 8Yz out would be Yarkov, whereas if Khlusevich
of 1 3 and Lykhin - 7Yz out of 1 0. In the last were to win, then gold medals would be
places on the number of points scored were awarded to both winners.
.....
f\,)
1 8th USSR CC Championship ( 1 988- 1 99 1 ) Oo

Ng I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

l V. Yarkov Moscow region y, Y2 l Y2 Y2 1 l l Y2 J l y, 1 Yz 1 l l Y,

2 l Y2 I 1;, Y2 1 1 Y2
Yu. Zelinsky Riga y, y, y, y, 1 l l 1 l 1

3 0. Lykhin 1;, Yz I Y2 Y2 Y2 ] Yz y, 1 11
D ivnogorsk y, l I 1 1

4 L.Rubinchik Kremenchug 0 Yz Y2 1 Y2 y, I 0 l y, y, 1 I Y2 l 9 Yi

5 M. Naivelt Moscow y, Y2 0 0 0 Y2 l 1 1 y, y, l l Y2 l 9

l/2 Y2 l

6 S.Khlusevich Izhevsk Y2 0 Y2 y, 1 1 1 Yz Y2 0 1 y, 9 Q..
.....
7 Y2 y, y, Y2 I 1h I y, 1 8 CD
I. Kopylov Ufa 0 0 0 0 l 1
:::t
8 A. Vikulov Cherepovets 0 0 y, 0 0 0 y, '
y, I I 0 I I I I 7Y2 �
(lj

9 A. Ufimtsev Kustanay 0 0 Y2 I 0 Y2 Y2 l/2 I Yi 0 1 0 I I 7Yz

10 A. Volchok Nikolaev Y2 Y2 0 0 0 y, 0 0 0 1 1 Y2 l l I 7

11 V. Koltsov B lagoveshchensk 0 0 Y2 Vi y, y, 0 0 y, 0 I 1 y, 1 Y2 I 6'/i

12 A . Korolev Moscow 0 0 0 Y2 y, l 0 I 1 0 0 0 y, Y2 y, SY,

1/2 l/2 Y2 Y2 I 5
13 I . Glek Moscow y, 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 l 0

14 G.Karnovich Moscow 0 0 0 0 0 Y2 0 0 1 0 0 y, I I I 5

15 V . Neverov Kharkov y, y, y, y, y, y, y, 0 0 0 y, y, y, 0 0 5

16 R. Akopov B aku 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 y, 0 0 l rn
Readers of this book will know that opponent to solve new problems.
similar situations had also arisen in USSR International grandmaster Igor Zaitsev,
Championships in the past, and that it was a universally acknowledged analyst, spent
endeavoured to complete games that influ­ a long time evaluating the position before
enced, even if only indirectly, the alloca­ reaching his verdict: "White has some ini­
tion of the places. For example, in the 1 6th tiative, but this initiative is of a temporary
Championship games were finished by tel­ nature and will fade against accurate play
egraph. On this occasion things were done by Black".
differently. I remember well the October After this it became clear that Vladimir
1 9 9 1 meeting of the USSR Chess Federa­ Yarkov was USSR Champion. He originates
tion's Council for Correspondence Events. from Kostroma peasantry and was born in
Despite the objections of both the Chair­ an isolated village in one of the remote
man of the Council, Professor Zagorovsky, northern districts of that region. After barely
and the author of these lines, who was the completing eight years of schooling, he be­
Deputy Chairman, it was decided to adju­ gan work in a primary school. After serving
dicate the Khlusevich-Koltsov game, which in the army as a gymnastics instructor he
was discontinued in the following position. tried studying in the Department of Geogra­
phy, but it did not last.
He made for Moscow to the chess section
White : S . Kh lu sevich of the Institute of Physical Culture, seeing
as he had first category rating, and after
Bla c k : V. Koltsov completing the course he gained his train­
er's diploma. He had been participating in
1 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 8 - 9 1 over-the-board events since the age of 17,
and while still young he became a candidate
master.
But after settling in Dmitrov on the out­
w skirts of Moscow he became fascinated by
correspondence play. Very soon he realised
that the job of security guard was a real
godsend for a correspondence player. The
work was not onerous, one might as well
be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb - ' dur­
ing my stint of duty nothing happened'. So
that it was possible to think as much as one
wanted.
"A real correspondence player," Yarkov
Khlusevich played 45 e6+ and presented reckons, "sends a move only when every­
an analysis claiming a win. White 's posi­ thing becomes completely clear to him.
tion is indeed better, but Black's drawing Even if this takes a month." I should add
chances are also considerable, if only after that occasionally it "becomes clear" to him
45 ... � xe6 46 t2Jxe6 CLJd5+ 47 @a3 @xe6. even later - three times during the final
Another variation is 45 . . . @g7 46 �a3 he rushed to the sorting office to correct a
� xg l 47 jbxg l CLJd5, and if 48 � b l , then move that was about to be sent!
48 . . . @f6 49 � fl+ <J;; e7 50 jbh2 � f8 5 1 Yarkov's progress to the champion's title
� xf8 @xf8 5 2 jbd6+ @g7 ! 5 3 jbe5+ was rapid: he won by a big margin in the
�f8 with equality. quarter-final, then also in the semi-final, and
True, 48 jbd4+! is possible, forcing the he finished second in the First League. By
the time that he won the champion' s title his
correspondence ' term of service' numbered
1 2 years. During this time he lost only one w
game ! As for the final, the winner consid­
ered that in this tournament he was lucky
- a couple of his opponents 'helped' him to
win. The quota of luck can be judged from
the following game.

White : V. Yarkov

Bla c k : R .Akopov 28 �eS! f6


28 . . . 'iVxe4 allows an obvious mate m
1 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 8 - 9 1 three moves: 29 � b8+ etc.
29 � b8+ @g7 30 � b7+ @h6
Queen 's Gambit 049 Or 30 ... @g8 3 1 'i¥d4 fxe5 32 'iVxe5.
31 �f4+ gS 32 'iVxe6 gxf4 33 'iVxdS f3?
1 d4 dS 2 c4 e6 3 C2Jc3 c6 4 4Jf3 CLJf6 S e3 34 � f7 1-0
CLJbd7 6 �d3 dxc4 7 �xc4 bS 8 �d3 a6 9 In the game with the winner of the pre­
e4 cS 10 eS cxd4 11 ct:JxbS ct:JxeS 12 ct:JxeS vious championship, which was of crucial
axbS 13 �xb5+ �d7 14 4Jxd7 'iVaS+ lS importance for the allocation of the prize
�d2 'iVxbS 16 4Jxf8 @xf8 17 a4 'iVxb2 places, the decisive moment occurred in the
18 0-0 hS 19 �f4 @g8 following position.
Up to this point the game Chekhov-Nev­
erov (Frunze 1 98 8) had been 'quoted' ; there
1 9 . . .h4 was played. White : l . Kopylov
20 �es � d8 21 'i¥d3 CLJg4 22 �c7 � c8
23 � acl CLJf6 24 �f4 Bla ck: V. Ya rkov
24 � c4! came into consideration, and if
24 ... 4Jd5 25 �e5 � xc4 26 'iVxc4 CLJb6 27 1 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 8 - 9 1
'i¥c6! 'i¥b4 28 a5 ! , with a great advantage
to White.
24 ... � c3?!
B
Dubious activity; 24 ... � d8 was correct.
2S 'iVxd4 CLJdS 26 'i¥e4
After 26 � xc3 White also has some ad­
vantage: 26 . . . 4Jxc3 27 @hl 'i¥e2 28 � a l ,
o r 2 6 ... 'iVxc3 27 �e5 'iVxd4 28 �xd4.
26 ... g6?
Better was 26 . . . � xc l 27 �xc l , al­
though even in this case White has a clear
advantage.
27 � bl
As was pointed out by Yarkov, even Black can regain the pawn in various
stronger was 27 � xc3 ! 4Jxc3 28 �e5 with ways, but instead of this he also sacrifices
a decisive advantage. a knight!
27 ... 'i¥c2 (D) 31...CLJg4 ! !
3 1 . . .tl'ie2+ 32 @hl tl'ixd4 33 'iVc3 tlJg4 8 tl'if3 tl'ie6 9 i,h4 0-0 10 0-0 g6 11 b4
34 tt:Jxg4 tl'ie2 35 'iVe3 'iVxd2 36 _: a l is The pawn, of course, is ' inedible' :
unclear. 1 1 ...i,xb4? 1 2 i,xf6 'iVxf6 1 3 tl'ixd5 and
32 tt:Jxg4 wins.
White loses immediately after 32 h3 11 ...c6
tl'ie2+ 33 @hl 'iVM with mate not later 1 1 . . . tl'ig7 followed by ... i,f5 or .... tl'if5
than the 36th move, or 32 tl'ixe4 'iVxd4+! . was more consistent.
3 2...'iVh4 33 _: a1 12 'iVb3 tl'ie4?
White fails to save the game by either This leads to an advantage for White.
33 tl'ih6+ 'iVxh6 34 tl'ifl (34 h3 tl'ie2+ 35 1 2 ... tt:Jg7 came into consideration.
@h2 'iVf4+) 34 . . .e3 35 tl'ixe3 tl'ih3+, or 13 i,xe7 'iVxe7 14 i,xe4 dxe4 IS tl'id2
33 tl'if6+ 'iVxf6 34 tl'ixe4 (34 h3 tl'ie2+ 3 5 tlJgS
@ h l 'iVt2; 34 _: a l tl'ih3+ 35 gxh3 'iVt2+ 1 5 . . . f5 16 d5 cxd5 1 7 tl'ixd5 also favours
36 @hl e3 37 _: fl e2) 34 ... tl'ih3+ 35 gxh3 White.
'iVfl mate. But now too Black finds a forced 16 h4 tl'ie6 17 dS tt:Jg7 18 tl'idxe4 'iVxh4
way to win. 19 _: adl @h8 20 tl'id6
33...'iVxg4 34 tl'ifl tl'ie2+ 3S @hl _: f2 36 With the threat of 21 dxc6 bxc6 22
tl'ie3 'iVf4 37 'iVa3 h6 38 dS tl'id4 39 h3 tl'ixf7+.
tl'if3 40 tt:Jg4 'iVg3 41 _: gl 'iVxg2+! 0-1 20... 'iVe7 21 dxc6 bxc6 22 'iVc4 i,d7 23
For the silver medal winner, Yury Ze­ ,: d2
linsky, on this occasion his games took a Zelinsky accurately conducts the techni­
quiet course, and it appeared that he was cal phase of the game, not allowing the op­
'not threatening' to finish among the prizes. ponent any chances.
But after the Riga player had succeeded 23 ... aS 24 e4 axb4 2S 'iVxb4 f6 26 _: bl
in several games in transforming a micro­ tl'ie6 27 'iVc4 tl'id8 28 f4 i,e6 29 'iVcS
scopic advantage into a full point, it began 'iVa7 (D)
to appear that the 1 8th Championship would The exchange of queens does not ease the
possibly become his ' finest hour'. position for Black, to whom it is hard to of­
This was how he defined the style of his fer any good advice.
wins in this tournament: "There were no
pretty games, nor any individual fragments,
but there was a fierce battle of strength". In
the following game he employed forceful w
methods over the entire battlefield.

White : Yu .Zelin sky

Black: A . U fimt sev

1 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 8 - 9 1

Queen 's Gambit D35 30 'iVxa7 _: xa7 31 _: b8 @g8 32 a4 tl'if7


33 tl'ie8 fS 34 es gS 3S g3 ,: e7 36 tl'if6+
1 d4 CLJf6 2 c4 e6 3 tl'ic3 dS 4 cxdS exdS S @g7 37 _: xf8 @xf8 38 _: b2 @g7 39
i,gS i,e7 6 e3 tl'ibd7 7 i,d3 tl'if8 tl'ie2 cS 40 tl'ic3 tl'id8 41 _: bS c4 42 _: b8
This manoeuvre was suggested by Gide­ tl'ic6 43 _: b6 tl'id4 44 _: d6 tl'if3+ 4S @f2
on Stahlberg. g4 46 as ,: b7
This piece sacrifice fails to save Black. ence events. The consequence was that
47 � xe6 � b2+ 48 <;;t> e3 � c2 49 lL\fdS he twice overstepped the time limit in the
� d2 50 lL\b4 1-0 majority of his games. Active participation
One of the best achievements in this in over-the-board play also influenced the
tournament by the third prize-winner Oleg poor results of Igor Glek and V.Neverov,
Lykhin was his game with Naivelt. who were then already well-known FIDE
grandmasters.
In parallel with the Premier League of the
Wh ite : O.Lykhin 1 8th Championship, the First League, �lso
called a final, was organised. The author of
Blac k : M . Naivelt these lines was entrusted with the control­
ling of this interesting event, which was
1 8th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 8 8 - 9 1 contested by nine masters and six candidate
masters.
King 's In dian Defence £99 The participants finished in pairs. The
first 'duet' comprised the winners - the
1 d4 lL\f6 2 c4 g6 3 lL\c3 �g7 4 e4 d6 5 master E.Shevelevich (Rostov-on-Don) and
lL\f3 0-0 6 �e2 eS 7 0-0 lL\c6 8 dS lL\e7 candidate master V.Sadovich (Orenburg),
9 lL\el lL\d7 10 f3 fS 11 g4 �h8 12 h4 who scored 9Yz points out of 14. The master
lL\g8 13 gS f4 14 <;;t> g2 h6 15 � hl � f7 16 had the superior additional coefficient, and
lL\d3 �f8 17 'iVgl hxgS 18 hxgS+ � h7 he was deemed the winner. (Incidentally,
19 � xh7+ ..t>xh7 20 'iVh2+ <;;t> g7 21 'iVh4 before this Shevelevich had been unlucky
lL\cS (D) with these 'additional coefficients' : twice in
the USSR Championship semi-final he had
shared a qualifying place, and each time an
inferior ' Sonneborn-Berger' prevented him
w from going forward to the final.)
Half a point behind the winners were the
second pair - A.Gurin from the Belorus­
sian town of Kobrin and A.Makarov from
Troitsk on the outskirts of Moscow, who
shared 3rd place. Both achieved the master
norm. Although by the regulations of the
USSR Championship the top three qualified
for the Premier League, the Council for Cor­
respondence Events allowed all the first four
22 �xf4! lL\xd3 23 �xd3 exf4 24 � hl into the 1 9th USSR Championship.
�f7 25 eS 1-0 The remaining places in the First
Some of the results in this tournament are League of the 1 8th USSR Championship
perplexing, in particular the one and a half were occupied by: 5 . V.Loginov (Vo­
points scored by R.Akopov, who had per­ logod Region) - 8Yz; 6. V.Buturin (Lvov)
formed splendidly in the qualifying stages. - 7 Yz; 7-8. E.Tyulin (Vladimir), A.Bragin
The explanation was that certain events (Leningrad) - 7; 9-10. V.Shemagonov
forced him to move urgently from Baku to (Ufa), M.Klimenok (Vitebsk) - 6Yz; 1 1 - 1 2.
the Armenian town of Oktemberian, there V.Yershov (Dneprodzerzhinsk), A.Belinkov
was the need to settle into a new place, and (Moscow) - 6; 1 3 . V.Lyukmanov (Moscow)
then he began travelling away to tourna­ - 5 Yz; 14. Yu.Solntsev (Moscow) - 4; 1 5 .
ments, not leaving any time for correspond- I.Figler (Kishinev) -: 3Yz.
Nineteenth Championship
(1991 -1993)

THE Premier League of the 1 9th USSR in which the fate of the title was decided in
Championship should have been contested favour of Vladimir Yarkov, who had an only
by 1 5 players. However, hardly had the very slightly better Sonneborn-Berger coeff­
starting list been sent out, when there came icient than Yury Zelinsky. Now three were
some sad news - the premature death of involved in the battle for the championship:
Aleksandr Khristoforovich Lipiridi. By the the leaders in the 1 8th Championship were
unanimous desire of the finalists and with joined by Anatoly Ufimtsev.
the agreement of the Council for Corre­ It appeared that on this occasion too ad­
spondence Events it was decided to restrict ditional coefficients would have to be taken
the number of participants to 14 and to into account, and that they would again
dedicate the tournament to the memory of make Yarkov the champion.
the former USSR CC Ch, correspondence In the end everything was decided by
international master Alexander Lipiridi. the adjudication of the unfinished game
Apart from the three representatives of between Zelinsky and Minakov, which was
Latvia, Kazakhstan and Belorussia, all the stopped after White' s 36th move in the fol­
remaining participants were Russians, and lowing position:
all participants had the master title. The du­
ties of arbiter were entrusted to the author of
these lines. The tournament started in 1 9 9 1 , White : Yu .Zelinsky
at the end of which the Soviet Union ceased
to exist. Play in the final of the 1 9th Cham­ Bla ck: Yu . M inakov
pionship (Premier and First Leagues), the
semi-finals of the 20th Championship and 1 9t h U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 - 9 3
the quarter-finals of the 2 1 st Championship
was only just beginning.
The recently-created Russian Council for
Correspondence Events deemed it necessary
to complete not only tournaments that had B
already begun, but also to organise all the
competitions that had been previously en­
visaged. Thus it became clear that che 2 1 st
USSR Championship would be the last.
The lead was seized by the oldest partici­
pant, Anatoly Ufimtsev from Kustanay - 412
out of 5. Yury Minakov, the then Moscow
correspondence champion, had the same
number of points, but from six games. Also
noteworthy were the scores of A.Makarov In the event of a win, Zelinsky would take
from near Moscow - 3 Yi out of 5 and the first place on his own, after a draw the three
Riga player Yury Zelinsky - 2 out of 2. players would complete the event with an
The tournament intrigue largely repeated identical number of points (with Yarkov first
the scenario of the previous USSR CC Ch, on the tie-break, and Zelinsky second), while
1 9th USSR CC Championship ( 1 99 1 - 1 993) Lipiridi Memorial

N2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Yu. Zelinsky Riga y, 1 1 1 y, 1 y, 1 1 1 1 1 lOVi

2 V. Yarkov Moscow region 1h y, y, y, 1 Y2 y, 1 1 ' 1 1 10

3 A. Ufimtsev Kustanay 1 1 1 1 1 y, y, 1 1 1 10

4 A. Makarov Moscow region 0 1 y, 0 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 9

5 G. Govashelishvili Kaliningrad 0 y, 0 y, 1 1 1 1h 1 y, 1 7Yi

6 S. Khlusevich Izhevsk 0 y, 0 0 y, Y2 y, Y2 1 Y2 1 7

7 V. Koltsov Blagoveshchensk y, y, 0 y, y, 1 0 I I I 6Yi

8 Yu. Minakov Moscow 0 0 0 1 0 y, 1 I 0 I 6

9 A. Mayorov Moscow y, y, 0 0 0 y, Y2 0 I 1 6

10 A . Gurin Brest region 0 y, y, 0 0 y, 0 1 1 1 6

11 I. Kopylov Ufa ' ;


0 0 y, 0 y, y, I 0 I 1h SYi

12 L. Levin Moscow 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 I 3Yi

13 V. Skobeev Moscow 0 0 0 0 y, y, 0 1 0 0 0 I 3

14 E. Shevelevich Rostov-on-Don 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
a win for Black would leave the Riga player Thus the winner of the first champion­
with the bronze medal. Black is one pawn ship in the post-Soviet era was the Riga
up and he wins a second, yet Zelinsky' s deep player Yury Zelinsky. Although on the
analysis revealed the true situation: geo-political map there was no longer a
36... �xc6 37 QJxc6 QJxgl state with the name 'USSR', nevertheless
White has two dangerous passed pawns, the title of champion of the Soviet Union,
but at first sight he cannot hope for more even though ' former', remained very sig­
than a draw, and that still has to be demon­ nificant.
strated. But let us look more closely. In 1 95 1 the 1 7-year-old first category
38 a4 hS 39 as h4 40 �d3+! player Yury Zelinsky achieved his first
In his analysis Yury Zelinsky remarks important success - he became schoolboy
that this is an important interposition, pre­ champion of the Chemovtsy Region. Then,
venting the activation of the black king via already as a candidate master, he won the
g6 and f5 . The direct 40 a6 h3 4 1 a7 h2 championship of Kaunas. He then moved
42 a8Vi' h l Vi' leads to a won position for to Riga, where for more than 30 years he
Black. But it is probable that the immediate worked as a construction engineer in a Riga
40 �fl also leads White to his goal. radio manufacturing plant.
40... g6 41 �fl Qje3 42 a6 QjdS 43 a7 In the 1 960s he was close to achieving the
QJb6 44 lLJxeS h3 (D) master norm for over-the-board play: in 1 967
he won a tournament of very strong Latvian
candidate masters and in 1 969 he became
champion of Riga. It was then, in the late
w 1 960s, that he began playing regularly by cor­
respondence. In one of the semi-finals of the
1 2th Championship (1 973-74) Zelinsky took
first place, ahead of 14 (!) masters, achieving
the master norm by a large margin.
Yury Zelinsky took part five times in
the finals of the USSR Championship and
always successfully. I should also like to
mention one other thing. Much has been said
about the poor working of communications
Now it can be said that the endgame is in general and about the sharp deterioration
not worse for White, but even so it is not in the postal links with the former Soviet
evident how his persistent victory claims Baltic state in particular. I, as arbiter of the
can be supported. Yet here the contender for 1 9th Championship, had to listen to numer­
the champion's title demonstrates an almost ous complaints about the difficulty of corre­
study-like win. sponding with the Latvian representative.
45 QJd7! Qj a8 46 b4 fS! 47 �xh3 !! Qjxh3 These complaints were justified, but at
48 bS Qjf4 49 b6 Qjd3+ 50 @c2 QJcs 51 the same time the sufferings of each player
QJxcS QJxb6 52 @b3 @g7 53 @b4 @f7 were limited to the difficulty in conducting
54 @bS QJa8 55 @c6 @e7 56 @b7 @d6 just one game - with Zelinsky. Imagine
57 QJe6! @d7 how it must have been for the Riga player,
57 . . . f4 58 QJxf4 g5 59 QJh3 g4 60 Qjf2 battling in such a situation with thirteen op­
g3 6 1 QJe4+ or 57 . . . g5 58 @xa8 and wins. ponents. He did not waste his energy griev­
58 QJf8+ @d8 59 QJxg6 @d7 60 Qjf4 ing, but steadfastly overcame the postal
@d6 61 QJdS! f4 62 QJxf4 @d7 63 QjdS impediments and methodically obtained
and White wins. full-weight points.
White : Yu .Zelinsky 1 8 . . . �xe4 1 9 �d3 ! �xd3 20 : xd3
and 2 1 : el does not change things.
Blac k : I. Kopylov 19 'fjb3 �cs 20 exdS �xdS 21 �c4
�xd4 22 �xdS
1 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 � 9 3 Not 22 : he l ? �e4 23 �xe6 : ds !
when White squanders the advantage that he
Sicilian Defence 896 has gained with such difficulty.
22 ... 'fixdS 23 'fixdS exdS 24 : xd4 0-0-0
l � d 2 �B � 3 M aM 4 ��4 �ffi 2S : n : heS 26 : d2 @ c7 27 ;g df2
S �c3 a6 6 �gs e6 7 f4 'fic7 S �xf6 gxf6 ;g d6 2S @cl ;g ee6 29 �d2 �d7 30 ;g fS
9 rs 'fies �es 31 : hs : d7 32 : et 1-0
According to Lepeshkin' s analysis, 9 . . .
�c6 1 0 fxe6 fxe6 1 1 �c4 �xd4 1 2 'fixd4
�e7 1 3 0-0-0 �d7 14 �b3 'fies 1 5 'fjd3 White : A . M a karov
0-0-0 1 6 �bl �b8 1 7 �e2 �b5 1 8 'fjf3
�c4 1 9 �d4 leads to advantage for White. Blac k : Yu .Zelinsky
10 'fjd3 �c6 11 �b3
Another try for an advantage is illustrated 1 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 - 9 3
by the variation 1 1 �xc6 bxc6 1 2 0-0-0
�h6+ 1 3 �bl �f4 1 4 e5 ! exf5 1 5 exd6 King 's Indian Defence £85
�e6 16 �e2 �e5 1 7 �d4 �d5 1 8 d7+
�d8 1 9 �b3 'fjb6 20 'fixf5 . 1 d4 �f6 2 c4 g6 3 �c3 �g7 4 e4 d6 S
1 1 ...'fjeS 1 2 0-0-0 �d7 1 3 �bl a 0-0 6 �e3 es 7 �ge2 exd4 s �xd4 c6
White did not achieved anything with 1 3 9 'fjd2 �bd7 10 0-0-0 : es 11 �c2 dS
g3 0-0-0 1 4 �bl @b8 1 5 'fie3 : cs 1 6 12 exdS
'fjb6 �a8 1 7 �e2 h5 in the game Cullip­ Another development of events leads to
Le Quang, Oakham 1 992. an advantage for White: 12 cxd5 cxd5 1 3
13 ... �e7?! (D) �xd5 �xd5 1 4 'fixd5 'fjf6 1 5 'fjb3 �e5
1 3 ... 0-0-0! ? came into consideration. 16 �d4 �d7 17 �b l .
12...cxdS 1 3 cxdS a6 1 4 g4
1 4 �c4!? b5 1 5 �b3 �b7 1 6 : he l
;g c 8 1 7 � b 1 came into consideration.
14 ... bS IS gS �hS (D)

14 �a4! �b4 IS 'fid2 �xa4 16 'fixb4


�c6
White 's position is also preferable after
1 6 ... �xb3 1 7 'fixb3 b5 1 8 fxe6 fxe6 1 9 g3
with the idea of 20 �h3. 16 d6?
17 fxe6 fxe6 IS �d4! dS Better was 1 6 f4 �b7 17 �g2 �b6 1 8
i,d4 4Jc4 1 9 Vt2 with advantage to White. White can exchange queens and win ma­
16 ... i,b7 17 ctJd5 i,xd5 18 Vxd5 ;g c8 terial by 7 dxc5 dxc5 8 Vxd8 followed by
19 Vd2 ;g c6! 20 i,h3 i,f8 21 f4 ;g xd6 9 i,xc5, but masters in recent years have
22 Vn Vc7 23 i,g4 investigated this gambit line deeply. The
23 �b l 4Jc5 24 i,d4 4Je4 25 VD accepted view nowadays is that Black then
i,g7 with advantage to Black. obtains ample compensation for .the pawn.
23 ... ttJcS! 24 i,xh5 gxh5 25 Ve2 4Ja4 The King's Indian bishop becomes very
26 ;g xd6 i,xd6 27 �bl Vc3! 28 bxc3 strong, Black has a lead in development and
4Jxc3+ 29 �b2 4Jxe2 30 ;g el the white pawn formation is rigid, confining
If 30 ;g fl Black wins easily after 30 ...b4 the fl -bishop to a limited role.
3 1 i,d2 ;g e4 etc. In view of these considerations, Y arkov
30... ctJxf4 31 i,xf4 ;g xel 32 i,xd6 ;g e2! prudently decides to avoid simplification
33 �c3 �g7 34 �d3 ;g e8 35 4Jd4 h6 and instead closes the centre.
36 gxh6+ 7 ... 4Je8
36 4Jf5+? �g6 37 4Jxh6 ;g ds and Zelinsky renounces the normal Benoni
Black wins. lever, . . . e7-e6, and intends a . . . b5 break,
36 �xh6 37 i,f4+ �g6 38 i,e3 �f6
.•. while his knight will prevent an enemy in­
39 h3 vasion on c7. This plan brings the game into
White would not have saved the game af­ unknown territory but does not work out
ter 39 i,f4 ;g e l 40 a3 ;g al 4 1 i,d6 �g5 well for Black in the end.
followed by 42 ... f5 and wins. 8 Vd2 Vas 9 i,d3 b5 10 4Jxb5 Vxd2+
39... ;g g8 40 4Je2 ;g g2 41 i,f4 ;g f2 42 11 �xd2 i,xb2 12 ;g bl i,g7 13 f4 4J a6
�e3 ;g n 43 a3 ;g b l 0-1 14 a3 f5
Second place was taken by Vladimir Black fights for air but the negative con­
Yarkov (Moscow Region), who, with ac­ sequences of this pawn advance will be seen
count being taken of his victory in the after White's 22nd move.
previous championship, achieved the norm 15 exf5 gxf5 16 4Jf3 ctJf6 17 � hel 4Je4+
of Russian grandmaster in correspondence 18 �c2 i,d7 19 '2Jg5 '2Jxg5 20 fxg5 i,eS
play. It was impressive that Yarkov was the 21 g3 ;g fb8 22 i,f4!
only player in the tournament to avoid de­ The position resembles a Leningrad vari­
feat and he was also able to inflict defeats on ation of the Dutch Defence that has gone
his main rivals. Here are these games, which wrong. Black's backward e-pawn will now
were of decisive importance for the arrange­ become a fatal weakness.
ment of the places on the 'podium' . 22 ... i,xf4 23 gxf4 @f7 24 ;g e3 i,xb5 25
cxb5 4Jc7 26 ;g bel e5 27 dxe6+ �e7 28
i,xf5 ;g h8 29 i,d3 h6 (D)
Wh ite : V.Yarkov

Black : Yu . Zelin sky


w
1 9t h U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 - 9 3

King 's In dian Defen ce E8 1

N otes by Ti m H a rd i n g

1 d4 ctJf6 2 c4 g6 3 4Jc3 i,g7 4 e4 d6 5 f3


0-0 6 i,e3 c5 7 d5
White now dispenses with technical solu­ 13 0-0 e6 14 CLia4 0-0 lS : f2 : e8 16
tions and finishes the game with two power­ : cl �a6 17 g4 (D)
ful blows that expose the black king.
30 fS hxgS 31 f6+ 1-0
Black resigns because after 3 1 . . . �xf6 32
: f3+ �e7 33 : f7+ �d8 34 e7+ �c8 (if B
34 . . . �e8 35 �g6 or 34 ... @d7 35 e8#) 35
�e4 his position would be in ruins (35 ... dS
36 �xd5 etc.).

White : V. Ya rkov

Black : A . Ufimtsev

1 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 - 9 3 17 ...fS
As in the previous game, this attempt to
King 's Indian Defence EBO block the kingside only creates new weak­
nesses.
N otes by Ti m H a rd i n g 18 exf6 �xf6 19 CLieS : a7 20 CLicS �c8
21 gS �xeS 22 dxeS ctJ8d7 23 C2Jxd7
1 d4 ctJf6 2 c4 g6 3 CLic3 �g7 4 e4 d6 S f3 �xd7 24 h4 : f8 2S hS : b7 26 hxg6
c6 6 �e3 a6 7 �d3 bS? ! hxg6 27 �cs : n 28 �c2 : g7 29 : h2
Postponing castling in this line has been C2Jc4 30 b3 : bS 31 �f2 C2Jb2 32 �f3
known for many years to be risky because of �f8 33 : bl 1-0
White 's next move. Presumably, Ufimtsev Black resigns, because the only way to
thought he had found an improvement on save the knight permits a mating attack:
theory at move 1 1 , but it is a mirage. 33 . . . �a3 34 �h3 �xa2 35 �h8+ �f7 36
8 es ctJfd7 9 f4 bxc4 10 �xc4 ctJb6 1 1 �xg6+! etc.
�b3 Despite that loss, an excellent result was
Since Knaak-Grivas, Athens Akropolis achieved by the famous veteran Anatoly
1 992, 1 1 �d3 has been reckoned to be an Ufimtsev. The acknowledged theory expert
even stronger move. Now Black plays his also played splendidly, becoming a prize­
novelty, instead of 1 1 ...dS 1 2 C2Ja4 CLixa4 winner in the USSR Championship shortly
1 3 �xa4 �a5+ 14 �f2 0-0 1 5 : c l which before his 80'h birthday.
was very good for White in H.Degenhardt­
A.Gipslis, Frankfurt 1 986.
11 ... aS White : A . U fimtsev
GM Gallagher's assessment of � here,
in his book on the Siimisch King's Indian, Bla ck : Yu . M inakov
seems over-optimistic from Black's point
of view. Yarkov crushes his opponent, who 1 9th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 1 - 9 3
never obtains any real counterplay.
12 C2Jf3 dS King 's In dian Defen ce £63
12 . . . �a6 would be consistent but prema­
ture, on account of the reply 1 3 e6. So White 1 C2Jf3 ctJf6 2 g3 g6 3 �g2 �g7 4 0-0 0-0
is able to get his king into safety before con­ S d4 d6 6 c4 CLic6 7 CLic3 a6 8 �gS h6
ducting active operations on both wings. 8 ... : b8 9 : c 1 �g4 1 0 d5 �xf3 1 1
exf3 ttJ e5 12 'ife2 l:t e8 1 3 l:t fe 1 c5 1 4
dxc6 tt:Jxc6 1 5 l:t c d 1 with a slight advan­
B
tage to White (Kasparov-Van der Wiel,
Brussels 1 987).
9 �xf6 �xf6 10 'ii'd 2 �g7
In the game Ufimtsev-Kopylov from
the same tournament, after 1 0 . . . c;t>h7 1 1 h3
�g7 12 l:t ad l �d7 1 3 b3 l:t b8 14 c;t>h2
b5 1 5 c5 b4 1 6 ctJd5 e6 1 7 ctJf4 tt:Je7 1 8 h4
�c6 1 9 'ii'c2 c;t>h8 20 .i:t fe l White gained
the better chances.
11 h3 l:t b8 12 l:t fdl 'if e8? !
1 2. . . �d7 ! ? came into consideration. 30 l:t fe8 31 f4 c;t>f6 32 l:t c6+ c;t>g7 33
...

13 l:t acl e5 (D) c;t>xg2 b4 34 c;t>f3 l:t a8 35 l:t xe8 l:t xe8 36
l:t b6 l:t a8 37 l:t xb4 l:t xa2 38 g4 1-0
Without wishing to comment on the re­
sults of the remaining participants, I should
w nevertheless like to say that among those
who were unsuccessful on this occasion
were some well-known masters, champions
and prize-winners in the championships of
Russia and Moscow, which testifies to the
high level of the 1 9th USSR Championship.
Simultaneously with the main final,
known as the Premier League, a secondary
tournament took place - the First League
of the 1 9th Championship, in which, apart
14 ctJd5 QJxd4 from Russians, representatives of Ukraine,
Possible was 1 4 . . . 'if d8 !? 1 5 dxe5 dxe5 Belarus, Latvia and Kazakhstan competed.
(inferior is 1 5 ... tt:Jxe5 1 6 tt:Jxe5 dxe5 1 7 Here are the final scores: 1 -2. L.Levit
'ii'a5 b6 1 8 'ii' a3 with advantage to White) (Minsk), V.Volodin (Moscow) - 1 0 out of
16 'ii'e3 �d7 with an unclear position. 15; 3-5. V.Kashlyuk (Lugansk), E.Tyulin
15 tt:Jxc7 'ifd8 16 ctJd5 QJxf3+ 17 exf3 (Vladimir), S.Polyakevich (Nevinnomyssk)
�e6 18 b3 'if g5 - 91h; 6. O.Batakovs (Riga) - 9; 7. S.Kuznetsov
1 8 . . . l:t e8 1 9 QJc3 �f8 20 tt:Je4 favours (Nikopol) - 81h; 8- 10. M.Volchikhin (Shad­
White. rinsk), R.Markarian (Alma Ata), A.Sirota
19 'ifxg5 hxg5 20 QJc3 b5 (Krivoy Rog, Ukraine) - 8; 1 1 -12. A.Pyshkin
Or 20 . . . l:t fd8 21 tt:Je4 d5 22 tt:Jxg5 dxc4 (Syktyvkar), V.Shemagonov (Ufa) -- 7; 13.
23 l:t xd8+ l:t xd8 24 tt:Jxe6 fxe6 25 l:t xc4 V.Nasybulin (Akmola) - 61h; 14. M.Klimenok
with a clear advantage to White. (Vitebsk) - 5; 15. A.Mishin (Vladimir) - 41h;
21 cxb5 axb5 22 tt:Je4 �h6 23 l:t xd6 g4? 16. K.Romanovsky (Ryazan) - 0.
23 ... l:t fc8 was better. Anatoli Sirota emigrated to Australia during
24 l:t c7 gxh3 25 ctJf6+ c;t> h8 26 l:t xe6 this event. He states that his unfinished games
�g7 27 l:t ec6 �xf6 28 l:t xf6 @g7 29 were not properly adjudicated and that a game
l:t e6 hxg2 30 l:t xe5 (D) he had already won against Kuznetsov appears
White 's position is won. There followed: as a loss for him in the official crosstable.
Miniatures ( I I )
Ya. Neishtadt - V. Bobkov, 17 @hl! (Black offered a pawn but White
6th USSR CC Championship, 1963-64 prefers to keep the King in the centre.)
Catalan Opening A32 17 ... c6 18 f4 tt:Jgf8 19 f5 tt:Jc7 20 e6! h5 21
1 c4 tLlf6 2 d4 e6 3 g3 c5 4 tLlf3 cxd4 5 Ve5 Vd8 22 Vxg7 z:!. h7 23 f6! 1-0
tt:Jxd4 j&c5 6 tLlb3 Vb6?! 7 tt:Jxc5 Vxc5
8 tLld2 Vc6 9 e4! (D) M. Umansky - R. Zborovsky,
13th USSR CC Championship, 1977-78
English Opening A22
1 c4 e5 2 tt:Jc3 tLlf6 3 tLlf3 e4 4 tLlg5 b5
B
5 d3 exd3 6 cxb5 h6 7 tLlf3 dxe2 8 j&xe2
a6 9 0-0 j&e7 10 tLld4 d5 11 j&f3 axb5 12
j&f4 j&b7 13 tt:Jcxb5 tt:Ja6 14 z:!. cl 0-0 15
tt:Jxc7 Z:. c8 16 Vb3 tLlc5 17 Ve3 tLlfe4
18 tLlf5 j&g5 19 j&xg5 hxg5 20 j&xe4
z:!. xc7 21 z:!. xc5 dxe4 22 Vc3 1-0

M. Naivelt - A. Volchok,
18th USSR CC Championship, 1988-91
Bogoljubow Indian E l l
9 ... h5 (9 . . . tt:Jxe4? 10 j&g2; better 9 .. b6)
. 1 d4 tLlf6 2 c4 e6 3 g3 j&b4+ 4 j&d2 j&e7
10 j&g2 h4 11 0-0 (Threatening e4-e5) 5 j&g2 d5 6 tLlf3 0-0 7 0-0 b6 8 cxd5 exd5
11 ... Vc7 ( 1 1 .. .hxg3 12 e5 gxh2+ 13 @h l ) 9 tt:Jc3 j&b7 10 z:!. cl tlJhd7 11 j&f4 tlJh5
12 z:!. el hxg3 13 hxg3 d6 14 b3! tLlbd7 15 12 j&e5 f6?! (12 ... tLleS)
j&a3 a5 16 tLlf3 .: a6 17 tLld4 tLlc5 18
tlJh5 Ve7 19 e5! dxe5 20 z:l. xe5 l-O

Yu. Kutyanin - A. Vasilyev,


13th USSR CC Championship, 1977-78
Ruy Lopez C80
1 e4 e5 2 tLlf3 tLlc6 3 j&b5 tLlf6 4 0--0 tt:Jxe4
5 d4 a6 6 j&a4 b5 7 j&b3 d5 8 dxe5 tt:Je7?!
(Played by Zukertort against Anderssen,
1 878) 9 a4 j&g4 10 c3 tLlc5 1 1 j&c2 tLle6 12
axb5 axb5 13 z:!. xa8 Vxa8 14 Vd3 j&xf3
15 Vxt3 tt:Jg6 16 Ve2 j&c5 (D)

13 j&xc7!! Vxc7 14 tt:Jxd5 Vd6 (If


14 . . . Vd8 1 5 Vb3 ! @h8 1 6 tt:Jxe7 Vxe7
1 7 z:!. c7 z:!. ab8 1 8 Vb5+- or 1 5 . . . z:!. f7 1 6
tt:Jxe7+ Vxe7 1 7 z:!. c7 z:!. b8 1 8 j&h3 !+-)
15 tLl h4 ! j&d8 ( 1 5 ... j&xd5? 1 6 tlJf5 Ve6
1 7 j&xd5+-) 16 tlJf5 Ve6 17 tt:Jc7 Vxf5 (If
17 . . . j&xc7 1 8 j&xb7 Vxf5 1 9 e4! Vas 20
j&xa8 z:!. xa8 21 Vb3+ @h8 22 z:!. xc7+- or
1 8 . . . z:!. ab8 1 9 j&d5 !+-) 18 j&xb7 j&xc7 19
j&xas j&f4 20 Vb3+ @hs 21 Vn Vg6
22 e3 j&h6 23 z:!. c7 Vf7 24 j&d5 l-O
Twentieth Championship
(1994-1998)

ON THE day when the Council of the Rus­ the leader on number of points scored, and
sian Correspondence Chess Association was even overtook him on points lost.
confirming at its meeting the composition of It became clear that only the two Sergeys
the 20th and penultimate USSR CC Cham­ were in contention for the top two places,
pionship, the colleagues of Isaak Romanov, while Kashlyuk, Rubinchik and Shikhirev
the well-known correspondence chess his­ were fighting for the 'bronze' . At the very
torian and ICCF international arbiter, were finish, by winning his last few games, FIDE
accompanying him on his last journey. And international master Viktor Volodin gained
it was decided to dedicate the tournament to third place. The following game proved
his memory. decisive in the battle for the prize-winning
Representatives of Russia, Ukraine, place.
Belarus, Estonia and Latvia participated in
the championship. Yuri Baidakov was ap­
pointed arbiter. From the very beginning the White : V. Volodin
tournament was regarded as an international
,
and, apart from several international mas­ Bla ck: D . Lybin
ters, the starters included two ICCF inter­
national masters and one FIDE international 20th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 94- 9 8
master.
By the end of the event the number of King 's Indian Defen ce £68
holders of international titles had grown
significantly, for the reason that in the Ro­ Notes by Vi ktor Vol o d i n
manov Memorial the ICCF established an
international master norm - 71h points out In this game White' s dark-square bishop
of 14. I should mention that by the time that literally 'terrorised' Black ( 1 3 Jtg5 ! , 1 8
the tournament finished, all the participants, Jte3 ! , 22 Jtg5 !), then sacrificed itself (24
with the exception of Rene Talving and Jtxf6!) and after a spectacular rook sacri­
E.Tyulin, and N.Vilchenkov who dropped fice (27 J:t xf7!) White's position became
out, were already international masters, and won, but on the way to the win he found
the winner had the title of grandmaster. some 'little combinations' (Capablanca' s
The tournament started on 3 1 st March expression).
1 994 and within roughly eighteen months 1 CLJf3 CLJf6 2 c4 g6 3 d4 Jtg7 4 g3 0-0 5
the leading group had emerged, comprising Jtg2 d6 6 0-0 CLJbd7 7 CZJc3 e5 8 e4 a6 9
Rubinchik, Khlusevich, Muravyev and Vo­ h3 bS 10 Vi'c2
lodin. By some point in mid- 1 996 the sole It is surprising, but in my database this
lead was seized by Sergey Muravyev. Then move occurs only once (Tukmakov-Weindl,
Sergey Khlusevich almost caught up with Lugano 1 986). 1 0 dxe5 or 1 0 Vi'e2 is more
20th USSR CC Championship ( 1 994- 1 998) Romanov Memorial

N2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

S . Khlusevich Izhevsk 1 Yi Yi Yi 1 1 1 1 Yi Yi 1 1 1 11

2 S. Muravyev Dnepropetrovsk Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 1 1 1 1 Yi 1 1 lOYz

3 V. Volodin Moscow 0 Yi Yi Yi 1 1 Yi Yi Yi 1 ' 1 1 9


4 L. Rubinchik Kremenchug Yi Yi Yi 1 Yi Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 1 SY,

5 V. Kashlyuk Lugansk Yi Yi Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 Yi 1 1 SY>

6 L. Shikhirev Moscow Yi Yi Yi Yi 0 0 1 1 . Yi Yi 1 1 SY,

7 A. Makarov Moscow region 0 Yi Yi Yi Yi 1 1 Y2 1 1 1 s

8 D. Lybin Minsk 0 0 0 0 Yi 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 s

9 I. Lensky Moscow 0 0 0 Yi Yi 1 Yi Yi 1 1 1 7

10 J. Schuster Estonia 0 0 Yi Yi Yi 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 6

11 0. Batakovs Riga Yi 0 Yi Yi Yi 0 0 0 1 Yi 5Y,

12 A. Popov Syktivkar Yi, , 0 Yi Yi 0 Yi Yi 0 Yi 0 Yi 1 5Yi

13 E. Tyulin Vladimir 0 Yi 0 Yi Yi Yi 0 0 0 1 Yi 1 5Y,

14 R. Talving Tallinn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

15 N. Vilchenkov Moscow region 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yo 0 Vi


usual. [Later this position occurred in Stohl­ 37 h4 'iic8 38 hS gxhS 39 'ii'xhS ;g, a6 40
Weiss (European Team Championship, tll gS+ �g8 41 'ii'f7+ �h8 42 ;g_ d7 'ii' a8+
Batumi 1 999), where 10 ... ;g, b8 was played 43 �gl 'ii'f8 44 'ii'dS 'ii'f6 4S ;g_ d8+ j,f8
( 1 -0, 36 moves), and also in Borovikov­ 46 tll f7+ @g7 47 tll xeS 1-0
Volokitin (Ukrainian Championship 2001 ), After gaining the international master
where a draw was agreed after 10 ... bxc4. title for his result in the 20th USSR Cham­
- S.G.] pionship (the Romanov Memorial), Viktor
10 ... j,b7 Volodin then performed successfully in
In the afore-mentioned game Black the Russian Championship, but his main
played 1 O . . .bxc4, but this was unsuccessful. triumph awaited him in the Kosenkov Me­
11 dxeS dxeS 12 ;g, dl 'ii'b8 13 j,gS! c6 14 morial, where the Muscovite won first prize,
b4 cS lS bxcS ;g, c8 exceeding the grandmaster norm by a whole
[ 1 5 . . .bxc4! was stronger. - S.G.] point.
16 cxbS ;g, xcS 17 'ii'b3 axbS 18 j,e3! The silver medal in the 20th Champion­
;g, xc3!? ship was won by Sergey Muravyev, who
Evidently the best practical chance. simultaneously with the main final also
19 'ii'xc3 Jtxe4 20 ;g, acl tll dS 21 'ii'b3 participated, and not unsuccessfully, in the
tll 7f6 22 j,gS! 'ii'b 7 23 ;g, cs b4 24 j,xf6! First League.
tll xf6 2S 'ii'c 4! Sergey Khlusevich, who by that time
After 25 ;g, dc l Black had the reply had become a grandmaster, emerged as the
25 ... j,d5 . champion of the ' former USSR'. He con­
2S ... ;g, f8 sidered his best creative achievement in the
Of course, not 25 ... j,xf3? because of 26 tournament to be his win over Volodin.
;g, c7.
26 ;g, c7 'ii a8 (D)
White : V.Volodin

Bla ck: S . K hlusevich


w
20th U S S R CC C h , 1 9 94-98

King 's Indian Defence £68

1 tll f3 tll f6 2 c4 g6 3 d4 Jtg7 4 g3 0-0 S


j,g2 d6 6 0-0 tll b d7 7 tll c3 eS 8 e4 exd4
9 tll xd4 ;g, e8 10 h3 tll cS 11 ;g, el j,d7 12
;g, bl h6 13 b3 tll h 7 14 b4
Apparently a novelty, which did not jus­
27 ;g, xf7! ;g, xf7 28 tll gS 'ii'a7 tify itself in the present game.
Only in this way can the resistance be 14 ... tll e6 lS j,e3 hS 16 h4 tll f6 17 f3
prolonged - the f2-square is under an X-ray After both 1 7 e5 tll g4 and 17 tll e6
attack. If 28 . . . Jtxg2, then 29 'ii'xf7+ @h8 Jtxe6 1 8 tll d 5 tll g4 Black has quite ad­
30 tll e 6. equate counterplay.
29 Jtxe4 tll xe4 30 tll xe4 h6 31 ;g, d2! 17 ... aS 18 a3 axb4 19 axb4 c6 20 tll de2
After this quiet move it becomes clear 'ii'c7 21 'ii' d2 ;g, a3 22 ;g, edl j,c8!? 23
that Black's position cannot be held. tll d4
31...@h7 32 'ii'x b4 ;g, b7 33 'ii' c3 ;g, bl+ With the idea of 24 tll db5 . After 23
34 @g2 'ii'b7 3S 'ii'f3 ;g, b4 36 a3! ;g, b6 'ii'xd6 'ii'xd6 24 ;g, xd6 tll d7 followed by
... tl:Je5 Black has compensation for the sac­ in 1 992 he achieved the FIDE international
rificed material. master norm.
23 ... 1i'e7 24 bS?! tl:Jxd4 2S i,xd4 i,e6 Since 1 968 he has been regularly play­
Black's chances are already preferable. ing by correspondence. He was the winner
26 eS? ! of the 1 0th Championship of the Russian
Or 26 bxc6 bxc6 27 'i'cl !? .l:. ea8. Federation ( 1 984-1 987) and in the final of
26 ... dxeS 27 i,xeS tt::l e4 28 tl:Jxe4 i,xeS the 1 8th USSR Championship he shared 5th
29 f4 i,g7 30 tt::l d6 .l:. ea8 place. In the 1 0th USSR Team Champion­
Black's initiative increases. ship ( 1 9 9 1 - 1 993) he made the best score on
31 � h2 .l:, a2 32 1i'd3 i,g4 33 .l:, d2 top board.
Other variations also favour Black: 3 3 In the memorial to the first USSR cor­
bxc6 bxc6 3 4 .l:, b7 1i'e2, or 3 4 .l:, e l i,e2. respondence champion Aleksandr Konst­
33 ... .l:. 8a3 34 1i'e4 1i'xe4 3S tt:Jxe4 .l:. xd2 antinopolsky, organised by the Russian
36 tl:Jxd2 .l:. a2 37 bxc6 bxc6 38 .l:. b8+ Correspondence Chess Association, he suc­
i,f8 39 .l:, d8 ¢;;; g7 40 tl:Jfl (D) cessively achieved the norm of international
With the idea of 4 1 .l:. d2 and possible master, and then also grandmaster.
counterplay. Sergey Khlusevich continued to perform
successfully in international tournaments,
and from one of the 3/4 finals he qualified
for the final of the world championship. All
B this indicates that his victory in the 20th
USSR Championship was no accident.
Simultaneously with the Premier League,
for the last time the First League was held,
with eight masters and five very strong
candidate masters, who had qualified from
the quarter-finals, fighting for three quali­
fying places to the Premier League of the
last, 2 1 st USSR Championship. Among the
participants were eight Russians, four rep­
40... i,b4 resentatives of the Ukraine and virtually the
Black's position is won. strongest correspondence player at that time
41 tt::l e3 i,e2 42 .l:, e8 i,el 43 �h3 i,f2 from Kazakhstan, A.Grishin, who finished
44 cs up as the winner. The final scores: A.Grishin
The resistance could have been prolonged (Alatau) - 9 Yz out of 12, 2-4. A.Bragin (Bry­
somewhat by 44 f5. ansk), A.Mayorov (Moscow), S.Muravyev
44... i,gl 4S rs i,f3 46 fxg6 .:. xg2 47 g4 (Dnepropetrovsk) - 8Yz; 5 . S.Kuznetsov
i,xe3 0-1 (Kazan) - 8 ; 6. V.Malinin (St Petersburg)
Sergey Khlusevich was born in 1 956. He - 7Yz; 7. S.Polyakevich (Novosibirsk Re­
learned to play chess at the . age of ten and gion) - 7; 8. A.Smirnov (Krasnodarsk Dis­
quickly advanc�d to become one of the lead­ trict) - 6Yz; 9. P.Chernyakhovsky (Sumsk
ing players in Udmurtiya. For his results in Region) - 6; 1 0. A.Lopukhin (Penza) - 4;
over-the-board competitions he was award­ 1 1 . V.Zaitsev (Moscow) - 3; 12. A.Vlaskov
ed the title of USSR master of sport. In an (Arkhangelsk Region) - 1 ; 1 3 . L.Gerasin
international tournament in Gdynia (Poland) (Kiev Region) - 0.
Twenty-First Championship
( 1 998- 2002)

IN FEBRUARY 1 998 a start was made to pleted the opening stage. Therefore during
the last USSR Championship. Among the the course of the tournament it is possible
1 5 competitors were the winners of the last to talk about the leaders only with a great
First League and the semi-finals. The Baltic degree of arbitrariness.
republics also sent their representatives, so Even so, we can say that by the autumn
that the representation of the former Soviet of 1 999 a leading group had emerged: May­
republics was nearly as great as during the orov - 6 points out of 7, Bragin - 51h out of
time when the USSR actually existed. 8, Jocas - 4Y2 out of 5, Grodzensky - 4 out
The tournament was registered with the of 5, Timko - 3 out of 4 and Verhni - 2Y2
ICCF as a memorial to ICCF international out of 3 . Note that Malinin and Grishin had
arbiter Boris Rozinov ( 1 9 1 7- 1 997). An each gained three successive wins.
international master norm was established By the first quarter of 2000 the results
- 9 points out of 1 4 - and the tournament of two thirds of the games were known, but
director was ICCF international arbiter Yury the situation in the table remained confused.
Baidakov. In terms of points scored, still in the lead
The first two results were recorded soon was Mayorov - 8 out of 10, followed by
after the start: the author of these lines Grodzensky - 61h out of 9, Jocas - 6 out of
agreed draws with White against Kuzenkov 8, Malinin - 51h out of 6, Bragin - 51h out of
on the 7th move, and with Kulagin on the 8, Grishin - 4 out of 5 , Timko - 3 Yi out of 5
14th. The reason for such a peaceful attitude and Verhni - 21h out of 3 .
was that Sergey Grodzensky, who had the ti­ B y August 2000 the number of contend­
tle of grandmaster, agreed to play in the last ers remained quite large: Mayorov - 91h out
USSR Championship as a mark of respect of 12, Bragin - 9 out of 12, Grodzensky
to the memory of his great personal friend - 81h out of 12, Malinin - 7 out of 8 and
Boris Rozinov - an outstanding organiser, Jocas - 6 out of 8. Timko - 4 out of 7 and
who became a veritable era in Soviet cor­ Grishin - 41h out of 8 had dropped back
respondence chess. somewhat. On the current results of the Ro­
The poor working of the post in the sec­ zinov Memorial, the 2000 ICCF Congress
ond half of the half of the 1 990s became the awarded the international master title to
talk of the town. And after the break-up of Bragin, Kulagin and Mayorov.
the USSR, corresponding with former com­ By the summer of 200 1 a trio of leaders
patriots who had ended up abroad became, had practically emerged (Malinin - 1 1 out
as they say, an absolute pain. Hence the of 1 3 , Mayorov - 1 01h out of 1 3 , Bragin
enormous spread in the number of moves - 1 0 out of 1 3 ), but as regards the alloca­
made. Some games had long been finished, tion of the places on the 'podium' there still
while in others the players had not yet com- remained questions, which were not finally
2 1 st USSR CC Championship (1 998-2002) Rozinov Memorial

NQ 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

V. Malinin St. Petersburg 0 Yz Yz 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l l 'h

2 A. Mayorov Moscow Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 1 1 1 1 1. 11

3 A. Bragin Bryansk 1 1 Yz 1 Yz 1 Yz Yz Yz 1 1 1 11

4 S. Grodzensky Moscow Yz Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

5 A. Grishin Kazakhstan Yz Yz 0 Yz 1 1 Yz 1 1 -
1 1 9

6 A. Kulagin Moscow region 0 0 Yz Yz 1 Yz 1 L Yz 1 1 1 9

7 V. Timko Ukraine 0 Yz 0 Yz 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 S'h

8 J. Jocas Lithuania 0 0 Yz 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 7'h

9 A. Kuzenkov Moscow 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 Yz 1 1 1 1 7

10 Yu. Minakov Moscow 0 0 Yz 0 Yz 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 6


11 K. Vitols Riga 0 0 Yz 0 0 0 0 0 Yz 1 1 5
12 V . Bendersky Dnepropetrovsk 0 0 Yz 0 0 Yz 1 0 0 0 1 1 4
' .

13 V . Verhni Estonia 0 0 0 0 -
0 0 0 0 0 1 3'h

14 V . Vasykin Novokusnetsk 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

15 A. Belousenko Minsk 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

The game between Grishin and Verhni was scored as a double forfeit.
resolved even by the start of 2002. It was 1iVc7 9 0-0-0 l2Ja5 10 �d3 b5 1 1 a3 �b7
decided to halt play in the tournament after 12 g4 � c8 13 g5 t2Jd7 14 f4
a winner had finally emerged - Vasily Ma­ This last move is a novelty.
linin. A few unfinished games, the results of The 'Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings'
which could no longer affect the placings, gives only 1 4 � he l �e7 15 1fi1h5 g6 1 6
were adjudicated. 'iVh6 tt:Je5 1 7 1iVg7 � f8 , citing the game
Thus the last USSR correspondence Fedorov-Kasimdzhanov, Moscow 1 996. 1 4
champion became Vasily Malinin from St f4 ! i s stronger, since i t prevents the black
Petersburg. Born in 1 956, he is a professor knight from going to e5.
of the St Petersburg University of the Rus­ 14...�e7 15 'iVhS g6
sian Ministry of Internal Affairs. In over­ After 1 5 . . . 0-0 1 6 f5 White' s attack devel­
the board play he has the title of national ops unchecked.
master. 16 1fi1h6 tbc4 17 �xc4 1iVxc4 18 1fi1g7
Malinin rapidly became one of the � f8 19 � hel b4 20 axb4 'iVxb4 21 t2J b3
strongest correspondence players. He be­ e5
gan his career in correspondence chess in The alternative was the exchange sacri­
1 9 83 with a win in a USSR Championship fice 2 1 ... � xc3 22 1iVxc3 1iVxc3 23 bxc3
quarter-final. In 1 9 86 he began participat­ �xe4, although it too would not have
ing in international tournaments. He was a equalised.
finalist in the 67th European Championship, 22 fxe5 dxe5 (D)
the 9th ICCF World Cup, the 20th USSR 22 ... tt:Jxe5 came into consideration.
Championship and the First Russian Cham­
pionship.
On the results of the Konstantinopolsky
Memorial Tournament he was awarded the w
ICCF international master title, and in the
Kosenkov Memorial, which was held at the
same time as the Rozinov Memorial (the
2 1 st USSR Championship) he achieved the
grandmaster norm.
In the 2 1 st USSR Championship Vas­
ily Malinin demonstrated mature play, both
with Black and with White.

23 � xd7! <;i>xd7 24 1iVxe5 <;i>e8 25 � dl


White : V. Malinin 1fi1c4
Black does not want to go totally onto the
Black: A . Kulagin defensive with 25 . . . � g8, nor to open up the
position by 25 . . .f6 or 25 ... f5.
21 st U S S R CC Ch, 1 9 9 8 - 26 tlJa5 1iVc7 27 'iYd4 �a8 28 tbc4 �cs
2002 29 'iVd3 �xe3+ 30 tt:Jxe3 � g8
Black is ready to try and buy White off
Sicilian Defence 889 with the exchange, but it is too late.
31 t2Jcd5 �xd5 32 t2Jxd5 1iVc6 33 t2Jf6+
N otes by Va s i l y M a l i n i n <;i>f8 34 t2Jd7+ �e8 35 � d2!
Even in such positions, prophylaxis is
1 e4 c5 2 t2Jf3 d 6 3 d4 cxd4 4 t2Jxd4 t2Jf6 required.
5 t2Jc3 t2Jc6 6 �c4 e6 7 �e3 a6 8 1iVe2 35... � d8 36 tbf6+ 1iVxf6 37 gxf6 � xd3
38 .:1 xd3 g5 39 c4 15... 0-0
The c-pawn cannot be stopped. The main thing is to remove the king
39 ... .:1 g6 40 .:1 d6 g4 41 c5 1-0 from the centre.
16 ctJe4 if d7 17 h3 bxa4!
An important interposition: now if White
White : V. Timko plays 1 8 i,xa4, there comes 1 8 ... i,a6 ! .
18 ,:1 xa4 ctJ f6!
Black : V. Malinin Most players would have played
I 8 ... ttJxe3. Otherwise, why did the knight
2 1 st U SS R CC C h , 1 99 8 - go to g4? But in the given position the
2002 knight at e4 presents a greater danger, and it
is this piece that Black wants to exchange.
Nimzo witsch Defence 800 19 l::l: a5 ttJxe4 20 ifxe4 i,d8 21 f5?! (D)
Realising that with quiet play Black will
N otes by Vas i l y M a l i n i n simply convert his extra pawn, White sharp­
ens the game. But in sowing the wind, he
1 d4 ctJc6 2 e4 e5 3 dxe5 ttJxe5 4 f4 ctJg6 reaps the whirlwind.
The 'Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings'
recommends 4... ctJc6.
5 i,c4
Not allowing the development of the B
bishop at c5, on which there follows, of
course, i,xf7+.
5...c6
Strangely enough, this is a novelty. Pre­
viously Black played 5 ... iff6, 5 ... i,d6,
5 ... d6, 5 . .. ctJf6 or 5 ... ctJh6.
6
This would appear to radically prevent
the development of the bishop at c5. But this
direct move encounters a refutation. 2 1 ... : e8!
6 ...iff6 The rook cannot be taken, since after
The f2- and b2-pawns are under attack. 2 1 ...i,xa5 22 fxg6 the advantage is now
7 e5 is refuted by 7 .. ttJxe5 8 fxe5 ifh4+
. with White.
and 9... ifxc4, while the attempt to defend 22 ifg4 23 fxg6 ifxg4 24 hxg4
both pawns by 7 'ire ! is unsuccessful : all i,xa5
the same Black wins a pawn by 7 ... ctJh4 8 Allowing White to promote a pawn.
ifg6 9 f5 ifg4 . However, Black will have perfectly ad­
7 ttJe2 equate compensation for the queen.
White sacrifices a pawn, hoping for a 25 l::l: xf7 l::l: xb3 26 l::l: f8+ <;t>xf8 27 gxh7
lead in development. l::l: bl+ 28 @h2 i,c7+ 29 g3 i,f5! 30
7 ... ifxb2 8 0-0 ctJf6 h8if+ @f7 31 ifh5+
Not 8 ... ifxal because of 9 After 3 1 ifxa8 i,e4 Black announces
9 if d3 ifh4 10 e5 d5 11 exd6 b5 12 i,b3 mate in three moves.
ifxd6 13 ctJd4 i,e7 14 a4 ctJg4 15 ctJc3 31. .. i,g6 32 ifg5 i,e4 0-1
The pawn cannot be regained: 1 5 axb5 Second and third places were shared by
c5 1 6 ife4 ttJxe3 1 7 ifxa8 0-0 1 8 ctJ f3 Aleksandr Mayorov (Moscow) and Ale­
ctJxfl 1 9 @xfl i,f6 and Black wins. ksandr Bragin (Bryansk).
Aleksandr Mayorov trained as a ship­ 10...e5
building engineer. In his youth he won the Not l 0 . . . dxe4 because of 1 1 Cbxc6.
adult championship of the town of Nikolaev 11 Cbxc6 bxc6 12 exd5 Cbxd5
and successfully completed in the Ukrainian The tempting 12 ... cxd5 would have been
Championships. After he moved to Moscow met by 13 �g5, when Black loses a pawn.
he distinguished himself in competitions 13 �c4 �e6 14 �c5?! (D)
of the Zenit Sports Society and had the A new move, which allows Black to re­
reputation of being a very strong candidate group. 1 4 Cbe4 was better, as in the game
master. Dvoiris-Basin (Simferopol 1 988). After
Mayorov began playing in correspond­ this I was intending to play 14 ... �b8 1 5
ence tournaments in the mid- 1980s. He has �c5 l:! d8 , or 1 4. . . �c7 1 5 �c5 l:! fb8 1 6
to his credit a second place in the Moscow �d6 �b6 1 7 �xb8 l:! xb8 1 8 b3 h6 with
Championship and participation in the Pre­ chances for both sides.
mier League of the 1 9th USSR Champion­
ship. As a member of the capital's team, he
participated in the last, 1 0th USSR Team
Championship. Mayorov's chief success B
came in the 2 1 st USSR CC Ch, in the course
of which he became an ICCF international
master.
Mayorov considered his best creative
achievement in the tournament to be his
game with his long-standing rival Yury
Minakov. In the 9th Moscow Champion­
ship ( 1 989- 1 990) Minakov took first place,
and Mayorov finished second, half a point
behind. 14 ... �g5+! 15 �bl l:! fd8
In the 1 8th USSR Championship Mina­ Black's pieces have become active. The
kov and Mayorov had an identical result, threats of . . . �xg2 and . . . tt:Jxc3 are very
sharing 8th- 1 0th places. Now here came unpleasant. White seeks simplification and
their third meeting. heads for the endgame.
16 �xd5 cxd5 17 �g3 �xg3 18 hxg3
So, Black has a strong centre and the two
White : Yu . M ina kov bishops.
18... l:! dc8!
Bla c k : A . M ayorov A bold decision - the rook is removed
from the defence of the d5-pawn.
21 st U S S R CC C h , 1 9 9 8 - 19 �f2
2002 1 9 �a3 was better, although one is
unwilling to move the bishop off the g 1 -a7
Sicilian Defence 876 diagonal.
19 ...d4 20 Cbe4 f5 21 l2Jg5 �xa2+! ! 22
N otes by A l e ks a n d r Ma yo rov �xa2 l:! xc2 23 �el l:! b8 24 l:! b l e4!
It is essential to include the bishop at g7
1 e4 c5 2 Cbt3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Cbxd4 Cbf6 5 in the attack.
Cbc3 g6 6 �e3 �g7 7 f3 0-0 8 �d2 Cbc6 25 l:! xh7
9 0-0-0 d5 10 �el ! ? If 25 fxe4 there follows 25 . . . d3 with a
1 0 exd5 o r 1 0 Cbxc6 i s more usual. threat to the b2-pawn.
25 ... d3 26 .&!, xg7+ �xg7 27 i,c3+ (D) 30... .&!. d8!!
White defends his b2-pawn and wants to The only move that leads to a win. I had
seize the initiative by .&l, hl or fxe4. already found it when I analysed the bishop
sacrifice on the 2 1 st move.
31 .&I. el
No better is 3 1 .&l, d l e2 32 l2Jxe2 dxe2
B 33 .&!, el .&l, d2+ 34 �b3 �e5 and wins.
31. .. gS 32 QJxd3
Forced.
32 ... .&l, xd3 33 �b3
Not 33 f4 in view of 33 ... gxf4 34 gxf4
�e6 with the idea of ... c;;t> d5 and . . . �e4.
33 ...f4 0-1
Now the activity of Black's king and the
protected e3-pawn assure him of a win.
The author of this book finished fourth,
27... .&!, xc3 ! ! 28 bxc3 e3 ! ! for which he was genuinely glad, especially
After the bishop and one rook, now the since a higher place would have led to a
second rook is also sacrificed. curious situation - on behalf of the Russian
29 lLle6+ �f6 30 Qjf4 Association of Correspondence Chess he
It appears that White is nevertheless win­ would have had to make an award to him­
ning. But: self.

A FEW WORDS IN CON CLUSION

We have traversed the entire history of the main correspondence tourna­


ments in pre-revolutionary Russia, the USSR and the post-Soviet period.
On the map of the world there is no longer a state with the name USSR,
but the memory of the great chess power will forever be preserved in the
history of the game. This also applies to its correspondence chess.
Playe rs & Arbiters in the Championsh ips

Abramov, Lev Ioakhimovich (born Asafov, V (Leningrad). Played in Played Ch- 1 1 .


14.6. 191 1 , Warsaw). IM ICCF Ch-07. Bibikov, V (Moscow). Played
1979, Master of Sport of USSR Atyashev, Pyotr Ivanovich Ch-03.
(1940), vice-president ofICCF from (15.2. 1918 Pikshen, Gorley region- Bobkov, VS (Mogilyov). Played
1957 to 1967, International Arbiter 12.6.1984, Moscow). 2"d Cham­ in Ch-06.
FIDE (1957). Resident Moscow pion; resident Baku, Azerbaijan, Bodisko, Aleksandr Petrovich
during Ch-01. Finalist in 8°' World during this event (1932-1994, Moscow). IM ICCF
Championship. 1992. Played in Ch-14.
Abramson, Dr. Moisei 0 (Sirnfer­ Baidakov, Yury lvanovich. Interna­ Bogatyryov, OM (Moscow).
opo� Ulaaine; deceased). IM ICCF tional Arbiter ICCF. ID/Arbiter for Played in Ch-05.
1%7. Played Ch-03, Ch-08. Finalist Ch-20 and Ch-21. Borisenko, Georgy Konstantinovi­
in 5°' World Championship. Bakharev, A (Riga, Latvia). Played ch (born 25.2.1922, Chuguev; resi­
Abroshin, MS (Saratov). Played Ch-10. dent Leningrad and then Sverdlovsk
Ch-02, Ch-03, Ch-04. Balendo, Eduard Pavlovich (Minsk, during these events; now living in
Akopov, Roman A (Baku, Azerbai­ Belorussia). Played in Ch-13. Uzbekistan). Master of Sport of
jan; but now living in Armenia). Bangiev, Alexander J (Sevastopo� USSR (1950), IM ICCF 1961, GM
Played Ch-16, Ch-17, Ch-18. now living in Germany). Played ICCF 1966. World Championship
Altshuler, Roman Zinovievich Ch-12. Notable theoretician. :finalist (runner-up in 4th, withdrew
(Moscow). IM ICCF 1967. Played Bannik, Anatoly Aleksandrovich the next time). Was both joint 3rd
Ch-04, Ch-06, Ch-07, Ch-14. Final­ (born 7.12.1921; lived in Kiev). USSR Champion and joint 5th
ist in 5°' World Championship. Master ofSport ofUSSR 1949, five Champion.
Andreyev, Nikolay Petrovich times OIB champion of Ulaaine. Borisov, Veniamin Ivanovich
(Moscow). Played in Ch-05, Ch- Played in Ch-06. (Moscow region). IM ICCF 1996.
08, Ch-09, Ch-10 and Ch-12. ID/ Barash, Dmitry Feliksovich (Len­ Played Ch-16.
Arbiter for Ch-07 and Ch-14. ingrad, emigrated to USA in 1990s). Bragin, Aleksandr Borisovich
Andrianov, Nikolay lvanovich GM ICCF 1993. 16"' Champion. (Bryansk). IM ICCF 2000. Played
(Moscow). Played Ch-17. Also played in Ch-17. Ch-2 1.
Antonov, Vitaly Aleksandrovich Barstatis, Reinhardas (Klaipeda, Bragin, Pavel Nikolaevich (Voron­
(Leningrad). IM ICCF 1990. Played Lithuania; deceased). Played Ch- 1 1 . ezh). Played in Ch-14.
in Ch-14. Batakovs, Olegs N (Riga, Latvia). Bulgin, Boris Konstantinovich.
Aratovsky, Nikolay Konstanti­ IM ICCF 1994. Played Ch-16, ID/Arbiter of Ch-16. International
novich (born 1919, Saratov). Played Ch-20. Arbiter of FIDE and ICCF.
Ch-02, Ch-03. Baturinsky, Viktor Davidovich Butkus, Yu (Vilnius, Lithuania).
Arkhangelsky, Mikhail Yurievich (27.6. 1914, Odessa-22. 12.2002, Played Ch- 1 1 .
(Moscow). IM ICCF 1992. Played Moscow). IM ICCF 1995. Senior
in Ch-14, Ch-15. Soviet chess administrator. Played Chumichyov, GA (Kolomna).
Aronin, Lev Solomonovich Ch-04, Ch-09 resident Moscow. Played Ch-08.
(20.6.1920, Samara, near Kuiby­ Belousenko, Artur Viktorovich
shev-4. 10.1983, Moscow). IM (Minsk, Belarus). Played Ch-21. Demidenko, Viktor Ivanovich
FIDE 1950. Played Ch-04 Bendersky, Valery (Dnepropetro­ (Kuibyshev). Played Ch-15.
Aronson, V (Moscow). Played in vsk, Ulaaine). Played Ch-21 . Dragunov, VN (Torez). Played in
Cb- 1 3 . Bershadsky, A (Novosibirsk). Ch-06, Ch-08.
Dubinin, Pyotr Vasilievich Giek, Igor Vladimirovich (Mos­ in Ch-01 and in the Unfinished
(Born 30.6.1909, Warsaw; died cow). later GM FIDE. Played Ch- Championship.
18.1 1.1983, Gorky). Master of Sport 17, Ch-18.
of USSR (1938), IM FIDE 1950, Godes, Devis [Dmitry] Rafailovich Jocas, Juozas (Lithuania). Played
GM ICCF 1962. Joint 3rd USSR (Ryazan, now living in Israel). IM Ch-21.
Champion, living in Gorky. Also ICCF 1983, GM ICCF 1984; IM
played Ch-02, Ch-04, Ch-07 and in FIDE. Played Ch-17. Kamenetsky, Yakov Efimovich
the Unfinished Championship. Run­ Golikov, G (Voronezh). Played in (Minsk, Belorussia; deceased, dates
ner-up in 3rd World Championship, Ch-07. unknown). Played in Ch-07.
also played 4th and 7th Wch. Goiovko, Nikolay Grigorievich Karelin, Evgeny Petrovich (Mos­
(Born 04.05. 1917, Rostov-on-Don. cow). Arbiter/TD of Ch-17. Interna­
Efremov see Yefremov. Died 05.01.1988, Moscow). Master tional Arbiter ICCF 1992.
Eremin see Yeryomin. of Sport of USSR (1959). Played in Karnovich, Gely Serafimovich
Estrin, Yakov Borisovich Ch-05, (Moscow). Played Ch-18.
(21.4.1923-02.2.1987 Moscow). Gorenshtein, R (Yalta). Played in Kashlyak, Anatoly Nikolaevich
GM ICCF 1966 ('711' World Cham­ Ch-05. (Semipalatinsk). Played Ch-I I.
pion and several other times a Govashelishvili, Gennady Ana­ Kashlyuk, Victor (Lugansk,
Wch-finalist). IM FIDE 1975. Joint tolievich (Kaliningrad). IM ICCF Ukraine). IM ICCF I997. Played
5th USSR Champion. Also played in 2001. Played Ch-I 9. Ch-20.
Ch-01, Ch-04, Ch-06 and Ch-10. Govbinder, Mikhail Yudovich Kastarnov, SM (Grozny). Played
Evdokimov see Yevdokimov. (Dushanbe, now living in Israel). Ch-16, Ch-17.
Eventov, Prof Yakov Stanislavovi­ World Championship finalist, IM Khlusevich, Sergey Olegovich
ch (1906-1989; emigrated to USA in ICCF 1976. Played Ch-09, Ch-10, (Izhevsk; born 1956). IM ICCF
1977). TD/Arbiter of Ch-08. Postal Ch-1 1, Ch-12. 1 996, GM ICCF I997, current
player, important CC organizer and Grechkin, Dmitry M (Stalingrad). World Championship finalist 20th
member ofICCF Commissions e.g. Played in Ch-01, Ch-03, Ch-05. USSR Champion; also played Ch-
in the 1960s, vice-president ofICCF Grishin, Anatoly Vitalievich (Ka­ 18, Ch-19.
from 1967 to 1 975. zakhstan). IM ICCF 2002. Played Kirshanov, A (Voroshilovgrad,
Ch-21. Ukraine). Played Ch-1 I.
Filippov, Vladimir Mikhailovich. Grodz.ensky, Sergey Yakovlevich. Kitaigorodsky, Ilia Petrovich
Arbiter/TD Ch-1 1, Master of Sport IM ICCF 1 991, GM ICCF 1999, (Moscow). Played Ch-IS, Ch-I6.
of USSR International Arbiter ICCF 1991, Kitayev, LA (Yaroslavl). Played
Filtser, Feliks Mikhailovich (Mos­ Master ofSport ofUSSR 1984. TD/ Ch-08.
cow). IM ICCF 1969. Played Ch- Arbiter of Ch-15 and Ch-19. Played Klompus, Grigocy Yakovlevich
12, Ch-14. in Ch-21. Co-author of this book. (Moscow, later USA; deceased,
Fink, LA (Kuibyshev). Played Gurin, Anatoly Sergeevich (Brest dates unknown). TD/Arbiter of
Ch-04. region, Belarus). Played Ch-19. Ch-04.
Foigel, Igor Yefimovich (Kiev, Gurvich, A. (Chernovitsy). Played Kobiencs, Aleksandrs Naftalievich
Ukraine; now Israel). IM ICCF Ch-06. (Riga, Latvia). Master of Sport
1989. Played in Ch-13. USSR 1945. Mikhail Tal's coach.
Isaev, L (Moscow). Played in Played Ch-04, Ch-08.
Galdanov, Nikolai Munkovich Ch-01. Kogan, Boris Marlcovich (Lvov,
(Barguzin). Played Ch-12. Ivanov, D (Leningrad). Played Ukraine). Played Ch-10, Ch-I2,
Garkunov, Lev Pavlovich (16.3. Ch- 1 1 . Ch-13.
1901-20.1 1 .1963). International Ivanov, Anatoly Grigorievich Kolker, B (Moscow). Played in
Arbiter FIDE. TD/Arbiter of Ch-05. (Chemigov, Ukraine). IM ICCF Ch-13.
Gilman, AM (Gorky). Played in 1987. Played Ch-10. Koltsov, Vyacheslav Aleksandrov­
Ch-01, Ch-06, Ch-07. lvashin, AF (Kuibyshev). Played ich (Blagoveshchensk). IM ICCF
1995. Played Ch-18, Ch-19. Koshil, Tikhon Stepanovich (Rya­ (Moscow). IM ICCF 1988. Played
Konoval, Ya (Orenburg). Played zan). Master of Sport USSR 1978. Ch-15, Ch-16, Ch-19.
in Ch-13. IM ICCF 1992. Played Ch-15. Llpiridi, Aleksandr Khristoforovich
Konovalov, L (Norilsk). Played in Kotenko, Georgy (Kiev, Ukraine). (20.10.1940-1991, Kislovodsk). IM
Ch-06. IM ICCF 1999. Played in Ch-13, ICCF 1989. 15"' Champion Also
Konstantinopolsky, Aleksandr Ch-16. played Ch-16.
Marlcovich (19.2.1910, Zhitomir, Kozlov, N (Vyska). Withdrew from Lnkin, A (Osh, Kyrgyzstan).
Ukraine-21.09.1990, Moscow). Ch-03, games cancelled. Played in Ch-05.
GM FIDE 1 983, IM ICCF 1%6. Kramar, N (Ufa). Played in Ch- Lutovinov, Aleksandr lvanovich
1 � Champion. Also played in: Ch- 05. (Leningrad). IM ICCF 1992. Played
02, Ch-03, Ch-04, Ch-06 and in the Krivun, Nikolay Minovich (Tagan­ Ch-15, Ch-16.
Unfinished Championship. gor). IM ICCF 1982. Played Ch-12. Lybin, Dmitzy Vitalievich (Minsk,
Kopaev, Nikolay Antonovich Kruglov, Dmitzy lvanovich (1899- Belarus). IM ICCF 1998, IM FIDE.
(11.1.1914, Voronezh-1 1.10.1978, 1978). TD/Arbiter for Ch-12. Played Ch-20.
Chemovtsy). Master of Sport of Kryukov, Vladimir Dmitrievich Lykhin, Oleg Vladimirovich (Div­
USSR (1940). Played in Ch-01 . (Cheliabinsk, 1918-1982). World nogorsk). Played Ch-18.
Kopylov, Igor Aleksandrovich Championship finalist. IM ICCF
(Ufa, 1939-2002). Master of Sport 1975. Played Ch-04, Ch-05. Makarov, Aleksandr Madyevich
USSR 1966. IM ICCF 1986, GM Kulagin, Aleksandr Petrovich (Moscow region). IM ICCF 1997,
ICCF 1994, twice a World Cham­ (Moscow region). IM ICCF 2000. SM ICCF 2001. Played Ch-19,
pionship finalist 1 Jl1 USSR Cham­ Played Ch-21. Ch-20.
pion. Also played in Ch-14, Ch-15, Kudinov, Igor Petrivich (Lenin­ Makovkin, A (Gorky). Played
Ch-16, Ch-18, Ch-19. grad). Played in Ch-13. Ch-02.
Kopylov, Nikolay Georgievich Kuntsevich, A (Moscow region). Markauss, Juris (Riga, Latvia). IM
(born 26.10.1919 Novonikolaevsk, Played Ch-10. ICCF 1989. Played Ch-16.
near Novosibirsk; resident Voron­ Kutyanin, Yury Fedorovich (Mos­ Malinin, Vasily Borisovich (Sankt
ezh; now deceased). Master of Sport cow region). Played in Ch-13. Petersburg; born 1956). IM ICCF
of USSR 1946. IM ICCF 1969. Kuuskmaa, Ende! R (Tartu, Es­ 1998, GM ICCF 2002; IM FIDE.
Played Ch-10, Ch-12, Ch-15. tonia; deceased). IM ICCF 1975. 21� Champion.
Korelov, Aleksandr Pavlovich Played Ch-09. Maseev, Leon losifovich
(Leningrad). World Championship Kw.enkov, Anatoly Vasilyevich (25.7.1909-1972, Odessa). IM
finalist Master of Sport USSR (Moscow). Played Ch-21. ICCF 1964. Played Ch-04, Ch-05,
1%0. IM ICCF 1984, GM ICCF Kuznetsov, Anatoly Georgievich Ch-07.
1995. Played Ch-09. (1932-2000 ; Moscow). Master Mayorov, Aleksandr Livovich
Kornilov, Anat.oly Aleksandrovich of Sport USSR 1961, IM (1980) (Moscow). IM ICCF 2000. Played
(Kalinin). Played Ch-12. and International Arbiter (1965) Ch-19, Ch-21 .
Korolev, Anatoly Vladimirovich for chess composition. Played in Mikenas, Vladas Ionovich (born
(Moscow). IM ICCF 1988. Played Ch-05. 17.4.1910 Reve� near Tallinn, Es­
Ch-16, Ch-17, Ch-18. tonia, but ofLithuanian descent, and
Korolev, Sergey lvanovich (Len­ Lapin, GV (lvanovo). Phtyed moved to Vilnius in 193 1 . Died in
ingrad). IM ICCF 1981, GM ICCF Ch-03. 1992). GM FIDE 1987 (retrospec­
1995. Played Ch-17. Latash, Albert Vladimirovich. tive: top board for Lithuama in five
Kosenkov, Vsevolod Tikhonovich TD/Arbiter of Ch-18, International FIDE Olympiads in the 1930s). IM
(19.3.1930, Kaluga--1995, Lenin­ Arbiter FIDE and ICCF. ICCF 1978. Played Ch-09.
grad), lived in Kuibyshev. World Lensky, Igor Leonidovich (Mos­ Mikhailov, Aleksey Ivanovich
Championship finalist. IM ICCF cow). IM ICCF 1997. Played (1936-2000, Leningrad). IM ICCF
1977, GM ICCF 1979. Played Ch- Ch-20. 1980, GM ICCF 1983. Twice
09, Ch-10. Levin, Leonid Bentsionovich a World Championship finalist.
Played Ch-09. Nosovsky, Aleksey Stepanovich (Leningrad). IM ICCF 1992. Played
Milyutin, V (Yaroslavl). Third priz.e (Anadoir). Played Ch- 1 1 . in Ch-14.
in Ch-06. Pulkis, Visvaldis (Liepaya, Latvia;
Minakov, Yury Mikhailovich Omelchenko, Lev Evgenyevich deceased). IM ICCF 1990. Played
(Moscow). Played Ch-19, Ch-21 . (born 6.6.1922 Zhashkov Kievskoy, Ch- 1 1 .
Mishuchkov, Nikolay Mikhailov­ Cherkassy region). Resident Pyatig­
ich (Leningrad region). Played orsk at time of his championships. Ragozin, Vyacheslav Vasilyevich
Ch-15. Master of Sport USSR 1971. IM (8.10.1908, Petersburg-1 1 .3.1962,
Monin, Nikolay Nikolaevich (Len­ ICCF 1977, GM ICCF 1986. 9th Moscow). GM FIDE 1950, GM
ingrad). Played Ch-17. and 10th Champion Finalist in 9th ICCF 1959 (2°d World Champion).
Morozov, Igor Anatolyevich (born World Championship. Played Ch-02; resident Moscow
27.6.1932 Yurevets lvanovsky Ovchinkin, GA (Nizhny Tagil). during this event
region; resident Gorky). Master of Played Ch-04. Razvalyaev, N.P. (Tashkent, Uz­
Sport of USSR (1969), GM ICCF bekistan). Played Ch-15.
1973. Played Ch-08, Ch-09, Ch- 1 1 . Pchyolkin, A (Nikolaevsk-Amur). Remenyuk, Leonid (Voroshilov­
Muravyev, Sergey (Dnepropetro­ Played Ch-09, Ch-16. grad, Ukraine). Played in Ch-14.
vsk, Ukraine). IM ICCF 1996. Peleshev, Leonid D (Narva, Esto­ Romanov, Isaak Zalmanovich
Played Ch-20. nia). Played Ch-16. (born 3 1 .5.1920-1993, Gorky
Perfiliev, Aleksander S (Gorky). region). International Arbiter ICCF
Nadezhdin, Evgeny Nikoleevich Played in Ch-01 . (1968). Chess writer. Played in Ch-
(Almalyk, Uzbekistan). Played Ch- Persits, Boris Davidovich (1916- 07; Moscow resident during this
1 1, Ch-12. 1992, Moscow). IM ICCF 1984. event. Arbiter of the 1 1 tl, and 13th
Naivelt, Mikhail Romanovich Played in Ch-07, Ch-12, Ch-14. Championships. The 20th Champi­
(Moscow). Now living in USA Petrov, B (Odessa, Ukraine). onship was his memorial.
Played Ch-18. Played Ch-09. Rozinov, Boris Abramovich
Neelov see Neyolov. Pivovarov, GA (Chelyabinsk). (1917-97). TD/Arbiter of Ch-06
Neishtadt, Yakov lsaevich (born Played Ch-12. and Ch-09. International Arbiter of
6.10. 1923 Moscow, emigrated to Podolsky, Arkady B (Kiev, ICCF. The 21" Championship was
Israel in 1990s). Well-known theo­ Ukraine). Played in Ch-13. his memorial.
retician and popular chess writer. Pokrovsky, NV (Chelyabinsk). Rubezov, A (Sverdlovsk region).
Master of Sport of USSR (1961), Played Ch-08. Played in Ch-05.
IM ICCF 1971. Played in Ch-06 Poleshchuk, Nikolay Nikolaevich Rubinchik, Leonid Y (Kremen­
and 12tl' World Championship. (Leningrad). IM ICCF 2000, Inter­ chug, Ukraine). IM ICCF 1987,
Nesis, Gennady Efimovich (Lenin­ national Arbiter ICCF 1998. Played GM ICCF 1999. Played Ch-17,
grad). IM ICCF 1982, GM ICCF in Ch-13. Ch-18, Ch-20.
1985. Well-known chess teacher Poletaev, Sergey Mikhailovich Rumyantsev, Yu. E (Moscow
and writer. Runner-up in Ch-12 (Cheliabinsk). Played in Ch-01. region). Played Ch-15.
and Ch-13. Also ICCF World Cup Polyansky, B (Saratov). Played Rusakov, Yakov Davidovich
winner and world championship Ch-09. (Omsk, 1934-1988). IM ICCF
runner-up. Popov, Dr. Albert Egorovich 1986. Played in Ch-14, Ch-15,
Neverov, Valery (Kharkov, (Syktyvkar, Russia). IM ICCF Ch-17.
Ukraine). GM FIDE. Played Ch- 1990. Played Ch-20. Russo, DI (Alma-Ata). Played in
18. Postovsky, Boris Naumovich (born Ch-01 and in the Unfinished Cham­
Neyolov, Yury N (Kaluga). Played 31.5.1937 Moscow, now living in pionship.
in Ch-07. USA). 14tl' Champion. Ryabikin, Yu (Dzerzhinsk). Played
Nikitin, Victor Alekseevich (Ka­ Prokofiev, S (Leningrad). Played Ch-12.
linin). IM ICCF 1998. Played in Ch-10.
Ch-14. Pnkshansky, Mikhail Borisovich Sadomsky, Anatoly Mikhailovich
(20.10.1910, Orenburg--07.08.1989, Ch-19. finalist. Played Ch-09, Ch-10. 1M
Moscow). Master of Sport ofUSSR Shifman, A (Kharkov). Played in ICCF 1978.
(1962). Resident Moscow during Ch-01. Sychyov, Anatoly Viktorovich
these events. 4th Champion. Also Shikhirev, Leonid Nikolaevich (Novosibirsk). 1M ICCF 1992,
played in Ch-02, Ch-03, Ch-05, Ch- (Moscow). lM ICCF 1998. Played SlM ICCF 2001. Played in Ch-
06, Ch-08 and Ch-10. Ch-20. 07, Ch-10, Ch-1 1 and 15th World
Sadurskis, Peteris K (10.10.1916- Shishlov, V (Sorsk, Khakasiaregion Championship Final.
30.04.2002, Riga, Latvia). Played of Siberia). Played in Ch-13. Talving, Rene K (Tallinn, Estonia).
Ch-09. Shulkin, Vadim V (Molodechno). Played Ch-20.
Sanakoev, Grigory Konstanti­ Played in Ch-07. Tanin, Sergey Pavlovich
novich (born 17.4.1935 Voronezh). Shwnakher, A (Gome!). Played (Zhel=ovodsk). Played Ch-02.
lM ICCF 1971, GM ICCF 1984 Ch-02. Timko, Viktor (Ulaaine). Played
(12th World Champion and several Shuvalov, 0 (Nakhodka). Played Ch-21.
times a Wch-finalist). Runner-up in in Ch-13. Tolush, Aleksandr Kazirnirovich
USSR Ch-06. Simagin, Vladimir Pavlovich (1.5.1910, Petersburg-2.3.1969,
Schuster, Jilri (Estonia). 1M ICCF (21.6.1919, Moscow-25.9.1968, Leningrad). GM FIDE 1953, 1M
1997. Played Ch-20. Kislovodsk). GM FIDE 1962. 6th ICCF 1965. World Championship
Semenyuk, Vladimir Vladimi­ Champion. Also played in: Ch-01, finalist. Played Ch-08.
rovich (Tula). 12th Champion. Also Ch-07. Tsamryuk, Aleksandr A (Samar­
played Ch-1 1, Ch-13, Ch-15. Sitsky, KN (Gorley). Played Ch-02. kand, Uzbekistan). Played in Ch-14,
Serebriisky, Alexandr S (Harkov, Skobeev, Viktor Aleksandrovich Ch-16.
Ulaaine; deceased). lM ICCF 1975. (1921-2002 Moscow). Played Tiirn, IY (Tallinn, Estonia). Played
Played Ch-09. Ch-19. Ch-08.
Shadchnev, V (Penz.a). Played Ch- Skotorenko, Vasily G (Kemerovo, Tyulin, Evgeny Viktorovich
09, Ch-10. Ulaaine). Played Ch-08. (Vladimir). Played Ch-20.
Shagapov, G (Bugulma). Played Smetanin, Anatoly Yakovlevich
Ch-09. (Ryazan). Master of Sport USSR Ufimtsev, Anatoly Gavrilovich
Shamkovich, Leonid Aleksan­ 1978. Played in Ch-14. (born 1 1 .5.1914 Omsk, Russia;
drovich (born 1.6.1923 Rostov-on­ Smolensky, Yury Andreyevich deceased 2002; at the time of
Don, emigrated to Israel 1974, then (Odessa, Ulaaine; now living in these events living in Kustanay,
in 1976 to USA). GM FIDE 1965. USA). Played Ch-08. Kazakhstan). Master of Sport of the
Resident Moscow during Ch-02. Sokolov, Sergey Mironovich USSR 1946 and well-known theo-­
Shapiro, I (Kiev, Ulaaine). Played (17.2. 1937 Moscow- 1992). Master retician. Played in Ch-14, Ch-15,
Ch- 1 1 . of Sport ofUSSR (1963), lM ICCF Ch-16, Ch-17, Ch-18, Ch- 19.
Shaposhnikov, Yury Nikolaevich 1982. 8th Champion. Umansky, Mikhail Markovich
(Kuibyshev). Played Ch-02, Ch-03, Sokolsky, Aleksey Pavlovich (born 2 1 . 1 .1952 Stavropol; at this
Ch-04, Ch-06. (3. 1 1 . 1908 Kangush Penz.onsky time living in Pyatigorsk; now living
Shapovalov, Igor Mikhailovich region-27.12.1969 Minsk, Belorus­ in Gem1any). 13th USSR Champion.
(Yaroslavl). Played Ch-06, Ch-08. sia). Master of Sport of USSR 13th CC World Champion and win­
Shapran, Yu (Stavropol). Played (1938). Notable theoretician and ner of ICCF's Jubilee Champions
Ch-10. chess writer. Resident Lvov during tournament 2002-3. lM ICCF 1986,
Sher, Miron Naurnovich (Belgo-­ Ch-01. Also played in Ch-02, Ch- GM ICCF 1995, 1M FIDE 1997.
rod). lM ICCF 1987, later GM 05, Ch-06, Ch-07 and Ch-08 (all
FIDE. Played Ch-15. from Minsk). Varlamov, Vyacheslav Vladimi­
Shershnyov, A (Riga, Latvia). Solodovnikov, Viktor P (Zhdanov, rovich (Leningrad). Played Ch-15.
Played Ch-1 1. Ulaaine). Played Ch-12. Vasilyev, AK (Karaganda, Kaza­
Shevelevich, Evgeny I (Rostov-on­ Sorokin, Garald Konstantinovich khstan). Played in Ch-13.
Don, emigrated to Israel). Played (Gorley). World Championship Vasykin, Vladimir Afanasievich
(Novokusnetsk). Played Ch-21. IM (Ivanovo). Played Ch-12. (Moscow). IM ICCF 1986. Finalist
ICCF 1999. Yakimenko, Aleksandr Andreevich in 1 1th CC World Championship.
Veltmander, Iogannes G (Izhevsk). (Donetsk region). IM ICCF 1992. Played Ch-02.
Played Ch-03, Ch-04. Played Ch-15. Zarubin, Yu (Moscow). Played
Veresov, Gavril Nikolaevich Yarkov, Vladimir Valentinovich Ch-08.
(08.07.1912-18.1 1 .1979, Minsk, (Moscow region). SM ICCF 1999. Zavemyaev, VA (Severodvinsk).
Belorussia). Theoretician and IM 18th Champion, runner-up Ch- i 9. Played Ch-10.
FIDE (1950). Played the Unfinished Yannolik, Vladimir Georgievich Zbandutto, Vladimir P (Moscow).
Championship and began Ch-08 (Saratov). Played Che 17. Played in Ch-01 and in the Unfin­
but dropped out; his games were Yefremov, V (Voroshilovgrad). ished Championship. TD/Arbiter of
cancelled Played Ch-02. 2"d and 3ro Championships.
Verhni, Vladimir (Estonia). Played Yershov, Vladimir N (Dneprodz­ Zborovsky, R (Grodno). Played
Ch-21. erzhinsk, Ukraine). Played in Ch-07, in Ch-13.
Veytse� David Grigoryevich Ch-08, Ch-13. Zelinsky, Yury (Riga, Latvia Now
(Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky). Yeryomin, M (Stavropol). Played living in Israel and calling himself
Played in Ch-13, now living in Ch-12. Jruis Zelinskis). 19th Champion.
Israel. Yevdokimov, KA (Zaporozhie). Runner-up Ch-18. Also played Ch-
VIkulov, Aleksandr V (Chere­ Played Ch-02, Ch-05. 10, Ch-12, Ch-14, Ch-16, Ch-17.
povets). Played Ch-18. Yudin, V (Sebastopol). Played Zhdanov, I (Riga, Latvia). Played
VIlchenkov, Nikolai Fedorovich Ch-09. Ch-04.
(Mosc-.ow region). Played Ch-20. Yudovich sr., Mikhail Mikhailov­ Zhdarsky, Y (Bugulma). Withdrew
Vitols, Karlis ( 1 1 .08.1938- ich (8.6.191 1, Roslavl-19.9.1987, from Ch-03, games cancelled
19.05.2002, Riga, Latvia). First Moscow). IM FIDE 1950, GM Zhuravlyov, Valery I (Liepaya,
president ofthe independent Latvian ICCF 1972. Writer. � Champion; Latvia). Played Ch-10.
CC Federation; host and chief or­ resident Moscow during this event. Zilberberg, Alik Samulovich
ganizer ofthe 1998 ICCF Congress. .· Finalist in � World Championship. (7.1.1.1937 Odessa, emigrated to
Played Ch-21. Yurgenson, Viktor Nikolaevich USA in 1980s). IM ICCF 1973,
Vlansky, P (Saratov). Played in (Moscow, 1915-1986). Arbiter/ID GM ICCF 1994. World Champion­
Ch-07. of Ch-09. International Arbiter ship :finalist. Played Ch-08.
Voitik, I (Voroshilovgrad region). ICCF 1986. Zhukov, V (Kharkov, Ukraine).
Played Ch- I0. Played in Ch-01.
Voitsekh, Anatoly Pavlovich (Bo­ Zagorovsky, Mikhail Pavlovich Zubarev, Nikolay Mikhailovich
bruisk; deceased). IM ICCF 1988. (Moscow, 1918-1993). World (1894-1951). TD/Arbiter ofCh-01.
1 1th Champioll Also played Ch-10. Championship :finalist. IM ICCF Zyukov, GD (Moscow). Played
Volchikhin, Mikhail (Shadrinsk). 1974. Played in Ch-07, Ch-08. in Ch-07.
Played Ch-15. Zagorovsky, Professor Vladimir NOTE: Russian uses a different
Volchok, Alexandr S (Nikolaev, Pavlovich (29.06.1925-06. 1 1.1994, alphabet from English and some
Ukraine). IM ICCF 1983, GM Voronezh). Master of Sport of names (e.g. Aleksandr, Anatoly,
ICCF 1993. Chess writer. Played USSR (1948), GM ICCF 1965. CC Nikolay and Yury) are often seen
Ch-16, Ch-18 and in 16th World organiser, 4th World Champion and in different spellings. Players who
Championship Final. many times a World Ch. :finalist. emigrated to the West sometimes
Volodin, Viktor Nikolaevich Played USSR Ch-03. changed their names and Ukrainians
(Moscow). IM ICCF 1998, SM Zaitsev, Aleksandr Nikolaevich can use different transliterations of
2000, GM 2002; IM FIDE 1991; (15.6.1935-3 1 .10.1971, Vladivos­ a name from Russians. When we
Master of Sport USSR 1988. Played tok). GM FIDE 1967. Played in know what a player prefers, we
Ch-20. Ch-06 and Ch-07. sometimes use that spelling in the
Vorobiyov, Viktor Dmitrievich Zaitsev, Vladimir Valentinovich book even if it is non-standard
Solutions to Tactical Finishes

Find the finish I (see page 54 ) .

1 . Konstantinopolsky-Perfiliev: or 23 . . . �g7 24 i,d4+).


16 : xh6! fS ( l 6 ... gxh6 1 7 : xd7 �xd7 3 . Shamkovich-Yevdokimov:
1 8 lbf6+) 17 exf6 lbxf6 18 lbxf6+ : xr6 18 g4! �g6 ( 1 8 ... fxg3 19 i,xg5) 19
( 1 8 . . . gxf6 1 9 �g6+ �g7 20 �h5) 19 i,xf4 �xe4 20 i,xe4 1-0
�h7+ �f7 ( 1 9 ... �f8 20 : xf6+, 2 1 �h8+ 4. Borisenko-Dubinin:
and 22 �xa8) 20 : xf6+ Wxf6 (20 ... �xf6 26 : xaS : b8 27 : xa6+ �xa6 28
21 : d7+) 21 e4! �cs (2 1 . .. : d8 22 �h4+ �e2+ �a7 29 �bS : b7 30 as 1-0
�f7 23 : xd8) 22 : d7 1-0 (22 . . . �e3+ 5. Kryukov-Estrin:
23 Wdl ). 22... i,cl ! 0-1
2. Ragozin-Abroshin: 6. Bogatyryov-Yevdokimov:
22 : xf7! Wxf7 23 i,xe6+! 1-0 21 : g3! i,xg3+ 22 �xhS �b7 23
(23 . . . �xe6 24 : n+ or 23 . . . We8 24 �b7 �g4 i,f2 24 �f4 �d7 2S l2Jh2 1-0

Find the finish I I (see page 1 1 4) .

1 . A. Zaitsev-Gilman: 3 . Yershov-Romanov:
24 �d3 ! (This wins a piece, whereas 21 : xfS! ! 1-0
24 �d3 brings nothing.) 24...�xf3+ (If 2 1 . . .�xf5 22 �xe3 with threats of
(24 . . . l2Jf5 25 i,xf5) 2S � 7g2 : es �c3, �d3 and �h6).
(25 . . . : g8 26 i,e2! �d5 27 �c4 �f3 4. Smolensky-Zilberberg:
28 exd4 ! or 25 ... : d6 26 exd4 : xd4 30 ... b3! (Destroys the last bastion) 31 dS
27 �c l !) 26 exd4 : gS 27 dxcS+ f6 bxa2 32 Wal �b8 0-1
(27 . . . : ee5 28 �d2 : hs 29 �f5 ! : gs 5 . Kuntsevich-Estrin:
30 �c2 : e2 3 1 �dl ! ) 28 �c4! 1-0 (Not White threatens mate and the a l - : , but
28 �c2? �xg2+! 29 : xg2 : e l +. Now for the price of a bishop Black stops both
White prepares to break the pin by 29 �fl threats and forces a winning endgame the
followed by �d3 and f3. If 28 . . . : hs 29 exchange ahead.
�e2! - Zaitsev). 40 ... �h3+! 41 wxh3 �f6 0-1
2. Yershov-Altshuler: 20 ... l2Jb4! 21 6. Poleshchuk-Foigel:
l2Jd2 lbxc2 22 �xc2 cS 0-1 19 �d8+! 1-0
Some statistics

SEVERAL years ago, Dutch chess organiser weighted towards frequency of participation
Nol van 't Riet devised a mathematical for­ over high percentage results. Also the fact
mula to determine which player had the best that the number of players in USSR Cham­
record in a series of events in which several pionship finals varied between 1 3 and 2 1
players compete many times. perhaps skewed the results.
The USSR CC Championships seemed a Some other statistics are also of interest.
suitable candidate for this kind of analysis, Lev Omelchenko was the only player with
since there were 21 events and numerous two outright victories, and with two consec­
players competed in three or more of them. utive victories. Georgy Borisenko also won
Three players were involved in six USSR twice, but both cases involved a tie. Several
CC Championship Finals and two played in players won at their first attempt and never
seven of them: one third of the total. competed again.
To determine Mister USSR CC Champi­ Also noteworthy is the achievement of
onships by the van 't Riet formula, you have Gennady Nesis in finishing second in two
to find the sum of "Mister points" = S (Total consecutive finals with the high overall
points scored) + G (Total games played) + score of 72.97% - which would have won
Percentage result (of S/G). some of the finals.
Performing this calculation, Tim Hard­ The greatest interval in time between first
ing found the clear winner (with 252 Mister and last participation is also down to Zelin­
Points) to be Yury Zelinsky of Riga (now Is­ sky, who began the 1 0th Final in 1 97 1 and
rael) who played 7 championships including concluded by winning the 19th in 1 993 . He
a first and a second place and no bad results. overlaps with Sadomsky who began the 2nd
In total, Zelinsky played 1 1 4 games, scoring in 1 952 and also played in the 1 0th.
73.5 which is a 64.47% record. The record for the longest interval be­
Runner-up, with 225 Mister Points, was tween two participations in championship
A. Sadomsky who also included a title in his finals is held by M. Abramson. He com­
seven starts. He too had 1 44 games but his pleted the 3rd championship in 1 957 and
overall score (59.5) was inferior to Zelin­ next played in the 8th, which began in 1 967.
sky's. Third was A. Sokolsky, who played His absence in the intervening period can
1 0 1 games in six finals. He did not win the be explained by his involvement in a world
title, but his game points total of 58.5 gave championship final.
him a better percentage than Sadomsky. However, if you count the unfinished
Fourth in the table, the only other player championship that began in 1 940, then Pyotr
with over 200 Mister Points, came Igor Ko­ Dubinin is the the player with the greatest
pylov with 55.5 from 94 games i!1 six finals longevity. He also competed in several post­
(59.04%). He too was once champion. war championships, his last being the 7th,
Also highly impressive records are Dubi­ which ended in 1 966, giving him a span of
nin's 66.94% from four finals and Simagin's 26 years activity in these events.
73.53% from three championships. Between them, the careers of Dubinin,
Looking at the results in more detail, it Sadomsky and Zelinsky span the whole era
seems that the Mister Points formula starts of those championships that were played
to break down after players have competed during the time that the USSR actually
in more than four or five events, as it is existed.
Index to Openings
Both indexes on this page include the miniature games on pages 84 and 140.

Bogoljubow Indian Defence Queen's Gambit 1 9, 5 1 , 1 04,1 12, 1 1 3, 1 3 1


1 40 QG Accepted 30, 34, 1 1 1
Caro-Kann Defence 23 , 66, 93 QG Semi-Slav 89, 1 1 1 , 1 3 0
Catalan Opening 1 40 Queen's Indian 70
Dutch Defence 84 Reti Opening 42
English Opening 12, 1 4, 75, 92, 1 05, 1 40 Richter-Veresov 84
Evans Gambit 1 1 , 95 Ruy Lopez
French Defence 48, 1 1 7, 1 24 Closed Defence 1 5 ,42,57 ,65,7 1 ,75,8 1 ,85
Griinfeld Defence 30 Steinitz Deferred 35, 38, 45
Hungarian Defence 4 1 Other lines 1 8, 27, 63, 83, 1 40
King's Gambit 10 Scandinavian Def. 76
King's Indian Defence Scotch Game 69
Classical 72, 132 Sicilian Defence
Lines with g3 9 1 , 138, 1 4 1 , 1 43 Dragon Variation 97, 149
Siimisch Var. 1 1 5 , 1 3 6, 1 37, 1 3 8 Najdorf Variation 29, 82, 1 3 6
Modem Benoni 77, 1 02 Scheveningen Var. 2 1 , 60
Modem Defence 91 Sozin Variation 52, 147
N imzo-Indian 6 1 , 97 Taimanov Var. 58, 98
Nimzowitsch Defence 1 48 Other lines 1 1 8, 123
Philidor Defence 1 22 Sokolsky Opening 20
Pirc-Ufimtsev 84, 1 03, 1 09, 125 Two Knights Def. 50

Index by E CO codes
AOO 20 B42 118 C6 1 18 D39 51
A06 42 B47 58 C73 38, 45 D43 1 04
Al9 75 B49 98 C75 35 D44 111
A2 1 14 B76 1 49 C78 83 D48 89
A22 1 40 B77 97 C80 1 40 D49 1 30
A28 12 B80 21 C82 27 D59 19
A30 92, 1 05 B88 52 C86 63 D87 30
A32 140 B89 1 47 C88 42 Ell 1 40
A4 1 91 B91 29 C90 15 El9 70
A6 1 77 B92 60 C93 75, 85 E42 97
A75 1 02 B94 82 C95 71 E58 61
A84 84 B96 . 136 C96 65 E63 1 38
BOO 148 C06 1 17 C97 57 E64 91
BO l 76 C07 1 24 C99 81 E68 1 4 1 , 1 43
B07 1 03 , 1 09 Cl7 48 DO l 84 E80 138
B08 84 C37 10 D2 1 34 E8 1 1 1 5, 1 3 7
B09 125 C4 1 1 22 D25 111 E85 136
Bl2 93 C45 69 D26 30 E99 72, 132
Bl4 23 C50 41 D30 112
Bl8 66 C51 1 1, 95 D35 131
B33 1 23 C55 50 D36 1 13
Index of players of complete games

This index includes the main chapters and miniatures but not the tactical finishes.

Abroshin 42, 84 Kutyanin 97, 1 40 Shifman 20


Akopov 1 1 5, 1 30 Lipiridi 1 1 1 [2 games] Shishlov 98
Altshuler 57 Lutovinov 1 1 1 , 1 12 Simagin
Andreyev 7 1 , 89 Lybin 141 1 8, 60, 6 1 , 63, 66
Andrianov 1 23 Lykhin 1 32 Skotorenko 72
Arkhangelsky 1 04, 1 0 5 Malinin 1 47, 148 Sokolov 69, 70
Aronin 41 Makarov 136 Sokolsky
Aronson 95 Markauss 118 20, 30, 48, 84
Atyashev 27 Maseev 4 1 , 45 Solodovnikov 92
Bakharev 81 Mayorov 1 49 Sorokin 77
Bannik 61 Mikenas 75 Sozin 12
Barash 1 1 5, 1 1 7 , 1 25 Milyutin 57, 60 Sychyov 65
Baturinsky 77 Minakov 1 33 , 1 38, 1 49 Timko 148
Bobkov 1 40 Mishuchkov 1 12 Tsamryuk 1 05
Borisenko 34, 46, 52 Morozov 7 1 , 85 Ufimtsev
Chigorin 11 Nadezhdin 91 103, 1 09, 1 25 , 1 3 1 , 1 3 8 [2]
Demidenko 1 09 Naivelt 1 32, 1 40 Umansky 95, 97, 1 40
Dubinin 14, 29, 3 5, 66 Neishtadt 1 40 Urusov 11
Estrin 23,46,48,50,5 1 Nesis 92, 97 Vasilyev 1 40
Gilman 2 1 Omelchenko Veltmander 35, 38
Godes 1 24 75 [2], 8 1 , 82 Vinogradov 10
Golovko 45 Pchyolkin 75 Voitsekh 85
Gorenshtein 5 1 Perfiliev 19 Volchikhin 113
Grechkin 34, 84 Persits 93, 1 04 Volchok 1 1 8, 1 40
lvashin 14 Postovsky 1 02, 1 03 Volodin 1 4 1 , 1 43
Khlusevich 1 29, 1 43 Prokofiev 83 Yarkov
Kitayev 69 Pukshansky 1 02 1 30 [2 games], 1 37, 1 38
Kitaigorodsky 1 1 3 , 1 1 7 Ragozin 1 2, 30 Yarmolik 1 22
Kogan 91 Rubezov 52 Yershov 97
Koltsov 1 29 Rubinchik 1 24 Yudovich 63 , 65
Konstantinopolsky Rusakov 111 Zagorovsky, M 70
1 5 , 2 1 , 23 , 30, 42, 84 Russo 15 Zagorovsky, V 38
Kopaev 19 Sadomsky 42 [2] , 50 Zaitsev, V 84
Kopylov, I 1 22,1 23 , 1 30, 1 36 Sanakoev 58 Zavernyaev 83
Kosenkov 76 Semenyuk 9 1 [2], 9 8 Zbandutto 18
Kramar 84 Serebriisky 76 Zborovsky 1 40
Krivun 93 Shabelsky 10 Zelinsky
Kulagin 1 47 Shamkovich 29, 30 89, 1 3 1 , 1 3 3, 136 [2], 1 3 7
Kuntsevich 82 Shaposhnikov 27, 58 Zilberberg 72