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DON’T LET GRAMMAR BUG YOU

OPEN ENDED GAME BOARD


©Word to the Wise

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PRINT AND PLAY!


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OPEN ENDED GAME BOARD
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This open ended game board is part of our Don’t Let Grammar Bug You unit on Teachers Pay Teachers. Open
ended game boards are great because you don’t have to spend hours laminating and cutting out materials! This
is especially useful this time of the school year when everyone is busy with meetings, testing, and teaching. To
play this game, simply print out the game board, laminate it (optional), and choose an activity from below (or
create your own idea) to adapt the game to your student’s skills that need practice in the classroom or therapy
setting.
Articulation Idea: For this version you can either print and laminate a game board and write the target words
with a dry erase marker or print a game board and write directly on the paper. Write a target word for each
student in the group on the caterpillar’s individual body parts (circles). For example, one body part might say:
stop, lemon, fun. Choose a student to go first. The student rolls the dice and moves the corresponding amount
of spaces. The student must identify which one of the words they should say, depending on the target sounds
they have been practicing in therapy. Once they identify the correct word have them practice it at the appropri-
ate level (word, phrase, or sentence level). The first player to reach the caterpillar’s tail wins!
Vocabulary/Comprehension Idea (Skills to Target: Adjectives & Inferences): For this version you can either print
and laminate a game board for each player in the group and have them write on it with dry erase markers or
you can print a game board for each player and let them write directly on the paper. Give each student a game
board. Have them write three adjectives to describe an object on each of the caterpillar’s individual body parts
(circles). For example, the student might write: big, black, and round on a body part. Once each student has
written three adjectives on each of the caterpillar’s body parts have them switch game boards with their peers
in the group. Every student should have one game board. Choose a student to go first. The student rolls the
dice and moves the corresponding amount of spaces. The student must identify an object that would meet the
description shown on the body part they landed on. For example, if the body part they landed on said, “big,
black, and round” they might name tire. The first player to reach the caterpillar’s tail wins!
Grammar Idea: For this version you can either print and laminate a game board and write the targets with a dry
erase maker or print a game board and write directly on the paper. Go around the group and have the students
choose verbs to write on each of the caterpillar’s individual body parts (circles). Choose a player to go first. The
student rolls the dice and moves the corresponding amount of spaces. The student must use the verb on the
space they landed on in three different sentences (past tense, present tense, future tense). For example, if they
land on a space that says, “break” their sentences could be: Yesterday, I broke the vase; I didn’t mean to break
the vase today; and I will break my arm if I fall off the monkey bars. The first player to reach the caterpillar’s tail
wins!
Social/Question Generation/Grammar Idea: For this version you can either print and laminate a game board and
write the targets with a dry erase marker or print a game board and write directly on the paper. Write one
spring related word on each of the caterpillar’s individual body parts (circles). Words could include: spring,
umbrella, rain, flowers, ladybug, grass, butterfly, April, rabbit, rainbow, raincoat, puddles, green, sunshine,
spring break, and eggs. Choose a player to go first. The student rolls the dice and moves the corresponding
amount of spaces. The student will then start a conversation using the target word by either making a comment
or asking a question. For example, if the student lands on “spring” they might say, “I like spring.” Then the next
student will roll the dice and make a comment or ask a question to continue the conversation using their target
word. For example, if they landed on “rain” they might say, “I don’t like spring because it rains too much and I
can’t go outside.” Then the next student rolls the dice and lands on “spring break.” They could say, “I like spring
because of Spring Break. What are you guys doing for Spring Break?” If students have grammar goals make sure
that they use correct grammar when generating questions and comments. The first player to reach the
caterpillar’s tail wins!
START head
on my

on my

FINISH tail

©Word to the Wise • www.wordtothewisespeech.com