You are on page 1of 25

10/14/2009

Balfour Beatty Construction

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

SUSPENSION
HOISTING
& RIGGING

SUSPENSION HOISTING
& RIGGING
The Qualified & Certified (Forklift) Operator
(Employer Certification)
1910.178
1910 178 Powered Industrial Trucks
(i) Operator Training
(3) Training program content
1 - General Operation
2 - Machine Specific Operation
3 - Site Conditions
4 - Proficiency Demonstration
5 - Retraining
R i i (as ( indicated)
i di d)
(6) Certification. The employer shall certify that each operator has been trained and
evaluated as required by this paragraph (l). The certification shall include the name of the
operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identity of the
person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

Note:: Machine and Operator must be Licensed in DC


Note

1
10/14/2009

Trained / Certified Operator?

Apparently Skilled Operators, but following Safe Operating Procedures??

2
10/14/2009

Tandem Forklift pic??

Suspension Hoisting
Advantages
(to forklift suspension-
suspension-hoisting in lieu of crane
crane--hoisting)

„ 2 fer 1 – Can lift from below i.e. “fork lift” and


from above i.e. “suspension hoist.”

„ Can maneuver in tight locations and on rough


terrain.

„ Eliminates need for additional hoisting equipment


such as small Rough Terrain (RT) or Carry
Carry--Deck
type cranes.

3
10/14/2009

Carry--Deck Crane
Carry

Suspension Hoisting
Disadvantages
g
„ Must carry forks much higher to have load suspended
below forks versus load being fork-
fork-lifted from beneath.

„ Deceptively changes perceived Center of Gravity.


Operators tend to forget this and not think as if load is on
forks
o s eve
even tthough
oug ooften
te suspe
suspended
ded far
a be
below.
ow.

„ Overturning of Forklift while suspension hoisting/carrying


a load is not unusual.

„ Load radius is increased with lifting boom.

4
10/14/2009

Swing /Sway
Of Load?

Device - Side to Side


Load - Increased y
Stability?
Center Radius /
Of Weight?
Gravity?

•Center of Gravity – Must consider as though load is on forks.


•“Load Sway” creates potential for side loading and increased radius.
•Lower load by lowering boom can significantly increase radius.
•Fork
Fork--mounted lifting beams increase radius and load weight, and must
be factored into load weight and capacity calculations.

Operator of this forklift attempted to “jump free”…

5
10/14/2009

Operator jumped - fell here.


(Not wearing seat-
seat-belt)

… and was nearly crushed by the overhead/rollover protection structure.

6
10/14/2009

Suspension Hoisting
Disadvantages continued.
„ Load tends to swing,
swing even on level ground.
ground
„ Difficult to steady load without two tag-
tag-lines
or load “bridled” (guyed) to forklift frame.
„ Employees attempting to steady load are
exposed to struck-
struck-by injury from the load
and/or the forklift.

Chain Knot?
NOT!

Off-Center
Off-
Loading

Off--Center loading, no positive connection and no tag line and worker exposed
Off

7
10/14/2009

Single Web Sling – Can chafe/cut sling – Load can roll side-to side

8
10/14/2009

9
10/14/2009

Suspension Hoisting
Disadvantages continued.
„ Rigging
i i to fork(s)
f k( ) can:
„ damage rigging

„ place torsion (twisting) force on the


boom when fork(s) are not centered.
„ risk rigging and load slipping off
fork(s) if not positively secured to the
fork(s) or mast.

10
10/14/2009

Short,
eye & eye,
wire-rope
sling

11
10/14/2009

Fork Damaged Web Slings

12
10/14/2009

Nice Heavy-
Heavy-Duty Chain Slings

Not likely to be damaged, and


“mean lean” up on fork tips,
but…

™ Not positively attached, and

™ Not rigged to center.


center

Plan B X
9 Plan A

13
10/14/2009

Better: Centered fork, short slings, folks tipped-up, but…


not positively attached.

Off-Center Loading

14
10/14/2009

No Latch

Poor Suspension Hoisting Practices are not Limited to Forklifts

No Latch

No Latches

15
10/14/2009

Suspension
Hoisting
Example of Good Rigging
Methods for Hoe-
Hoe-Hoisting
equipment.

Note:
•Hardware (for hard wear)
•Closed pad-
pad-eye on bucket
•All positive attachment
connections

16
10/14/2009

17
10/14/2009

Generally good rigging method, but attachment point (back-


(back-rest) may not
be strong enough for capacity loads

Beefy, but shop


shop--made? Engineered and marked with weight and capacity?

18
10/14/2009

Suspension Hoisting
Best Practice
i Options
i
For
P
Proper Ri
Rigging/Devices
i /D i
May Include:

19
10/14/2009

Latching Safety Hook 9Positive connection


(versus sorting hook) 9Structural member
necessary for “high- 9Close to center
hoisting.”
9Properly stowed
when not in use.

Taper of forks
could
ld allow
ll
device to
loosen.

20
10/14/2009

Safety
Attachment

21
10/14/2009

22
10/14/2009

23
10/14/2009

24
10/14/2009

Bottom Line: Proper Forklift Suspension-Hoisting, or…

…One of These.

BBC SUSPENSION-HOISTING POLICY


No rigging may be directly attached to the forks (tines) of a forklift (Powered
Industrial Truck) or the teeth of an earthmoving equipment bucket for the
purpose of suspension-hoisting or “Free-Rigging.” (see OSHA Letter of
Interpretation - October 22, 1999 regarding “Free-Rigging”)

Rigging used for suspension hoisting must be positively attached to the equipment
or to a purpose-designed, suspension-hoisting device with hardware (shackles,
latched safety hooks, etc.) at all connection points.

Fork-mounted suspension-hoisting devices must be engineered for use with the


intended forklift, and have a load-chart specifically designed for the device.

S
Suspended
d d lload
d weights
i ht mustt be
b known
k by
b the
th Operator
O t to
t be
b within
ithi the
th capacity
it
of the equipment in its current configuration. (e.gs. charted capacity, engineered
lift)

An Activity Hazard Analysis must be submitted to Balfour Beatty, and


authorization to proceed given by Balfour Beatty Project Supervision/Safety prior
to complex or unusual suspension-hoisting.

25