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INTERNATIONAL ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY MALAYSIA

COURSE OUTLINE

Kulliyyah Engineering

Department Mechatronics Engineering

Programme B. Eng. (Mechatronics)

Course Title Robotics

Course Code MCT 4215

Status Core Course

Level 4

Credit Hours 3

Contact Hours Lecture- 3 Hours

Pre-requisites MCT 2212, MCT 3222


(if any)

Co-requisites
(if any)

Instructional Lecture
Strategies

Course
Assessment LO Method %
1,2,3,4,5,6,7 Assignments 10
1,2,3,4,5,6,7 Quiz 20
1,2,3,4 Mid-term Exam 30
2,3,4,5,6,7 Final Exam 40

Instructor(s) Dr. Roslizar Mat Ali

Semester Every semester


Offered
Course Synopsis Overview of robots. Robot kinematics and dynamics. Control and sensing
systems, robot vision. Programming and interfacing. Basics of robot
design and robot test. Applications of robots.

Course The objectives of this course are to:


Objectives 1. Introduce students to the fundamental of robotics and applications.
2. Expose students to the robot kinematics and dynamics.
3. Familiarize students to control features of robots.
4. Introduce students to robot programming languages.
5. Expose students to different applications of robots in industry.
6. Introduce students to mobile robots and autonomous navigation
system.

Learning Upon completion of the course students will be able to:


Outcomes 1. Identify the structure of any robot, degrees of freedom, type of
joints, sensors attached and the robot workspace.
2. Perform kinematics and dynamics analyses of robot.
3. Analyze the forward and inverse kinematics using Denavit-
Hartenberg representation.
4. Derive the robot Jacobian and apply it to control the robot
motion.
5. Derive the equations of motion of any robot using Lagrange
Equation.
6. Design the robot trajectory either in joint space or Cartesian
space for specified tasks.
7. Design controller for executing robotic tasks.
Content Outlines

Weeks Topics Task/Reading


1,2,3 Fundamentals: Introduction, history of robotics, Chapter 1
advantages and disadvantages of robots, robot
components, robot degrees-of-freedom, robot joints,
robot coordinates and work space, robot reference,
robot applications.
4,5,6 Robot kinematics and Position Analysis: Introduction, Chapter 2
matrix representation, homogeneous transformation
matrices, inverse of transformation matrices, Denavit-
Hartenberg representation, the inverse kinematic
solution of robots.
7,8 Differential Motions and Velocities: Differential Chapter 3
relationships, Jacobian, differential motion of a frame,
interpretation of differential change, Differential
motion of a robot and its hand frame, calculation of
Jacobian, inverse Jacobian.
9,10 Dynamic Analysis and Forces: Lagrange mechanics: A Chapter 4
short overview, effective moment of inertia, dynamic
equations for multiple-degree-of-freedom robots, static
force analysis. Transformation of forces and moments
between coordinate frames.
11,12 Trajectory Planning: Introduction, path vs. trajectory, Chapter 5
joint space vs. Cartesian space, basics of trajectory
planning, joint space trajectory planning, Cartesian
space trajectory planning.
13 Actuators: Introduction, characteristics of actuating Chapter 6
systems, comparison of actuating systems, hydraulic
devices, pneumatic devices, electric motors.
14 Sensors: Introduction, sensor characteristics, position Chapter 7
sensors, velocity sensors, acceleration sensors, force
and pressure sensors, torque sensors.
References Required
Niku,S. B., (2001). Introduction to Robotics, Analysis, Systems, Applications,
Prentice Hall,

Recommended
Craig, J. J. (1989). Introduction to Robotics, (2nd ed.), Prentice Hall.
Fu, K. S., Gonzalez, R. C., & Lee, C. S. G., (1987). Robotics: Control, Vision,
and Intelligence, McGraw-Hill.
Fuller, J. L., (1999). Robotics: Introduction, Programming, and Projects,
Prentice Hall.
Spong, M.W., & Vidyasagar, M., (1989). Robot Dynamics and Control, John
Wiley.
Tsai, L.W., (1999). Robot analysis: The Mechanics of Serial and Parallel
Manipulators, John Wiley.

Proposed Semester I, 2006-2007


Start Date
(Semester)
Batch of 2005 intakes and onward
Students to
be Affected

Prepared by: Checked by: Approved by:

_______________________ _______________________ _______________________


_ _
(Dr. Roslizar Mat Ali) ( Assoc. Prof. Dr Raisuddin (Prof. Ahmad F. Ismail)
Khan)
Course Assessment Matrix: MCT 4215

Outcome 1

Outcome 2

Outcome 3

Outcome 4

Outcome 5

Outcome 6

Outcome 7

Outcome 8

Outcome 9

Outcome 10

Outcome 11

Outcome 12

Outcome 13
Course Learning Outcomes

1. Identify the structure of any robot, degrees of freedom, 3 3 3 3 3 2 1


type of joints, sensors attached and the robot workspace.

2. Perform kinematics and dynamics analyses of robot. 3 3 3 2

3. Analyze the forward and inverse kinematics using 3 3 3 2 2


Denavit-Hartenberg representation.

4. Derive the robot Jacobian and apply it to control the robot 3 3 3 3 2


motion.

5. Derive the equations of motion of any robot using 3 3 3 2 2


Lagrange Equation.

6. Design the robot trajectory either in joint space or 3 3 3 3 3 1


Cartesian space for specified tasks.

7. Design controller for executing robotic tasks. 3 2 2 2 2 2 1

*1=objective addresses outcome slightly, 2=moderately, 3=substantively


The educational outcomes of the programmes conducted by the Kulliyyah are as follows:

1. The ability to acquire and apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals.

2. To have acquired a broad based education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal
context.

3. The ability to have in-depth understanding and technical competency in relevant engineering.

4. The ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution.

5. The ability to design a system, component, or process for operational performance.

6. The ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.

7. The ability to understand the principles of sustainable design and development.

8. The ability to effectively communicate orally, in writing and using multimedia tools.

9. The ability to function effectively as an individual and in group with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an
effective team member.

10. The ability to recognize the need for life long learning and possess the ability to pursue independent learning for professional
development.

11. The ability to understand the social, cultural, global and environmental responsibilities of a professional engineer, and the need
for sustainable development.

12. The ability to understand and commit to professional and ethical responsibilities.

13. The ability to understand the expectations of an engineer who practices in an industrial or governmental organization.

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