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NEWiNCH� •

ear 00

Contributing Authors
Adorjan • I.Almasi • Antic • Bok • Bologan • Bosch • Bruzon Batista • Erwich
Flear • Fogarasi • Frolyanov • Giri • Hazai • lkonnikov • llczuk • Jobava
Karolyi • Lalic • l'Ami • Lukacs • Mch edlishvili • Ninov • Olthof • Panczyk
Perunovic • Pijpers • Prasanna • Puc h er • Raznikov • Ris • Rodi • Short
Skatchkov • Stohl • Timman • Vachier-Lagrave • Van der Tak • Vigorito • Volokitin

CHESS OPENING NEWS


Ed ited by Jan Timman

2017 New I n Chess - The Netherlands


Colophon
Editor-in-chief: Jan Timman
Managing editor: Peter Boe!
Editors: Rene Olthof. Frank Erwich
Production: Anton Schermer, Joop de Grooc
Translation: Ken Neat
Proofreading: Piet Verhagen

Cover photo: New In Chess

New In Chess Yearbook


ed. by Jan Timman
ISSN 0168-7697
4 times a year
Yearbook 122 (2017)
ISBN: 978-90-5691-708-1 hardcover
ISBN: 978-90-5691-707-4 softcover

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Code System
White stands slightly better ;!; excellent move see
Black stands slightly better :j: bad move editorial comment RR
White stands better ± blunder ?? Yearbook YB
Black stands better + interesting move !? championship ch
White has a decisive advantage +- dubious move ?! zonal tournament zt
Black has a decisive advantage -+ only move D interzonal tournament izt
balanced position with the idea 6 candidates tournament ct
unclear position attack team tournament tt
compensation for the material g? initiative olympiad ol
strong (sufficient) > counterplay "' match m
weak (insufficient) < mate # correspondence er
better is ;,, novelty N junior jr
weaker is s: zugzwang z
good move time T
From the editor

A n ew look

Dear reader,

Yearbook 122 has a new layout. It is our aim to improve the quality constantly - both of the
contents and the outlook. We hope that our changes will make the Yearbook more accessible.

We welcome three new contributors: columnist GM Victor Bologan as well as two young fellow
Dutchmen who wrote a Survey: GM Benjamin Bok and I M Robert Ris.

In his first instalment of Bologan's Opening Bulletin, Victor focuses on the Rapid and Blitz World
Championships in Doha, Qatar. Grandmasters sometimes have a different repertoire for rapid
and blitz: they may try out lines that are objectively a bit dubious, but work out well when time
is limited. This is also an aspect of opening theory - and it is not unimportant.

Bok's Survey deals with a topical issue: how to avoid the M arshall in the Ruy Lopez, while Ris
concentrates on the Arkhangelsk Variation in the same opening. This line has never been my
favourite, since the play is forced and there is little room for imagination. But it is quite apt for
hard workers who don't want to be surprised in the opening, and since Magnus Carlsen tried it
in a crucial World Championship game against Sergey Karjakin, it is well worth close scrutiny.
The Najdorf is another opening that needs extensive preparation. Tibor Fogarasi focuses on
Mateusz Bartel's 6. tt:lb3, a move Black also plays in the Bremen Variation of the Reversed
Sicilian. And Tata Steel saw two games with 6.a3, a line that is discussed by Jeroen Bosch. Tibor
Karolyi looks at Baadur Jobava's knight sortie to b5 in the Veresov Attack. Here is another idea
that is known with reversed colours, in the Chigorin Defence. It is obviously more promising
to play these systems with the extra tempo. In my own Survey I look at a system in the Reti that
may become popular with white players.

Finally, Glenn Flear has a treat for King's Indian fans. He reviews no less than three books
on this opening - and also two New In Chess books, The Zaitsev System by Alexey Kuzmin and
Winning with the Slow (but Venomous!) Italian by Karsten Miiller and Georgios Souleidis.

Jan Timman
Opening Highlights

Vladimir Kramnik

The Russian ex-World Champ continues to confound us


with his chess. In the opening, it's still an ironclad law that
where Kramnik leads, chess legions follow. This is certainly
true for the move ...c7-c5 in the Orthodox QGD, which
offers Black fine prospects nowadays. As Erwin I' Ami and
Lazaro Bruzon explain in their Surveys on page 127 and
134, Kramnik's games in these lines are exemplary. It's no
accident that he scores so well in both QGD's with black!

Magnus Carlsen

2017 didn't see a great start for the World Champion, who
failed to catch Wesley So at the Tata Steel tournament.
Magnus did make his mark in the opening, though. Not
only was his 12. tLle2! in the Exchange Queen's Gambit
voted Novelty of the Year 2016 by our readers - he also
did a lot to help Black's cause by playing 10 ...dS! against
Nepomniachtchi in the Reversed Sicilian with 2.. .ib4. .

Dani Raznikov wrote a Survey on this line, see page 193.

Benjamin Bok

Alongside 17-year-old Dutch champion Jorden van Foreest,


his slightly older compatriot Benjamin Bok also made great
progress in 2016. Bok's powerful style is based on thorough
opening study, which is why we asked him to write a
Survey! The Yearbook debut of the young grandmaster -
also not a bad soccer player, by the way - is about a nice
subtlety in the 6.d3 Anti-Marshall Ruy Lopez with which
Black can get his queenside play cracking. See page 113.

Mateusz Bartel

The critical moment in the Najdorf Sicilian seems to


come at move 6 these days! White players are trying so
many new things here - at Tata Steel, 6.a3 was given a
go, as we can see in Jeroen Bosch's Survey on page 48.
But even more striking are the exploits of Polish GM
Mateusz Bartel, who recently crushed some very strong
opponents with the innocent-looking 6.tZ:lb3. This may
look like just a transposition, but there's a lot more to it,
as Tibor Fogarasi makes clear on page 55.
Victor Bologan

A new year - a new columnist! The top GM from Moldova,


author of best-selling chess books Bologan's Black Weapons and
Bologan's Ruy Lopez, soon to be followed by an awesome new
tome on the King's Indian, presents the first instalment of
Bologan's Opening Bulletin in this Yearbook. It's about the star­
studded Rapid and Blitz World Championship in Doha.
Victor himself took part in the event, so expect an insider's
review on page 25.

Baadur Jobava

One thing Baadur didn't discuss in his Survey on the


Veresov/Jobava Attack in Yearbook 119 was the sharp move
4.lLibS. Coincidence or not, this was what the flamboyant
Georgian grandmaster went on to play twice at the Baku
Olympiad, and which contributed to his amazing score there.
Tibor Karolyi fills the gap in our coverage of this super­
modern line on page 184. Also, do check out the stunning
Petroff gambit Jobava introduced in Doha (page 14) .

Ivan Bukavshin

The Russian player tragically died at 20 a little over a


year ago, but he did leave us a legacy, not only with his
games as a promising young talent, but also with an actual
opening variation! The move 7...b6 seems to be a good
antidote to the annoying 7.'ii'c2 in the Open Catalan,
and Bukavshin was the guy who made this line popular,
even with 2700+ grandmasters. The 'Bukavshin Variation'
is investigated by Istvan Almasi in his Survey on page 119.

Robert Ris

The gregarious Dutch IM is a tireless chess player and


organizer, but also an astute opening theoretician. Ris
confesses in his first Survey on page 95 that he has
spent 'endless hours' analysing the fascinating Neo­
Arkhangelsk in the Ruy Lopez. The reason he brings it
up now is that Magnus Carlsen tried it in the crucial 9th
World Championship Match game against Sergey Karjakin.
A demanding line with long, forcing variations - just the
ticket for Robert Ris!
Your Variations

Trends & Opinions


Forum

Queen's Gambit Declined .. Exchange Variation 5.�g5 .......... Editorial staff......... 10


Caro-Kann Defence ....... Panov Variation 5... ti:Jc6 ............ Rodi ................ 11
HOT! Queen's Gambit Declined..The 4... ti:Jbd7 Complex............. Ninov ............... 12
GAMBIT Petroff Defence .......... Early Divergences 3...d5............ Boel ................ 14
Sicilian Defence.......... Najdorf Variation 6.gg5............Olthof............... 15
Sicilian Defence.......... Dragon Variation 9.0-0-0 . . . . . . . .. . . Van der Tak .......... 17
Catalan Opening.......... Open Variation 6...dxc4 ............ Boel ................ 18
Nimzo-lndian Defence..... Vienna Variation 7.�c4 ...........Adorjan.............. 19
Nimzo-lndian Defence..... Vienna Variation 7.�c4 ........... Lalic ................ 20
Sicilian Defence.......... Nimzowitsch Variation 2... ti:Jf6 ....... Pucher .............. 21
Italian Game.............Giuoco Piano 6.h3 ................ Erwich .............. 22
Nimzo-lndian Defence..... Classical Variation 4. 'i:Yc2 .......... Mchedlishvili......... 24
Bologan's Opening Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bologan ............. 25

Surveys
1.e4 openings

GAMBIT Sicilian Defence.......... Najdorf Variation 6.�g5............ Pijpers .............. 38


Sicilian Defence.......... Najdorf Variation 6.a3 ............. Bosch............... 4 8
HOT! Sicilian Defence.......... Najdorf Variation 6.ti:Jb3............ Fogarasi . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Sicilian Defence.......... Najdorf Variation 6.�e3............ Lukacs/Hazai ........ 6 5
Sicilian Defence.
. ......... Rossolimo Variation 3...g6 .......... Prasanna............ 7 2
SOS Sicilian Defence.......... Early Divergences 2...b6............ Pucher.............. 7 7
French Defence ..........Tarrasch Variation 3... �e7 .......... Rodi ................ 84
Caro-Kann Defence ....... Advanced Variation 4.h4 ........... Perunovic............ 91
Ruy Lopez............... Neo-Arkhangelsk 6... �c5........... Ris ................. 95
Ruy Lopez............... Arkhangelsk Variation 6... �b7 ...... Rodi ............... 105
Ruy Lopez...............The 6.d3 Line .................... Bok................ 113

6
1.d4 openings

Catalan Opening..........Open Variation 6 ...dxc4 ............Almasi .............119


HOTI Queen's Gambit Declined ..Blackburne Variation 5.�f4 .........l'Ami ...............127
Queen's Gambit Declined ..Classical Main Line 4.i.g5..........Bruzon Batista .......134
Queen's Gambit Declined ..Early Divergences 4 ...dxc4 ..........lkonnikov ...........14 4
Slav Defence.............Krause Variation 6 ...li:Jbd7 ..........Skatchkov/Frolyanov .14 9
Nimzo-lndian Defence .....Rubinstein Variation 4 ...b6 ..........Flear ...............156
Grunfeld Indian Defence ...Fianchetto Variation 3.g3 ...........Olthof ..............16 6
King's Indian Defence .....Fianchetto Variation 3.g3 ...........Stohl............... 17 4
SOS Queen's Pawn Openings ...Richter-Veresov 2.li:Jc3 .............Karolyi .............184

Others

English Opening ..........Reversed Sicilian 2...i.b4 ..........Raznikov ...........193


English Opening ..........Symmetrical Variation 7 .d4 .........Vigorito .............202
English Opening ..........Symmetrical Variation 3.d4 .........Panczyk/llczuk ......210
Reti Opening .............1...d5 2.c4 c6 ....................Timman ............218
Reti Opening .............1...d5 2.c4 e6 ....................Antic ...............225

Views
Reviews by Flear

New Weapons in the King's Indian by Milos Pavlovic ...............................236

A Practical Black Repertoire with tLJf6, g6, d6 (2) by Alexei Kornev....................238


King's Indian Warfare! by llya Smirin ............................................239

Winning with the Slow (but Venomous!) Italian by Karsten Muller & Georgios Souleidis...241

The Zaitsev System by Alexey Kuzmin ...........................................24 4

Solutions to exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

HOT! = a trendy line or an important discovery

SOS= an early deviation


GAMBIT= a pawn sacrifice in the opening
TRENDS & OPINIONS

Featuring

Forum
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

9
Forum

Devastati ng respo nses

The FORUM Is a platform for And the winner is ...

discussion of developments In
by the Editorial staff
chess opening theory In general
and particularly In variations
QO 11.4 (035) YB 120

discussed In previous Yearbook


Issues. ... Magnus Carlsen! Or is
it? When we presented
the World Champion the
Contributions to these World Champion with the
pages should be sent to: prize for the Novelty of the
Year contest for 2016, he
edltors@newlnchess.com immediately reacted: 'This
one is for Jon Ludvig.' After
all, his second, Jon Ludvig
Hammer, was the brain
behind the novelty that
Yearbook readers voted to be Magnus Carlsen
the best one from last year:
his Survey in Yearbook 120
Magnus Carlsen on page 145), in chess there
Vladimir Kramnik is always more than meets
Stava nger 2016 ( 7 ) the eye, and Black does not
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 2.lLic3 llJf6 have to despair yet. Still, a
4.cxd5 exd5 5 . .igs c6 6.e3 .ifs novelty that enables you to
7.1i'f3 .ig6 9. 1i'xf6 gxf6 10.llJf3 beat Kramnik has to be a
lbd7 11.llJh4 .ie7 big one no matter what the
computers say!
� Just as devastating was the
readers' response: last year
� .t .t. .t. there were 379 - this time no
.t. .t. .t less than 552 valid ones!
.t. There were 8 good candidate
novelties this time - even
� though we had been quite
t2J � strict when we made the
� � � � � shortlist. Hammer's 12. tlle 2
� <it>� � got a whopping 210 votes,
a percentage of 38%, which
would have earned him a big
12.lbe21 position in the Dutch cabinet.
Though this move had Ian Nepomniachtchi came
a devastating effect on second. For his brilliant
Kramnik, and Viacheslav sacrificing idea in the Petroff
Ikonnikov agreed that it is Defence with 5.c4 the Russian
an 'interesting move' (in was awarded with 93 votes.
10
Forum

Ian Nepomnlachtchl in the Najdorf Variation �4 7.cxdS lt::ixd S 8.'itb3 bf3


Sanan Sjuglrov (Yearbook 118, Kuzmin's 9.gxf3 e6 10. 'itxb7 lt::ix d4
Sochi tt 2016 (5) Harvest, page 39). Fabiano 11.�bS+ lt::ixb 5 12.'itc6+ We7
Caruana's 18.h4!? in the Open
Ruy Lopez, (Alexey Kuzmin,
Forum Yearbook 120 page 10)
got 41 votes. Numbers 7 and
8 were, respectively, Liviu­
Dieter Nisipeanu (10.lbf'd2
in the Alapin Sicilian with
4.�e2, Survey Adhiban, page
77 of Yearbook 119, 25 votes),
and Radoslaw Wojtaszek
(12.t0e5 in the Nimzo-Indian
with 7 ... �a6, Survey by
9.hg5, 10.hh7+ and 11.h4 Ikonnikov on page 155 of Relying on the ending that
the Russian was awarded with Yearbook 119, 19 votes). appears after 13.1/!YxbS �d7
93 votes (Forum contribution Jon Ludvig H ammer 14.tillcdS+ 1/!Yxd5 and now
by Frank Erwich in Yearbook received 350 euro for his 15.'i'xdS exd5 or 15.�gS+ f6
120, page 22). novelty. The raffle was 16. �xd5 exd5.
Number 3 was Wesley So, won by Joseph Miller from 13.'itcS+I?
who came up with 15 . .wbl! in Westover, U SA, who will It seems that we still won't
the Open Catalan with 7.t0e5 receive a one-year Yearbook get an ending in this Panov
against Hikaru Nakamura in St subscription. line after all! Under the
Louis (65 votes), analysed by (huge, I imagine) surprise
Istvan Almasi in his Survey on effect, Indian grandmaster
page 179 of Yearbook 121. Still not an ending Vidit does not find the
by Luis Rodi critical reply. inviting White
Wesley So to enter another version of
CK 3.9(813)
Hlkaru Nakamura the ending, which White can
St Louis 2016 ( 1) and must ignore.
My team mate proudly exclaimed 13 ... @es
:i� � that he was going to play the Panov Obviously, the big test for
i i ii .t. that day. I knew his opponent the 13.1/!YcS+ line must be
.t i i� would opt for the 5 ... 0.c6 line, so I 13 ... lt::id 6, retaining the piece .
told him this. 'Then I just take on A difficult position occurs
� d5', he said confidently. 'Oh, you're after 14. tt:JxdS+.
f'!, i :i going for the ending', I replied. A) I found a correspondence
� f'!, 'What ending', he said with a facial game from 2014 that seems
f'!, f'!, f'!, � f'!, expression like he had just heard
the stupidest question ever. Well,
to be the first one with
13. �c5. There Black preferred
� It� I showed him a few moves, and 14 ... 'it;>d7!? 15. tt:Jc3 'i'b6,
voiJa, there was the ending. (Lars when the material balance
15.:tbl!N Schandorff in The Caro-Kann) was re-established and the
There are new developments The chess world is wonder­ position looked balanced.
in this line - see Peter Boel's ful. You may rely on a In Schuster-Ciucurel, er
contribution elsewhere in this well-known variation, with 2014, White continued with
Forum Section. decades of use on a high level 16. 'i'h5 (16. 'if eS!? is another
Fourth came Adhiban and thousands of games, like idea) 16 ... 'it;>e8 17.0-0 tt:Jfs
Baskaran with his fabulous this popular line of the Panov: 18.l:tdl l:td8 19. l:txd8+ 'i'xd8
piece sac 12 ... lbxf2! in the 20. �e3 �d6=;
Fianchetto King's Indian Alexa nder Grischuk B) 14... exdS 15.0-0(15. 'i'xd5
(Yearbook 121, page 224, Santos Gujrathi Vldlt may transpose, but there
Survey Adhiban, 54 votes) . Doha Wch ra pid 2016 (6) are also some independent
Hou Yifan got 45 votes for her 1.e4 c6 2.d4 dS 3.exdS cxdS lines, for instance: 15 ... l:tc8
hypermodern 14.00! concept 4.c4 lt::if6 5. lLic3 lLlc6 6.lt::if3 16.0-0 'i'b6 17. �f4 l:tc5
11
18. �d4 l::.c 6 19.'/Wds �cs Anand drew comfortably with
20. �b3�) lS ... °'lWb6 16. �xdS it against Aronian. Not only
°'lWb7. White's compensation the latter went for this line in
is based on Black's exposed 2016, but also the participants
king, but only future games in the world title match. A
can tell us if it is sufficient. Survey was dedicated to it by
A possible continuation is Panczyk and Ilczuk in YB 121.
17.kgs+ (17. '/Wes+ 'it>d7 18.l::.d l Here is a small update based on
is another idea) 17 ... Wd7 (17 ... the latest practical examples.
f6 18.l::.fel+ @d8 19. 'tWaS+
�b6 20.'ti'dS '/Wb7=) 18. �d4 Wesley So
f6 19.kf4 '/Wb6 20. � dS 'iVb7 Viswanathan Anand
(20 ... l::.e 8 21.J::.fdl l::.e 2 22.l::.d42) London 2016 (5)
21. '/Wd3 l::.e 8!? (21... '/Wbs 1.d4 ll:Jf6 2.c4 e6 3.ll:Jf3 d5
22. �d4 �b6=; Black has 4.lbc3 lLJbd7 5.i.f4 dxc4 6.e3
no time for 21...ke7? due to b51? 7.ltJxb5
22.l::.fel+-) 22.l::.adl (22.l::.a cl!?)
22 ... l::. e 6 23.J::.fel l::.x el+ Alexander Grlschuk
24.l::.x el�.
14.'W'xb5+ 'ifd7 15.ltJxd5 E E
With the black king on e8,
this move is possible. After ' 'if .,,
the mandatory recapture by '
the pawn, the structure is '
equal to the one that appears
in the ending line. A big
i. �
difference here is that the 'iV !'!,
queens remain on the board. !'!, � !'!, cj;; !'!, 7... i.b4+
15...exd5 16. 'W'd3 : : A natural and pleasant
Best. White doesn't fear the move; if 7 ... tlldS 8. �g3 �b4+
check on b4. Four days later, The rest of the game, played 9. tlld2.
another game with the move in rapid rhythm, is outside 8.lbc3
13. '/Wes+ featured the most the scope of this article. In case of 8. tlld2 Black is
respectable alternative 16. '/Wb3, White won on move 39. not obliged to transpose to
but after 16 ...�d6 the game is Of course, Grischuk's new the text. Instead, 8 ... tlle 4!
balanced. Kislinsky-Dzierzak, move does not refute this 9. tllc 3 lbxc3 10.bxc3 �xc3
Krakow 2016, continued with Panov line, but it opens 11.l::.c l �xd2+ 12. �xd2 tllb 6
17.kd2 �e6+ (17 ... l::.b 8!?) another road for White equalized convincingly in
18. Wdl and now the most in an original way - we Czonka-Roganovic, Hungary
simple way to reach an e qual may compare it with Jacob tt 2016/17: 13. �b4 ll:JdS
position seems to be 18 ... 'tW fS. Murey's amazing 4 ... tllc 6 in 14. �a4+ kd7 15. �xc4 tllxf4
16... i.b4+ the Petroff. And certainly 16.exf4 0-0 17.�e2 1/2-l/2
16 ... kd6 17.ke3 looks some- Schandorffs team mate might 8 lLJd5 9.a3
•••

what better for the first now ask 'What ending?' with 9.l::.c l tll7b6 (the insertion
player. real reason! of 9 ... lbxf4?! 10.exf4 ll:Jb6
17.�11 just drops a pawn after
Natural. Now White also loses 11.kxc4 0-0 12.�e2 tlldS
the right to castle, but 17.�d2 The solution - or a bluff? 13.g3 and Black could not
'tWe6+ (17 ... �xd2+ 18. �xd2 by Nikolay Ninov
avoid a loss in Mamedyarov­
'/We6+ 19. '/We3 We7=) 18. Wfl Aronian, Moscow 2016. It is
QO 16.14 (037) YB 121
�xd2 19.'tWxd2 �a6+ 20.Wg2 notable that two recent GM
°'lWg6+ is equal. encounters ended in Black's
17...f6 S ... dxc4 6.e3 bS!? is the favour, but this was after
17 ... l::.d 8 18. Wg2±; 17 .. �h3+
. fashionable way to meet the mutual inaccuracies rather
18. We2± QGD with S.�f4, which has than clarifying some essential
18.@g2 �7 19.i.f4± been gaining popularity since questions.
12
Forum

Grigoryan-lvanisevic, Serbia 10... .ha31?N - to find the proper moment


tt 2016, saw 10 . ..Q.g 3 10. .. 0-0 What a splendid idea! for pushing ... c7-cS.
ll.tt:ld2 ..Q.a6?! 12 . .Q.e2?! (12.tt:lce4 There are no major Here is how he can fulfil at
'Wle7? 13.a3 ..Q.as 14.b4! led to a developments after the usual least two of them:
quick disaster, as pointed out 10 ... tt:ldS (10 ... tbe2!?): after A) 12 ... ..Q.a6 13 . ..Was -+i'c8
in Yearbook 121) 12 ... cS 13.dxcS ll.axb4 tt:lxf4 12.exf4 tbb6 14. tbd2 (Black seems OK
tt:lxc3 14.bxc3 ..Q.xcS 15.0-0 .Q.a3 13 . .Q.e2 .Q.b7 14.0-0 0-0 lS.tt:leS after 14.e4 tlJSb6 1S . .Q.e2 0-0
16.l:lbl l:lc8 and Black prevailed (lS. l:laS 'iYd6 16.l:lfal allowed 16.0-0 l:ld8 b. ...c7-cS) 14...
in a complicated battle. a quick liquidation: 16 ... tt:ldS cS 1S.tt:le4 0-0 16.tbxcS tbxcS
The drawback of ll ... ..Q.a6?! was 17. tbeS 'iYxb4 18.'iYxb4 tbxb4 17.dxcS tbf6 By investing time
already revealed in the above­ 19.l:lxa7 tt:lc2 20.l:lxa8 l:lxa8 White has regained his pawn.
mentioned Survey. Instead, 21. l:lxa8+ .Q.xa8 22 . ..Q.xc4 New simplifications are to
11 ... cS! was correct, e.g. 12.dxcS tbxd4= in Sychev-Grachev, be expected, but Black still
tt:lxc3(or 12... .Q.xcS 13.a3 Moscow 2016) lS ... 'iYd6 has to be on the alert. after
..Q.b7, which can result in a 16. l:lfdl a6 17. l:lacl rubs 18 . .Q.e2 l:ld8! is more precise
repetition after 14.tt:lxc4 tt:lxc3 18. tbxc4 tbxc4 19.l:lxc4 ..Q.ds than 18 ... tt:le4 19 . ..Q.c7 'iYd7
15. l:lxc3 'iYxdl+ 16. 'it>xdl l:lfd8+ 20. l:lcS l:lb6 21 . ..Q.c4 .Q.xc4 20.l:ldl 'iYbS 21. ..Q.f3;
17.'it>cl l:lac8 18.tt:la5 ..Q.xa3! 22. l:lxc4 l:lab8, Brunner­ B) More sharp, and obliging
(remember this motifl) 19. l:lxc8 Studer, Novi Sad 2016, White at the same time, is 12 ... c3
l:lxc8+ 20. 'it>dl l:ld8+ 21. 'it>cl tried in vain to make use of 13. 'ifc2 cS 14 . .Q.bS! 'iYaS (a
l:lc8+=)13.bxc3 ..Q.xcS 14.tt:lxc4 his extra pawn. sound alternative is 14 ... 0-0!?
..Q.b7 with compensation. 11.'it'xc3 with the idea 1S . ..Q.c6?! .Q.a6!,
The second game continued The neat fork after 11.l:lxa3?! so White's best option is to
10. .Q.gs f6 n . .Q.h4 o-o 12.ttJd2 tbbl! is worth mentioning castle as well) :
.Q.a6?! (here too 12 ... cS! is just because of its elegance; Bl) It's important that
necessary - 13.dxcS tt:lxc3 ll.bxc3 .Q.d6 12 . .Q.xc4 ..Q.xf4 1S.�c6 is well met by IS ...
14.bxc3 ..Q.xcS 15.tt:lxc4 'ifxdl+ 13.exf4 and here Black had tt:lb4! 16.axb4 (16. 'iYe4
(both 15 ... ..Q.b7 and 15 ... .Q.a6 better prepare the 'equalizer' tbxc6 17. 'ifxc6 0-0! 18.0-0
are also promising) 16.l:lxdl ... c7-cS by 13 ... 0-0 or 13 ... ..Q.b7, (18. 'W/xa8?! .Q.a6 19. 'ti'e4 c2+
.Q.a6 with compensation) while the impatient 13 ... cS can 20.tbd2 'iYxa3) and now
13 . ..Q.e2?! (an identical be effectively met by 14.fS! 18 ... 'ti'a6 is probably simplest)
omission by White; better is exfS IS. 'ife3+ 'if e7 16. 'ifxe7+ 16 ... 'iYxal+ 17. 'ifdl 'iYb2 18.0-
13.tt:lce4 gs 14 . ..Q.g3 fS lS. tbcS) @xe7 17 . .Q.ds! l:lb8 18.0-0!t. 000-0 19 . .Q.xa8 (the engines
13 ... cS 14.tt:lxdS tt:lxdS 1S.a3 Very principled is ll.bxa3 indicate the repetition 19.bS
c3! 16.axb4 cxd2+ 17. 'iYxd2 tbdS 12 . .Q.g3. l:lb8 20.�d6 l:ld8 21. .Q.c7
..Q.xe2 18. 'ifxe2 cxd4 19.exd4 l:lf8=) 19 ... .Q.a6 20.l:lel l:lxa8
'iYd7 20.0-0 (20 . ..Q.g3!?) K .t .... K (20 ... cxb4!?) 21.bxcS .ic4 and
20 ... l:lab8 21. l:lfel l:lfe8 and ' ·� ' ' ' Black can rely on his passed
Black confidently converted ' pawns;
his strategic advantage in B2) lS. l:lbl ..Q.a6! (playable
Kempinski-Kryvoruchko, � is 1S ... cxd4 16. tbxd4 i.a6, but
Poland tt 2016. ' £::, the greedy IS ... 'ti'xa3? is not to
9... �c3 10.1i'd2 £::, £::, Cjj ii be recommended in view of
� £::, £::, £::, 16.0-0 0-0 17 . .Q.d6) 16 . .Q.xd7+
'it>xd7 and once again Black,
: @� : who has realized all his
three aims, has the better
A key position - White is prospects;
putting his hopes on the B2) IS. 'ti' a4! is the most
pair of bishops. In my view, testing: IS ... 'ti'xa4 16 . .Q.xa4
during his next moves Black 'it>e7 and now White can
has three concrete tasks: demonstrate that the threat
- to protect his extra pawn as is stronger than its execution:
long as possible; 17.0-0-0!(after 17.i.c6 i.a6
- to exchange the light­ Black seems to have sufficient
squared bishops; compensation for the
13
exchange even without the Jobava's slip of the wrist The move 3 ... dS isn't even
queens) 17 ... cxd4 (or 17 ... �b7 by Peter Boe/
featured in our SOS series,
18. �xd7 @xd7 19.dxc5 ?e4?) nor in The Good, the Bad and
RG 3.1 (C42)
18. �c6 �a6 19. �xa8 .lha8 the Ugly by John Watson
20.l:rxd4 f6 21.e4 tlJSb6 and Eric Schiller, nor in
22. �d6+ @f7 23.eS tlldS Our new author Benjamin Or Cohen's A Vigorous Chess
24.l:rel and it is not easy for Bok (see his Spanish Survey Opening Repertoire, which does
Black to show compensation elsewhere in this issue) advocate an active handling
for his material deficit. must have expected the of the Petroff.
11...�d6 12 . .ixd6 unexpected when he faced 4.exdS
An understandable risk-free Baadur Jobava in the 15th In the databases we find 73
decision by the tournament round of the World Rapid in games with 3 ... dS, 50 of which
leader. Doha. But not Black's third with this reply. The games are
12. �xc4 �xf4 13.exf4 Just move. mostly by players in the 500-
like in the subline with 1500 Elo range.
ll.bxc3 above, Black must Benjamin Bok 4 'W'xd5 5.d4
.••

beware of tactical shots like Baadur Jobava 5.00 �g4 was seen in
13 ... �b7 14.f5 ! exfS 15. �xf7+ Doha Wch rapid 2016 ( 15) the very first game in the
\t>xf7 16. �b3+. 13 ... 0-0 is 1.e4 es 2.tllf3 tllf6 3.tllxes dS!? databases with 3 ... dS. Black
safe enough. Just compare lost, but not due to the
the resulting position with opening! 6 . �e2 �cs (probably
Brunner-Studer after move 15. Jobava would have gone
12 ...cxd6 13 . .bc4 O·O 14.0-0 6 ... 0-0-0) 7. tllc3 't\Vhs s.h3
�b7 15.�e2 'W'b6=16.J:lfc1 0-0 9.d4 l:rd8 10. �e3 (10.0-0)
J:[fcS 17.'W'a3 .ixf3 18. .ixf3 10 ... tllc 6 11. tlla 4? (11.0-0 was
l:lab8 19.h4 J:lxc1+ 20.J:lxc1 again best, but White may
•xb2 21....xb2 l:lxb2 22.J:lc7 have been afraid of sacs on
tllfS 23.J:lxa7 dS h3) ll ... �xd4 12. tllx d4 �xe2
And the opponents only had 13. �xe2 tllx d4 14. 'if xhS
to reach the 30th move. tllx c2+ 15. @e2 tllx hS 16.l:racl
In his next two games as tllx e3+ Joseph Wright-Jubrila
Black the former World Ayinla, London 1985.
Champion switched to What's this?? A slip of the 5 lLlc6 6.tllxc6 •xc6 7.'ii'e 2+
.•.

4 ... �e7. Was then his wrist, moving a pawn one �e6 8 .'ii' b 5
attractive novelty just a 'one­ square too far? It happens. A little frustrating. But even
off, as it was labelled in some But I rather suspect the move without queens Black gets
comments? I would rather was born in the devious mind some compensation with his
agree with GM Gleizerov of the Georgian GM. edge in development.
that the idea is approved by 8 'ii'x bS 9 . .ixbS+ c6 10.�e2
.••

the engines in depth. Even 0-0-0 11.c3 �d6


though they tend to give a
small plus to White after •• :i
taking the knight (actually .l .l .l .l .l
this is the common picture .l .t .t •
right away after 6 ... bS!? and
this does not change even
on move 15 in the featured
game) , after castling, the
second player has little to
worry about. ll.bxa3 is more
ambitious, and Black has to
react adequately - he has
several options to choose It looks nice for Black, but
from. Anand and his team Bok played very solidly and
must certainly have found Jobava had to grovel for 149
Baadur Jobava
the solution. moves to save the half point.
14
Forum

However, Jobava went on to 12... .id 7 13.lbc4 .ics 14. .if4 Yearbook 115 this could be
repeat his gambit three times tD<ts 1s.�3 .ifs 16.ltJeS hc2 branded as the critical line.
in the Blitz event! Marin 17.J:l.ac1 .id6 18.ltJxc6 There really isn't much news
Bosiocic (who by the way had 18. lhc2 �xeS 19. lhc6 gives to report on the alternatives
already had 3 ... dS on the board White a solid plus; 18.t2Jxf7 8.gb3 or 8.'t!fd2.
in an Ul7 Croatian event in @xf7 19. lhc2 also looks good. s...1!Vcs
Pula, 2002) transposed to 18...�e4 19.l:l.fe1?1 hf3 A double attack on two
the main lines with 4.d4. But 20.l:l.xeS+ l:l.xeS 21.gxf3 bishops.
against no lesser players than And Black was OK now, but A) 8 ... �xb2 9. tLldS tLlxdS
Leinier Dominguez Perez and later got into trouble and lost 10.l:lli l 'ti'c3 11. �xdS
eventual Blitz winner Sergey anyway, 1-0 (43) Karjakin­ Al) ll ... 'i!Yc7 Adhiban-Zhou
Karjakin, Jobava pulled the Jobava, Doha Blitz 2016. Jianchao, Hyderabad 2015 -
trick again. My guess is that we will see YB/115-42;
In both these games, 6.liJc3 more of 3 ... dS in rapid and Al) ll ... g6 12. l:1b3! �c7
came on the board, which blitz events. But we may have 13. 'tlf al! ?:tg8 (Azarov-Xu
had never been seen before! to wait a long time for the Yinglun, Moscow 2016)
(first 5 moves as above) - by first 'classical' game on top 14. l:1f3! tLieS (14 ... e6 15. lhf7!!
the way 6 . .ic4 1!Vxg2 favours level with it ... exdS 16. lhh7+-) 15. l:1c3±;
Black. A3) ll ... e6 12.gxb7 �xb7
6...1!Vxd4 7.ltJxc61!Vxd1+ 13. lhb7 ti)cS 14J1b6 tLixe4
S.ltJxd1 bxc6 A good novelty and a bad one 15 .ge3 �e7 (15 ... lLif6 16. �f3!
by Rene Otthof
Sethuraman-Al Sayed,
Tromso 2014 - YB/115-42)
SI 4.1 (894) YB 115
16. �g4 lLif6 17. 'ti'xg7 l:1g8
18. 'ti'h6 l:1g6 N (18 ... 't!f c4
It's not our habit to publish 19.l:ifbl 'although the
bad preparation, but in Round computer gives equality, it
8 of this year's Tata Steel is difficult for Black to play
Chess Tournament Dutch this position over the board'
hero Loek van Wely in his - Sethuraman) 19. �h3 �c4
25th appearance in Wijk aan 20.l:ifbl l:1c8 21. �f3 lLldS
Zee was caught red-handed. 22.?:tb8 l:1xb8 23. l:1xb 8+ �d8=
Sheng- Preotu, Rockville
Wei YI 2016;
So much for the gambit. Loek van Wely B) 8 ... e6 9.gxe6!? fxe6
Now Black has a crippled Wij k a a n Zee 2017 ( 7 ) 10. tLlxe6 ti)eS (10 ... @f7 ll.li)dS!
pawn structure, but still his 1.e4 cs 2.tl)f3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 'tlfxb2 12.lLld8+!N @e8 13.?:tbl
pieces are a little more active. 4.ltJxd4 ti)f6 S.lbc3 a6 6 .�S 't!fxa2 14.ti)e6 @f7 1S .ti)ec7
Dominguez played ti)bd71? 7.�c4! lLixdS 16.exdS l:1b8 17. �e2
9.ltJe3 .icS 10.g3 The most principled reply. with a ra ging attack) 11.lLldS!
He may have regretted this 7�.1i'b6 8.0-0 tLixdS 12. W_ xdS ?:tb8 B.ge3
move later ... 'i!Yc6 14.ga7 (Ootes-Burg,
10...0-0 11.�2 h6 12 . .id2
J:l.ae8 13.hc6 l:l.e6 14. .if3
K .i. * .t. K Vienna 2009) 14 ... @e7!oo
9. .idS e6
ltJe4 1S.he4 l:l.xe4 16.0-0-0 i � i iii 9 ... g6 10. �d2 gg7 11.?:tadl 0-0
.ie2 17.l:l.de1 .if3 i 'ii' i � is quite a sensible option to
This bishop is a nail in � circumvent all theoretical
White's coffin - Jobava pitfalls and ambushes.
eventually won. 10.l:l.e1 �e7 11.�e3 'ifas
12.he6
Karjakin's improvisation 12.gb3 didn't amount to
looked more convincing: much after 12 ... tLicS 13.f3 �c7
9. .ie2 .id6 10.ltJe3 0-0 11.0-0 14.a4 tLixb3 15 .t2Jxb3 b6 in Wei
l:te8 12. .if3 Yi-Xu Yinglun, China Team
More solid than Dominguez' Since Sethuraman's Championship 2015.
g2-g3. innovative Survey in 12 ...fxe6 13.ltJxe6

15
compensation for the piece' for Wei Yi, but there is
is Sethuraman's verdict in no shock-proof guarantee
YB/llS. Black's best defensive White will win in view of the
line may be 17 ... tt::lc S! 18. �xcS opposite-coloured bishops
(18.tt::lxcS dxcSoo) 18 ... dxcS and his structural pawn
19.fS c4! 20. 'ir'xc4 �xe6 weaknesses on the queenside.
21. 'tl!l'xe6+ @f8 22.eS l:te8 and Nevertheless, the young
Black is holding: 23. 'tl!l'b3 tt::lg 4. Chinese GM managed to haul
14.b4 in the point on move S3.
14.tt::lxg 7+ @f7 1S.tt::ldS @xg7
16.tt::lxe 7 is just as devastating, Quite an opening disaster.
13 ...ltJcS?N e.g. 16 ... l:te8 17.b4 �xb4 What is it that King Loek
To all appearances, no novelty 18. 'ir'xd6 tt::ld 3 19. �h6+ @f7 should have played? How
from his Najdorf laboratory, 20.tt::lxc 8 l:taxc8 21. 'iVxd3 l:txe4 about the following good
given the fact that it took 22. l:tebl and White is two novelty, introduced by
Loek SO minutes to come up pawns to the good. Loek's compatriot Frank van
with this innovation. 14...'it'xb4 1S.ltJc7+ ..ti?dS Tellingen?
13 ... @f7 14.tt::lg S+ and now: 16.tbadS tbxdS 17.tbxdS 'it'a3
18.lllb6 Arthur Pljpers
Not necessarily bad, but Frank van Telllngen
going for the kill with Leiden 2016 ( 7 )
18. 'fr'f3, 18.eS, or even 18.l:tbl 1.e4 cs 2.lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
would have resulted in a 4.tbxd4 lllf6 s.ltJc3 a6 6.i.gs
swifter victory. lllb d7 7.i.c4 'it'bG s.o-o 'ires
18... :t>S 19.ltJc4 9.i.dS e6 10.l:l.e1 llle S!?N
This is part of Wei Yi' s grand This novelty had been lying
plan. on the shelves of several
19... 'it'b4 20.tbxdG tbd31 grandmasters for quite some
Loek is clutching at his last time.
straw. 11.hf6
21.'it'xd3 According to Van Tellingen,
A) 14 ... @g8? 1S.b4! 'ti!l'eS After 21. lllf7 + @e8 22. 'it'hS 11.f4 tt:Jeg4 (Sethuraman
(1S ... 'ir'xb4 16.tt::ld S!+-) 16.'tl!l'd3 g6 23. °fr'dS l:tf8 24. l:tebl l:txf7 analyses ll ... �e7 in Yearbook
h6 (16 ... dS) 17.f4!+- Azarov­ 2S. l:txb4 tt:Jxb4 26. 'iVeS tt::lc 6 11s) 12.h3 h6 n. �h4 gs
Amanov, Chicago 201S; 27. 'ir'h8+ �f8 28.�h6 �e6 14.fxgS hxgS lS. �xgS �h6
B) 14... @e8?! lS. tt:JdS 29. �xf8 l:txf8 30. 'ir'xh7 Black 16. �xh6 tt::lxh 6oo is the critical
tt:Jxds 16.exdS tt:Jes (16 ... tt:Jf6 is struggling, but not yet line.
17. �d4+- Azarov-Xiong, finished off. 11...gxf6 12.i.b3
Rockville 2 014) 17. �f4! 21... 'it'xd6 22. 'it'xd6+ hd6
�f6 18.tt::le4 'ir'c7 19.c4 with 23.l:ad1 ..ti?c7 24.:Xd6 ..ti?xd6
E j_
total domination, Adhiban­ 2S.i.f4+ ..ti?e6 26.hbS
Swiercz, Biel 2014 - YB/llS-41; j.
C) 14 ... @f8 is probably best:
� .t E j.
1S.f4 h6 16.tt::le 6+ (16.00!?
@g8 17.h3 @h7 18.eS? dxeS j. j. j.
19.°fr'd3+ e4?! (19 ... g6!'f) j. •
20.tt::lx e 4 'it>g8 21. �d4 \tbs
22.tt::lx f6+ �xf6 23. l:te8+
tt:Jf8 24. 'ifxbS (Igonin-Ab.
Gupta, Tashkent 2016) 24 ...
axbS! 2S. �xf6 gxf6 26.l:tdl
@f7 27. l:tdd8 �d7 28.l:txf8+ 12 ...hS
l:txf8 29. l:txd7+ @e6 30.l:txb7 On the very same day, July
rubs 31. l:txb8 l:txb8 and this 22, Black played 12 ... �d7
should be equal) 16 ... @£7 Obviously a wonderful 13. l:te3 hS 14. l:tg3 (14. lllc e2!?)
17. 'tl!l'd3!. 'White has very good outcome of the opening 14 ... 0-0-0 lS. tt:JdS!? exdS 16.l:tc3
16
Forum

dxe4 (16 ... @b8 17. lhcS dxcS pawns for White, the
is another possibility) 17. 'ii'e l computer quite consistently
@b8 18. lhcS dxcS 19.ltJe2 giving a ;t assessment). Let's
c4 20.ka4 ha4 21. 'ir'aS see:
l:td7 (21...�6 22. 'it'xa4 l:td2)
22. 'ir'xa4 �cs in the game Samuel Sevian
Azarov-Li Ruifeng, Dayton Tuan Minh Le
2016. Which proves that this Da llas 2016 (8)
position is harder to play for 1.e4 cs 2.lbf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
White than it is for Black. 4.lbxd4 lbf6 5.lbc3 g6 6.i.e3
13.lDa4 'ifa7 14.c4 i.d7 15.h3 �7 7.f3 lbc6 8. 'ifd2 0-0 9.0-
l:l.c81 16.l:l.c1 bSI? 0-0 d5 10....e1 e5 11.lbxc6
The cool and collected bxc6 12.exd5 lbxd5 13.i.c4
16 ... �h6 may be preferable - i.e6 14.�b1 l:l.b8 15.lt:le4
Van Tellingen. 1S.kxa7?! l:tb7 16.kcS e4t
17.cxbS l:l.xc1 18.b6 l:l.xd1
Frank van Telllngen
17. llla4 exf3 18.kxf8 'ir'xf8
18 ... 'ir'b7? 19. 'ir'xcl tlJd3? loses 19.kb3 fxg2 20.l:tgl tl:if4?!
to 20. 'ir'c7! 'it'xc7 21.bxc7 tl:ixel Reinderman showed a nice (20 ... �g4! 21. l:td2 l:te7
22. lllb 6 win for White: 23. lllb 6! lllg4+ 22. �g3 llle3=i=) 21. 'il'h4 tlJdS
19.bxa7 l:l.xe1+ 20.�h2 �7 24.hxg4 hxg4+ (24 ... keS+ 22. lhgH Pad mini-Paszewski,
21.aS'iV+ �e7 2S.f4 �xf4+ 26.g3) 2S. @g3 Pardubice 2016.
�es+ 26.f4 �xd4 27. 'it'xd7+ 15...fS 16.ha71?
� x @f6 28.tlJdS+!! @g7 29.exfS
exdS 30.kxdS.
16.lt:JgS Edouard-Jones,
London 2014, and Lampert­
.t•i.t Jones, Wunsiedel 201S -
i iii YB/116-S9.
� i Gawain Jones's bishop launch

ttJ ttJ � by A.C. van der Tak .i :i �


'ii'
� � SI 17.4 (876) YB 116 � .ti
�� � �� i .t i
x Shortly after my Yearbook �ii
116 Survey on the Dragon
Sicilian 1.e4 cS 2.00 d6 3.d4 � ttJ
22.'ifa7 cxd4 4.lt:Jxd4 tl:if6 S. lllc 3 g6 �
22. 'ir'b7! seems more logical 6.ke3 kg7 7.f3 0-0 8. 'ir'd2 ��� ��
and accurate: 22 ... kh6 23.tllb 6
h4 24.tl:ic6+! (after 24.lt:JdS+
lllc 6 9.0-0-0 dS 10. 'iVel eS
11. ltJxc6 bxc6 12.exdS lt:JxdS
� :a:� n
@f8! 2S. �b4 Black has a 13.kc4 ke6 and now 14. @bl,
hidden resource: 2S ... lhe4 Quality Chess brought out 16 ......e7
26.lt:Jxf6 i.f4+ 27. @gl tlJd3! Gawain Jones's impressive 16 ... 'ir'c7? 17.kxb8 :.Xb8
28.lt:Jxd7+ @g8 29.tl:if6+ @g7 two-volume work The Dragon. 18.kb3? (18.lt:JgS e4
30.lt:JhS+ lhhS 31.ltJxe6+ :.Xe6 In Volume 2, after 14 ... l:tb8 19.kb3+-) 18 ... fxe4 19.fxe4
32. 'ir'd4+ nf6 33. 'ir'xd3=) 1S.ltJe4 fS he launched the tl:if4oo/=; Kasimdzhanov­
24 ... lt:Jxc6 2S.lt:Jxd7! (rather idea of 16.kxa7!?, a move that Jones, Almaty blitz 2016;
than 2S. 'it'xd7+) 2S ... kf4+ hadn't been played yet. Since 16 ... l:ta8 17.kcs m718 .i.b3
26.g3 hxg3+ 27. @g2 llld 8 then, the move has occurred fxe4 (18 ... l:td7 19.tl:ifH) 19.fxe4
28. 'tlt'c7± and White is happy! on the board in a number l:td7 20.exdS �xdS (20 ... cxdS
22...fS? of games. Enough occasion 21.hH) 21.kb4 'it'c7 22. �e3
After 22 ... �h6 23. lllb 6 h4 for me to devote a Forum 'ii'b 7 23.a3± Ganguly-Cuenca
there is more than one option contribution to it. Jimenez, Spain tt 2016.
for White to reach a safe The move leads to unclear 17.hbS
haven: both 24.tlJdS+ and positions with unequal 17. �cS �b7 18.�b3 fxe4
24.lt:Jc6+ suffice. material in most cases (two 19. �xf8 llxf8 (19 ... @xf8
Now after 23.f3? Black minor pieces for Black, and 20.fxe4 lt:Jf6 (20 ...lt:Jf4) 21. �e3
won quickly, but Dimitri a rook and some queenside i.xb3 22.cxb3 @g8 23. 'iVc3
17
h6 24. 'li'c4+ @h7 25.l:lhel problem of finding a useful 23...e4 24.l:tc1 'ires 2S.l:tc3
h5 26.h3 h4 27. l::teH Selin­ move, but so far the results @h7 26.l:thc1oo/= 1/2-•/2
Kurgansky, er 2016) 20.fxe4 have been satisfactory for 26. i/c7 l:td6oo/=
tDf4 21. 'i¥e3 (21.g3 .2.xb3 Black. See the following game: For the moment, 16. �xa7!?
22.axb3 tl:ie6 ;!; Rybka, but may give White slightly better
Jones says 'I think the position Mark Noble prospects, but 14 ... h6!? looks
is dynamically equal'. Games Nelson Gonzalez Rabago playable. We'll wait and see ...
wanted!) 21... Wh8 (21... �xb3 er WS/ G M N/045 2015
22. i/xb3+ 'irxb3 23.cxb3 tl:ixg2 1.e4 cs 2.d4 cxd4 3.tl:if3 d6
24.a4oo/;!;) 22.l:lhfl (22 . .2.xe6 4.tl:ixd4 tl:if6 S.tl:ic3 g6 6.i.e3 More than a fortress
tl:ixe6 23. 'li'b3) 22 ... .2.g4?! �7 7.f3 tl:ic6 8. 'it'd2 0-0 9.0- by Peter Boe/
23. l::td2 c5 24.h3 �c8 25. 1\Yxc5 0-0 dS 10. 'it'e1 eS 11.tl:ixc6
CA 5 . 4 ( E0 5 ) YB 121
i/xe4 26. i/c7 'irb7 27. 'li'xb7 bxc6 12.exdS tl:ixdS 13.i.c4
.2.xb7 28.g3 .2.a6 29.rut2 i.e6 14.@b1 h61?
tl:ixh3 30. 1hf8+ £.xf8 3UM8 As you saw in the first article
Wg7 32.�dS± Konstantinov­ of this Forum section, Wesley
L.H. Hansen, er 2016. So's 15. rubl! against Hikaru
17... lbbS 18.l:td3!? Nakamura (St Louis) in the
18.tl:ic3?! e4-+ 19 . .2.b3 tl:ixc3+ Open Catalan with 7.tl:ie5
20.bxc3 cS 21.fxe4 f4� Jones; was pronounced the third­
18.tl:ig3? 1hb2+! 19. @xb2 e4+; best novelty of 2016 by our
18. 'li'aSoo readers. Now it was Black's
18...fxe4 19.fxe4 tl:if6 turn, and lo and behold:
19 ... tl:if4 20. l::tb 3;!; Dmitry Yakovenko came up
20.:b3 :dS with a stunning concept for
20 ... 1hb3 21. .2.xb3 .2.xb3 the second player, playing
22.cxbJ;!; 1S.i.cS for Schwabisch Hall against
21.1i'b4 1i't7 A) 15. 'iYd2 'li'c7!? 16. tl:ixd5 Baden-Baden in the 3rd
21...c5 22. 'ti'b7± cxd5 17. �xd5 .2.xd5 18. i/xd5 weekend (9th round) of the
22 . .be6 1i'xe6 23.l:td3 J:as l::tab8 19. i/c5 'ti'b7 20.b3 German Bundesliga.
24.a3 .�.fS 2S. 1i'b7 J:a4 26.l:tdS l:f.fc8 21. 'i¥d6 e4 22.l:lhfl aS�
lbe4?1 Savoca- D.Dimov, er 2016; Radoslaw Wojtaszek
26 ... l:f.d4 27. 1\Yc8 ;!; B) 15.h4 l:!e8 16.£.b3 i/c7 Dmltry Yakovenko
27. 1i'a8 1i'e7 28.l:hd1 l:tf4? 17.hS g5 18.tl:ie4 f5 19.tl:icS �f7 Germany B u ndesl iga 2016/17 (9)
28 ... l:td4 29. l:t8xd4 exd4 20.g4 aS 21.gxf5 a4 22. �c4 e4 1.d4 tl:if6 2.c4 e6 3.tl:if3 dS
30. 'li'xc6± 23.tl:ixe4 tl:ic3+ 24.tl:ixc3 �xc4 4.g3 i.e7 s.i.g2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4
29.lbfS+ @g7 30.l:tcS @h6 25.f6 �xf6 26.tl:ie4 l:!xe4 27.fxe4 7.tl:ies tl:ic6 8.tl:ixc6 bxc6 9.tl:ia3
31.1i'xc6 l:tfS 32.l:tc7 1i'f8 Vz Pirs-D.Dimov, er 2016. .ba3 10.bxa3 i.a6 11. 'it'd2
33.1i'cS 1-0 1S... l:te8 16.tl:ie4 l:tb8 12.1i'as
16 . .2.xd5 cxdS 17.tl:ixdS £.xdS
Another interesting thing 18.c4 £.xc4 19.1hd8 l:!axd8= • � ••
is that in a number of 16...fS 17.tl:id6 l:te7 18.i.b3 .t. .t. .t. .t. .t.
correspondence games, Black
tried a completely different
l:td7 19.c4 i. .t. .t. �
19.tl:ic4 'irf6 20.g3 (20. l:td2
move instead of 14 ... nb8: l:f.ad8 21. 'i'f2 @h7= Ottesen­ �
14... h6. As I remarked in Marez, er 2015) 20 ... l:f.ad8 21.c3 .t. �
Yearbook 116, the idea behind @h7 22.rut h5 23. 'ti'e2 nb7 � �
14. @bl is that the move
14 ... 'ti'c7, in itself desirable,
24.tl:id6 l:tbb8 25. 'li'a6 (25.c4!?)
25 ... e4+:t Schuller-Hagen, er
� � ���
is no good here as it loses a 2012. � � l:[ w
pawn. So Black has to choose 19... lbd6 20..bd6 'it'xd6
a less useful move. We can say 21. 'it'aS :dS 22.cxdS cxdS 12 ... l:tb6!?
that the move 14 ... h6 is useful, 23. 'it'xa 7 Here, Nakamura played
since it prevents tl:ig5. I can 23. lhdS .2.xd5 24. l:f.dl 'i¥b6=; 12 ... 'iYc8 13.a4 l::td 8 14 . .2.a3
imagine that 14 ... h6 is not the 23.h4 ilb6 24. 'li'xb6 axb6 1hd4 and was surprised by
ultimate solution to Black's 25. l:f.cl l:f.d6oo/= 15 . rubl!, and Black got into
18
Forum

trouble. Yakovenko came up and in the 9th round I saw


with a brilliant idea: a familiar picture in the
13.a4 1i'd6 14.1i'c3 l:l.d81? game So-Aronian. I had had
This looks futile, but it turns something just like that in
out not to be! my practice, 27 years ago in
14 ... tlidS lS. �xdS 'ti'xdS the 1990 Barcza Memorial.
16. �a3 ne8 17. �cS nbb8 Debrecen, Hungary. In that
18.£3 eS 19.e4 exd4 20. �xd4 ' Super Oldie', I invented
"i!'gS 21. nadl;!; was Li Chao­ 13.h2-h4 behind the board.
Ganguly, Ningbo 2011, as Chemin went wrong and the
indicated on page 181 of whole game lasted a mere 22
Yearbook 121. moves.
15.h3 A lot of water has passed
1S.e3 tlidS or lS. l::td l tlld S under the bridge since then,
16. �xdS cxdS would now be many games have been
very nice for Black. But after played, and it seems the way
the text, taking on d4 loses Dm ltry Yakovenko Aronian played it in Wijk is
the exchange, doesn't it? good enough to neutralize
15 11t"xd4! 16. 1i'xd4 l:l.xd4
.•. A) 24.£3 @e7 2S. i::tfdl (2S. l::tb4 White's initiative. That game
17. .icS l:l.dSI? 'it>d6 and White is too late) was drawn. This is how chess
2S ... @d6 26.e4 @cs 27.exdS theory develops: everybody
• tlixdS is no use, as Black's has a say, and to pass any
l l l l l remaining queenside pawns final judgement is more than
.i. .l l l� are still far too strong; risky .
B) 24. nb4 tlie4 2s. i::tc I!?
� .I (2S. i::tfb l tlic3! 26. l::tlb2 @e7 Andras Adorjan
� l etc.) 2S ... @e7 26.£3 tlld 6 Alexander Chernln
27. @f2 @d7 28.e3 (28. @e3 Debrecen 1990 (3)
@c6 29.g4 @cs 30. l::tc bl tllb 7!? 1.c4 lllf6 2.lllc3 e6 3.lllf3 dS
is starting to look worse for 4.d4 dxc4 5.e4 .ib4 6. .igs cs
White) 28 ... @c6 29.'it>el @cs 7. .ixc4 cxd4 8.tllxd4 .ixc3+
30. ncbl es 31.f4 f6 and also 9.bxc3 1i'a5 10. .ib5+ lllb d7
Or maybe two? here the clouds are gathering 11 .ixf6 1i'xc3+ 12. �1 gxf6

18 .ixdS cxdS 19 . .ixb6 axb6


• above White's head.
20.l:l.ab1 �8 21.aS bS 22.a4?! So Wojtaszek, probably .I .i. • .I
c6 23.axbS cxbS wisely, forced a draw by
violent means: l l � l l
• 24.l:l.xbS! .ixbS 25.l:l.b1 .id7 l l
l l l 26.a6 llJe8 27.a7 .ic6 28.l:l.b6
.i. l� h8 29.l:l.b8 .ic6 30.l:l.c8 .ib7
31.l:l.b8 .ic6 32.l:l.c8 .ib7
� l .\ 33.l:l.b8 1/2-V2
l It looks as if Yakovenko's
idea is a good winning try for
Black! Only Wojtaszek's rook
sac seems to save White from
disaster. A fantastic concept. 13.h4!N!?
A) 13. l::tc l 'ti'b4 14.h4 a6
... and a fortress! Well, that's 1S . .ae2 0-0 Vz-1/2 Smejkal­
what it was called by Raj A 'Super Oldie' revisited Chernin, Altensteig 1990;
Tischbierek in Schoch 2017 /1, by Andras Adorjan
B) 13. tlixe6? 'ti'eS 14. lllg7+
page 44, but in fact once @f8+ (Lobron-Zsu. Polgar,
N I 27. 16 (D39)
Black gathers enough support Dortmund 1990) 1S. jlxd7
for these queenside pawns, it (lS. tllfS?? 'i!VxbS+ 16. Wgl 'i!VeS)
will be more of a steamroller Well, I followed the Tata lS ... .axd7 16. tlifS �xfS 17.exfS
than a fortress! Let's see: Steel tournament online, 'ti'xfS+.
19
13 ... �e7? A great counter. The bishop
13 ... a6 is the better known almost single-handedly holds
move, see for example the off White's attack.
quite recent game Giri­ 19.J:lc3
Aronian given below (with Giri played 19.l:tb3 against the
transposition) - and see also same opponent in Stavanger
the next Forum item! 2015. There followed 19 ... l:tc8
In our stem game, Chemin 20 . ..Q.xb5+ axb5 21. �b4 �xb4
decided to 'castle by hand', 22. l:txb4 0-0 23. l:t7xb5 nfd8
which proved to be too 24.@e2 @g7 25. :la4 l:la8
dangerous: 26.l:tbb4 :ldb8 and Black
14.J:lh3 1i' a 5 15.l%1>1 J:ldS regained the pawn and drew
15 ... tt:Je5 16.f4 tt:Jg6 17. 'if cl on move 36.
�b6 18.l:td3 @f8 19.f5 tt:Je5 19... :ds 20.lllta 1i'xd2
20. 'ifh6+ gives White a strong 21.hb5+ axb5 22.�d2 0-0
initiative. Alexander Chernln Not 22 ... l:txd2?? 23.:lc8+ l:td8
16.1i'c11 24. l:txd8+ @xd8 25. l:lb8+.
21. l:txb7+ l:td7 is less clear) 23.lllf3 �f3 24.J:lxf3 J:lbS
.I ..t .I 20 ... ..Q.xfS 21.exf5 and here 25.llga+
l l ll • l ' White's artillery is placed Of course it wouldn't do to
l l perfectly for a winning attack. take on b8 and f6 as he then
17.1i'c5+ :d6 1S.:d1!+- 1i'b6 loses the a-pawn.
18 ... f!Yd8 19.f4! 25...�hS 26.J:lxbS J:lxbS 27.J:lb3
:as
.I ..t And the draw was agreed 11
l l •1 ' not very exciting moves later.
'if .I l l
.,t 'if • A surprise In the 13 aG line
{jj � �
...

16... lDe5?/?? by Bogdan Lalic


A) His best chance was : N I 27.16 (039)
16 ... f!Yb6 ! ? when nevertheless
White plays 17. tt:Jf5 + ! (in
� ��
the event of 17 . ..Q.xd7 Black l:;I � In the London Super
seems to h ang on by a thread Rapidplay I played the
after 17 ... 'ii' x d4 18. � a3+ 19.tt:Jc6+1 bxc6 20.1i'xd6+ �es following interesting game
'if d6) 17 ... exf5 18 . ..Q.xd7 21.llg3 'W'xb5+ 22.�g1 1-0 against Israeli FM Shachar
�d6 (18 ... f!Ya6+?! leads to a Gindi. In the QGD (for this
difficult endgame for Black Wesley So game I decided to change
after 19 . ..Q.b5 �b6 20 . ..Q.d3 Levon Aronlan from the Catalan Opening)
�c6 21.exfS 'if xcl+ 22. :lxcl) Wij k aan Zee 2017 (9) I was surprised early on with
19 . ..Q.xc8 (19 . ..Q.xf5 b6 2 0 . :lc3 (position after 12 ... gxf6) 15 ... tt:Je5!?. I wrote a book
�xfS 21.exfS :lac8 22. 'ftf e3+ 13.h41? 'W'b4 14.J:lh3 a6 on QG D lines with ..Q.g5
also gives White a slightly 15. .te2 lDe5 16.l%b1 1i'd6 (Everyman, 2000) but the
better ending, since Black 17.'W'd2 .td7 1S.J:lxb7 .tb51 problem is that this move
has to play 22 ... ..Wes here) (instead of the ordinary
19 ... naxc8 20. �e3 ncs .I • .I 15 ... 'ftf d6) first appeared
(20 ... f!Yd2 21. :lxb7+ @f8 � l l in 2004, so I was quite
22. @gl±) 21.exfS + (21. @gl b 6 l 'it' l l unprepared after all!
22.exfS+) 21... :le5 22. �a3 l:td7 My move 16.@gl is possible,
23.g4 and in the double-rook ..t • but it's not impressive
ending Black still has to {jj � � (neither is Anand's 16.h5 in
struggle for the half-point; � his game against Kramnik) ,
B) 16 ... a6 17. :la3 �b6
18. tt:Jf5+ exf5 19 . ..Q.xd7 �d6
� 'if .,t � � but all the same White
hasn't shown any opening
20 . ..Q.xfS (20 . ..Q.xc8 l:taxc8 � advantage with other moves
20
Forum

either. Later, as the analysis 29. l:la3 h6 30. l:lg3+ @h7 31. ID'J order with 6 ... h6?!. After the
shows, I should have avoided 'it>g7= better move 6 ... e6, Finkel
the queen sacrifice (I did not shows how Black has been
clearly see the winning plan .. . .I struggling against White's
with .. J1dl-fl). Later in the .\ .\ .\ plan with 7. �c4, 8. 'i!Ye2 and
time scramble my opponent .\ 'if .\ .\ 9.0-0-0. I have a suggestion to
opted for a perpetual check, improve Black's play and try
missing a very nice win. � to make this whole variation
This game clearly shows all .t � � more attractive for him.
the advantages of 15 ... tlle S lLJ �
over the older move 15 ... ird6, � 'iff Ji � � Andreas Heimann
and this line covers the entire Grlgory Bogdanovich
jungle starting with 14 ... 'f!Vb4. : @ Basel 2013 (5)
1.e4 cs 2.lLif3 lLif6 3.es lLids
Bogdan Lallc 20 1i'xd1+1 21.bd1 :Xd1+
••. 4.lLlc3 tbxc3 S.dxc3 lLlc6
Shachar Gindi 22. CiPh2 lLig4+ 23.<oPg3 :gs Usually in this variation,
London ra pid 2016 (6) 24.lLlcS? general plans are more
1.d4 dS 2.c4 e6 3.lLlf3 lLlf6 24. tlld 20 �c6 25.f3 tlle S+ important than specific move
4.lLlc3 dxc4 S.e4 i.b4 6.i.gs 26.@h2 tlld 3 27. °i!Vc3 00 28.g3 orders, but this game might
cs 7.hc4 cxd4 8.lbxd4 hc3+ nhl+ 29. @g2 l:lxh3 30. @xf2 be an exception.
9.bxc3 1i'aS 10.i.bS+ lLlbd7 nhxg3 31. Wxf6+ 6.i.f4 h6?1
11.bf6 1i'xc3+ 12.�1 gxf6 24 lLieS+??
••. An old favourite of
13.h4 a6 14.:t.3 1i'b4 1S.i.e2 � 24 ... nfl! 25.f3 00+ 26. 'it>f4 grandmaster Jacob Murey.
tllx h3+ 27.gxh3 eS+ 28. @e3
.I .t • .I l:lg3-+
.\ � .\ .\ 2S. coPh2 lLlg4+ 26.CiPg3 lLleS+??
.\ .\ .\ 27. coPh2 lLlg4+ 1/�2
So perhaps White should turn
to 15. �a4 instead of 15 . .2.e2
(which I recommended in
my book as best for White!) .
I think that despite White's
loss, the game Kosic-Macieja,
Istanbul Olympiad 2012, is an
interesting line to follow for
1S... lLieSI? White - in that game Black
s; 15 ... 'f/id6 eventually won, but after 7.e61
16.CiPg1?1N White sacrificed the knight This move was in my
16.l:lbl 'f!id6 17. l:lc3 0-0
:2!: on e6 Black's position was in files since 2011, but to my
18. l:lb2 bS 19. l:ld2� great danger. knowledge Heimann was the
16... 1i'd6 17.1i'd2 i.d7 18. 'ii' b 2 first to put it into practice.
J:ld81 19J �d1 h4f 20.lLlb3? Moiseenko played 7. �d3 e6
:2!:20.l:ld2 and now: 8. 'f!id2 'f!ic7 9.h4 b6 10.0-0-0
A) 20 ...bs 21. l:lc3 o-o 22. tllb 3 Serious doubts �b7 ll. �e4 (V2-1/2, 5 8) against
'f!ie7 (s: 22 ... 'f!ib4?! 23.f4 tllg 6 by Olivier Pucher Nataf in Kapuskasing 2004.
24.hS �xb3 25.axb3 tllxf4 By that time Igor-Alexandre
S I 43.4 (B29) YB 120
26.l:lg3+ tllg 6 27. l:lxd8 l:lxd8 Nataf was working with
28 . ... xf6 ..,d4+ 29. 'f!ixd4 Murey, which may explain
l:lxd4 30.hxg6 hxg6 31. l:le3±) I read Alexander Finkel's his opening choice.
23. tllc S�; Survey on the Nimzowitsch Short chose 7. �c4 e6 8. 'flie2
B) 20 ... 0-0 21. ffi! 'f!ic7 Sicilian in YB 120 with great against Ostermeyer.
22.l:lxd8 l:lxd8 23. tllx eS fxeS interest. As a complement, I 7 dxe6
..•

24. l:lc3 �c6 25. �xa6! bxa6 would like to point out the 7 .. .fxe6? gives White a
26. 'iVcl 'f!Ve7 (s: 26 ... l:ld6?? game Heimann- Bogdanovich, free ride on the kingside:
27. 'iVh6 l:ldl+ 28. @h2+-) Basel 2013, which I think cast 8. tllh 4-+ d6 9. tllg 6 l:lg8
27. l:lxc6 'f!ixh4 2 8 . l:lxa6 @g7 serious doubts on the move 10. 'IWhS � aS (10 ... @d 7 11. �c4)
21
11. tbeS+ g6 12. tllx g 6 @d8 and possibly ... l:ib8, ... 'iYaS , 1S.J:the1
13. t2Jxf8 l:ixf8 14. 'iY xh6 ... bS-b4. 1S.l:id2 b4; lS.hS b4
8. 'ifxdS+ �dS?! 8 ... .ib7 9.0-0-0 1S ... b4 16.cxb4
8 ... @xd8 is probably more Or 16.c4 aS.
resilient: 9.0-0-0+We8 (9 ... �d7
10.nd2 gs 11. tbes gxf4 12. tllxd7
K 1¥ • .t K 16 ... �b4
With counterchances.
@c7 13.tllx cs t) and now the i .! i i i i I think this idea needs
simplest is to double on the ill i practical tests; at least here
d-file with 10. �e2 (10. �bS a6 i � Black is not restrained to
11.bc6+ bxc600; 10. �e3 es passive defence.
11. hcS kg4 12. �e3 e600) 10 ... � �
gS (10. .. �d7 11.l:id2 or ll. �e3 � ttJ
... b6? 12.l:ixd7 'it>xd7 13.l:idl+ � � � 'J/11 � � �
@c8 14. �a6+ @c7 1S. �4++-)
11. �e3 eS (11 ... b6? 12. �bS;
<it> � � An extraordinary tactic
by Fran k Erwich
ll ... g4 12. tlJc:l2 b6 13. �gH)
12. hcS;!; . White already has 9 ... a6!? IG 2.1 (C50)

his pawn back, and is better. As far as I know, this is a new


9. lbeSI idea. Once White has castled, The seventh round of the Tata
It is very hard for Black to Black wants to harass the Steel Chess Tournament will
develop his pieces. �c4 and grab space on the go down in the history books
9 ... f6 queenside. Castling kingside as a special one. Magnus
9 ... tbc6 10. tllx c6 bxc6 11.0- too early is obviously very Carlsen missed a mate in
0-0� is similar. After the risky for Black, but his king is three (if one doesn't take into
cS-pawn has fallen, White quite safe on e8 for the time account the opponent giving
will still enjoy control of the being and he can concentrate up lots of material to prevent
d-file and an easy-to-activate on creating some counterplay the mate) against Anish Giri.
majority on the queenside. first. But even more stunning was
10 . .ibS+ tlJc6 11. �c6 .id7 After standard moves like what happened between
12.0-0-0 hc6 13. bc6+ bxc6 9 ... 'iYc7 10.l:id2 h6 11.h4 0-0-0 Karjakin and Aronian.
14 . .ie3 h S 12.l:ihdl �e7 13. �a6 I totally
It's already hard to find a agree with GM Finkel: Black Sergey Karjakln
good move for Black. is passive, and no path to Levon Aronlan
1S. hcS h4 16.g4 hxg3 17.hxg3 equality has been found here. Wij k a a n Zee 2017 ( 7 )
l:lxh1 18. l:lxh1 Wd7 19.b4 es 10. .id3 1.e4 es 2.tbf3 tlJc6 3 . .ic4 .ics
20. l:thS 10.l:id2 bS ll. �d3 t2Je7 12.c4 4.0-0 t2Jf6 S.d3 0-0 6.h3
With full domination in the (12. �e4 tbdS) 12 ... 'fifaS 13. @bl 6.c3 dS 7.exdS tbxdS (Kuzmin
endgame (1-0, 4S) . bxc4 14. �xc4 tbdS lS. �xdS YB 121 p.122). After 6.l:iel, to
(1S. �g3 tbb6) lS ... exdS00 prevent 6 ... dS , 6 ... t2Jg4 7.l:ie2
(lS ... �xdS 16.c4 �c6 17.l:ihdl) ; @h8 8.h3 fS is an interesting
The plan with ..tc4 and 11Ve2 10.a4 is a bit weird with the idea (Erwich, YB 121 p.16) .
1.e4 cs 2. t2Jf3 t2Jf6 3.es lbds king on cl, and anyway it 6 ... dS
4. tlJc3 �c3 S.dxc3 tlJc6 6 . .if4 won't stop ... b7-bS for very This move has been played
e6 long: 10 ... �e7 11.h4 h6 12.l:ih3 only once in a grandmaster
I like this better than queen bS 13.axbS axbS 14. �xbS game. 6 ... d6 is the main line.
moves. 'iYb6� 7.exdS �dS 8.J:te1
7. .ic4 10 ... bS 11 . .ie4 Now it's clear why White
7. 'fifd2 and 7.'iYe2 are two Prevents ll ... t2Je7. 11.l:id2 tbe7 played 6.h3. 8 ... �g4 is no
other promising plans. is the previous note. option here.
7... b6 8. 'ife2 11 ... 'it'c7 12 . .iga .ie7 13.Wb1 8 ... .ie6
After 8.0-0 �b7 9.l:iel my 13.l:id2 h6 14.l:ihdl l:id8 1S. @bl Aronian finds a way to defend
recommendation would be 0-0 followed by ... t2JaS-c4 the pawn tactically.
9 ... tbe7, going to g6. Against looks very playable. A) 8 ... l:ie8 9.d4!;
8.'iYd2 �b7 9.0-0-0 we can 13 ... h6 14.h4 J:tb8 B) 8 .. .f6 9.tbc3 �e6 10.d4!
try the same plan: 9 ... a6 Black can create some play on t2Jxd4? 11. tllx d4 �xd4 12. �xdS
followed by ... b7-bS , t2Je7-dS , the queenside. �xdS 13. tllx dS 't!fxdS 14.c3;
22
Forum

C) 8 ... 'iVd6?! 9.t2Jbd2 tLif6 was the only one in which


and the black pieces on cS, d6 Black spotted the idea!
and f6 look clumsy. Even when the bishop on e3
9.c3 is protected, Black can go for
Not 9.tlJxeS? tLixeS 10. l:heS the pawn push:
�xf2+ ll. @xf2? °f!Yf6+ and now
we see the point of 8... �e6. Eva van Harten
After 12. 'f!Vf3 'il'xeS the knight Iris Schelleman
on dS is protected twice! R ijswij k ch-NED j r 2013 (6)
9.tlJbd2 was played in the
other grandmaster game.
White develops a piece,
but also threatens to take
the e5-pawn. For instance:
9 ... �b6 10.ttJxeS tlJxeS 11. l:heS
�xf2+? 12. @xf2 °f!Yf6+ 13.00!
Levon Aron lan
Therefore, in Jorden van
Foreest-Bachmann, Teplice
2016, Black replied with 9 ... think of a positionally
f6 and after 10.t2Jb3 �b6 ll.d4 unsound move like ll.c3-
�f7 12.dxeS tLixeS 13. ttJxeS c4 here? The p awn on c4
fxeS 14. �xdS �xdS 15. �e3 blocks its own bishop, d4
the position is around equal. becomes an outpost, and the Black should have played 12 ...
9.. ..tb6 10. ..tb3 f6?
. d3-pawn is weak. cS!. After 13. tLifS c4! 14. �a4
Like Bachmann. The move �xfS 15.exfS �xe3 16. 'iVxe3
seems logical, but here it turns Actually, this tactic is quite a6 the bishop on a4 will be
out to be a terrible mistake! rare. Nevertheless, I found trapped.
two examples that have In this case, Black did .
much in common with the not win a piece by a
tactic Karjakin and Aronian discovered attack, but by
overlooked. using a discovered attack as
preparatory means to trap the
Lucia Pascual Palomo piece.
Miguel Rada Equlza If Aronian or Karjakin would
Ca rtagena 2007 (9) encounter their position
after ten moves in a puzzle
book, they should certainly
spot this tactic within
seconds. However, during a
game plenty of other things
Of course, all the online play an important role. It
kibitzers with their Stockfish sounds a bit strange, but
immediately saw the perhaps these players are too
refutation of the move. After strong to find this idea over
ll.c4! t2Jde7 12.cS, White the board!
wins a piece by a discovered Anyway, thanks to this
attack. After the zwischenzug game most chess players
12 ... �xb3, White recaptures have acquired a new tactical
the bishop with check: 10...cSI weapon in their arsenal.
13. 'f!Vxb3+. It's as easy as that! After 11. tLifS (to protect the And Karjakin? Well, he
H owever, after thinking for bishop on e3) 11 ... �xfS 12.exfS didn't even need this tactic
about ten minutes, Karjakin Black wins a piece by 12 ... c4!. to overcome Aronian. After
played ll.d4 and the game Admittedly, with a knight on his oversight on move 11
lasted for many more eS, covering c4, one will be the Russian still managed to
moves. Unbelievable? Well more inclined to play ... c7-c5. outplay his opponent in a
then, who on earth would Still, out of four games this very convincing manner.
23
A 'simple' move 12.cxd4 0-0 13. tlle 2 'ir'c8 C) 13 . .Q.e3 was the line I was
by Mikheil Mchedlish vili
14. l:tb3 �a6= Hillarp focusing on: 13 ... 0-0 14.dS
Persson-Gustafsson, d2+! (a very important move
NI 24.4 (E32)
Barcelona 2013) 12.l:tbl 'i!f c6 which we will also see in the
(I wanted to play this to game. Finding this move
I played a very interesting provoke 13.f3) 13.f3 dS and game me the confidence
game in the Iranian league Black has a nice French-type to enter this line) 15. @fl
recently and wanted to position. (15. �xd2 tlla 6+) 15 ... 'ti;fb5+
share it with you. I was 9 cxd4 10.cxd4
.•• 16. tlle 2 tl:ixe4 and Black is just
very impressed when my Here I spent about half an winning.
computer showed the move hour trying to figure out 13 ... 'iVb1
14. l:tal!!. how to continue. I decided 13 ... 0-0 14. l:tb2 d2+ 15. @xd2
to enter a sharp line which I 'tWxd4+ 16. Wel 'ti;fc3+ 17. Wdl=
Amin Nasrl thought I had calculated well.
Mikhell Mchedllshvlll
Iran tt 2017 (3)
10 ... bxc4
I didn't like 10 ... tllc 6 because
'if � • K
1.d4 ltJf6 2.c4 e6 3.lLic3 .ib4 of 11.cxbS (11. 'tWxbS!?) ' ' ' ' '
4. 1Vc2 b6 5.e4 cs 6.a3 ll ... tl:ixd4 12. 'tWb2 es 13. tlle 2. ,.
6.dS is mostly played. 11.'iVxb7 cxd3 12. 1Vxa8 'iVb6
6 .i.xc3+ 7.bxc3 .ib7 8 .id3
� �
.•• •

8.eS tllg 8 9. 'ir'd3 is what I


expected.
'if • • K � '
' ' ' ' ' l:[ � � �
'if ,. 'if .i <it> tt:J �
� � My opponent thought for
� ' about 35 minutes before
� � � playing 13. l:ta2. He thought he
n .i <it> tt:J � had no defence. After 13 ... 'tWbl
he continued to play fast:
14. '0td1?
It's important to cover the This was the move I had also
b-file. Now I didn't see any calculated.
defence for White. Indeed, 14. l:tal!! looks simple when
Igor Lysyj and Jeffery Xiong you know that this is a
also failed to find the correct correct move, but I think
moves in this position. it's not easy to find this nice
12 ... 'i!Vc7? 13. l:tbl little move over the board.
Mlkhell Mchedllshvlll 13.l:la2 I completely overlooked it!
A) 13 . .Q.d2? 0-0 14. .Q.b4 l:te8 14 ... 'ir'b6 is no more than a
8 ... bS and ... tllc 6; draw.
If I don't play this move, B) 13. ffi? 0-0 14. �e3 14 1!t'b3+ 15. 'Ote1 0-0 16.:b2
•.•

introduced by Planinc in (14.0-0 tllc 6 15. 'tWxf8+ @xf8 1Vc3+ 17. '0td1 d2!
1976, I think Black is just 16.dS exdS 17.exdS tl:ixds+ Not 17 ... l:tc8 18. tlle 2 and White
worse. I remembered this Xiong-Moradiabadi, I CC can defend.
move, and that Black was fine 2015) 14 ... tllc 6! (14 ... tlla 6 18.:Xd2 1!t'b3+ 19. 'Ote1 lLic6
after it, but unfortunately I (good enough) 15. �xf8+ 20. 1!fxf8+ 'OtxfS-+
didn't remember exactly how. @xf8 16.0-0 (16. tlld 2 is more Now White cannot defend
9. 1!t'b1 tenacious) 16 ... tl:ixe4! Lysyj­ his central pawns, and he
9.l:tbl was another possibility, Morozevich, Poikovsky 2015) collapses.
e.g.: 9 ... bxc4 10. lhb7 cxd3 15. 'fr'xf8+ @xf8 16.dS 'i!Vb3! 21.f3 tl:ixd4 22. llle2 lLic2+
11. 'tWxd3 'ir'c8 (11 ... cxd4 17.0-0 exdS; 23. 'Otf2 dS 24.:hd1 1!t'b6+ 0-1

24
Bol oga n ' s O pe ni n g B u l letin

Secrets of O pe n i ng Prepa rati on at the


Doha R a p i d a nd B l itz 2016

Vasily lvanchuk
Magnus Carlsen
Doha Wo rld Rapid 2016 ( 7 )

Victor Bologan, a 1.d4!


top grandmaster It is interesting that in his first two games
and writer of with white, against the Ruy Lopez and the
several best­ Caro-Kann, although Ivanchuk scored two
selllng chess wins he was obviously dissatisfied with the
books, scans the results of the opening. Then against Dreev he
most recent top opened l.c4, subsequently transposing into a
events for new Slav, and against Carlsen he successfully tried
tendencies In l.d4. The belief exists that against Ivanchuk
opening play. it is pointless preparing, either as White or as
Black. He can play everything.
by Victor Bologan 1 ... d5 2.c4 c6 3.tbf3 tbf6 4. 1i'c2
Quite a good anti-Slav idea. The character
of the play differs strongly from typical Slav
In view of the growing popularity of rapid set-ups. It is surprising that out of more than
chess, many players ask which openings are 2000 games played in all four championships,
effective when time for thought is restricted. this move occurred only in three, and in all of
Several main approaches can be singled out. them Ivanchuk won!
Most players who work deeply on opening 4 ... e6
theory endeavour not to disclose their This is considered the second most popular
preparations, and therefore choose sidelines, move after 4 ... dxc4. What Ivanchuk had
especially with white. English and Reti prepared against 4 ... g6 we will obviously
Openings, checks on bS in the Sicilian and learn at the next championship, when he will
even l.b3, are frequently seen in rapid events. defend his title.
On the one hand this leaves the main theory 4 ... dxc4 5. l\Yxc4:
in the shade, but on the other hand it assists
the rapid development of these sidelines.
Here I would like to pick out the 'productive'
play of Vasily Ivanchuk against the Slav in
rapid chess. It was his wins against Dreev,
Carlsen and Mamedyarov that enabled him,
at the age of 47, to win the title of rapidplay
World Champion. Strictly speaking, his
opening strategy does not strongly differ from
the Carlsen manner of transferring the weight
of the battle to the middlegame.
25
A) s ... kg4 6.tt:Jbd2 tt:Jbd7 7.g3 e6 8.�g2 �d6
9 . 'ifb3 tZ:lb6 10. tLleS �hS ll. tt:Jdc4 �xeS?! (on
encountering a rare variation, Dreev grabs
a poisoned pawn. After the stronger ll ... �c7
12.e3 0-0 13.a4 tt:Jxc4 14.tlJxc4 l:lb8 lS.0-0 as
16. �d2;!;; White would retain slight pressure)
12.dxeS tt:Jxc4 13. 'if xc4 (13.exf6! was even
stronger: 13 ... 'if aS+ 14. @fl tt:Jb6 1S.fxg7 l:lg8
16.h3 l:lxg7 17.g4 �g6 18.�h6 l:lg8 19.h4±)
13 ... 'ifaS+ 14. �d2 'tlf'xeS 1S. �c3 'ifc7 16. 'tlf'h4!
Vasily's entire calculation was based on this
double attack. 16 ... �g6 17. �xf6 gxf6 18. 'ifxf6
'if aS+ 19. @fl l:lg8 20.h4 'ifb4 (20 ... l:ld8 21.hS
kxhS) 21.a3 'ife7 22. 'ifc3 'ifd6 23.hS �fS 24.e4 Vasily
�g4 2S.f3± Ivanchuk-Dreev, Doha Rapid 2016. lvanchuk
The bishop is lost, and the compensation for
it is obviously insufficient. 14. tLlel tt:Je4 1S. tt:Jc3 tt:Jxd2 16. l:lxd2 �b4 17. �xb7
B) A few rounds later, Mamedyarov l:lc7 18.�f3 l:lxc3 19.bxc3 �xc3 20.l:ladl �xd2
unsuccessfully tried the main S ...kfS 6.g3 e6 21. l:lxd2 l:lc8 22.tt:Jd3 @f8 23. tt:Jb4 tlJf6
7. �g2 tt:Jbd7 8.0-0 �e7 9.e3 0-0 10. 'tlf'e2.
:I •
.l .l .l .l
.t •
.l .t
ttJ �
���
� � � �

Black has a small edge (Ivanchuk-Mamedyarov,


A tabiya of the variation. Bringing out the Doha 2016). In the given instance it can be
knight to c3 is considered premature. It is ascertained that the opening was not at all to
better first to secure a safe shelter for the blame, it was simply that Ivanchuk contrived
queen. But five years ago this same ruse of time after time to outplay his opponents in
lvanchuk did not work against Karjakin. completely equal, or even inferior endings.
10 ... l:lc8 is a new trend in the variation. 5. ti::lb d2
10 ... 'tlf'c7 is also not bad; it was played by
Karjakin in another rapid event against :I • .t if • .i. :I
Ivanchuk, at the SportAccord, Beijing 2011, .l .l .l .l .l
and also by Karjakin' s second, Alexander .l .l �
Motylev. Although after 10 ... l:lc8 the old
11. l:ldl 'ifaS 12. �d2 has also been played by
.l
Mamedyarov with white (12.h3 h6 13.b3 eS � �
14. �b2 e4 1S. tLlfd2 rues 16.tt:Jc3 �b4 17. l:lacl
'iVd8 18.a3 �xc3 19. �xc3 tZ:ldS 20.kb2 �e7
21. @h2 tlJ7f6= Mamedyarov-Wagner, Moscow
Aeroflot 201S) 12... 'ifbS ! (an exchange of
queens typical of this variation) 13. �xbS cxbS 5 dxc4?!
...

26
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

It is hard to explain this decision. Obviously 19 f6


..•

the knight went to d2 in order to capture on


c4. So why help it? 5 ... tLlbd7 is usually played. .I .t. .I •
Incidentally, that was how Ivanchuk played i .t. ii
with black. In general this approach of Vasily ��� i i
to openings has been known since Soviet
ttJ ttJ
times. It was said that often during analysis
the Lviv player would turn the board round �
and study the variation for the opposite side. �
In Aronian-lvanchuk, Wijk aan Zee 2015, ��
there followed 6.g3 b6!?. Black aims for the .:
rapid fianchetto of his light-squared bishop
and the ... c6-c5 advance. The premature 20. i..f 3! !
development of the dark-squared bishop with Another Soviet chess literary cliche runs
6 ... �d6 gives White good statistics: 7 . .Q.g2 'tactics at the service of strategy'. A simple
�b7 8.0-0 c5! 9.cxd5 tLlxd5 10.tLlc4 and now, calculation shows that White not only regains
instead of 10 .. Jk8, Black might have equalized the piece, but also wins at least a pawn.
with 10 ... b5!? 11. tLle3 ttJsf6 12.a4 �e4 13. 'il'b3 b4 20 fxeS 21.tbc6 i.. b 7
.••

14.l::td l J:[c8 15 .dxc5 .Q.xc5=. 2I...J:[b7 22.tLlxd8


6. lbxc4 cs 7.dxcS hcS 8.a3! 22.lbxe7+ �8 23. heS! lbbc4 24. bd6
Starting to seize space on the queenside. lbxd6 2S. tbc6 hc6 26 .J:r.xc6 tll b S •

8 0-0 9.b4 i..e 7 10. i.. b 2 1i'c7 11 .J:r.c1


..• • 27. l:r.xd8+ l:r.xd8 28 .J:r.a6 •

lbbd7 12.e4!? The game is practically decided, but all the


Principled play. Simpler was 12.e3 b6 13. �e2 same Ivanchuk's inexorable technique at
�b7 14.0-0 i:rac8 15. �d3 'il'b8 16. 'il'e2 J:[fd8 the end of the game is impressive. And this
17. tLlfe5 h6 18.J:[fdl with a microscopic against the best player in the world!
advantage for White. 28 .J:r.c8 29.h4 .J:r.c7 30. i..g4 es 31 .J:r.aS
••. •

12 bS?
••• tbd6 32 .J:r.xes tbc4 33 . .J:r.fS+ '1te7 34 . .J:r.f3

This move leads to a difficult endgame. Of tbes 3S .J:r.e3 '1td6 36. i..e 2 h6 37.f4 .J:r.c1+

course, in a classical game Magnus would 38. �2 tbd7 39. i..f3 .J:r.c2+ 40. '1tg3 .J:r.a2
never have played ... b7-b5 . 41 .J:r.d3+ '1te7 42 .J:r.c3 '1td8 43. '1tg4 .J:r.d2
• •

12 ... a5! In the game it was from this square 44 .J:r.c6 .J:r.d3 4S .J:r.a6 tllf 6+ 46. �S .J:r.d 7
• •

that the white cavalry invaded the Viking 47.g4 llJe8 48.gS hxgS 49.hxgs llld 6 +
ranks and inflicted irreparable losses. S0. '1tg6 tll b S S1 .J:r.aS tbd4 S2. i..g4 1-0

Exploiting a little tactical motif, Black could


have either simplified the position, or gained The current World Champion played
new squares on the queenside: 13.b5 (13.bxa5 unevenly in both championships. He began
b5 14.axb6 tLlxb6 15. tLlcd2 'il'xc2 16.J:[xc2 �xa3; sluggishly, making blunders, but the only
13. tLlxa5 'il'xc2 14. J:[xc2 tLlxe4 15 . .Q.d3 tLldc5 thing that was constant was his champion's
16 . .Q.e2 �d7 17.0-0 rues 18.tLlc4 tLla4) 13 ... b6 character. Magnus fought like a lion. A
14.e5 tLld5 15. �d3 h6 16.0-0 tLlc5 17. �d4 �b7= lion, who after each game returned to his
13.tbaS 1i'xc2 14 .J:r.xc2 ltJxe4 1S. bbS
• 'cage' (a VIP room courteously provided by
tbd6 16. i..c6 l:r.b8 17.0-0 the organizers) and to his 'pride' (Carlsen's
Black has great problems with completing his wonderful family, who all came to Doha) ,
development. in order to lick his wounds, tune up for the
17 lbb6 18 . .J:r.d1 .J:r.d8 19. llJeS!
.•• next game, and simply to prepare for the next
'Only forward, and only all together'. This old opponent. Photographs were even published
pioneers' slogan fully applies to this offensive recording the moment when Carlsen the lion
by the white pieces. leaped into the playing arena.
27
With white, of course, Magnus played other the gentle, positional 9.f3. As they say, a
everything. Even l.e3 at the start of the matter of taste.
tournament. At the same time, it was not
possible to observe any particular logic in
his choice of first move. Possibly before a
game he simply managed to decide on the
openings that were most uncomfortable for
the opponent.

I should mention the attempt to return the


Rauzer Variation of the Sicilian Defence to
top-class chess. The main games in the Rauzer
opera were performed with black by the
honoured veterans Ivanchuk and Kozul. Bl) 9 .f3 looked less convincing in this
tournament: 9 ... .Q.e7 10 . .Q.e3 0-0 ll.g4 till: d4
Magnus Carlsen 12. �xd4 �c6 13.h4 ll:id7 14. \t>bl b5. Here, 15.gS
Cristobal Henriquez Vlllagra b4 16. ll:ie2 ll:ie5 was seen in Leko-Kozul, Doha
Doha World Rapid 2016 (3) Rapid 2016, with a complex game. The game
1.e4 cs 2 . tlJf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4. tlJxd4 tlJf6 Sanal-Kozul in the blitz event saw 15.hS h6
5. tlJc3 tlJc6 6 . .igs e6 7. 'ii'd 2 a6 s.o-o-o 16. 'ifg2 b4 17. ll:ie2 'if aS. Here at the disposal of
the only Turkish player in the championship
in Doha was a typical Rauzer possibility of
changing course with 18 . .Q.e3! and carrying
out a regrouping of his forces in the centre:
18 ... l:lfc8 19. ll:id4 �b7 20. �d3 ll:ie5 21.gS with a
good attack for White.
B2) 9.f4 b5 10. �xf6 gxf6 11 . ..t>bl
B21) ll ... l::tc 8 12.fS ll:ie5 13.fxe6 fxe6 14. ll:ice2
'ife7 (14... ll:ic4 15. 'it'd3 e5 16. ll:ifS) 15. ll:if4 �g7
16 . .Q.e2 0-0 17 . .l:llifl l:lc5 18.ll:ihS ll:ic4 19 . .Q.xc4
bxc4 20. till:g 7 \t>xg7 21.l:lf3± Tari-Kozul, Doha
8 ... h6 Blitz 2016;
A) Apart from the move in the game, B22) Two days earlier in the rapid, Li Chao
Ivanchuk himself also tried 8 ... .Q.e7 9 . .Q.xf6 tried ll ... b4 12. ll:ice2 'iYb6 13.g3. A fashionable
gxf6 10.f4 till: d4 11. 'ii'xd4 b5 12.eS d5 13.ke2 positional line in which White simply
�b7 14.fS fxe5 15. 'ii'x eS �f6 16. 'S'g3 'ifb8 completes his development. 13 ... l:lc8 14. �g2 hS
17. 'it'h3 d4 18.fxe6 dxc3 (18 ... �f4+ 19 . ..t>bl dxc3 15 . .Q.f3 ll:ia5 16.b3 �g7
20.exf7+ @f8 21.a3! gave White a strong attack
in the game Sengupta-Edouard, Hastings .! • .!
2010/11) 19 . .l:lli fl ? (here the game ceases .t .\ .t
to be of theoretical interest, since instead .\ .\ .\
.\ 'if
of the move played, Grischuk could have
� .\
gained a decisive advantage after 19.exf7+
@f8 20. 'i!Yh6+ �g7 21. 'i!Yb6) 19 ... 'ifes 20. l:ldel .\ (fj £::, £::,
'ifgS+ 21.'>t>bl �xg2 22.exf7+ ..t>f8 23. �e6 £::, � £::,
.Q.xfl 24. l:lxfl .Q.e7 25.bxc3 l::td 8-+ Grischuk­ £::, £::, if (fj £::,
Ivanchuk, Doha Blitz 2016; � I:t �
B) After 8 ... .Q.d7 there are two approaches -
one is the forceful and critical 9.f4, and the
28
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

17.g4!? (an unusual decision for the given type • .i. 'if • •
of position. It was possible to await active ' .t.
measures by Black with 17. nhgl) 17 ... h4 (17 ... ' .t. .t. � .t.
hxg4 18 . .Q.xg4 tt:lc6+ was stronger) 18.gS fxgS .i. .t.
19 . nhgl l:tcS 20.fxgS± Anand-Li Chao, Doha � Ji
Rapid 2016.
9.tlJxc6
� ttJ �
9. �e3 ge7 10.f3 tt:lxd4 ll. �xd4 eS 12 . .Q.e3 .Q.e6
� � � � �
13.@bl l:tc8 14.g4 �as is considered more @ .U Ji l:[
traditional.
There is no need to fear the exchange 13 . .ie2
sacrifice: 1S.a3 l:txc3 16. 'iYxc3 �xc3 17.bxc3 13.f3 0-0 14.eS tt:JhS? (14 ... tt:Jd7 would have
dS 18.exdS tt:lxdS 19. £.d2 £.xa3 20. �cH!; given Black good play) 1S. �xh6!! the sacrifice
nevertheless, in Naiditsch-Henriquez Villagra, works 1S ... gxh6 16. 'if xh6 tt:lg7 17. �d3 fS 18.g4!
Doha Rapid 2016, there followed lS. ti:JdS?! the opening of the g-file gives the white rooks
'ti'xd2 16.tt:lxf6+ gxf6 17. l:txd2 hS. access to the black king 18 ... �xc3 19.bxc3 l:ta7
9 ... bxc6 10 . .if4 d5 11. 'if e3 .ib4 12.a3 20.nhgl 'if aS 21.gxfS exfS 22. 'it>d2 l:td8 23.l:tgS
Karjakin against Ivanchuk did not drive back d4 Perez Ponsa-Ivanchuk, Doha Rapid 2016.
the bishop, which apparently unsettled Vasily: Here one can talk about the champion's luck
12. �e2 0-0 13.eS tt:ld7 14.h4 cs 1S. �xh6 gxh6 of Ivanchuk in this tournament, since after
16. 'ifxh6 tt:lxeS 17. nh3 gxc3 18.bxc3 l:ta7 24.f4 Black has no defence against mate.
19. l:tg3+ tt:lg6 20.hS �h4 21.l:tg4 �h2 22.gd3 13 ... 0-0 14.e5 ltJh7
1-0, Karjakin-lvanchuk, Doha Blitz 2016. Perhaps 14 ... tt:Jd7!? 1S. l!k'g3 �c7 16. �xh6 .Q.xeS.
Ivanchuk is an Evil Genie for Carlsen: three 15.h4 :bS 16. lDa4 .ic7 17. .i.d3 f6 18.g4
times he denied Magnus the rapid champions fxe5 19 . .ixes lDf6 20.f3 lbeS 21.f4 .ixeS
titles. Both in rapid and in blitz, when he 22.fxeS 'if as 23. :hf1 'ifxa4 24. :XfS+
himself simply outplayed Carlsen, and in this @xfS 25. 'ifcs+ Wf7 2s. :t1+ lDf6 27.exf6
game when he offered zero resistance against gxf6 28.gS fS 29.g6+ '.txg6 30. 'if d6 1-0
Karjakin.
12 ... .ias Against stronger opponents, the World
Champion employed the London System. The
early development of the bishop on f4, which
had become ultra-popular in recent times,
has acquired many followers, mainly thanks
to the small amount of necessary theoretical
knowledge, and also the ease of remembering
the basic ideas. Many players, including,
incidentally, women players, also resort to the
services of the London System exclusively in
blitz and rapid.

Magnus Carlsen
Viswanathan Anand
Doha Wo rld B l itz 2016 (20)

Magnus 1.d4 ltJf6 2 . .i.f4 d5 3.e3 cs 4.c3 lDc6


Carlsen 5 . lbd 2 e6 6. lDgf3 .id6 7. .i.g3 0-0 8 . .ibS
A strictly positional line aimed at weakening
the dark squares in Black's position followed
by occupying them.
29
in Zhukova- Sviridova, Doha Blitz Women
2016 (1-0, 29);
C) 8 ... �e7 occurred in two games of
Alexandra Goryachkina:
Cl) 9.0-0 °iYb6 (9 ... tt::lhS !?) 10. �xc6 bxc6
11. 'l:!Vc2 �a6 12. nfel cxd4 13.exd4 cs+ Zhukova­
Goryachkina, Doha Blitz Women 2016;
C2) 9. �d3 h6 10.tt::le S °iYb6 11. l:l'.b l �d7 12.0-0
nfd8 (Ju Wenjun-Goryachkina, Doha Rapid
Women 2016) 13.f4 �e8 14. �hH.
8 ... a6 9. hc6 bxc6 10. 'ifa4 J:lbS
A) 8 ... tt::l e 7 would have avoided the exchange 10 ... �b7 11. �xd6 °fgxd6 12. 'ii'a3 tt::ld 7 13.tt::lb 3±
on c6 and avoided the problems with the dark leads to similar problems, as was seen in
squares, which led to Anand's defeat: 9. �d3 Charochkina-Pham Le Thao Nguyen, Doha
b6 10.e4 and now: Blitz Women 2016.
Al) 10 ... �xg3 11.hxg3 dxe4 12.tt::lxe4 tt::lg 6. 11. 'ifa3
Magnus has acquired a problem - he began If ll. �xd6 'iYxd6 12. °iYa3 tt::ld 7 13.tt::lb 3 es
badly on the first day of the rapid, and again 14.dxcS °fgg6.
here on the third day. Here, 13.tt::le S!, allowing 11 ... i.xg3 12.hxg3 cxd4 13.cxd4 as
the queen to go to hS, would have quickly 14.0-0 'ii' b 6 15.b3 �a6 16. J:lfc1
concluded matters: 13 ... tt::lx e4 14. �xe4 l:l'.b8
IS. �hS +-. The gods also make mistakes ... ••
Instead, the Norwegian played 13.dxcS , then l i i
overplayed his hand, and lost due to a blunder
.t 'if i i 'i
against Anton Korobov, another Ukrainian
i
player who distinguished himself with fresh
and original chess, and who seriously spoiled �
the Norwegian's mood in the very first game � CiJ �
of the last playing day of rapid chess. ttJ � �
A2) 10 ... dxe4 does not lead to full equality: � w
11.tt::lx e 4 llJxe4 12. �xe4 l:l'.b 8 13.dxcS �xg3
14.hxg3 fS IS. °fgxd8 l:l'.xd8 16 ... tbd7?
The es-square could have been controlled
I .t I * from g4: 16 ... tt::lg 4 17. °iYcS nfc8 18.'iYxb6 l:l'.xb6
i I) i i 19. l:l'.c3;t. Now White penetrated with
i i 17. 'ifdG
and won on move 24.
� i

CiJ � Pham Le Thao Nguyen
� � Ju Wenjun
� ti Doha World Rapid 2016 ( 1 )

1.d4 tllf6 2. tllf3 d5 3 . �f4 cs 4.e3 tllc 6


16.c6!+- Carlsen-Bosiocic, Doha Blitz 2016; 5. tllb d2 e6 6.c3 cxd4
B) 8 ...cxd4 9.exd4 °fgc7 10. �xd6 °fgxd6 11.0-0 Black fixes the Karlsbad structure, which,
�d7 12. �d3 nfe8 13. l:l'.el eS 14.dxeS tt::lxe S other things being equal, gives a perfectly
lS. l:l'.xeS l:l'..x e S 16.tt::lc4 dxc4 17. �xh7+ @xh7 good game.
18. °fgxd6 is a well-known trick that was seen 7.exd4 tllh 5

30
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

f6 17. lLJe3 'ii'f7 18. J:radl @h8 19. �c2 a6= Zhao
Xue-Ju Wenjun, Doha Blitz Women 2016;
B) 10. 'ii' e 2 ..Q.d7 11. lLJeS tlJxe5 12 . ..Q.xeS f6
13. �g3 0-0 14. ffi nc8 15.0-0 tUxg3 16.hxg3
�d6 17. nfel a6 18. 'il#'d2 'lt>g7 19. ne2 'ii'c 7
20.nael nfe8= Batsiashvili-Ju Wenjun, Doha
Rapid Women 2016.
9 . .te2 .te7 10. lbe5 tbxeS 11 . .heS f6
12 . .tg3 tbxg3 13.hxg3 e5 14. 'it'a4+ .td 7
15 . ..tbS e4 16. tbf1 a6 17. hd7+ 'it'xd 7
s . .tga 18. 'it'b3 f5� Y2-Y2 (34)
...

A) 8. �e3 �d6
Al) 9.g3 g6 10. �g2 0-0 11.0-0 f5?! (11 ... lLJg7
12. �h6 J:re8=) 12. �h6 J:re8 13. J:rel 'il#'f6 (Zhao Anton Korobov
Xue-Gaponenko, Doha Blitz Women 2016) Leinier Dominguez Perez
14.c4! tbxd4 15.cxd5 tUxf3+ 16. �xf3±; Doha World Rapid 2016 ( 7 )

A2) 9.lLJe5 g6 10. tU<l3 (10. �b5 0-0 11. lUxc6 1.d4 d 5 2 . .tf4 tbf6 3.tbf3 e6 4.e3 cs
bxc6 12. �xc6 J:rb8 13. lLJb3 �a6 14. 'ik'c2 'il#'c7 s. lbbd2 tbc6 6.c3 .td6 7. .tg3 0-0 s . .td3
15. �a4 tbg7=i=) 10 ... 0-0 ll. �e2 tUg7 12.0-0 'ik'c7 This, strictly speaking, is the London System.
13.g3 (Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son-Ganguly, 8 ... b6
Doha Blitz 2016) 13 ... f6!? 14. �f3 'ii'f7 15. J:rcl
tUfS=
B) 8. �g5 f6 9. �e3 �d6 10.g3 0-0 ll. �g2 f5
12. lLJeS f4 13. 'il#'xh5 fxe3 14.fxe3 tlJxeS 15.dxeS
�cs 16. l:[fl �xe3 17. nxf8+ 'il#'xf8 18. 'il#'f3 'il#'xf3
19.tlJxf3 �d7= Giri-So, London 2016.
8... g6
It is also possible to first play 8 ... �e7 9 . �d3
and then 9 ... g6:
A) 10.0-0 0-0 11. ne1 �d7 12. 'ii'e 2 tbxg3
13.hxg3 �d6 14. 00 'ii'e 7 15. lLJe3 nae8 16. lLJg4
s.lbes
A) 9. 'il#'e2 is an attempt to advance e3-e4
in a more prepared version: 9 ... �b7 10.J:[dl
h6 (10 ... lLJe7 ll.e4;!; Melkumyan- Henriquez
Villagra, Doha Blitz 2016) and now:
Al) ll.e4 �xg3 12.hxg3 cxd4 13.cxd4 dxe4
(13 ... lLJb4 14.e5 tLixd3+ 15. 'il#'xd3 lLJe4=i=) 14.tlJxe4
lLJb4 15 . lLJc3 tlJxd3+ 16. �xd3 (Quintiliano
Pinto-Zhang Zhong, Doha Blitz 2016) 16 ... aS!+;
A2) ll. �xd6 'f!Vxd6 12.e4 dxe4 13. lLJxe4 tbxe4
14. �xe4 J:[ad8 15.dxcS 'ii'xc5 16.0-0 'tlf e7=
Artemiev-Korobov, Doha Blitz 2016.
B) 9.e4 is an idea of Vietnamese players,
and the best reply to this move staggers the
imagination: 9 ... �e7! IO.es lLJh5 ll.a3
Bl) ll ... c4 12. �c2 b5 13. lLJgS �xg5 14. 'ti'xh5
Ju g6 15. 'ti'e2 h5 16.h4 �h6 (Pham Le Thao
Wenjun

31
Nguyen-Harika Dronavalli, Doha Rapid The other hero of Doha, Sergey Karjakin, also
Women 2016) 17.'tWf3 aS 18. �f4±; avoided the main continuations with white,
B2) 11 ... aS 12. �e2 ..Q.b7 (12.. Jb7 13.0-0 g6 playing either 1.00, or l.e4 in combination
14. �e3 c4 1S . ..Q.c2 bS 16. �h6 came on the with the Italian Game. And against the
board in Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son-Salinas attempts by Salem and Adly to go into a
Herrera, Doha Rapid 2016. Here it is now Najdorf, he simply gave check on bS. This is
possible to play 16 ... b4 17.axb4 axb4 18. lha7 understandable - who would want to reveal
0,xa7 19 . ..Q.h4! .Q.xh4 20.0,xh4 'tWxh4 21. tllf3 the numerous opening ideas, prepared but
'§'e7 22.g400) 13.0-0 0,xg3 14.hxg3 'irc8 1S. @h2 not in fact demonstrated in the match with
..Q.a6 and Black was doing well in Nguyen Carlsen?
Ngoc Truong Son-Tregubov, Doha Blitz 2016. In connection with this, another very
9 ... .ib7 10.0-0 'fi'c7 11.f4 4Je7 fashionable variation is of interest, namely
the set-up with a2-a4 in the Italian Game.
Here it should be mentioned that on
the whole Black coped with his opening
problems.

Sergey Karjakln
Maxim Matlakov
Doha World Rapid 2016 ( 15 )

1.e4 e5 2. ltJf3 ltJc6 3 . .ic4 .ic5 4.0-0 ltJf6


5.d3 0-0 6.a4

12. 'ii' b 1!? K i. 'if x•


An interesting attempt to confuse an 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
experienced opponent. After 12. 'fi'f3 Black � �
splendidly carried out the classical plan of
switching the knight to d6: 12 ... tllfS 13 . .Q.f2
i. 1
�e7 14.g4 tlld 6 lS. l:ladl tllfe4 16.�el f6-+, in � i. �
Geldiyeva-Pham Le Thao Nguyen, Doha Blitz � ttJ
Women 2016. � � � � �
12 ... 'fi'cS?! � ttJ i. � z:t �
Excessively slow and methodical. More
forceful was 12 ... g6 13 . ..Q.h4 tlle 8 14. �el f6=F as 6 ... a6
in Gholami-Krush, Doha 201S. 6 ... aS fundamentally prevents b2-b4, but this
13 . .ih4! ltJf5 14. hf5 exf 5 15. hf6 gxf6 move also has its minuses, the chief of which
16. 4Jef3 is White's firm control of the squares c4
The two knights are obviously stronger than and bS. Levon Aronian, who had also played
the bishop pair, and also the tripled pawns this against Maxime Vachier-Lagrave in
will most probably be reduced to two. White London 2016, got a good game with it against
won. Nepomniachtchi in the rapid.
It is interesting that in the women's 7.h3 d6 8.c3 4Je7
tournament Black coped better with the After 8 ... .Q.a7:
London System, doing especially well after A) Nothing is given by the attempt to play
6 ... cxd4. Which is not surprising, since this for the pin of the knight 9 . ..Q.gs. The best that
move had already been employed at high level White can achieve after the piece sacrifice is a
by none other than Wesley So against Giri, draw: 9 ... h6 10 . .Q.h4 gS 11. 0,xgS hxgS 12 . ..Q.xgS
precisely in London. 'it>g7 13. 'tWf3 l:lli 8 14. llld 2 'it>g6 1s . ..Q.e3 Wg7
16. �gS @g6 17 . .Q.e3 Wg7= 18Jbel?! ..Q.e6? (a
32
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

serious mistake; the queen should have been White can also attempt first to transfer his
brought into play with 18 ... ..Wg8+) 19 . ..Wg3+ knight to g3 via fl, and only then prepare the
@f8 20. �xe6 fxe6 21. �xa7 lha7 22.f4± d3-d4 advance, but Volokitin failed to get an
Nepomniachtchi-Fressinet, Doha Rapid 2016; advantage with this idea against Leko in the
B) 9.ti:lbd2 h6 10. l:lel rapid event.
Bl) 10. .. tbhS!? 11. 00 (11. ti:lxeS ..Wh4-+ Pahtz­ 11 ... c6 12.b4
Lagno, Doha Blitz Women 2016) 11... ..Wf6 An attempt to improve on the play in one of
12.�e3 �e6; his own games from the World Championship
B2) 10. .. l:1e8 ll.b4 �e6 12. �xe6 lhe6 match, although there also things were not
easy for Black: 12. �fl aS 13.dxeS dxeS 14. �c2
�e6 15 . ti:lc4 �c7 16.bH Carlsen-Karjakin,
New York Wch rapid tiebreak 2016.

K j_'if K*
1. i iii
i ii 66
i
!'::, !'::, !ii.. !'::, !'::,
!'::, ttJ !'::,
13 . ..Wc2 A good example of exploiting a spatial ttJ !'::, !'::,
advantage on the queenside. White was better � !ii.. � :S @
in Nepomniachtchi-Borisek, Doha Rapid 2016,
and Karjakin-Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son, Doha 12 ... exd4 13.cxd4 dS 14.exdS tlJxdS
Rapid 2016, although later Sergey contrived 15.bS
even to lose this game. Later in blitz Sergey played 15. 'fr'b3 �e6 16.bS
9. tlJbd2 axbS 17.axbS ti:ldf4 18. �xe6 tbxe6 19. �a3? (a
9.�gS ti:lg6 10.d4 �a7 11.dxe5 dxe5 12. 'iWxd8 blunder which later led to victory not only
lhd8 13. ti:la3 (13. �xf6 gxf6 14. ti:lbd2 ti:lf4=F) in the game, but also in the championship.
13 ... �d7 14. tbc2 �c6 15. �xf6 gxf6 16. l:1fel After the simple 19. �b2 White would have
'it>g7= Henriquez Villagra-Flores, Doha Rapid retained definite pressure) 19 ... ti:lxd4 20.ti:lxd4
2016. �xd4 21. l:ladl l:1e8 22. ti:le4 ..Wb6 23. ti:ld6 lhel+
9 ... 0g6 10. :e1 h7 11.d4 24. lhel �xf2+ 25. @hl �xel?? (25 ... 'i!Yc7 26. �fl
'fr'e7=F) 26 . ..Wxf7+ @h8 27. �b2 �g8 28. ti:lfS 1-0,
Karjakin-Leko, Doha Blitz 2016.
15 ... axbS 16.axbS ..ie6 17.bxc6 bxc6
18. :aG ..ib6
18 ... ti:lc7 19. lhc6 ..Wd7 was simpler.
19. :Xas 'ifxas 20. tbgs ..ixd4 21. tt:Jdf3
..if6 22. tt:Jxe6 fxe6 23. :Xe6;!; 1 -0 (34) ...

Sergey Karjakin
Viswanathan Anand
Doha World Bl itz 2016 (8)

1.e4 es 2. tt:Jf3 tt:Jc6 3 . ..ic4 ..ics 4.0-0 tt:Jt6


5.d3 d6
Sergey With this move Black avoids plans with a
KarJakln rapid ... d7-d5.
33
6.a4 16 . .ie3 dS
Anand carries out the standard push, since
it is hard to imagine how else Black could
improve his position.
17.exdS
The tempting 17. lllx eS lllx eS 18.dxeS tt:Jxe4
would allow White to win a pawn. 19. tt:Jxe4
dxe4 20. �d4 ..Q.b6 21. ..Q.xe4 �xd4 22.cxd4, but
Black gets counterplay by 22 ... 'ir'b6 23. �c2
l:tad8 24. 't!Yd3 g6 2S. l:tedl cS.
17... .ixdS
6 ... h6 17 ... 'ir'xdS 18. 't!Ybl! e4 19. lllxe4 tt:Jxe4 20 . ..Q.xe4
It is also possible to begin with 6 ... a6, securing 'ifhS 21. 'ti'c2;!;.
the bishop a comfortable existence on the 18. .ixg6 fxg6 19. tbxeS .hes 20.dxeS
gl-a7 diagonal. 7.c3, followed by the queenside l:txeS 21 . .id4
expansion with b2-b4 (sooner or later) , was 21. �c2!? �f7 22.c4 'ti'e7 23. �d2 l:txel+ 24. l:txel
played in Xu Yi-Borisek, Doha Blitz 2016, and 't!Y cS 2S. l:tcl;!;.
Najer- Inarkiev, Doha Rapid 2016. 21 ... l:txe1+ 22 . ...xe1 Wd6 23 . ... d2 l:te8
7.c3 as 8. ltJbd2 24. l:te1 l:txe1+ Y2-Y2 (32)
...

8 . l:tel 0-0 9. llla3 (I have always had a rather


sceptical regard for this development of the As a player who scored l.S out of 10 with
knight at a3, although it is direct consequence black in blitz (8.S out of 11 with white) , I am
of the plan with a2-a4) 9 ... l:te8 10. lllc2 �e6 very interested in an answer to the question
11. �bS �b6 12.d4 �d7 13.dxeS tt:JxeS 14. �xd7 of how the champions defend the black
'i!Vxd7 1S . �f4 lllg 6+ Xu Yi-Alexandrov, Doha pieces. For example, in 17 games Karjakin
Blitz 2016. suffered only one defeat, and that was when
8 ... 0-0 9 . l:te1 CiJe7 he overstepped the mark in a better endgame
The transference of the knight to g6 is with Grandelius.
currently becoming virtually Black's main l.e4 eS! - in classical, in rapid and in blitz,
idea in the Italian Game. Karjakin remains true to himself, and the
10. ltJf1 c6 11. tbg3 .ib6 12 . .ib3 tbg6 main thing is that he is not afraid of possible
13.h3 l:te8 14.d4 .ie6 1S . .ic2 .ic7 forced draws. Moreover, he did not have to
demonstrate anything special with black, and
Dominguez and Yu Yangyi were themselves
the first to take the bait, demonstrating
peaceful intentions. In the closed openings
the Russian player invariably went in for the
Nimzo-/Queen's Indian complex, which in
fact led him to the match with Carlsen.
In general, the assignment of the medals at
the World Championship in Doha can fully
be called purely Ukrainian. After all, Vasily
Ivanchuk and Anna Muzychuk, and even
In principle this position frequently occurs Sergey Karjakin currently playing for Russia,
in the normal Italian Game without the are all products of the Ukrainian chess school.
inclusion of the moves a2-a4 and ... a7-aS. It is And whereas the entire chess world sincerely
hard to say in whose favour this inclusion is, rejoiced for Vasily, and Karjakin's victory
but from White's side I would prefer to retain was fully predictable , Anna Muzychuk's two
the mobility of the pawn structure. gold medals in the women's championships
34
Bologan's Opening Bulletin

cannot but earn respect. What opening secrets


enabled her to achieve such a result in rapid
ch ess?
With white strictly 1.e4, with no open
Sicilians, main-line Spanishes etc. Similar to
the men's picture, wouldn't you agree?

Anna Muzychuk
Sarasadat Khademalsharieh
Doha World Rapid 2016 (9)

1.e4 es 2. tllf3 tllc6 3. tllc3 tllf6 4. �b5

Anna
Muzychuk

Tomashevsky and Naiditsch-Tomashevsky;


Tomashevsky lost both these blitz games,
however.
C) 4 ... �d6 5.d3 (5.0-0 0-0 6.d3 was seen in
Muzychuk-Lagno, Doha Blitz Women 2016)
5 ... 0-0 6.a3 l:!.e8 7.g4!!
This classical opening rarely occurs in modern
tournament practice. It is occasionally
employed in rapidplay or blitz. Counting on
the opponent being unprepared may work
perfectly well.
4 ... �cs
Provoking the enemy fire.
A) 4 ... tl:ld4 is considered the most critical
move. In Doha, this came on the board in
Vallejo-Alexandrov (blitz) , where Vallejo
played 5. �a4, and twice with Naiditsch as
White, who tried 5 . tl:lxd4 exd4 6. tl:ldS against Of course, this is not a novelty, but for rapid
Dominguez in the blitz event. It is hard to say play the idea is undoubtedly fresh and very
what White is hoping for in this variation. strong.
Perhaps simply a draw? Instead of 6 ... tl:lxdS , Cl) The pawn can well be taken; it is not
Alexandra Kosteniuk decided to try and really so poisoned: 7 ... tl:lxg4 and now:
exploit the poor placing of White's bishop and CU) 8 . l:[gl tLlf6 9.�gS 9..e 7 10. �xc6 dxc6
knight by 6 ... tl:lg8, but after the simple 7. 'iVhS 11. tl:lxeS tl:lxe4 12. tl:lxe4 �xgS 13. tl:lxf7 @xf7
it is hard to find a satisfactory defence: 7 ... �d6 14. �hS+ g6 15. °i¥xh7+ Wf8 16. �h8+ @f7=;
8.eS g6 9. �e2 �c5 10. VWc4 �b6 11. tl:lxb6 axb6 C12) 8 . tl:lgS and now:
12. �xd4± A.Muzychuk- Kosteniuk, Doha C121) 8 ... tl:lh6 9.l:[gl �cS 10. tl:ldS tl:ld4 11. °i¥h5
Rapid Women 2016. �f8 (11 ... tl:lxc2+ 12. Wdl tl:lxal walks into a
Against Bu Xiangzhi, Naiditsch had more mate after 13. tl:lxh7 Wxh7 14. l:!.xg7+) 12. tl:lf3 c6
success with 5. �c4. 13. tl:lxd4 cxdS 14. �xh6 exd4 15. �xg7 �xg7
B) 4 ... �b4 is the most orthodox reply, 16. VWh6+- Ivanisevic-Stefanova, Skopje 2013;
promising Black steady, gradual equality after C122) 8 ... tLlf6 9. �c4 l:!.£8 10. l:!.gl tl:ld4 11. tl:le2
5.0-0 0-0 6.d3 �xc3 7.bxc3 d6, Bologan- tl:lxe2 12. 'iVxe2 c6 13. �d2 �cs 14.0-0-0
35
dS 15 . �b3 'iVe7 16.J:tg2 aS 17. J:tdgl g6:f 13 ... ttJd 7 14. J:.ae1 llJc5 15.e5
Nemeth-Srbis, Croatia tt 2014, White's attack The other pawn move is no less dangerous
has misfired. for Black. 15.fS!? 'iVeS 16.J:te3 lllx d3 17.cxd3 f6
C2) 7 ... �cS 8.J:tgl dS 9.gS lllg4 I0.1:tg2 18. �f4 li'e7 19. li'hS t.
practically forces Black to give up two pieces 15 ... ltJxd3 16.cxd3 dxe5 17.fxe5 �d7
for a rook with 10 ... lllx f2, when White was 18.d4 �c6 19. 'ifg3 'ifg6
better in Naiditsch-Malakhov, Doha Blitz Here, in accordance with all the rules of
2016. conflict, it was essential to remove the king
D) 4 ... d6 transposes into the Steinitz from the dangerous opposition with the
Variation of the Ruy Lopez after 5.d4 exd4 queen by 19 ... @hS!=.
6. lllx d4 �d7, which came on the board in 20.c4 �e4 21. l:l.f4 �d3 22.dS f6 23.exf6
Naiditsch-Jobava, Doha Rapid 2016. gxf6 24. l:l.e6
5.0-0 0-0 6. lbxe5 lbxe5 7.d4 From the standpoint of converting the
advantage, it was better to try and keep both
white rooks on the board with 24. �xf6 'f:i'xg3
25.hxg3 J:tae8 26. J:tdl±.
24... �fS 25. l:l.xf6 l:l.xf6 26. bf6 'ifxg3
27.hxg3 �d7 28.cS
Practical chances would have been retained
by 28.g4t, not allowing Black to become
established on the light squares.
28 ... l:l.e8 29. @12 h5!
Securing a post for the bishop on g4. Black
held the draw without any more problems.
White certainly regains the piece; it only
remains to be seen in which version. And with black Anna Muzychuk adhered to
7... �d6 8.dxe5 Karjakin's champion prescription, answering
Possibly home preparation. It is unlikely that l.e4 strictly with 1 ... eS. True, in the closed
Anna mixed up the variation. Here everyone openings she fianchettoed her bishop on g7,
plays 8.f4, when 8 ... lllc 6 is the most accurate which did not prevent her from keeping the
reply. black goal safe and sound throughout both
8 ... hes 9 . �d3 hc3 10.bxc3 'if e7 tournaments.
At the board it is not easy to work out what
is best. 10 ... d6 is possible, but here also White Conclusions:
develops as in the game with 11. �gS J:te8 12.f4. 1. The white opening repertoire of the leading
11. �gs players in rapid chess and in blitz differs
n.'f:i'f3 d6 12. �g5 li'e5 13. �xf6 li'xf6 14. li'xf6 significantly from their classical repertoire.
gxf6=. Relative sidelines predominate.
11 ... d6 12.f4 'ife6 13. 'iff3 2. With black, on the other hand, it is better to
It was also possible to develop the queen on play sound, well-tested set-ups, not especially
e2. avoiding a draw.

36
S U RVEYS

Featuring

2 5 Opening Variations
Sici l i a n Defe n ce N aj d o rf Va riatio n S I 8 . 14 ( 897 )

S m a l l d iffe rences
by Arth u r P ij pe rs

1. e4 cs
2. tllf3 d6 .i ') .i. • .i. .i
3. d4 cxd4 i ') i i
4. tllx d4 tllf6 i i .\
s. tllc3 a6 �
6. �gs e6 ttJ ttJ .i
7. f4 'ifb6
8. 'ifd2 'ifxb2 it' �� � �
9. l:bl 'ii'a 3 � @.i :s
10. eS h6
11. i.h4 dxeS Play usually continued 14 ... �dS 1S. �e3
12. fxeS tllfd 7 �xeS (lS ... �cS was heavily discussed in
13. tlle 4 'ifxa2 the early days of this line, e.g. in Surveys
14. l:dl 'ifdS by Berg in Yearbook 86 and Zakhartsov
1S. 'ife3 'ii'x eS in Yearbook 89, but is now regarded
16. i.e2 i.cs as inferior) 16. �e2 �cs 17. �g3 �xd4
17. i.g3 'ifdS 18. �xd4 �aS+ 19. �d2 0-0 20. �d6, leading
18. c4 bd4 to one of the main theoretical positions.
19. :Xd4 'ifaS+ Many games have been played here,
20. l:d2 0-0 and it seems that Black is under some
21. i.d6 pressure, although he should have enough
resources for equality .
.i ') .i. .1 •
i ') i i
i .i .\ .\
'if
� ttJ

� .i � �
@ :s

Tazelaa r's novelty


In the past decade, the main battleground
in the Najdorf Poisoned Pawn has been
the line with 10.eS and 14. �dl. Louk Tazelaar

38
Survey SI 8.14

Already back in 2007, the correspondence Compa risons


player Louk Tazelaar discovered a When analysing the position after 21. �d6
remarkable alternative line, it is very important to always compare
the lines with those in which the pawn
K � i. • K is still on c2. The theory in the position
i � i i with the pawn on c2 can be used as
i i i a guideline, but in many lines slight
.i. .. differences can drastically change the
ttJ ttJ evaluation of the position. Therefore,
� .i before diving more deeply into the
� .i � � matter, I have made a list of differences
�� n between our position and the analogous
one with the pawn on c2:
viz. 17 ... �d5!?. After the critical 18.c4 • White has the option of c4-c5, cutting
Black is forced to play 18 ... �xd4 anyway, off the black queen along the fifth rank
and following 19 . .!:ixd4 �a5+ 20. l::td 2 and supporting a bishop or knight on
0-0 21. �d6 we obtain the previously d6. As we will see, this move is especially
mentioned theoretical position, but powerful when combined with a kingside
with an extra tempo for White: c2-c4. attack consisting of g2-g4. The possibility
At the first glance, Black's idea looks of c4-c5 also discourages checks on b6
absurd. General chess logic would after White has castled.
seem to dictate that this extra move is • White can no longer play c2-c3 to block
advantageous for White, if anything. a check from a5, cut off the black queen
General chess logic doesn't always apply from al, or attack a black knight on d4.
in the Poisoned Pawn, though, and • White can no longer place a bishop
correspondence players have found ways or knight on c4. This is most relevant in
to turn the inclusion of c2-c4 to Black's positions in which the queens have been
advantage. exchanged and White tries to quickly
The position after 21. �d6 has only manoeuvre his pieces around to exploit
occurred 10 times in regular play so far, Black's lag in development.
but it should be noted that most of these • Square b3 is no longer protected. This
games are from 2016, and by people like is only relevant in one line, but it is one
Giri and Vachier-Lagrave on the black of the most critical lines.
side. The correspondence database has • Black can play ... �b4 without having to
over 200 games after 21. �d6, and, as so worry about ideas along the fourth rank.
often in sharp positions, these games
give a very good idea of which moves Finally, it is time to start our concrete
are playable and which aren't. Another analysis of the position after 21. �d6.
important source of information about Here Black faces a crucial choice. He can
this line is Parimarjan Negi's excellent either move his rook to safety or sacrifice
book l.e4 vs The Sicilian I, in which the the exchange with 21...fS. Perhaps not
author gives a full repertoire for White in surprisingly, the former option has been
the 6 . .2.gS Najdorf, which includes many favoured in correspondence chess, while
ideas in our line. the latter is by far the main move in
39
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

over-the-board chess. Moving the rook though, with the great move 22 ... b6! from
gives White a huge attack that you will Nemchenko-Spirin. This move is not
definitely want an engine to help you possible with the pawn on c2, but here
defend against, while 21...fS is the safe it seems to be playable, although Black's
option, more suitable for a regular game. position remains dangerous.

Livi ng d angerously Human chess


Moving the rook to e8 is a mistake with Black's other option is 21...fS, giving back
the pawn on c2, and although there are the exchange immediately in order to
some extra subtleties now, White still take most of the sting out of White's
obtains a winning attack, as shown in kingside attack. This is the line that
the game Morokova-Woznica. This game attracted the attention of the top players,
is a great illustration of the strength of and has been played by Giri, Vachier­
combining the moves c4-c5 and g2-g4. Lagrave and Wei Yi. The play usually
Instead, if Black wants to move the rook, becomes more positional in nature, with
21. . . �d8 is the correct move. Then, in White trying to establish a bind in the
the analogous position with the pawn centre and on the queenside instead
on c2, the main line is 22. 'ii'g 3. However, of going for a direct attack against the
here Black can equalize immediately enemy king.
with the deep 22 ... 'ii' fS!, as shown in After the forced moves 22. �xf8 tbxf8
the game Dibley-Bancevich. More 23. tt::ld 6 tt::lb d7 White has two main
interesting is 22.g4!?, which is also Negi's options.
recommendation. Then 22 ... tt::lc 6? has
been played in several correspondence
games, and after 23.0-0 tt:JdeS

The immediate 24.g4 will be examined


in Poli-Zakharov, and Negi's more
restrained move 24. �f3 will be discussed
everybody settled for a slight endgame in the final game, Radjabov-Giri. After
advantage with white. However, 24.gS!!, as either move Black should be fine,
in Bekkesletten-Hagen, is an immediate although caution is required.
refutation of Black's play. In that game
a draw was agreed two moves later, but I Concl usion
will show that in the final position White Tazelaar's move 17 ... 'iWdS is a perfectly
has a winning attack. sound alternative to the more common
Recently, correspondence players have 17 ... �xd4. After 21. �d6 the move 21... .!:1d8
managed to improve this line for Black, should be reserved for daredevils and
40
Survey SI 8.14

correspondence players, and the only to be White's best try. Giri's response
correct follow-up is 22.g4 b6!. The human doesn't fully convince me yet in view of
move 21...fS looks fine for Black, who 26. IDidl, but I think Black is okay after
always gets enough counterplay in the either 24 . . 'if al+ or 25 ... tbf6.
.

sharper lines with 24.g4. Negi's plan with The Poisoned Pawn is alive and well - as
2 4. �f3. as played by Radjabov, is likely it should be!

Livi ng da ngerously himself in the position with the definitely look good enough for
21 . ..Q.dG pawn on c2. but here it's rather the win. 26. 1Vxe4 l:le7 27.gS
senseless because 2 8 . Axf4! lLif5 hxgs 28. "it'g6 tlJf8 29. "it'xgs tlJh7
Larisa Morokova 2 9 . lld3 'ifb6+ can be simply met 29 ... Ad7 doesn't help either:
Mlroslaw Woznica by 30.c5) 2 8 . tllg 5! hxg5 2 9 . l:h3 30. Axe7 '*fxe7 31. Af7+ 'it>h8
er ICCF 2013 tllf6 (29 ... 'it>g8 30. 'ifh7+ - lovely! (3 1... 'ifxf7 32. l:txf7 'it>xf7 33.l:tg2! g6
1.e4 cs 2 . tlJf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 - 30 . . . 'it>xh7 31. Af7#) 30. Ae5 and 34. l::tf2+ 'it>g8 35. 'iff6+-) 32. 'ifh5 +
4. tl\xd4 lLif6 s . lLic3 a6 6. �gs e6 Black resigned in Soh- M auro, tllh7 33.l:txd7 'ifg5+ 34. 'ifxg5
7.t4 Wb6 8. Wd2 Wxb2 9 . .l:ib1 ICCF 2016, because he gets tt:lxg5± 30.he7 tl\xgs 31. bd8
1Va3 10.eS dxeS 11.fxeS lLifd 7 mated after 3 0 . . . 'iff8 31. 'ifxg5 ti:lh3+ 32. Wh1± In this horrible
12. lLie4 h6 13. �h4 1Vxa2 14 . .l:id 1 'it>g8 3 2 . Ag6+-. 23.cSI I like this endgame Black still managed to
°iVdS 1S. 1Ve3 "it'xeS 16. �e2 move a lot, cutting off Black's put up a valiant defensive effort,
�cs 17. �g3 °iVdS 18.c4 bd4 only defender before starting the but it was no match for White's
19 . .l:ixd4 "it'aS+ 20 . .l:id2 0-0 kingside attack. Black's idea is computer-assisted technique.
21. �d6 .l:ie8? This is a mistake, 23. 'ifg3 tlle 7! 24. Ac7 'ifb4. 32 ... es 33. �f7+ Wh8 34.�c7
no matter where the white ti:lgS 3S. �dS �e6 36. l:lg1 bdS+
c-pawn is. 37 . .l:ixdS lLie6 38. hes J:it8 39.l:ld6
tl\xes 40. J:ixe6 lLic6 4Utd6 l:lf7
42. l:lgd i lLieS 43. l:l6dS ti:lg4
.I � .i. .I •
44. l:lhS+ tlJh6 4S. l:ld8+ Wh7 46.h3
' � l l as 47.l:lhdS .l:if1+ 48. Wg2 l:lf4
' ..i l l 49. l:l8d7 tZJts so. wg1 a4 s1. J:ixb7
'if tl\d4 S2.l:ldd7 lLie6 S3.l:le7 tl\xcs
S4 . .l:ixg7+ Wh6 SS.l:lh7+ wg6
� llJ S6. l:lbg7+ @ts S7.l:lf7+ @gs
'iV S8 . .l:ixf4 <lo>xf4 S9. <lo>g2 <lo>gs 60. <i;>f3
a: ..i � � tl\d3 61.h4+ <lo>f6 62. l:la 7 1-0
With the pawn still on c2 this
<\!( a:
loses instantly to 24. 'iff4 with Shane Dibley
22.0-0 lLic61? In this position, the double threat 25. 'ifxf7 and Sergey Bancevich
with the pawn on c2, White 2 5 . tll f6+. Here this trick along Lechenicher SchachServer 2009
wins rather easily starting with the fourth rank is not available, 1.e4 cs 2 . ti:lf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
23. 'ifg3. Here that line is less and White should instead 4 . tl\xd4 tlJf6 s. tLic3 a 6 6 . �gs
clear, though still good for White. play 25. 'iff2! f5 26.Ah5 'ifxc4 e6 7 .f4 °iVb6 8. °iVd2 "it'xb2
However, as this game shows , a 27. tlld 6 'ifxc7 28. tllx e8, which is 9 . l:lb1 1Va3 10.eS dxeS 11.fxeS
completely different plan is even promising, but not as good as tlJfd 7 12. lLie4 h 6 13 . �h 4 1Vxa2
stronger! 22 . . .f5 also loses, though the line played in the game. 23 ... 14. l:ld1 °iVdS 1S. We3 WxeS
later in the line White must play fS The only chance, but it meets 16. �e2 �cs 17 . �g3 WdS 18.c4
differently than when the pawn a spectacular refutation. 24.�hS hd4 19 . .l:ixd4 Was+ 20.l:ld2
is on c2: 23. 'ifg3 lLic6 24. 'ifg6 °ti'd8 24 ... lld8 25.g4! fxe4 2 6.g5 is 0-0 21. �d6 .l:id8 22. Wg3 In the
'ifd8 2 5 . lld3 lle7 2 6 . llg3 lLid4 also crushing. Just look at Black's analogous position with the pawn
27. Ah5 ! (27. Ad3 is the winning army stuck in the corner! 2S.g41 on c2 this is the main line, and it
move with the pawn back on c2, Opening lines towards Black's must be met by 2 1 ... ti:lc6 . But here
but after 27 ... 'it>h8 there is no king! 2S .. .fxe4 At this point White it's not the same!
c2-c3 anymore) 27 . . . 'it>h8 (27 ... f4 has many attractive options. A) After 22.0-0 Black should
is the attempt for Black to save The moves played in the game give up the queen as follows:

41
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

Wh7 43. 'l!fa3 e4 44.'l!fe3 llc7 Cato Bekkesletten


45. Ae2 'i!Yg7 46.h4 Ae6 47. lld4 Terje Hagen
llxcS 4 8 . llxe4 1/2-1/2 Persson­ er ICCF 2014
Maliangkay, ICCF 2007. 1.e4 cs 2. tllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
4. tllx d4 tllf6 s . ti:Jc3 a 6 6. �gs
e6 7 .f4 h6 8. �h4 'it'b6 9. 'it'd2
.i � .t .i • 'it'xb2 10. :b1 'it'a3 11.eS dxeS
.t. � .t. 1 12.fxeS tt:lfd 7 13. tlle 4 'it'xa2
1 � .t. 1 14. :d1 'it'dS 1S. 'it'e3 'it'xeS
if 16. �e2 �cs 17. �g3 'it'dS 18.c4
bd4 19. :Xd4 'it'aS+ 20.:d2 0-0
22 .. .fS ! (22 . . . ti:Jc6 ? 23.g4! must be
!::, ttJ 21. �d6 :ds 22.g41 This seems to
avoided; this position will be � be the most critical option.
discussed under the move order :� !::, !::,
22.g4 ti:lc6 23.0-0) 23. ti:Jc3 ti:Jf6
24. lla2 'l!fxa2 2 S . ti:Jxa2 llxd6 This
w � .i � .i. .i •
unbalanced position could still 22 ... 'it'fSI This loses with the 1 � 1 1
go either way, but it seems that pawn o n c2, but not here. The 1 �1 1
Black is doing perfectly fine. For
example: 26. 'l!fcS lld8 27 . ..tf3 aS
point i s very deep. 22 ... ti:Jc6 ! ?
23. �c7 'l!fb4! also looks fi n e for
'ii
28. 'l!fc7 llf8 2 9 . ti:Jc3 a4 30. llal Black, but the line in the game
� ttJ !::,
a3 31. 'l!fd6 ti:Jc6 3 2 . llxa3 J:'lxa3 just works so I'll focus my efforts �
33. 'l!fxa3 ..td7 34.h3 llc8 3S.cS ti:Jd8 on that. 2 3 . �es 'it'g6 24.'it'h4 :� !::,
3 6 . 'l!fa7 Wf7 37. 'l!fb6 We8 3 8 . 'l!fd 6
ti:Jf7 3 9 . 'l!f b 6 1/2-1h Manduch­
ti:Jc6 2S. �hS 'it'fS 26 . .bg71 With
the pawn on c2 this move is the
w �
Burne, ICCF 2012; refutation of 21... 'l!ffS, having 22 ... ti:Jc6? The most common
B) 2 2 . ..te7 .lle 8 and now: been played hundreds of times, move, but not a good one. 22 ...
Bl) 23 . ..th4 led to two wins by with a massive score for White. fS ? has been played in many
Ljubicic back in 2008 and 2009, 26 ... tllc SI 2 7 . tt:lxcs @xg7 2s.:r1 correspondence games. After the
but later the precise defensive 2 8 . ti:Je4 also leads to a quick strong reply 23.gS! White gets a
move 23 . . . llf8 ! was found. White perpetual: 28 ... lld4 29. llxd4 ti:Jxd4 winning attack for the piece. From
has no better than to offer a 30. llfl ltJc2+ 31. We2 ti:Jd4+ 1/2-1/2 this position White has a perfect
repetition with 24 . ..te7, which Gomez Celdran- Solf, ICCF 2010. 24/24 score! One example: 23 . . .
Black can even seriously consider 28 . . . 'it' e s + 29. tlle 4 'it'a1+ 3 0 . :d 1 fxe4 24.gxh6 g6 2 5 . 0 - 0 ti:J c 6 26.cS!
declining with 24 ... ti:Jc6!?; :Xd1+ 3 1 . b d 1 f S (again this typical move to cut
B2) 23 . ..ta3 ti:Jc6 24.0-0 ti:JdeS off the queen. Black's position is
2S . ..tb2 lld8 2 6 . Ac3 'Wc7 beyond hope now) 2 6 ... Wh8 27. llf7
27. llxd8 + (27. 'Wg3 llxd2 2 8 . ti:Jf6+
.i .i. J:'lg8 28. l::td l 'l!fd8 29. l::tdfl 'l!fe8
Wf8 2 9 . Axd2 'Wd8 3 0 . ti:JhS 1 • 30. Ac4 l::ta 7 31. 'l!fc3+ es 32. 'l!fg3
'l!fxd2 31. 'Wxg7+ We7 1/2-V2 1 � .t. 1 ti:Jd4 33. 'l!fgS Gerhards-Voiculescu,
Ferreira-Quaresma, ICCF 20 10) 1 ICCF 2014. 23.0-01 23.gS was the
27 ... 'l!fxd8 2 8 . 'l!fg3 fS (another
correspondence game continued
!::, ttJ � choice of Jorden van Foreest in
the only over-the-board game
2 8 ... ti:Jd4, which looks scary, that reached this position. This
but should be playable as well: !::, !::, move is also briefly mentioned by
29. AhS ti:Jg6 30. 'Wf2 (30. llxf7 Negi. The aforementioned game
if �w :
Wxf7 31. 'l!fxg6+ Wg8 3 2 . ti:Jd 6 continued 23 ... hxgS (I'm curious
es 33. ti:Jf7 'l!fe7 34.ti:Jxh6+ ctlh8 Now White would be winning what happens after 23 ... 'l!fal+, an
3S. ti:Jf7 + =) 3 0 ... ti:JfS 31. lldl (31.g4 if he could move the pawn to idea that is easy to miss because
'l!fd3) 31... 'l!fe7 32. Axg6 fxg 6 33.g4 c3. But alas, pawns can't move the engines insist that Black is
Ad7 34.gxfS exfS =) 29. AxeS ti:JxeS backwards. Now it's only a better and shouldn't repeat moves.
30. 'l!fxeS fxe4 31. 'l!fxe4 'l!fb6 + draw. 3 2 . :f3 'it'eS 33. :g3 + @f7 A) 24. Wf2 was played in one
32. llf2 'l!fc6 33. 'l!ff4 'l!fe8 34. Ad3 34. 'it'xh6 'it'xe4+ 3S. �e2 �es game. A beautiful idea, but rather
es 3S. 'l!fe4 g 6 36.cS Afs 37. �c4+ 3 6 . 'it' h 7 'it'b1+ 3 7 . �f2 'it'b6+ sens eless because Black can
Wh8 3 8 . 'Wxb7 llc8 39. 'l!fxa6 llc6 38. @f1 112-V2 create a repetition anyway with
40. 'l!faS 'l!fd7 41. lld2 'l!fe7 42. lldS 24 ... 'l!fxhl 25.gxh6 'l!fal 2 6 . lldl
42
Survey SI 8.14

'i!fb2 (26 ... ..Was 27.cS! is extremely Moving pawns in front of your A) 29 ... �d7 30. ti:lxf7 �eS 3 1 . ti:lxeS
dangerous) 27J:!d2 ..Wal 2 S . l:tdl king is rarely a good cure for ti:lxeS 32. �dl ti:lxc4 3 3 . l:te 2 �bS
'i'b2 29.l:td2 ..Wal 30.l:tdl 'l!Vb2 1/2-1/2 backward development. White has 34. �b3 l:tfS 3SJkl l:tf4 3 6 . l:txe6
(32) Relyea-Tudorache, ICCF 2016; a choice between two moves, both @f7 37. l:tb6 @fS 3 S . �xc4 �xc4
B) After 24.l:tdl 'i'aS+ we see one of which seem to be winning: 39. @h2 l:tg4 4 0 . l:tc2 @e7 41. @h3
of the advantages of luring the A) 24.cS is the more human way l:td4 42.l:tb7+ @e6 43. l:txg7 aS
p awn to c4: to play, and led to two nice wins: 44. l:tf2 @es 4S.@g3 1/2-1/2 Sferle­
24 ... '1Wb4 (24 ... bS 2S.gS hxgS Gusan, ICCF 2012;
2 6 . '1Wh3 fS 27. �hS ti:lceS 2S. l:tdf2 B) 29 ... ti:ld4 30. �xf7+ @fS
.I .t .I • l:ta7 29. ti:lxgS ti:lf6 30. �xeS 1-0 31. l:txd4 cxd4 3 2 . ti:lxcS ti:lxf7
.t. I) .t. .\ Selen- Dorer, ICCF 2 012) 2 S .h4 33. ti:lb6 l:tdS 34.g6 d3 3S. l:txf7+
.\ l) iil, .\ .\ bS 2 6 .gS hxgS 27.hxgS fS 2 S . ti:lc3 @es 36. l:tfl d2 37.l:td l l:td3 3 S . ti:la4
ti' l ti:ldeS 29. l:tf4 l:txd6 30.l:txd6 'IWaS l:td4 3 9 . ti:lb2 aS 40. @f2 1/2-1/2

l ttJ 31. �f3 'IWal+ 3 2 . @f2 ti:lxf3 33. l:txf3


'1Wb2+ 34.@gl es 3 S . l:txc6 �b7
Borstnik-Quaresma, ICCF 200S.

... 36. 'IWxeS 'IWcl+ 37. @f2 '1Wb2+


iil. l 3 S . @el 'IWcl+ 3 9 . ti:ldl 'ifc4 4 0 . l:tc7
l:I @ n '1We4+ 41. l:te3 'IWxeS 42.l:txeS �e4
43. l:tee7 l-O Ljubicic-Johansson,
White can no longer block the ICCF 2011;
check with c2-c3. Now 2S. @f2 ! ? B) 24.l:td3!? is the most forcing,
i s t h e critical attempt to play immediately threatening 2 S .gS
for an advantage. After 2S ... 'i' fS + followed by 26. '1Wh3: 24 ... l:tfS ! ?
26.@g2 hxgS the position is very ( 2 4. . . @ h S 2S .gS fxgS 2 6 . c S @ g s
unclear) 24. l:tgl ti:ldeS ? (Negi 27. ti:lxgS +- Schuller-Costa Trillo,
continues his analysis with ICCF 2 01S) 2S.gS! hxgS 26. '1Wh3
24 ... f6! , eventually reaching an ti:lceS 27. 'i'xe 6 + ! (27. ti:lxgS? allows 24 ... hxgS 25. 'ifxg5 lb d 6 '12-1/2
unclear position) 2S.l:txgS l:txd 6 an incredible escape: 27 .. .fxgS In this position, Black, possibly
26.ti:lxd6 f6 27.l:thS ti:le7 2 S . 'i'h3 2S. '1Wxe6+ ti:lf7 2 9 . �xfS ti:lf6! realizing that he was lost, offered
ti:l7g6 2 9 . ti:lxcS ti:lf4 3 0 . l:thS+ @f7 30. '1We7 �fS 3 Uta3 '1Wb6+ 32. 'IWcS a draw ... and it was accepted! Let's
31.�hS+ ti:leg6 3 2 . �xg6+ ti:lxg6 'IWxcS + 33. �xcS �g4 and Black continue the variation: 2 6 . l:txd6
33.ti:ld6+ @e7 34.l:txaS ..Wes+ went on to draw in Petruzzelli­ fS . Now the engines are stuck on
3S.l:te2 'l!fal+ 36. @f2 °i!Vd4+ 37. @fl Calio, ICCF 2016) 27 ... l:tf7 2 S . �hS 0.00, recommending White to
'i'f4+ 3 S . @g2 "i!Vxd6 3 9 . l:txe6+ g 6 29.cS! @g7 3 0 . ti:lxgS ti:lxcS give a perpetual with ti:lf6 -h7-f6.
'i'xe6 40. l:te S + @f7 41. 'i'xe6# 31. 'IWdS '1Wb6 (31 . . . l:td7 32. l:te3!+-) To make things even more
Van Foreest-Zwirs, Amsterdam 32. �xcS '1Wc6 33. 'IWxeS! �h3 ! ? Isn't annoying, options 2 and 3 are
201S. 23 ... ti:ldeSI? Intending to it amazing what computers can random moves followed by the
chop off the powerful bishop on come up with? (33 ... �fS 34. l:txfS same perpetual. I wasn't so easily
d6 on the next move. This move fxeS 3 S . l:txf7+ @gs 3 6 . l:tdd7+-) convinced that this was a draw
has given Black decent results in 34. l:txh3! fxeS 3S.l:txf7+ @g s though, so I attempted almost
the correspondence games where 3 6 . �e3! gxhS 37. l:tg3+- every possible move directed
it was played. Shocking, because 24.g511 The start of a very deep towards Black's king, hoping that
White can win by force! combination. 24.h4 is by far the the evaluation would jump up. Lo
23 .. .£6 doesn't save Black either. most commonly played move, and and behold ...
it's also Negi's recommendation.
It leads to an endgame where
.I .t .I • White is better, but Black can
.t. I) .\ draw with accurate play: 24 . . . l:txd6
.\ l) iil, .t i .\ 2 S . ti:lxd6 b6 2 6 .gS 'IWcS 27. 'IWxcS
... bxcS 2 S . �hS hxgS 29.hxgS Now
l ttJ l Black has two options. In both
lines he seems to be suffering .
... but correspondence players
1:1 iil. l consistently manage to make
n@ draws. I'll give a sample game for
each move:

43
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

27.tiJf6+ @fS (27 . . . @f7? takes away bd4 19. :Xd4 Was+ 20.:d2 O·O -� K •
the f7-square from the knight, 21. �d6 :ds 22.g4 b61 � .t. .t.
and after 2 S . l:tfdl Black is in
trouble, e.g. 2 S ... '1Wc7 2 9 . �h5+ .t. .t. .i .t. £::,
g6 3 0 . tiJd7+-) 2 S . tiJh5! '1Wc5+
K � .t. K • 'if
2 9 . @g2! '1Wxd6 (Black can refuse � .t. .t. £::, �
the rook with 29 ... tiJf7!? 30. '1Wxg7+ .t. .t. .i .t. .t.
@e7, but White sacrifices it ... � .i £::,
anyway: 31. l:txc6! '1Wxc6+ 32. �f3
'1Wd6 33. '1Wf6 + @es 34. @ht!
£::, ttJ £::, @ :
with a crushing attack for the �
investment of merely two pawns) : .i £::, 2S lllf 8 The most solid move,
..•

30. '1Wxg7+ @es 31. tiJf6 + @ds and the one that correspondence
� :
32. l:tdl li:\d4 players use to make draws.
Only with this move can Black 25 ... li:\c5 ! ? is the sharper
successfully defend against the alternative. This position can
kingside attack. The speed at be analysed forever, I'll just
which Black threatens to swap off summarize the most important
the knight on e4 forces White to lines: 26. '1Wg2 (26 . 'IWxaS li:\b3
attack immediately. 27.0-0 li:\xd2 2 S . �e7 '1We5 29. �xdS
23 .gS The alternative 23.0-0 'i!fxe 2 =) 2 6 ... 'i!fal+ 27. �d l and
leads by force to a position where now there is a split:
White has a piece against three A) 27 ... li:\b3?! leads to incredible
pawns. Four correspondence stuff, but sadly it does not seem
games h ave been played in this to b e correct: 2 S . l:tb2 '1Wa5+ 29. @£2
line, all ending in quick draws: 'i!ff5 + 3 0 . @e3 'i!ff6 3U[xb3 l:txd6
33. 'IWgS+! (a nice motif, forcing 23 ... �b7 24. l:tddl �xe4 25. 'i!fxe4 32. 'i!fxaS 'i!fxh6+ Black is a full
the king back to e7 due to the I:la7 26. 'i!ff4 f6 27. �xbS '1Wc5+ rook down, but he has almost
knight fork on eS) 33 ... @e7 34. 'i!fg5 2 S . @hl (2 S. @g2 doesn't change enough compensation. Almost . . .
Around this point the computer anything, e.g. 2S ... l:txbS 29. l:txd7 33. @£2! (33 . @e2? 'i!f d 2 + 34. @£3
finally realizes that Black is l:txd7 30. 'i!fxb S + @f7 31. 'i!ff4 l:td4 e5! 3 5 . 'i!fxbS+ @h7 forces White
lost. Some sample lines: 34 ... li:\f7 32. 'i!ff3 'i!fe5 V2-1/2 Yaroshenko­ to give up the queen) 33 ... 'i!fh4+
(34 . . . '1Wc6+ 35.li:\e4+ @fS 36. '1Wh6+ Voronin, ICCF 2 0 15) 2S ... l:txbS 34.l:tg3! 'i!fd4+ 3 5 . l:te3 'i!fh4+
@gs 37.l:!xd4 �d7 3S.@h3! fxe4 29. I:lxd7 l:txd7 30. 'i!fxb S + @h7 3 6 . @e2! 'i!fdS! 37.'i!ff3 li:\c6 3 S . Wel!
39. '1Wg5+ @h7 40. '1Wxe5+- ; 34 . . . @fS 31. '1Wf4 l:td4 32. 'i!ff3 @gs 3 3 . l:tel b5 3 9 . l:tfl!±;
35. �h5 'i!fc6+ 36. @h3+- this is 'i!fd6 34. 'i!fg3 (White's king B) 27 . . . l:ta7! looks playable
why the king should go to g2, is exposed, and attempts to though. The critical line goes
not hl) 35. 'i!fh4 WfS (35 ... '1Wc6+ become active always give 2S.O-O f5 29. �xc5 l:txd2 30. lit'xd2
36.li:\d5+ @fs 37. '1We7+ wg7 Black counterplay, for example: bxc5 31.'IWdS+ @h7 32. 'i!fxbS
3S. '1Wf6+ @gS 39.'1Wg6+ @fS 40. �h5 34. 'i!faS+ @h7 35. �£3 f5 ! 3 6 .gxf5 '1Wd4+ 3 3 . @g2 l:td7� with enough
li:\e5 41. '1Wf6+ WgS 42.'1Wg5+ WfS l:td2 ! 37. �g2 l:tdl 3 S . 'i!fe4 l:txel+ compensation for the piece.
43. '1We7+ @gs 44. Wf2+-) 36.li:\h7+ 39. 'i!fxel exf5 =) 34 ... a5 35. '1Wxd6 26. "tt' d 4 eS 27. 'li'xeS 'li'xeS
'if;>gS (36 ... @es 37. l:txd4+-) 37.@£2! l:txd 6 3 6 . @g2 @f7 37. @£3 f5 3 S . l:tbl 28. beS :Xd2 29. �xd2 li:lbd7
li:\xe2 3 S . li:\f6 + @fS 39.l:txd6 li:\xd6 g6 3 9 . l:tb5 @f6 4 0 . We3 White is 30. hg7 li:\e6
40. Wxe2+- on the better side of the draw
but even over the board it's hard
Valery Nemchenko to imagine losing this as Black;
Anatoly Splrin 1/2-V2 Nogga-Jonsson, ICCF 2016.
er ICCF 2014 23 ... � b 7 24.gxh6 If White's pawn .t. .t.
1.e4 cs 2 . tiJf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 were still on c2, 24.l:tgl? would
4.�d4 tiJf6 s. tLJc3 a6 6. �gs e6 start a winning attack here. But
7.f4 'li'b6 8. 'li'd2 'li'xb2 9 . :b1 now it is Black who wins, with
W'a3 10.eS dxeS 11.fxeS h 6 the following combination:
12. �h4 lt:lfd 7 13. lt:le4 'li'xa2 24 ... �xe4 25. 'i!fxe4 lllc 5! 26. 'i!fxaS
14. :d1 'li' d S 1S. 'li'e3 'li'xeS li:\b3-+ . A crucial difference.
16. �e2 �cS 17. �g3 'li'dS 18.c4 24 ... he4 2S. 'li'xe4

44
Survey SI 8.14

One of the critical positions A) 24.0-0 allows Black to next game) to be better. However,
for the evaluation of 22 ... b 6 . exchange queens in a good in the only game with this move
Objectively it should be equal . but version by 24 ... 'ifcS !. Let m e give Wei Yi followed up way too
White is pressing. The remainder you two recent examples to prove slowly, and Black was soon better:
of the game is a good illustration this point: 24 ... tLlcS
of what can happen. 31. �b2 The
alternative 31. l:tgl is well met
�·
by 3 1 . . . tLldcS! and White has no
useful discovered check: 3 2 . �dl i
li.Jxg7 33Jhg7+ 'it>h8 34. l1xf7 i
•/2-1/2 Petruzzelli-Palladino, i
ICCF 2016. 31 ... Wh7 3 2 . lif1 lifS
33.�g4 Wxh6 34. Wc2 I like this
unhurried approach. Black's king
remains permanently unsafe .
3 4... wgs 3S. �ts+ �gs 36.wb1
:cs 3 7 . �d3 tLJdcS 3S. �c2
With engines, positions like Al) 2 S . lld3!? is a serious try for 2 S . l:lfl ? (this is where White will
these can be defended relatively an advantage in the position with have to improve. Black shouldn't
easily. But in a practical game the pawn on c2, but here White be allowed to develop so easily.
it's a completely different story. misses the idea of 'ifxcS fol lowed Still, an advantage for White
3S ... :c1 39. :g1+ �h4 4o. :gs by llc3. Still, g2-g4 is something seems to be very far off) 25 ... �d7
tLJd 7 41.lihS+ �g4 42.h4 :Xc4 of a threat now, and Black must 2 6 . Wgl It's amazing to see a 2700+
43. hS WgS 44. h6 :Xc2 4S. wxc2 be careful not to land in a worse player play @f2. l:tfl and 'it>gl
wg6 46. �c1 ll:les 47. :bs tLJd 7 endgame. In the game Black where castling is a legal move!
4S. JhS tLJdcS 49. �e3 Wh7 chose a radical but fully playable Of course Wei Yi had his reasons
SO. libs tLJd 7 S1. lib7 tbecS way to stop g2-g4: 2S ... gS!? 2 6.h4 (the queens are still on) , but now
S2. lic7 tbeS S3. �c1 lLie6 S4.lib7 (26. lld4! ?, keeping the queens on Black finishes his development
bS ss. :a 1 tLJcl4+ S6.Wb1 as the board, is the move I would and takes over: 2 6 ... �c6 27.g4 ll:le4
S7. �f4 tLJdc6 SS.lib7 b4 112-112 play almost instantly if Black 28. tLlxe4 fxe4! 2 9 . l:td 6 'ifes 30. llfd l
weakens his kingside like this. tLlg6 Black is clearly better. The
But if we look deeper, Black seems remainder of the game contains
H u m a n chess to be doing fine with several mistakes from both sides, but Lu
I
2 1 . . .fS different moves) 26 ... b6 27.hxgS Shanglei does eventually score
hxgS 28. 'ifxcS tLlxcS 2 9 . llg3 the full point: 31. 'ifd4 'ifxd4+
Giuseppe Poll 'it>g7 3 0 . l:txgS+ 'it>f6 3 1 . llgS �d7 32. l:t6xd4 ll:lf4 3 3 . lld 8 + llxd8
Vlktor Zakharov 32. �f3 llb8 33. llel es 34.g4 1/2-1/2 34. llxd8+ @f7 3S. @f2 @f6 3 6 . �fl
er ICCF 2014 Thompson- Sherwood, ICCF 201S; aS 37. @e3 gS 3 8 . l:tfS + 'it>eS 3 9 . l:taS
1.e4 cs 2 . lLlf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 A2) 2S. 'ifxcS tLlxcS 2 6 . llbl a4 4 0 . l:taS+ @d6 41.h4 b 6 42.l1a7
4. lLlxd4 lLlf6 S.tLJc3 a6 6. �gS e6 tLlfd7 27. �f3 'it>f8 2 8 . �xb7 �xb7 'it>cS 43.hS eS 44. lla6 tLle6 4S. �e2
7.f4 1i'b6 S. 1i'd2 1i'xb2 9. lib1 2 9 . ll:lxb7 l:tb8 ? ! (29 ... @e7! 3 0 . tLlxcS ll:ld4 4 6 . �dl ll:lb3 47. �c2 ll:laS
1i'a3 10.eS dxeS 11.fxeS h6 tLlxcS = is more logical. fol lowing 48. �xa4 �xa4 49. @xe4 �d7 0-1
12. �h4 ll:lfd7 13. tbe4 1i'xa2 the general rule that the side Wei Yi- Lu Shanglei, Shenzhen
14. lid 1 1i'dS 1S. 1i'e3 1i'xeS with an exchange less should 2016.
16. �e2 �cS 17. �g3 1i'dS 1S.c4 keep the extra pair of rooks on
hd4 19. :Xd4 'ii' a s+ 20.lid2 the board. White has no e ntry
0-0 21. �d6 fS The safe move. squares for his rooks and Black
K .t �·
Black gives back some material is completely fine) 3 0 . l:tddl @e7 i � i
to improve his development. 31. tLlxcS l:lxbl 3 2 . l:txbl tLlxcS i tU i i
22. hfS tLlxfS 23.tLJd6 lLlbd7 White is slightly better now, but 'if i
24.g41? This forcing move is the Black managed to draw anyway
main option in the analogous in Cernousek-Vykouk, Czechia
� �
position with the pawn on c2, so tt 2 0 1 6 . �
we must consider it here as well. B ) 24. @f2 is a reasonable move. �� �
It turns out that in this case the Negi also mentions it, but he
w �
inclusion of c2-c4 favours Black: considers 24. �f3 (as seen in the

45
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

24 . . .fxg4 2 S . hg4 2S.0-0 is the bd4 19. J:l.xd4 Was+ 20.J:l.d2 0-0 the queens on, the king is less
main line with the pawn on c2, 21. �d6 fS 22. bfB lLJxfS 2 3 . tt:ld6 safe here. One game has been
but here it is strongly met by lLibd7 24. �f3 played with chis move. It was
2S ... 'l!t'eS!. Now, 26. 'l!t'xeS tt:lxeS an interesting fight, but I get
27. tt:lc4 would be a great way co
exploit White's advantage in
�· the idea that after finishing his
development (which he should
development, but the pawn is in ' manage) Black is the one having
the way! Instead, after 26. 'l!t'f2 tt:lf6 ' most of the fun: 2S . . . tt:leS 26. l::tb l
27 . .axg4 'l!t'gS 2 8 . @hl the players lLifg6 21 . ..ahs @h7 2 s . @n .ad7
agreed co a draw in Ncirlis-David­ 29. 'l!t'd4 .ac6 30. l::te l bS 31.cS .ads
Bordier, ICCF 2 0 14, because of 32.h4 l::tf8 33. l::ta l 'l!t'c7 34. l::t x a6
the following two lines: 2 8 . . . tt:lxg4! tt:lc6 3 S . .axg6+ 'it>xg6 36. 'l!t'al
29. 'l!t'xf8 + @h7 and now: @h7 37. l::tb 6 l::tb 8 3 8 . l::tx b8 'l!t'xb8
A) 3 0 . tt:le 8 b6! 31. l:tf7 .ab7+ 39. l::tx dS exdS 40. 'l!t'bl lLie7
32. l::t x b7 l::tx e8 33. l::tx g7+ 'l!t'xg7 41.g4 'l!t'f8 42.gxfS 'i!t'f6 43.hS
34. 'l!t'xe8 tt:lf2 + 3S. l::t xf2 'l!t'al+= and Negi's recommendation. White b4 44. 'l!t'xb4 'i!t'gS 4S. 'l!t'b7 tt:lg8
it's a perpetual; makes a solid move without yet 46. 'l!t'xdS tt:lf6 47. 'l!t'dl tt:lxhS
B) 30. l::tg 2 .ad7! 3 1 . tt:le4! l::tx f8 committing co g2-g4. The idea 4 8 . 'l!t'd4 tt:lf6 49.@f2 'l!t'cl 1/2-1/2
(3 1... 'l!t'g6!? also works) 32. tt:lxgS+ is co meet . . . 'lW cS or . . . 'lW eS with Llorente Alvarez-Caruso, ICCF
'it>g8 33. l::tx fS + @xf8 34. l::tx g4 a king move, intending co keep 201S. 2 S . . . 1WcS?I Giri tries to
hxg S = pressing without the queens. simplify, but this allows White
2 S lt:l e s Winning a tempo
..• 24 . . . J:l.bS A simple response which to keep serious pressure in the
against the bishop in order is not mentioned by Negi. Black ensuing queenless position.
co finish development with waits for White co choose a square 2S ... tt:lf6 ! ? would have been my
... .ad7-c6. After chat there is no for the king and then responds personal preference. The position
reason at all why Black should accordingly. is very complicated, for example:
be worse . He has more than A) 24 ... 'l!t'cS?! is inaccurate. After 2 6 . J:thdl es 27. �dS+ 'it>h7 2 8 .h3
enough material, and White's 2 S . 'it>e2 J:tb8 we have the position lLig 6 with chances for both sides.
king i s just as unsafe as Black's. from the main game with the
It's still a complicated struggle king on e2 instead of f2. This is
K i. ••
though . 26. �e2 11'a1+ 2 7 . J:l.d1 a big improvement for White,
1WaS+ Here in four out of five whose queen is not pinned now, ' � '
(correspondence) games White and after 2 6 . l::tb l b6 27.g4! Black ' tt:J i '
repeated moves . In this game faces serious problems. However, ... '
he played on, but there is no 27. 'l!t'xcS ? tt:lxcS 2 8 . tt:lxcS l::tx c8
advantage co be seen anywhere. 29. l::txb6 = was very similar to

The rest o f the game looks like Radjabov-Giri in the game Wei ��
a correct d raw. 28. �2 tt:lfg6 Yi-Yang Liu, China tt 2016 (1/2-1/2, � @� �
29. J:l.hf1 �d7 3 0 . lDxb7 1Wc7 74) ;

31. tt:lcS tt:lf4 3 2 . lDxd7 lLJxd 7 B) 24 ... 'l!t'al+ 2 S . J:!dl 'l!t'es is a
3 3 . �g1 lDxe2+ 34. 1Wxe2 tt:lcS very solid alternative to Giri's 26.J:l.b1 2 6 . J:thdl!, threatening to
3S. 11'f3 J:l.bB 36. J:l.d 2 a s 3 7 . J:l.g2 line given above. I cannot find take o n c8, is a better try. I cannot
a4 3 8 . � h 1 11'es 3 9 . 11'f7+ 'tt h 8 a way co seriously improve over find a completely clear road to
40. J:l.fg1 J:l.b7 41. 11'e8+ 'tt h 7 the following game: 26. @f2 equality here:
42. 1l'g6+ @gs 43. 11fes+ 112.112 J:tb8 27. 'i!fxeS tt:lxeS 28. l::tb l tt:lfd7 A) 2 6 ... 'l!t'xe3+ 27. @xe3 tt:lcS
29 . .axb7 .axb7 30. l::tx b7 l::tx b7 2 8 J 1b l transposes to a line
Telmour Radjabov 31. tt:lxb7 tt:lxc4 3 2 . l:tdl tt:lceS 3 3 . tt:ld 8 covered by Negi from a different
Anlsh Girl 1/2-V2 Ylonen- Rogos, I C C F 201S. move order. White keeps a
Novi Sad tt 2 0 16 (4) 2S. 'ttf 21 By far the best square for nagging edge;
1.e4 cs 2 . tt:lf3 d 6 3 .d4 cxd4 the king. Alternatively: B) Trying to obtain the same
4.lDxd4 tt:lf6 s. tt:lc3 a6 6. �gs e6 A) 2S.O-O?! 'l!t'cS 26. 'l!t'xcS tt:lxcS is ending as in the game with 2 6 ...
7.f4 1l'b6 8. 1l'd2 1l'xb2 9 . J:l.b1 again nothing special, and indeed b6?! runs into some trouble after
1Wa3 10.eS h6 11. �h4 dxeS a draw was immediately agreed in 27. tt:lxcS l::tx c8 28. l::tx d7 tt:lxd7
12 .fxeS tt:lfd 7 13 . lt:le4 1Wxa2 Khazagarov- Schiippen, ICCF 2015; 29. l::tx d7 'lWxe3+ 30. @xe3 l:lxc4
14. J:l.d1 1l' d S 1S. 1We3 1WxeS B) 2S. @e2?! avoids the pin 31. l::te 7!;
16. �e2 �cs 17. �g3 1l'dS 18.c4 with 2S ... 'l!t'cS, but if Black keeps

46
Survey SI 8.14

C) 26 . . . Wh7!? 27.g4! (after C2) 27 ... fxg4 looks a bit 26 ... b6 Now Black is fully safe
27. lLlxc8 'ifxc8 there is no more compliant: 2 8 . �xg4 aS again. 27. 1"xcS Unlike in the
l:!xd7 trick) isn't easy for Black (28 ... 'ifxe3+ 2 9 . Wxe3 lLleS 3 0 . �e2 Wei Yi-Yang Liu game, 27.g4 can
either, despite the large number �d7 3I. Wd4 lLlfg 6 ;t) 29. �f3 b6 now be met by 27 ... f4! . 2 7 ... �cS
of options here: 30. 'ifxcS lLlxcS 31.lLle4;!;; 28. �c8 lbc8 29. lbb6 lLlcd 71?
C3) 27 . . . b6 is well met by 28.gxfS This isn't even necessary. The
exfS 2 9 . ne2! when there is no knight on cS is e xcellently placed,
i i. �
easy way to equalize. The sharp and Black can continue playing
i � ... � 29 . . . 'if c7!? looks a bit better simple moves, with equality. I
i ttJ i .\ for White after 30. lLlxfS lLlg6 assume that Giri assessed the
� .\ (30 ... lLlf6 ! ? 31. 'ife7 'ifxh2+ 32. We3 endgame after 29 ... lLlcd7 as easily
8 8 'ifxe2+ 33. �xe2 �xfS 34. nd8
nxd 8 3S. 'ifxd8 lLJ8d7 might be a
drawn and therefore went for
this simplification. 29 . . . lLlfd7
�� fortress, but I'm not entirely sure) 3o.nbd6 l:tc7=; 29 . . . 'it>f7 30. we3
l:t � 8 31.lLle7 lLlcS 3 2 . Wgl 'ifxe7 33. 'ik'xe7 We7= 30.lba6 lbc4 31.:& 7
n lLlxe7 34. nxe7 �e6 3 S . �d S ;!; ;
C 4 ) Trading queens doesn't
�f7 32.J:ldxd 7 + �d7 3 3 . lbd7+
Wf6= The engines do not approve
CI) 27 ... f4? is one of those crazy fully get rid o f White's a nnoying of going for this piece down
computer suggestions that just pressure: 2 7 ... 'ifxe3+ 2 8 . @xe3 position, but it must b e a draw, of
cannot be good, and indeed White lLleS 2 9 . gxfS lLlxf3 (29 ... exfS course. 34.h3 g6 3S.g3 hS 36.h4
wins after a long line: 28. 'ifxcS 3 0 . �dS � e 6 31.cS lLled7 3 2 . 'it>d4 gs 3 7 . hxgS+ WxgS 38. J:lg7+ Wf6
lLlxcS 29.lLle4 lLlfd7 3 0 . lLlxcS lLlxcS �xdS 3 3 . @xdS lLlf6+ 34. 'it>c4!) 39.J:lh7 f4 40.gxf4 lbf4 41. lbhS
3I.nd8 aS 32.h4! a4 33.hS gS! 3 0 . @xf3 �d7! 3 1 . f6 ! gxf6 3 2 . 'it>e3 l:lfS 42.l:lh6+ �e7 43. �e3 J:la S
34.ne8 wg7 3 S . ne7+ wf6 3 6 . nh7 �c6 3 3 . lLlf7 lLlg6 34. nd8 J:!xd8 44. �g4 J:la3 + 4S. �f4 :S4+
bS 37. nxh6 + wf7 3 8 . nh7+ wf6 3 S . lLlx d 8 lLleS ;!; Black should 46. wgs l:le4 47.l:lh7+ wd6
39.nc7! lLia6 40.na7 bxc4 4I.nd8! probably hold this, but there is 48. :& 7 J:le1 49. wg6 J:le4 so. �gs
tLics 42.nf8+ wes 43.h6+- ; still work to d o . J:le1 S1. �hS J:lg1+ S2. �g4 112-112

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

i i. ttJ � .i � .i *
Il .\ � i. � .\ i
i .\ .\ .\ i i � ... .\
'ii' � 8
8 � 8 ttJ

n 8 l:t � 8
� � �
position after 27. . . 'it>g8-h8 position after 3 1 . l:tf1-f7 position after 24. l:lh 1-g1

White to play and win. A At first sight, g7 looks With the pawn on c2 instead
difficult one, with a very impossible to defend, but there of c4, White would be winning
beautiful point in one of the is more to this position. How here. But now Black wins.
lines. does the game end? How?
(solution on page 247) (solution on page 247) (solution on page 247)

47
Sicilia n Defe n ce N aj d o rf Va riati on SI 14.1 ( 890)

A su rprisi ng N aj d o rf: 6.a3


an ech o of 5 . . . a 6 ?
by J e ro e n Bosc h

1. e4 cs World Champion at his best. He played


2. tlJf3 d6 a frivolous opening (our present subject
3. d4 cxd4 6.a3 versus the Najdorf) , trying to leave
4. tbxd4 tlJf6 the well-trodden paths as soon as possible
5. tbc3 a6 (but don't be mistaken: more than 10
6. a3 years ago I mentioned the position
after his 11th move in an SOS article)
and do what he does best: simply play
chess! Carlsen's adoption of 6.a3 against
Wojtaszek had everything to do with his
sense of humour. In the opening round at
Cjj fJ, Wijk aan Zee, Sergey Karjakin had given
fJ, Cjj 6.a3 a try against recent Najdorf convert
fJ, fJ, fJ, fJ, fJ, Anish Giri. Talking about humour: the
� � 'if <;t> � � challenger later tweeted that a forgotten
adapter had forced him to improvise
in the opening. Despite his problems
A frivolous try? accessing his computer, I am pretty sure
In the second round of the 2017 Tata that Karjakin was aware of the blitz game
Steel Chess Tournament, we saw our Harikrishna-Giri, Stavanger 2016. In yet
another Wijk aan Zee outing, Chinese
grandmaster Lu also tried 6.a3 against
young grandmaster Jeffery Xiong. The
American sensibly played the Dragon
reply 6 ... g6.

Strong support
With this number of grandmasters
rallying behind 6.a3, we should pay at
least some attention to the little move
with the rook pawn. Surely, 6.a3 will
trickle down the ranks and be adopted
by club players as well. Ten years ago,
when I wrote about 6.a3 (see Chapter 7
Semen Dvolrys
of SOS-6, NIC 2007) , it had been adopted

48
Survey SI 14.1

by Nigel Short in several game formats normal move 7. t2Jf3, when White has
(classical, rapid and blitz) , and quite often the positional idea of highlighting that
in serious tournament games by Najdorf dS has been weakened by going �fl-c4
expert Semen Dvoirys. These days, 6.h3 and �cl-gS, as I explained above. Giri
is a decidedly popular treatment of the didn't seem all that impressed and simply
Najdorf. Can 6.a3 be any worse? organized counterplay on the queenside
with ... b5-b4. Carlsen went for the far
What's the point of 6.a3 ? more critical 7. tLifS, which provokes an
With the move with the other rook immediate crisis. If White succeeds in
pawn - 6.h3 - White has the clear idea executing �cl-gS, t2Jf5-e3 and �fl-c4, he
of expanding on the kingside. No such will be clearly for choice. So 7 ... dS is sort
space-gaining ideas exist in White's of forced, as is the follow-up 8 . .igS d4
mind when he plays 6.a3. The move, of 9. �xf6.
course, is a cheeky echo of 5 ... a6 ... once
more passing the ball to Black: you didn't
develop a piece, so neither will I! A kind
of sur place, if you like. Now 5 ... a6 appears
to be more useful than 6.a3 - Black
always has intentions of expanding on
the queenside with ... b7-b5 in the Sicilian!
However, it is true that the cyclist's
approach with 6.a3 has its points. White
is simply waiting for Black to execute his
Najdorf thrust 6 ... eS, after which he will Now I think that Wojtaszek made a
be able to play the �cl to gS, and the �fl crucial mistake. He took back with the
to c4. As a result, he may find himself in a queen (9 ... '*fxf6) , when after 10. tlJdS '*Vd8
situation in which he has the useful extra ll. '*Vg4! White had exactly the kind of
move a2-a3. The pawn on a3 protects annoying little plus that Carlsen excels
the b4-square against a future ... b5-b4, at exploiting. Ten years ago, I already
and it may also reserve the a2-square for mentioned that Black should avoid this
the light-squared bishop. Indeed, the and go for 9 ... gxf6, when the position
strongest reply to 6 . �e2 is 6 ... eS , and is roughly dynamically balanced: White
when you play 6. �c4, the flexible Najdorf must now withdraw his queen's knight
player will go 6 ... e6, not weakening the to a much humbler square, giving Black
dS-square. Similarly, 6. �e3 is generally activity for his weakened structure.
met by 6 ... eS and 6. �gS by 6 ... e6. Is this
a revolutionary idea? Well, hardly: the Other approaches
same prophylactic idea lies behind the One of the great things about the
move 6.a4 ! Najdorf is its flexibility. While it is
true that 5 ... a6 prepares 6 ... eS (5 ... eS
The Najdorf reply is strongly met by 6 . �bS+!) , nobody
Najdorf aficionados will meet 6.a3 with forces you to actually play ... e7-e5 on
6 ... eS when, funnily enough, White the sixth move. After an 'insipid' move
faces a choice. Karjakin went for the like 6.a3 you have every 'right' to go for
49
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

the Dragon (6 ... g6) or the Scheveningen tempo. Short demolished Zhigalko in an
(6 ... e 6) . In both cases I would advise attractive rapid game as early as 2004.
white players to follow in the footsteps
of Nigel Short. Against the Dragon Conclusion
he has adopted a classical approach, Theoretically speaking, 6.a3 isn't much
similar to a well-known line from 6.a4 of a challenge for Black. He can equalize
g6 (Tal-Ubilava, Sochi 1984, is the stem with 6 ... eS , and there is nothing much
game) . He only made a 'short' draw against 6 ... g6 or 6 ... e6 either. For 6 ... b5
against Nielsen in a blitz game, but the see Dvoirys- Pahtz, and surely 6 ... tt:Jc6
resulting position may be studied with (not a popular square for the knight
reference to games played with 6.a4. with Najdorf players) should be playable
Besides, I don't trust the alternatives - 7. �c4!? turns 6.a3 into a moderately
(with queenside castling) all that much. useful move, though! However, given
Short's play against 6 ... e6 with 7.f4 is the fact that none of White's 6th move
even more impressive. H e is aiming for alternatives promise anything real against
a Scheveningen by playing �fl-d3 in the Najdorf, I think it makes a lot of
one go (rather than �fl-e2-d3, as in the practical sense to give 6.a3 an occasional
Scheveningen) . If that works out, White try. Varying your opening moves can be a
has the very useful a2-a3 as an extra profitable strategy in these database days.

The Najdorf reply B) 7 ... h6 s. gc4 �e6 (8 ... 'f!lc7 bS?! (14 ... 'f!lcS ! ;: 15 . 0 - 0 gds)
6 . .. eS 9 . �b3 �e6 10.0-0 tllb d7 11. tllh 4!) IS .axb6 'f!/xb6 1 6 . l:lbl l:lfb8 17.0-0;!;
9 . �xe6! (9. 'f!le2 tllb d7 10. geJ l:lc8 Djurasevic-Gligoric, Belgrade
Sergey Karjakln 11. tlld 2 ge7 12.0-0 0-0 13. l:lfdl 19S4; 9 . tll d 2 bS) 9 ... ge7 (9 ... h 6)
Anlsh Girl 'f!lc7 14. gb3 'f!lc6 IS.f3= Drazic­ 10. tLld2 h6 11. gh4 (11. gxf6 tllx f6
Wij k a a n Zee 2017 (1) Damljanovic, Kragujevac 20 11) 9 . . . 1 2 . li:Jc4 ge6 13. t2Je3) 11 ... bs 12. tllfl
1.e4 cs 2. �3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4. lLJxd4 fxe6 t2Jb6 13.li:Je3 ge6 14. 'f!/f3 (14.0-0)
tllf6 s. tllc3 a6 6.a3 es 7. tllf3 Bl) 10.0-0 ge7?! 11. tllh 4! @fl 14 ... 0 - 0 lS. tllfS ! ? gxfS 16. 'f!/xfS g 6
12.f4! exf4 13. gxf4 gs 14.gxd6! ( 1 6 ... tllh 7! 17. gxe7 'f!l x e 7 1 8 . 0 - 0
gxd6 (14... 'f!/xd6 IS. 'f!lhS+ 'it>f8 tll f6 =) 1 7 . 'f!lf3 'it> g 7 1 8 . ggJ?!
1 6 . l:ladl 'flies+ 17. 'it>hl tllc 6 1 8 . 'f!lg6 (A. Zhigalko- Kuzubov, Groningen
'flies 19. tllf3 'f!/f4 20. tlld 4 with 2 004) 1 8 . gxf6 + gxf6 19.h4!?)
attack) IS. 'f!lhS+ 'it>e7 16. l:lxf6! 1 8 ... li:Jc4!=F;
'f!le8 (16 ... 'it>xf6 17. tlld S+ exdS C2) s . gdJ h 6 (8 . . . �e7 9 . t2Jd2
18. 'f!lg 6 + 'it>e7 19. tllfS + 'it>d7 (9 . ggs) 9 . . . �e6 1 0 . tll fl tllb d7
20. 'f!lxd 6 + +-) 17. l:lg6+-; 11. tll e 3 bS 12. 'f!/f3 li:JcS 13. tll fS
B2) 1 0 . li:Jh4! tll c 6 11.f4! exf4 (please mark this interesting
(11 . . . l:lg 8 12. tllg 6) 12. tllg 6 l:lg 8 set-up by Dvoirys)
13. �xf4± Dvoirys- Shomoev,
7 . . . �e7 Khanty- M ansiysk 2012.
A) 7 ... bs s . ggs (is 8.a4!? so soon C) 7 ... 'f!lc7 and now:
after 6.a3 too crazy? 8 ... b4 9 . tlld S) CI) s . ggs tllb d7 (8 ... ge7?!
8 ... ge7 (8 . . . tllb d7) 9. gxf6 gxf6 9 . gxf6 gxf6 10. tll d S 'f!ld8
10.a4 (10. tlld S 0-0 11.c4!?) 10 ... b4 11. �cH) 9 . gdJ (9 . ge2 ge7
11. tlld S tllc 6 12. gc4 0-0 13. tllx f6+ ?! 1 0 . li:Jd2 tllb 6?! (10 ... h6!; 10 ... bS
(13.0-0±) 13 ... 'f!/xf6 14. gds gb7 11. tllfl! gb7 12. tlle 3!) ll.a4! �e6
IS. 'f!ld2 l:lab8 16.0-0 (Harikrishna­ 12.aS li:Jbd7 (12 ... t2Jc4? 13. t2Jxc4
Giri, Stavanger blitz 2016) 16 ... tlld 4! gxc4 14. gxc4 'f!/xc4 1S. gxf6
17. tllx d4 gxdS 18.exdS exd4+:t; �xf6 1 6 . l:la4±) 13. li:Jfl 0-0 14. t2Je3

50
Survey SI 14.l

13 . . . �xfS 14. �xfS li:lxd3+ (14 ... dS Magnus Carlsen


lS .exdS J:!d8 16.0-0 li:lxdS 17. li:lxdS Radoslaw Wojtaszek
J:!xdS 18 . .ie2 0-0=) 1S .cxd3 �d7 Wij k a a n Zee 2017 ( 2 )
16. �f3 h6 (16 . . . 0-0 17 . .igS ! ;!;) 1.e4 c5 2 . lllf 3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4
1 7.0-0 0-0 18. �g3 li:lhS 19. �f3 4. tbxd4 tllf6 5. tt:lc3 a6 6.a3 e5
li:lf6 2 0 . J:!dl �e6 21.d4 J:!ad8 7 . tt:lf51?
22.dS �d7 23. �d3 J:!c8 24.a4!;!;
Dvoirys- Lozhnikov, Pavlodar
2012) 9 . li:ld2 .ie6 10. li:lfl g6?! (10 ...
K � .t 'ii' • .t K
dS 11.exdS li:lxdS 12. li:lxdS .ixdS .l .l .l .l
13. li:le3 �e6 14.0-0;!;; 10 ... .ie7 .l .l �
11. li:le3 li:lbd7 12.0-0 0-0 13. li:lcdS; .l tlJ The opposite-coloured bishops
13. li:ledS) 11. li:le3 .ig7 12.0-0 li:lbd7 ensure that only White is playing
13.f3!? 0-0 14.a4! J:!ac8 1S. J:!f2 l:lfd 8
� for more than a draw. The World
16 . .ifl �cs (16 . . . �as 17 . .id2 Champion gets to demonstrate
�b6 1 8 . �el;!; �xb2 1 9 . J:!bl �a3 the art of manoeuvring. 11... hf5
20. J:!xb?;!;) 17.aS @h7 18. �el �a7 Forced, as ll ... g 6 ? fails to 12. �g3!
(18 ... dS 19. li:lexdS li:lxdS 2 0 .exdS and if 12 ... li:lc6 then 13.tt:lxd4!.
�xdS 2 1 . .ie3 �c6 22. li:lxdS �xdS 7 ... d5 The consistent reply. 7 ... .ie6?! 12. 1txf5 �d 6 13.h41? Gaining
23. f%d2±) 1 9 . '.t>hl hs 2 0 . lld2 �cs 8 . �gS °tfb6 (Nisiotis·Katsimihas, space and preparing llh l·h3-f3
21.l:tdl �c6 2 2 . J:!a3;!; Dvoirys­ Glyfada 1999) is worse because of (or g3) . 13 ... tt:lc6 14. �c4 b5
Vaulin, St Petersburg 1999. 9. hf6! gxf6 10. llle 3 with a huge 15. �b3 llle 7 16. 1tg4 16. li:lxe7
8. �c4 �e6 8 ... 0-0 9 . .igS li:lbd 7 positional edge, as 10 ... 'tfxb2 fails �xe7 17 . .idS also looks good.
10 . .i a 2 bS 11. li:ldS .ib7 12. li:lxe7+?! to 11. llle dS. Also bad is 7 ... tt:lxe4?! 16 ... 0-0 17.J:h31? tbxd 5 18. hd 5
(12 . .ixf6 li:lxf6 13. li:lxf6 + �xf6 8. li:lxg7+ hg7 9.li:lxe4 dS and now J:a 7 19. J:[g3 White's king is safe
14. �dS) 12 ....�xe7 13. li:ld2 h6f 10.�gS! f6 (10 ... �as+ 11.b4 shows in the centre, and by avoiding
14.h4?! llfd8 1S. �e2 @f8 16. �xf6 one advantage of 6.a3 !) 11. 'ifhS + castling the king's rook can be
li:lxf6 17.g4 dS! 18 .gS (18.0-0-0) @f8 12 . .ie3 and since Black can't employed in the attack. 19 ... 1tf6
18 . . . li:lxe4 19.gxh6 gxh6 20.0-0-0 take the knight he is horribly 20.a41? Now Carlsen starts on
�f6 + Novopashin- Zurakhov, placed. 7 ... .ixfS 8.exfS dS 9 . �gS the other side. Play is still well
Kiev 1960. 9 . �a2 9 . .ixe6?! fxe6 looks comparable to the game, within drawing limits, but it
10.0-0 0-0 11. �d3 li:lc6= 12. � c4?! but is a worse version for Black is clearly unpleasant for Black.
dS'i' 9 . . .0-0 10.0-0 b51? 11. J:e1 because of 9 ... d4 10 . .ixf6! 'tfxf6 20 . . . �b4+?1 2 0 ... b4 was better.
:es 12. �gs li:lbd7 13. lLJd2 J:bSI? (10 ... gxf6 11. llle 4 - now the knight The king wanted to move anyway.
Preparing counterplay with reaches this active square) 11.li:ldS 21. �f1 bxa4 22. :Xa4 a5 23.J:a1
... bS·b4. 14. hf6 14. li:lfl 14 ... tbxf6 °tfc6 12.c4! and White is better, J:c7 24. �b3 :as 2s. �g1 �ts
15. lllf1 b41 16. tlld 5 16.axb4 llxb4 things went completely wrong for Again Black isn't all that worse,
17 . .ixe6 (17 . .ib3 aS) 17 .. .fxe6 Black following 12 ... dxc3 13. llcl! but he is forced to wait passively.
18.J:!a2 �b6 ;::t 16 ... bxa3 17.bxa3 .icS ? 14. J:!xc3 aS? lS . .ibS 1-0 Schou 26. 1th5 g6?1 This gives White a
tllx d5 18. hd5 �g51 Black is Moldt- Skrabakova, Teplice 2012. target. 27. 1tg4 J:a6 2S. h 5 1if4?1
comfortable, but not much is S. �5 d4 Again this is forced, 29. 1te2 1tf6 30. 1tb5 'li'c6?
going on. 18 ... �xdS 19. �xdS as 8 ... �xfS is met by 9 . .ixf6!, Correct was 30 ... ncs , but in time
�c7= 19.g3 1td7 19 ... �c7 gaining an edge: 9 ... gxf6 1 0 .exfS trouble Wojtaszek misses a tactic.
20.1td3 J:b6?1 20 ... �xdS ! ? d4 11. llle 4 9. hf6 1txf6?1 Correct 31. 1txe51 J:e7 White could take
21. �xds J:!bs 22. �d3 l k 8 21. h4 was 9 ... gxf6!, the difference with the pawn, as the planned win
�h6 22.J:eb1 J:eb8 2 3 . J: b3 the above lines being that the of an exchange doesn't work:
bd5 24. 1txd5 g6 2 5 . J:ab1 :Xb3 knight now has to withdraw to 3 1 . . . �d6 32.hxg6! .ixeS 33.gxf7+
26. :Xb3 26 .cxb3 26 . . . 1tc7 27.a4 a passive square: 10. li:le2 li:lc6; @f8 34. llg8+ @e7 3S.f8 llt' + @d7
�c1 28.�g2 h 5 29.tt:lh 2 29. J:!xb 8 + 10 ... �b6; 10 ... �xfS!? 11.exfS is also 3 6 . °tfd8# 32. 1tf4 White is a pawn
�xb8 30. � c 6 aS 31. lllh 2 @g7 quite playable for Black. 10. lLJd 5 up, having preserved his other
32. lllf3 �b4;::t 29 ... :Xb31? 30.cxb3 lids 11. 1tg4 This is t h e position advantages. 32 ... a4 32 ... 'tfxe4
1ic2?1 30 ... aS= 31. lllf 1?1 31. 'tfxd6 I mentioned in an SOS article 33.hxg6! hxg6 34. �xf7 + ' Wg7
.ie3 (31... 'tfxe4+ 32. lllf3 ±) 32. °tff6! in 2006. White is somewhat 3S. 'tfxe4 nxe4 36 . .ic4± 33. �d 5
.id4 3 3 . �f3 ;!; 31...a5 32. �f3 better, and, perhaps even more 1t c 7 White also wins after
1tc3+ 33.�e2 1tc2+ 34. �f3 important: it is a typical Carlsen 33 ... �xc2 34. llcl! �xb2 3 S . llc8 d3
1tc3+ 35.�e2 Y2-Y2 position. 36. llf3 J:!f6 37. 'tfxf6 �xf6 38. llxf6

51
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

d2 39 . .ft.xf7+! @g7 40. l:Id 6 l:Ixe4 10 . . . 't!faS + ! ? 11. 't!f d 2 (11.b4 tfc7) Tatranske Zruby 2012; 13 ... 't!f c7
41. l:Ixd2. 34. 1fd2 1"b6 3S.:a2 11 . . . 't!fxd2+ 12. @xd2 .ft.xfS 13.exfS 14. 't!f el=) 14. 't!fd2;!;; 12 . . . tt:lhS 13.fS
Black is a pawn down, moreover tlld Ti= 11.:b1 �e6� 12. 1fc1 (13 . t!Jde2) 13 . . . tlle S 14.g4? (Metz­
he has several weakies and a tt:ld 7 13. tt:leg3 tt::ic s 14.f3 l:tc8 Muuss, Erfurt 2014; 14.fxg6 hxg6
bad king. 3S :c7 36. l:tf3 1"b4
•.. 14 . . . hS 1S.h4 0-0-0!? 1S.b4 llla 4 lS. tllfS ! ?) 14 . . . l:Ixc3! 1S .bxc3 tllg 3+
37. 1fe2 l:tb6 38. hxg61? hxg6 16. �d3 tt:lc3 17. l:tb2 hSI 18.h4 13 . bd4 �c6?1 13 . . . �e6!= 14. :e1
39.g3 q,,g 7 40. q,,g 2 l:td 7 41. 1fd1 lllb S?l 18 . . . 't!fc6!+, planning 14.fS t tt:lxe4? 1S.fxg6 hxg6 16 . .ft.xg7
l:tf6? 42. l:txf6 q,, xf6 43.c31 dxc3 19 ... 't!fa4. 19.a4 llld 6 20.aS 1fc7 @xg7 17. tt:lxe4 't!fb6 + (17 ... �xe4
44. l:txa4 And Wojtaszek resigned. 21. lllx d6+ 1fxd6 22.0·0 �h6 18. 'Wd4+ +-) 18. tllf2 'Wxb2
H e loses another pawn as taking 23.1fd1 �e3+ 24. q,, h 1 q,,e 7?1 19 . .ft.b3+- 14 ... 1fc7 1S. "ifd3
on b2 fails: 44 ... 't!fxb2 4S. 't!fd4+ 24 ... 't!ff8 � 2S.bSl+:t :cg8?1 lS.fS 1S ... bS lS ... eS 1 6 . fxeS dxeS
@gs 46.eS @h6 47. 'Wh4+ ..t>g7 26. 1fe1 26.bxa6! J:lxg3? (26 . . . 17. �f2 l:Ifd 8 ;::t 16.:ad1 1"b7
48. 't!ff6 + @h7 49. J:lh4+ .ft.h6 b x a 6 2 7 . l:Ib6 W e s 28. tllfS + .ft.xfS 17. llld S bdSI 18.exdS :c7
s o . l:txh6+ @xh6 S L 't!fh8+ @gs 29.exfS ±) 27. 't!fel! J:lhg8 (27 ... �f4 18 . . . tt:lhS 19. �xg7 tt:lxg7 20.cH
S2. 'Wh4+ @fS S3. 't!ff4# 1·0 28 .a7! J:la8 2 9 . l:Ixb7+ +- ; 27 ... l:Igg 8 19. l:td2 19.c3;!; 19 . . . :tcS 20.c3
28 .axb7+-; 27 . . . l:Ih3+ 28 .gxh3 bxa6 as 2 1. �b3 21.g4 b4;::t 21 . . . tlld 7 1
Das Debashis 2 9 . l:Ib6 Wes 30. tfg3+-) 28. lhb7+ 22. 1f e 3 2 2 . J:lxe7 tt:lcS 23. l:Ixc7
Jayaram Ashwin �d7 29 . �bS+- 26 ... 1fa3 2 7 . :b1 't!fxc7 24 . .ft.xcS (24. tfc2 .ft.xd4+
New Delhi 2008 ( 7 ) :hs 28.bxa6 bxa6 29.:b7+ �f8 2S. l:Ixd4 (2S.cxd4 tll x b3 26. 'Wxb3
1.e4 cs 2 . lllf3 d 6 3 . d 4 cxd4 30.:bs+ 30. tll fS ! .ft.xfS 31.exfS+-. 't!fcl+ 27. 't!fdl 't!fxdl+ 2 8 . l:Ixdl
4. lllx d4 lllf 6 s. lllc 3 a6 6.a3 es planning 32. �c4. 30 ... �g7 l:Ic2+) 2S ... 'lWe7�) 24 ... 'WxcS +�
7 . tt:lfS d S 8 . �gS d4 9. bf6 gxf61 31. l:txgS+ �xg8 3 2 . ba6;t fSI 22 ... tt:lcS?I 22 . . . .ft.f6 ! ? 23. �d 1
33. �d31 f4 34.tt:lts :gs 3S.a6 �h6 24. 1ff3 24. 't!ff2 b4 2S. 'Wh4
bfS 3 6.exfS :g37 3 6 . . . J:lxa6! .ft.g7 2 6 . .ft.xg7 @xg7 27. axb4 axb4
I � .i. 'ii' • .t. I 37 . .ft.xa6 'Wxa600 3 7.f61+- ... 1-0 2 8 .c4± 24 b41 2S.axb4 axb4
i i i
•.•

(44 ) 26.c4 b3 2 7 . l:tde2 1"b41 28.l:txe7


i i l:txe 7 2 9 . l:txe7 1fxc4 30. 1fe3
i tlJ �f8 30 ... 'i!fxdS 31. �f3 'ii' fS
Other a pproaches 32. �g4 'Wbl+ 33.@h2� 31.:a7
i � 6 ... g6 "ifxd S 32. �g4 32 . .2.f3 't!fe6
� tlJ 32 tt:les 33. �c3 "ifcs 33 ... .ft.h6�;
..•

� � � � � Shanglel Lu 33 ... J:lxc3! ? 34. 't!fxc3 �g7


Jeffery Xiong 3S.°ifc8+ tllf8 3 6 . @hl hS 37 . .ft.f3
.: � 'lt> � �
Wij k aan Zee B 2017 (8) (37 . .2.e2) 37 . . . 't!fd4+ 34. "ifxcS
10. tt:le2 10. tllb l .ft.xfS 11.exfS 't!fdS 1.e4 cs 2 . lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 dxcs 3S. be6 fxe6 3 6 . :b7 c4
12. 't!fd3 tll c 6 (12 ... tt:ld7 13. tlld 2 4. lllx d4 tt:lf6 s. lllc 3 a6 6.a3 g6 3 7 . q,, f 2gg hS 1h-1h
(13. tllc 3?? Was-+) 13 . . . 't!fc6;
12 . . . .ft.h6 13. tllc 3) 13. tlld 2 .ft.h6 Nigel Short
(13 ... 'lWaS ! 14 . .ft.e2 .ft.h6 lS. J:ldl=) Peter Heine Nielsen
14. tlle 4;!; Was + 1S.c3 dxc3 16. 't!fxc3 Ech I nternet fi nal 2004 ( 1 )
(16.bxc3! J:ld8 (16 ... 0-0 17 . .ft.e2 1.e4 cs 2 . tllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
l:Ifd 8 18. 'lWg3+ @h8 19.0-0±) 4. lllx d4 tt:lf6 S. lllc 3 a 6 6.a3
17. 't!fg3±) 1 6 . . . 't!fxc3+ (16 . . . 0-0-0) 6.a4 g6 7 . .ft.e2 .ft.g7 8 . 0 - 0 0-0
17.bxc3 @e7 18 . .ft.e2 tlla S 19.a4 9 . .ft.e3 tllc 6 10.f4 .ft.g4 11. tll x c6
l:Iac8 2 0 . J:lbl J:lhd8 21.h4 J:ld7 .2.xe2 12. tllx e7+ tfxe7 13. 'Wxe2
2 2 . J:lh3 l:Ic6 (1/2-1/2 Schou Moldt­ l:Iae 8 14 . .ft.d4 (14.eS!? dxeS lS.fS
Ochsner, Horsens 2013) 2 3 . J:ld3;!; °ii' b 4 (1S . . . e4;::t) 1 6 . l:Ia3;!; Bosch­
1 0 . . . 1" b 6 10 . . . tllc 6 11. tll e g3 tll e 7 Hoffmann, Netherlands tt 1999)
(11 . . . hS 12.h4 tlle 7) 12. tllx e7 .ft.xe7 7.h31? �g7 8. �c4 8 . �e3 0-0 14 . . . t!Jxe4 1S . .2.xg7 @xg7 16. tlld S
13 . .ft.e2 Was+ 14.b4 'lWc7 lS.0-0 9 . �c4 tllc 6 10. tllx c6?! (10. �a2) 10 . . . (16 . tll x e4 "ifxe4 17. tfd2 'Wc4
l:Ig 8 (1S . . . .2.e6) 1 6 . @hl .ft.e6 17. �d3 b x c 6 1 1 . 0 - 0 l:Ib8 12.J:lbl (Vardi­ 18. J:lf2 l:Ie4= Heberla- Szoen, Sroda
.2.d6 (17 ... 0-0-0) 18. tlle 2 (18. 'lWhS) Berenboym, Jerusalem 20 1S) Wielkopolska 2 00S) 16 ... 't!fd7
18 ... aS 19. 't!fd2 axb4 20.axb4 12 . . . tt:lxe4 13. tllx e4 dS= 8 ... 0·0 17. °ii' d 3 fS 18. J:lfel (18.aS @h8
@e7 21.bS 'Wes 2 2 . lha8 l:!xa800 9 . �a2 lllc 6 10.0-0 �d7 11. �e3 (18 . . . tllf 6=) 19.J:fael;!; T. Petrosian­
Ramesh-Arun Prasad, Hyderabad :cs 12 .f4 lllx d41 12 . . . e6 13. tll f3 Sadvakasov, Calicut 2 0 07) 18 ...
2006; 10 ... .2.xfS ! ? 11.exfS 't!faS + ; tt:le8?! (H anzluvka- Selecky, hS 19. °ii' d 4+ @h6 2 0 . J:ladl 't!fc6

52
Survey SI 14.l

21. l::te 2 'i!fcS 22.tl:lb6 'i!fc6 2 3 . tLldS 6 21.eS+- ; 2 0 .fS ± 20 ... dxeS 2 0 . 'i!fxb7 gxb7 2 1 . .2.d2 gxe4
'i!fcS 24. @fl l::te 6 2S. 'iif x cS 1/2-1/2 21.fxeS l:[ad8? The wrong rook. 2 2 . l::t a bl gxc2 2 3 . l::t x bS gd6
Tal-Ubilava, Sochi 1984. 6 ... 21... l::te dS! 22.e6 l::tx d4 23.exf7+ 24. l::t c l gfs 2 S . l::tb xc5 .2.xcS+
g6 7. �e2 �g7 8.0-0 0-0 9 . �e3 @fS ! -+ (23 ... @xf7 24. l::td fl + @es 2 6 . l::t x cS f6 27. gxf4 @£7 2 8 . gd 2 ;!;
9. ggs tl:lc6 10.tl:lb3 ge6 ll.f4 bS 2S. l::th 7 l::ta d8 26. 'i!fe6±) 22. 'it'f4 Short- Sandipan, Gibraltar 2 0 0 6 ;
12. gf3 l::tc 8 13.tLldS= Littlewood­ 22.e6!± l::tx d4? 6 23.exf7+ @xf7 7 . . . 'i!f c 7 s . gd3 g e 7 9 . 0 - 0 tl:lbd7
King. 4NCL 2004/0S. 9 ... �6 24. l::td fl++- 22 ... hg2 23.l:[h2 1 0 . tl:lf3 (10. 'it>hl) 1 0 . . . bs 11. 'Wel
10 .f4 10. 'iif d 2 tl:lg4! u. gxg4 gxg4 W'cSl 24.e6 24. l::t x g2 gxeS tl:lcS 12. gd2 gb7 13. 'it>hl 0 - 0
12. tLldS l::tc 8 13.f3 ge6 (13 ... gd7) 2S. l::tg S! gxf4 26. l::tx cS ;!; 24 ... 14. l::t c l (14.b4!? tl:l x d 3 15 .cxd3=)
14.c3 (14. tl:lxe6 fxe6 1S . tl:lb6 fxe6 2 S . tt:lxe6 2S. 'tfg4 l::t x d4 14 . . . tl:lxd3 (14 . . . d S 1 5 . e S tl:lfe4)
l::tc 7 16. l::ta dl tLleS ;::t) 14 . . . tl:leS 26. 'tfxe6+ @f8 27. l::tfl+! �xfl 15.cxd3= Kolar- Kovac, Bled
(14 ... gxdS! lS.exdS tl:leS) 1S .b3 2 8 . l::t f2+ gf6 29. l::t x f6 + exf6 1996. 8. �e3 tt:l c 6 9 . �d 3 0-0
(1S . tl:lb6!) lS ... gxdS 16.exdS 'i!faS 30. 'Wxf6 + = 2S . . . :Xd1+ 2 6 . tt:lxd1 9 . . . e S ; 9 . . . 'i!fb6 ? 1 0 . tt:lfS 'tfxb2??
17. tl:le2 'i!fbs 18. l::ta bl 'i!fd3 19. l::t fdl 'it'd61 27. 'it'g4 'it'xh2 27 ... gf3 ! 1 1 . tt:la4+- 10.0-0
'i!fxd2 20. l::tx d2 bS=F Harikrishna­ 2 8 . 'i!fxf3 (28 . 'i!f x g 6 'i!fxdl+
Vachier- Lagrave, Stavanger 29. @a2 �dS+ 30.c4 �xc4+ 31.b3
blitz 2016. 10 ... �g41 10 ... tl:lg4?! �xb3#) 2 8 ... 'iif x h2-+ 28. 'it'xg6
11. gxg4 gxd4 (11... gxg4 12. tt:lxc6 'it'eS 28 . . . 'Wh6 29. 'i!fxeS+ gfs =
�xdl 13.tLlxdS±) 12. �xd4 �xg4 29. 'it'xe8+ �h7 30. 'it'xe7 �dS
13. 'i!fd2 tl:lxd4 14. 'iif x d4 ;!; 11. tt:lxc6 31. 'it'xg7+ 'lt'xg7 3 2 . tt:lxg7 Wxg7
n. gxg4 tl:lxg4 12. 'i!fxg4 tl:lxd4 33. tlle 3± ... 'h -'h (80)
13. 'iif d l tl:lc6 = 11 ... he2 12 . tt:lxd8
12. tl:lxe7+ !? 'iif x e7 13. 'i!fxe2 l::ta e8
(13 ... tl:lxe4 14. tLldS ;!;) 14.eS ! ? Other a p p roaches
(14. l::ta dl tl:lxe4 lS.tl:ldS; 14. �d4 6 ... e6
tl:lxe4 1S. �xg7 @xg7 1 6 . tLldS 'tfd7
17. 'i!fd3 fS) 14 ... dxeS lS.fS e4;::t Nigel Short 10 ... 'it'c7 10 ... tt:lxd4 ll. gxd4 es
12 ... bd1 13Jhxd1 %%fxd8= 112-112 Andrey Zhlgalko n. gf2 (12.fxeS dxeS 13. gxeS
Wa rsaw ra pid 2004 (6) tl:lg4=F) 12 ... exf4 (12 ... tl:lg4=) 13. gd4
Ramachandran B Ramesh 1.e4 cs 2. tllf3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4 ge6 14. l::txf4 tl:ld7= 11. Wh1
M. Srlnlvasa Rao 4.tt:lxd4 tllf6 S . �3 a6 6.a3 e6 7.f4 bS 12. 'it'f31? �b7 13. l:lae1
Hydera bad 2006 (5) tlld 7?1 14. 'it'h3 � S 1S.fSI
1.e4 cs 2 . tt:lf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 tt:lxd4 1S ... tl:lxd3 1 6.cxd3 tt:lxd4
4. tt:lxd4 tllf6 S.�3 a6 6.a3 g6 17. gxd4 es 1 8 . ge3i 16. bd4 eS?
7.�e2 �g7 8. �e3 0-0 9. 'it'd2 16 ... tl:lxd3 17.cxd3 eS 17. bcSI
�6 10.0·0-0 dxcS 17 ... 'i!fxcS 1 8 .f6 ! gxf6 19. l::t x f6
gxf6 20. 'iif h 6 + - , planning 21. l::te 3.
18.f61 bf6 1 8 ... gxf6 19. 'iif h 6+-
19. tlld S l 19. l::tx f6 c4! (19 ... gxf6
2 0 . tl:ldS gxdS 21.exdS l::tfe8
22. �xh7+ @fS 23. gg6 l:!a700)
2 0 . ge2 gxf6 21. �h6 fS 22.�gS+
@h8 23. �f6 + = 1 9 'it'd6? .•.

7 ..• �e7 7 . . . bs s . gd3 tllb d7 9 . o - o 19 ... gxdS? 20.exdS h6 21. l:!xf6 gxf6
g 6 1 0 . fS ! ? (10 . 'it>hl) 1 0 . . . 'i!fb6! 22. �g4+ @h8 23. 'i!f fS + - ; 19 ... 'WdS!
11. ge3 es 1 2 . fxg6 hxg6 (12 . . . exd4 2 0 . tt:lxf6 + (20. l:!xf6 c4!!) 20 ... gxf6
13.gxf7+ @ d 8 14. gf2-+) 13. tl:lfS 21. l::te 3 @h8 22. �hS l::tg 8 23. 'Wxf7±
tll c S 14.b4 (14. tt:lg3 tl:lg4 lS . tLldS 20. :Xf61 gxf6 21. 'it'h6 1-0
10 . . . tl\g4 11. hg4 hg4 12.f3 'i!fa7+) 14 . . . gxfS lS.bxcS dxcS
�d7 13 .h4 tlle S 14. h S tllc 4 1 6 . tt:ld S ! tll x dS 17. gxb S + ! axbS Sergei Movseslan
1S. 'it'd3 tt:lxe3 1S . . . l::tc 8!? 16 .hxg6 18. 'iif x dS f4 (18 ... 'i!fb8! 19. l::t a dl Maxlme Vachler-Lagrave
fxg 6;::t 17.�h6? gxh6+ 18. l::tx h6 f6 ! ! + ; 19 . . . ge7? 2 0 . 'W c 6 + @ f8 Dubai Wch rapid 2014 (6)
eS!-+ 16. 'lt'xe3oo �c6? 16 .. JkS 2 i . gh 6 + ± ; 19 . . . gd6 2 0 . 'i!f x d 6 1.e4 cs 2 . tt:lf3 d6 3 . d 4 cxd4
17.hxgG hxgG 17 . . . fxg6?? 1 8 . tl:le 6 'i!fxd6 21. lhd6 lha3 2 2 . gxcS 4 . tt:lxd4 lLlfG S . �3 a 6 6.a3 e6
18. Wb1 1 8.f4! 18 ... :e8 19.f4
-+ l::t c 3 2 3 . l::t fdl l::t x cS 24. l::td S + 6 ... �c7 7. ggs (7. ge2; 7 . gd3)
W'b6 20.eS? 20. 'i!fh3-+ gxd4? @ e 7 2 5 . l::t x hS ;!;) 1 9 . 'Wxa8 'tfb7 7 ... tl:lbd 7 s . ge 2 e6 9 . 0 - 0 ge7

53
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

1 0 . @hl bS 11.f4 .Q.b7 12 . .Q.f3 lk8 12 ... g6 12 ... 0-0 13. i..d 2 es 13 ... i::tc 8
1 3 . � e l ( H ou Yifan-Ushenina, 14. lLlde2 ll:lcs 1S.fxeS dxeS
Beijing blitz 2 0 13) 13 . . . h 6 14 . .Q.h4 16. i..h 6 ! ;!; 0-0-0? 1 6 ... lLlcxe4?
g S ! ? 7 .f4 7 . .Q.c4 lLlxe4 (7 ... $.. e 7 17. lLlxe4 lLlxe4 18. �xe4 .Q.xe4
8 . 0 - 0 0 - 0 9 . .Q. a 2 is a normal 19. lLlc3 $..b 7 20 . .Q.g7±: 16 . . . i::tg 8
Sozin line) 8 . lLlxe4 dS 9 . .Q.gs 17 . �g7± Wd6? 17 ... lLlcd7
(9 . .Q.d3 dxe4 1 0 . 9.. x e4 es 1 1 . lLlb3 18 . .Q.xh 8 i::tx h8 19.b4± 1S. Wf3 1
�xdl+ 1 2 . @xdl= Brunello­ lLlcd 7 19.bhS JbhS 20. b41
Humphrey, Helsing0r 2 0 0 8) 'iPbS 21.a4!+- bxa4 22 . ll:lxa4
9 . . . � a S + (9 . . . .Q.e7 1 0 . .Q.xe7 (1/2- 1/2 1:1.cS 23.c4 Wxb4 24. l:l.fb1 Wd2
Saltaev- Nevostrujev, Vladivostok 2S.cS l:l.c6 26. l:l.b2 Was 2 7 . l:l.ab1
199S) 1 0 ... �xe7 n . .Q.d3 dxe4 Wxa4 2S.lbb7+ �cs 29. ll:lc3 13.fxeS dxeS 14. tLlfS bfS
12 . .Q.xe4 0-0 13. �e2 �cs 'ird4 3 0 . lLld S WxcS 31. 1Wh31 WdS 1S. JbfS= Wd6 16. 'ti'f1 1:1.acS
14. 0 - 0 - 0 ;!; Saltaev-Roschina, 32. lLJxf6 lLJxf6 33. ba6 33. l::tb 8 + ! 17.a4 b4 1S. lLld1 18.aS!? bxc3
M oscow 1 9 9 6) 1 0 . �d2 �xd2+ @ c 7 34. lk8+ @ d 6 3S . .Q.xa6+- (18 ... lLlbd7 19. ti:la4 9..d 8 20. i.xa6
ll. lLlxd2 dxc4 12. lLlxc4 lLld7 33 ... �d 6 34. l:l.f1? 34 . .Q.bs °ifcl+ i::ta 8 2 1 . i.d3 J;[xaS =) 19.axb6
1 3 . 0 - 0 - 0 bS 14. tLlaS .Q.cs lS. i::t h el 35. 9..fl 'ifc2 3 6 . i::ta l+- 34 . . . lba6 J;[b8 (19 ... cxb2 20. i.xb2 'ifxb6
0 - 0 1 6 . .Q.e3 ;!; Teske- Loffler, 3S.Wb3 ll:lxe4? 3S ... na7! 36. Wxf7 21. i.xeS) 2 0 . J;[xa6 J;[xb6 21. J;[xb6
Austria Bundesliga 2 0 0 6/07. �e7? 36 ... i.c7 3 7 . Wgs+ 1-0 'ifxb 6 22.b3 ± 1S . . . as 19.b3 tLlfd 7
7 i.. e 7 S . i.. d 3 b S 9.0-0 i.. b 7
.•• 20. �b2 g6 21. l:l.f3 ll:lcS 2 2 . tLlf2
10. 'iP h 1 ll:lbd7 11. 'irf3 'twc7 lLle6? 22 . . . tLlxdn 2 3 . lL\g41 -+ lLld4
12. "tt' g 3 Other a pproaches 24.l:l.f2?1 24. i.xd4 'ifxd4 2 S . tLlh6+
6 ... bS @g7 2 6 . lLlxf7 'ifcs 27.J;[dl;!; 24 ...
f6 24 . . . i.gs 2S.l:l.d1 We6 26.h3
Semen Dvolrys l:l.c6?1 2 7 . We1 �cs 2S. l:l.f1
Elisabeth Pahtz We7 29. Wh4 Wg7 30. �c11 gs
Cappelle-la-G rande 2001 ( 1) 30 ... 'ife7 31. i.h6 J;[f7 3 2 . J;[d2! J;[e6
1.e4 cs 2. lLlf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 33. J;[df2 @h8 34.g3! (34. J;[xf6
4. ll:lxd4 li:lf6 s . lLlc3 a6 6.a3 bS nexf6 3S. J;[xf6 lLle6 3 6 .g3±)
7 . �d3 e s 7 ... e6 S . lLlde21 lLlbd7 34 . . . °ifd8 (34 ... lLld7 3 S . i.c4+-)
9 . lL\g3 lLlb6 10.0-0 1 0 . i.gS 3S. J;[xf6 J;[exf6 3 6 . lhf6 lhf6
i.e7 ll. �xf6 i.xf6 12.lLlhS 0-0 37. 'ifxf6 + 'ifxf6 3 8 . lLlxf6± 31. Wg3
13.lLlxf6 + 'ifxf6 14.0-0= 10 . . . �e7 WhS 3 2 . ll:le3 ll:lcs 33. �bS l:l.e6
11.f4 o-o 12. Wh1 �e6 34. Wg4± . . . 1-0 ( 4 4 )

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

.i •
.\ .\ .t
.\ tt' ttJ .\
'ii'

� � .t :
@ ttJ
position after 9 d 5-d4 ... position after 27. �f4-g4 position after 17. . . d 6xc5

White to move gains a Black to play and win. White to play gains an edge.
positional edge. (solution on page 247) (solution on page 247)
(solution on page 247)

54
Sicilia n Defen ce N aj d o rf Va riatio n S I 14 . 1 ( 890)

Ba rte l 's ' d ea d ly' reci pe aga i nst the


N aj d o rf
by T i b o r Foga ra s i

1. e4 cs week. The stats are catastrophic for Black,


2. tbt3 d6 even at first sight: Bartel, for example, won
3. d4 cxd4 three of his games and drew the other two.
4. lbxd4 tbf6 Moreover, he tried his favourite move against
5. tbc3 a6 top Najdorf specialists: the 'team' of Gelfand,
6. lbb3 Artemiev, Wojtaszek, Ragger and Swiercz are
not exactly weak opposition, right?
I read in several theoretical articles and
game analyses that 6 ... eS transposes to the
normal main lines, but I definitely think
that this is wrong! Why would White
play 6. tt::lb 3 if Black could transpose to
the main lines by almost any move? The
actual fact is that 6 ... eS?! loses a tempo
compared to some Najdorf lines, e.g.
6. ge3 eS 7. 00. After 6.tt:Jb3, White can
We may rightly feel that the title of this play ggs in one move, and the knight can
article is an exaggeration: of course we be placed on d2 from b3 as well as from
are not saying that the good old Najdorf f3. White also has another option - the
has been refuted. However, Polish GM set-up ggs/ 'fWd3/0-0-0 - so basically he
Mateusz Bartel has tried an interesting is avoiding the main line with 6 ... eS.
move at the highest level. Bartel, who The continuation 6 ... bS?! cannot be
is known for his aggressive style, has recommended for Black either.
demonstrated quite a few times how
important it is in our age of 'computer
chess' to throw in new, unusual weapons.
In the line with 6. lt:Jb3, White plays four
of his first six moves with his knights. The
databases tell us that this mysterious move
occurred for the first time at the highest level
in Geller-Stein at the Stockholm Interzonal
1962 (1-0 in 56 moves). Then came a long
silence, only to be followed by the big
breakthrough. In 2016, we saw this dangerous White can choose between the aggressive
set-up in more and more games, week by 7.eS!? dxeS 8. Wif3 �a7 9. ge3 and the
55
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

positional 7.a4! b4 8. tlld S. Now Black is tllb 6 15. Wbl tllfd7! 16. �d4 �xd4 followed
in big trouble after 8 ... tllx e4?! 9. 'tWf3 ! fS in Van Foreest- Ivanchuk, Novi Sad tt
10. �e3!. 2016,
The main idea behind 6. tllb 3 is that White
tries to launch a quick attack by g2-g4,
after which he often develops his bishop
to g2.

Va riatio n A
The natural developing move 6 ... tllc 6
prevents g2-g4 for the time being. After
7. �e3 Black can opt for 7 ... tllg4 8 . �d2!?
tllf6 9 .h4!?, with chances for both sides,
see Grischuk-Kokarev, Novosibirsk and Black had good play on the queenside
ch- RUS 2016. The other option is 7 ... e6 after 17. �xd4?! 0-0 18. �e3 @h7 19. �d3
8.g4 bS 9 . �g2 �b7 10.gS tlld 7 ll.f4 tllb 6! tlle S!.
12. 'ife2 tllc 4 13.0-0-0 tllx e3 14. 'i:Yxe3 tllaS!.
Boris Gelfand is worthy of his fame as a Variation C
top Najdorf specialist: by targeting the The ' Scheveningen move' 6 ... e6 is also
weak c4-square for a second time, he popular: 7.g4 bS 8. �g2 �b7 9.gS b4
demonstrates Black's correct strategy! 10. tlld S! exdS (White is better after
As we will see later, Vassily Ivanchuk 10 ... tllx d S?! 11.exdS eS 12.a3!) ll.gxf6 dxe4
followed the same plan in a Dragon
structure. 15.fS lllc4

E .. . .t. E
.t. 1 1 1
1 1 1
1 £::, £::,
ll £::,
ttJ ttJ 'ti
£::, £::, £::, � £::,
@ l:. : In this position, 12. 'ifg4 and 12. �e3 have
been played, with mixed results. Black
... led to a position with chances for both cannot take on f6 with the queen because
sides in Bartel-Gelfand in the Aeroflot of 13. tllaS, whereas after 12 ... gxf6 his pawn
Open, Moscow 2016. structure is ruined, and White has ample
compensation for the sacrificed pawn.
Va riation B
6 ... g6 is the ' Dragon move'. Now, 7. �e2 Variation D
�g7 8.g4 h6 9 . �e3 tllb d7!? (Ivanchuk's 6 ... tllb d7 7.g4 h6 8.a4 I like this move.
move seems to be better than 9 ... tllc 6, White plays on both flanks, and tries to
which had been played earlier) 10. �d2 pin down Black's queenside. The other
bS 11.0-0-0 �b7 12.£3 �c7 13.a3! .!:!.c8 14.h4 option is 8. �g2 bS 9.h4 b4 10. tlld S tllx dS
56
Survey S I 14.l

U.exd5 tt:le5, but White's position is not


really preferable here. After 8.a4 'iVc7
9. �g2 tt:le5 10.h3 g5 ll.f4 gxf4 12. �xf4
�g7 13. 'ife2 �d7 14.0-0 �c8 15.rul!

Mateusz Bartel

Black had problems with his king; see middlegames are somehow easier to
Bartel-Ragger, Germany Bundesliga play for White. Black runs out of typical,
2014/15. routine moves sooner or later, and his
king often gets stuck in the middle.
Conclusion Najdorf players can draw some comfort
In tournament practice, Black seems to from Gelfand's and Ivanchuk's games:
be in trouble. Even if the computer says if we can occupy the c4-square with a
that he has a good position, the ensuing knight, then Black is 0 K!

No transposition 2016. S ... lllb 6 8 . . . fl.. e 7 9 . 1Llc4! Kacper Plorun


6 ... es 9 . bf61 1Wxf6 10.a4 10.1Llc4 1Llxc4 Klrlll Shevchenko
ll. fl.. x c4± 10 ... 1i'dS?l 10 . . . fl.. e 6 11.aS Katowice tt rapid 2016 (6)
Adam Horvath 1Lld7 12. 1Llc4 (12. fl.. c 4! ?) 12 ... 0-0-0 1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4
Tibor Farkas 13.1Lle 3 ± (13 . 1Llxd6+ ?! 'it>b8!gg); 4. lllx d4 lllf6 s. lllc 3 a 6 6. lllb 3
H ungary tt 2015/16 (8) 10 ... dS!? 11.exdS fl..b 4gg 11.a S eS?I 7. �gSI �e6 7 . . . fl.. e 7 8. W/d2
1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 lild 1 12. lilc4 lilts 13 . lllb s :bs 0-0 9. fl..xf6 fl..xf6 10.l:tdl fi.e7
4. lllx d4 lllf6 S. lllc 3 a6 6. lll b 3 eS?I 14. �c4± �e6 1S. 1i'd3 .bc4? 11. ILldS (11. fl..c 4! ?) ll ... 1Llc6 12.g3?!
7.�gS! lllb d7 15 ... fl.. e 7 16.0-0 0-0 17. l:tadl± fl..g4 13. fl..e2 fl..h3 14. W/d3 fS !+='
16. 1Wxc4 � e 7 17. 1i'a4+! �fS B. Bellahcene-Bates, London 2016.
17 . . . llld 7 1 8 . lllc dS+- 18.0-0 g6
19. :fd1 'itg7 20.:d3 1WeS
21. 1i'b31 llld 7 22. lllc a4 l:lfS
2 3 . l:lad1 lllx b6 24. lllx b6 1Wc6
2 S.f3 1Wcs+ 26. 'itf1 l:lbdS 2 1 . :ds
1Wc7 2S. l:l1d3 :deS 29.l:lc3 1i'dS
30.l:lcS 1WxcS 31. lllx cS :Xcs
32. 1i'xb7+- �gs 33. 'irb3 :bs
34. 1i'a2 l:lfcS 3S.c4 �e7 3 6 . 'ite2
:b4 3 7 . 'itd3 :cbS 3S. 'itc3 fS
39. 'ira3 l:l4b7 40.b4 fxe4 41.fxe4
S. llld 2! 8.a4 fl.. e 7 9.aS 0-0 10. fl.. e 3 :ts 42.bS axbS 43.cxbS l:lc 7+
Wlc7 ll.g4 (11. fl..e2!?) 11 ... dS! 12.e xdS 44. 'itb4 l:lf4 4S. 1i'd3 l:lf2 46.b6 s. 'ifd2 lllb d7 9.0-0-0 :cs 10.f3
.Q.b4 13. l::!a4 fl.. x c3+ 14.bxc3 bS l:lb2+ 47. 'ita3 l:lcc2 4S.1Wxc21 hS 11. 'itb1 �e7 12 .h4 'ifc7 13.g3
15.axb6 1Llxb6 16. fl.. x b6 W/xb6gg :Xc2 49.b7 �gs so. l:ld1 �c1+ bS 14.a3 0-0 1S. �e2 15. fl.. h 3!?
Demidov-Cerveny, Pardubice S1.:Xc1 1-0 1S ... l:lfdS 16.f4 lllc S?! 16 . . . 1Llb6!+='

57
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

17. lLJxc5 dxc5 18. 1l'e3 exf4 8.i.d21? The first surprising a4? 2S. 'i!fd2! l:!cS 26.f4!+-) 25.cxb3
19.gxf4 b4 20.f51 bxc3? 20 . . . gxfS! move in the game. The usual l:!xb3+ 26.Wal l:!b2! 27.l:!bl l:!xbl+
21.exfS bxc3 22. 'llk xc3 li:Je4 23. 'llk e3 continuation is 8.ggs h6 9 , gh4 28. l:!xbl '1Wd4+ 29.l:!b2 li:lc4 30. 'i!fcl
l:!e8<=' 21.fxe6 fxe6 22. i.c4 1l'b6 gs 10. gg3 ..Q.g7. s ... li:lf& 9.h41? (30 . ..Q.xc4 'i!fdl+ 31.l:!bl 'i!fd4+=)
23. 'ifxc3± l:ld4 24.l:lxd4 cxd4 The second 'shocking' move. 30 . . . li:lxb2 31. 'i!fxb2 'i!fgl+ 32. 'IWbl
25. '*'b3 •xb3 26.cxb3 �7 Grischuk's original play thoroughly 'llk d 4+=) 24.axb3 l:!xb3+ 25.cxb3
27.l:lfl l:lc5 2s.La6 wes 29.b4 confuses his opponent. 9 ... g6?1 '1Wxb3+ 26.Wal 'i!fa3+ 27.Wbl
l:lxg5 30.hxg5 lbxe4 31. i.b5+ Now a Dragon-like position arises, 'i!fb3+= 22. lt:\d4!+- Defending
WdS 32.l:ldl e5 33.l:lel lt:ld2+ where the move h2-h4 definitely and attacking at the same time!
34. Wc2 lt:lf3 35.l:lhl e4 36.l:lxh5 fits into White's strategy. I prefer The black queen is in trouble. The
d3+ 37.Wdl lt:\d4 38.g&+- i.f6 immediate queenside action by the Russian GM attacks the king and
39. i.c4 lt:lc2 40.Wd2 Lb2 41. i.d 5 active 9 ... bS!?. 10. i.g5 10. li:ld51? also the trapped queen at the same
La3 42. Le4 lLJxb4 43. l:la5 lt:\c2 came into consideration: 10 ... gg? time. 22 /l:lg3 22 . . . ..Q.c4 23. l:!dfl
.•.

44. l:laS+ We7 45. Ld3 1·0 (10 ... li:Jxe4? ll. ..Q.e3! li:lcS 12. li:lxcS '1Wg3 24. li:lfS gxfS 25. l:!fgl gxe2
dxcS 13 . ..Q.f4! eS 14 . ..Q.gS 'l!kaS+ 15.c3 26. 'IWxhS +- ; 22 ... li:lc4 23. l:!dgl+-
(IS .b4!? cxb4 16. li:lf6+ We7 17. li:lxh7+ 23.h5! g5 23 . . . li:lxhl 24. li:lxe6 fxe6
Va riation A We8 18. li:lf6+ We7 19 . ..Q.c4-+) 2S.hxg6+- 24. 11'xg5+ Wh7 25. l:ldfl
6 . . . tllc 6 15 ... ..Q.g 7 16. li:lf6+ gxf6 17. gxf6 lLJxfl 26. l:lxfl lLJxf3 26 ... 'i!fh2
l:!g8 18.'1Wd6±) ll. ..Q.c3 li:JhS 12. gxg7 27. li:lxe6 fxe6 28.l:!gl+- 27. •cl
Alexander Grlschuk li:lxg7 13 . ..Q.e2;!; 10 ... i.g7 11. 'ifd2 h6 The knight as well as the game
Dmltry Kokarev 12. i.f4 i.e6 13.0-0-0 h5 14. Wb1 are lost! Black surrendered in this
Novosibirsk ch-RUS 2016 (11) 0-0 14 ... l:!c8!? 15.f3 l:lc8 16. i.h6 hopeless position. We have seen
1.e4 c5 2 . lt:lf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 Lh6 17 ... xh6 'it'b6 17 . . . li:le5 instructive and original play in all
4. lLJxd4 lt:lf6 5. lt:lc3 a6 6. li:lb3 18.li:ld4 ..Q.d7 19.li:JdS ! ;;!; 18.g4! li:le5 phases of this game.
lt:lc6 7 . i.e3 /l:lg4 7 . . . g6 8 . li:JdS! 18 . . . hxg4 19.hS+- 19.gxh5 lLJxh5
li:JxdS (8 ... li:ld7 9 . gd4! eS (9 . . . li:Jxd4 20. i.e2 l:lxc3! 20 ... li:lg3 21.hS! li:lxhl Mateusz Bartel
10. 'llk x d4 eS? 11. '1Wc3!) 10. �e3 h6 22.l:!xhl+- 21. bxc3 Boris Gelfand
11. 'llk d 2 li:lcS 12.f3 ge6 13. ge2 Moscow 2016 (8)
l:!c8 14. 0-0 gxdS 15.exdS li:Jxb3 1.e4 c5 2 . lt:lf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
16.axb3 CiJe7 17.f4 li:JfS 18. gd3 li:Jxe3
.1 • 4. lt:lxd4 lt:lf6 5. lLic3 a6 6. lt:lb3 li:lc6
19. '1Wxe3 gg7 20.fS!± Aravindh­ i i i 7 . i.e3 e6 8.g4 b5 9. i.g2 i.b7
Kuntner, London 2016) 9 .exdS i 'if i .i. i 'iV 10.g5 lt:ld 7 11.f4
li:JeS 10. gd4 (10.f4 li:Jg4 ll. gd4 li:Jf6 6 6
12. gxf6 exf6 13. gdH) 10 . . . gh6!
11. ge2 0-0 12.0-0 bS 13.a4 b4 14.c3
� � .i 'if • .i. .i
(14.aS!?) 14 ... gb? 15.cxb4 gxdS CD � � .! 6 i i i
16. li:laS e 6 <=' Anand-Vachier­ � � � i 6i i
Lagrave, Bastia rapid 2016; 7 . . . eS
<it> J:[ J:[ i �
8. 'llk d 2 ge7 9.f3 aS?! 10. gbs! 0-0
11. l:!dl ge6 12.0-0 'llk b 8 13.a3 l:!d8 The critical position. Now the
� �
14. li:ldS gxdS 15.exdS a4 16. li:lcl li:la7 game will be decided in a few CD CD �
17. gxa4 bS 1 8 . gb3 l:!c8 19.li:ld3± moves: the question is, who gets � � � ��
David-Magrini, Bratto 2016. there first? 21... 'iff2? 21. . . l:!c8!gg was
l:1 'iV @ J:[
Black's only chance. Now it's not
clear how White can get an edge: 11... lt:lb6 12. 1l'e2 12. 'i!ff3 b4 13. li:le2
22.l:!hgl (22. l:!dgl?! 'llk c 7!! 23. 'llk e 3 li:lc4 14.0-0-0 'i!fc7 15. Wbl 0-0-0
(23.c4 gxc4 24 . ..Q.xc4 'li'xc4 2S.l:!g2 16. gf2 g6 17.fS (17. �d3!?) 17 ... li:l6e5
li:lg3!+) 23 ... '1Wxc3 24. 'llk xc3 l:!xcn) 18. �h3;!; Kurmann-Bogner, Flims
22 ... l:!xc3 (22... 'llk c 7? 23.f4! 'i!l'xc3 2016. 12 ... lt:lc4 13.0-0·0 lbxe3 13 ... l:!c8
24. l:!cl±) 23. 'llk xhS (23. Wb2?! l:!e3! 14. Wbl ge7 15 . ..Q.c1 0-0 16.l:!d3
24. l:!g2 li:lg3!+) 23 . . . gxb3 (23 . . . aS li:lb4 17. l:!h3 g6 18.l:!dl as 19. li:ld4
24. 'llk g S! (24. Wb2?! a4! 25. @xc3 axb3 eS 20. li:ldxbS exf4 21.b3?! (21.a3:.:!
26.axb3 'IWcS+ 27.Wd2 (27 . ..Q.c4 ..Q.xc4 li:Ja6 (21... ..Q.a6 22. l:!d4!±) 22. gxf4±)
28 .bxc4 'IWaS+ 29.Wb3 'i!fb6+=) 2!... tlle3 22 . ..Q.xe3 fxe3 23. 'i!fxe3 ..Q.a6
27 ... li:lc4+ 28. gxc4 'llk xhS 29 . ..Q.xe6 24. �g3 (24. tlld4 gxgS 25.'i!fg3 gf6
fxe6 30.@e2 Wf7=) 24 ... ..Q.xb3 (24 . . . 26.a3 tllc6 27. li:lxc6 l:!xc6 28.eS l:!xc3!

58
Survey SI 14 .I

29 . 'ifxc3 .bes 30. 'ifel S..c8 3Ulli d3 2S. 'ifd4 lle6+ Valuet-V. Petkov, 22. 'it>xg2 'ifc7f Fluvia Poyatos­
'l!l'b6--+) 24 ... fLxbS 2S.tlixbS :.Xc2 Juvisy sur Orge 2013. Bezemer, Belgium tt 2015/ 16. 8 ...
2 6.eS fLxgS 27.a3 'ifc8--+ Aravindh-Lu b5 9.a3 h6 10.f4 .tb7 11 .tf3 :cs•

Shanglei, Tashkent 2016. 14. 'ifxe3 12.0-0 .te7 13. i.g2 e5?1 13 ... gS!?
tlla S 15.fS IS. lllx aS °lWxaS 16. @bl 14.gS hxg5 15.fxg5 'it'b6+? lS ... tlJhS
lk8 17. tlJe2 fLe7 18.h400 15 ... lDc4 16. 'iff3 (16. 'ifg4!?; 16.g6!?) 16 ... l2Jf4
16. 'ifg3 b4 17. �4 eS 18. �cS 17. S..xf4 exf4 18. 'ifxf4 tlJeS 19.h4
.ic6 19 . .if11 lllb6 20. li:lxa6 20.tt:laS!? f61 +=' 1s. :12 ttihs 11.0.i1s1 'it'ds
.ibS 21.g6--+ 20 ... .te7 21.f6 gxf6 18. 'it'f3 tllf4 19. lbxf4 exf4 20 . .bf4
22.li:lxb4 ;;,, 22.gxf6 fLxf6 23. 'iff3_. o-o 21. :d1± .bgs 22 . .bd6 .te7
22 ... .be4 23. i.g2 i.g6! 24. .bas 23.eS �5 24. 'it'e2 .bg2 25. :Xg2
'i'xa8 25. 'it'f2 0.d7 26.0.dS 'ifxa2 tllc4 26.'it<h1 lbxd6 27.exd6 .tf6
27.gxf6 i.f8� 28. 'ifd2?1 28.'ife3! 27 ... .ixd6 28.l:.txg7+! 'it>xg7 29. 'ifg4+
hS 29. �d 'ifa6 30. 'iff3 fLh6+ @h7 (29 ... @f6 30.llfl+ 'it>e7 31. llel+
31.'it>bl o-o 32. llligl 'it>h7g? 28 ... 9. i.g2 tties 10.h3 tllc4 11. 'ife2 'it>f6 32.'iWf3+ 'it>g6 33. l::tg l++-)
hS?I 28 ... tlJcS! 29. �e3 tlJxb3+ lbxe3 12. 'ifxe3 'it'c7 13.0-0-0 30.lld3+- 28.d7 :c7 29. 'it'g4
30.cxb3 hS 31. °lWc3 .ih6+ 32. tlJe3 0-0 tal 7 14.f4 gS!? 15.fS?l lS. 'ifd4! bb2 30. 0.d4! "tlt'f6 30 ... S.. x d4
33. llligl dS 34.:.Xg6+ fxg6 3S. l:.txdS llg8 16.fS tt:leS 17. tt:la4! f 15 tlle S
..• 31. :.Xd4 g6 (31... 'iWf6 32.dS 'iW+-)
'ifa8+ 29. lDc3 'l'a6 30. 'it'f2 i.h6+ 16. i.f1 i.d 7 17 .tal4 bS!i=t 18.a3 32. lld6+-; 30 ... g6 31.tt:le6! fxe6
31.Wb1 O·O 32. 'it'e2 32. llli g l 'it>h7� 'it'b6 19 .h4 :gs 20 . .te2 .te7 32. 'iWxg6+ 'it>h8 33. 'iWh6# 31. tllfS
32 ... 'ifxe2 33. li:lxe2 li:lxf6 34.:Xd6 21. Wb1 b4 21...tt:lc6 22.hxgS S.. x gS gs 32. :ds :c4 33. "tlt'h3+- :h4
0g4 35.lDc:3 llle3 36Jlg1 Wh7 23. 'ifgl tt:lxd4 24. 'ifxd4 'ifxd4 33 ... 'iWd8 34. lldxg6+ fxg6 3S.llxg6+
37.Dgxg6 37.lld2 llb8 38.lle2 lhb3 25. llxd4 'it>e7'i' 22.axb4 'it'xb4 @f7 36. 'iWh7+ .ig7 37. 'iWxg7#
(38 ... tlJc4'?) 39.lhg6 lhb2+ 40.@xb2 23.f6? 23. tlJa2 'ifb7 24.hxgS fLxgS 34. :Xf6 :Xh3 3S.:gxg6+ 'it<h8
@xg6� 37 .. .fxg6 38.0.d2 i.f4 2S. 'if a3 23 ... bf6 24. tllf 5 exf5 36. :hs+ lbh6 37.lbhs+ <Jtgs
39.h3 gS'i' 40. 0.de4 wg7 41.b4 g4 2 5 . ta! S lbxg41 26. 'ifc1 bb21 38.:ds :ds 39.tlie7+ 'it<fs 40.tlics
42.hxg4 li:lxg4 42 ... hxg4 43.bS g3 2 7 . 'it'xb2 'it'xb2+ 28. �xb2 tllf 2-+ .ba3 41. :d3 .te7 42. lbxdS bd8
44.b6 g2 45.tlJe2 l2JfS 46. lld7+ 'it>g6'i' 29. hxgS hxg5 30.e5 lbxd1+ 43. lle3 .te7 44.h4 1-0
43.bS h4 44.:d31 llle 3 45. tllf2 :bS 31. lbd1 dxe5 32. tllf 6+ We7
46.Wb2 wg6 47. �b3 �s 4S. :d7 33.lbxd7 :ad8 34.lbxe5 lbd1
we6 49.:h7 tllfS 50. tllfe4 tllh 6 35. bd1 g4 36. wc3 g3 37. tllf3 g2 Va riation B
51. llle 2 .te3 52.Wc4 h3 53. Wd3 h2 3s. tLig1 :hs 39. 'it<d4 0-1 6 . . . g6
54. tll2g3 .tf4 55.c4 SS. tlJcS+! @f6
(5S ... @dS? 56.tlJge4!+-) S6. l:.txh6+ Yusup Atabayev Jorden van Foreest
.ixh6 S7.tlJd7+ We6 S8. tlixb8 Annaberdl Esenov Vaslly lvanchuk
.if4 S9.tlJhl e4+ 60. @xe4 S..xb8= Buda pest 2016 (4) Novi Sad tt 2016 ( 1 )
55... :ds+ 56. �e2 :d4 57.�3 :Xc4 1.e4 cs 2 . lbf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 1 . e 4 cs 2 . tllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
58.b6 :b4 59.b7 �dS 60. �g2 :b2+ 4.lbxd4 lbf6 5. lbc3 a6 6. tllb 3 lbc6 4. lbxd4 lbf6 5. lbc3 a 6 6. lbb3
61. �h1 0g4 62. :g1 :b1+ 63. wg2 7 . .te2 e6 g6 7 . i.e2 .tg7 8 .g4 h6 9. i.e3
h1'1'+ 64. li:lxh1 wxe4 65. :Xg4 lbbd 71?N
:b2+ 66. tllf2+0 we3 67.bS'it' :Xb8
6S.:h4 we2 69.:g4 :b2 70.:h4
:c2 71.:h3 :cs 72. :h4 i.e3
73.:e41= .. V2-1h (77)
.

Mees van Osch


Emanuel Berg
Maastricht 2016 ( 1 )
1.e4 c s 2. tllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4. lbxd4
tllf6 5. tllc3 a6 6. tllb3 tllc 6 7 . .te3
e6 s.g4 h6 8...bs 9. S..g 2 S..b 7 IO.gs
tlJd7 ll.f4 b4 12. tlJa4 tlJaS 13.tlJd2 8.g4 8.0-0 bS 9.a3 .ib7 10.f4 S.. e 7
llc8 14.a3 bxa3 IS.b3 .ie7 16.0-0 0-0 11. .if3 0-0 12.g4 llc8 13.gS tlJd7 10. "tlt'd2 bS 11.0-0-0 i.b7 12.f3
17.h4 dS 18.fS dxe4 19. tt:lxe4 exfS 14. fLg2 b4 15.axb4 lbxb4 16.l:ID dS 9c7 12 ... b41? 1 3 . lbdS (13. tll a 4 llb8!;
20. llxfS tlJc6 21.tlJd6 .ixd6 22. 'ifxd6 17.exdS tlixdS 18.tt:lxdS fLxdS 19.lld3 13.tt:lbl a51) 13 ... tt:lxdS 14.exdS tt:lb6
tlJe7 23. llf2 S.. xg2 24. 'it>xg2 llc6 tt:lcS 20. tlixcS .ixcS+ 21. Whl S.. x g2+ 15. 'iWxb4 (15 . fLd4 S.. x d4 1 6 . 'iWxd4

59
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

0-0 17. �xb4 .axdS +:<) lS . . . ILlxdS 10.f3 bS 11.1i'd2 �e6 12.0-0-0 J:lb8 29.J:le1 wg7 3 0 . J:le2 J:ld S
16. �xb7 12lxe3 17. 'ii' c 6+ @f8 J:lc8 12 ... �xb3!? 13.cxb3! lk8 31J:ld4 J:ld bS 32.J:ldd2 1i' h 1+
1 8 . l:td2 l:tc8 19. 'li'e4 'ii'b 6 +:< 13 .a31 14. Wbl 'ii' a s lS . l:tcl;!; 13. wb1 ttJeS 3 3 . J:le1 1i'b7 34. 1i'd4+ �gs
J:lc8 14. h 4 lLlb6 14 . . . 12lxg4!? 1S.fxg4 14.h4 �c4?1 14 . . 12lfd7!?; 14 . . .
. 3S.c4 J:lcS 3S . . . l:tb4 3 6 . a3 l:tb3
.axc3 1 6 .bxc3 .axe4 17 . .ad4! es hS!? 1S. �d41 1i'c7? 1S . . . .be2?! (3 6 . . . l:ta4 37.l:te3±) 37. Wal± 36.b3
18. l:th3! lLlf6 19 . .agl ILldS 2 0 . @b2 16. 'li'xe2 12led7 (16 . . . 12lc4? 17.eS! +-) aS 3 7 . 1i'xd6 J:lxc4 38.J:le7?1 38.fS!
0-0� 1S. �b1 lS . .ad4 12lc4! 1 6 . 'if d3 17.f4±; 1S ... �xb3 16.cxb3 12lc6 gxfS (38 . . . J:tcc8 39. 'li'f4±) 3 9 . l:Ie7!
es 17 . .af2 0-0 17 . .axf6 (17. �e3 hS!) 17 . . . .axf6 6 3 9 ... 'li'b4? 40. 'ii' f6 l:tf8 41. l:txf7!

18.f4f 16.f41 he2 17. 1i'xe2 l::tx f7 42.J:[d8+ l:tf8 43. l:txf8 +
ttJexg4 17 . . . lll c 4 18 . .axf6 �xf6 'ii' x f8 44. 'ii' xf8 + @xf8 4S .bxc4+-
(18 . . . exf6 1 9 . ILldS 'ii' d 8 2 0 . 12ld4±) 38 1i'b4 39. 1i'xb4 J:lcxb4 40. J:lf2
..•

19.ILldS 'it'a7 20. 12lxf6+ exf6 a4 41. Wb21 axb3 42.a3 J:l4bS
21.12ld4± 18.eSI dxeS 19.fxeS 43. J:le3 wg7 44. J:lff3 J:lfS 44 ... h6!?
1i'c4 20.exf6 2 0 . l:td3!? 12ld7 4S.J:lxb3 J:le8 46. J:lf2 h 6 4 7 . h 4
21. 'ii' x g4 12lxe5 22. 'ii' d l!+- J:le1 48.a4 J:le4 49. Wa3 J:lfxf4?1
20 ... 1i'xe2 21. ttJxe2 hf6 22.hS 49 . . . l:td5 ! +:< SO. J:lxf4 J:lxf4 S1. J:lb4
gs 23. ttJg3 hd4 24.J:lxd4 ttJes hxgs S2.hxgs J:lf1 S3. J:lb6 J:lfS
2S.J:le4 f6 26. J:lf1+- J:lc4 2 7 . ttJd4 S3 . . . l:tgl! S4.J:lbS J:lf1 ;, 54 ... l:tfJ+!
J:lcS 2 8 . lLle6 J:lc6 29.ltJg7+ Wd7 s s . 'it.>b4 J:[f4+ S 6 . 'it.>a5 f6! 5 7 . l;tb7+
30. ttJafSI+- J:lg8 31.J:ld4+ wc7 @f8 S 8 . @bs l:tfS + S 9 . 'it.>b6 fxgS
1S . . . ttJfd 7 1 16. �d4 hd4 32.ttJxe71 J:lxg7 33. ttJxc6 ttJxc6 60.a5 l:tf6+ 6 1 . @bs J:[fS + 62. 'it.>a4
17. 1i'xd4?1 ;, 17. 12lxd4 ttJeS 18. 'iWcl 34.J:ld 2 g4 3S.J:lxf6 g3 3 6 . J:lg6 J:[f6 SS.as f6 S6.J:lb7+ Wf8
12lec4 19. �xc4 12lxc4 20. ILldS! J:lxg6 3 7 . hxg6 h S 38.J:le2 ttJd4 S7. �a41+- fxgS S8.a6 J:la1+
�xdS 21.exdS00 17 . . . 0-0 18. 1i'e3 39.J:lg2 ltJfS 40. J:lxg3 1 1-0 S9. wbS g4 60.a7 1-0
�h7 19. �d3 lLleSI 20.hS?I
20. 'ii' e 2!?. 20 . . . gSI 21.ttJd S lLlbc41 Arturs Neiksans Judith Fuchs
22. 1i'e2 1i'd8 2 3 . ttJd4 e6 24. hc4 Darius Zagorskls Alexander Fier
J:lxc4 2 S . ttJe3 J:lc7 26.J:ld2 Pa rnu zt 2016 (3) Maastricht 2016 (3)
1i'f61 2 7 . J:lh d 1 J:ld8 28.�a1 dS 1.e4 cs 2. ttJf3 d6 3.d4 lLlf6 4. ttJc3 1.e4 cs 2. tLlf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
29.exdS bdS 3 0 . ltJxdS J:lxd S cxd4 S . ttJxd4 a6 6. lLlb3 g6 7 . �e2 4. ttJxd4 ttJf6 S. ttJc3 a6 6. lLlb3
31. lLlb3? ;, 31.c3 12lc4 3 2 . l:td3 aS-+ �g7 8.g4 ttJc6 g6 7 . �e2 �g7 8.g4 bS 8 ... 12lc6
31 . . . 1i'xf3 32. 1i'h2 32. 'ii' xf3 12lxf3 9 . �e 3 �e6 10.gS 12ld7 11. 'ii' d 2 l:tc8
33. l:txdS exdS 34. l:txdS (34.c3 12.0-0-0 ILlaS 13. 12ld5 (:. 13. �d4!?)
l:tc4-+) 3 4 . . . 12lh2! 3 S . l:td4 J:txc2-+ 13 . . . ti:Jxb3 + 14.axb3 ILlcS 1 5 . @bl
32 . . . J:lxc21 3 3 . J:lxc2 J:lxd 1+ 12lxe4 1 6 . 'li'b4 lllc S 17.h4 0-0?!
34.Wa2 1i'e4-+ 3S. 1i'f2 �g7 0-1 (17 ... aS!) 18.hS �fS 1 9 . hxg6 fxg6
20. �c4 (20 . °iWh4! @f7 2 1 . .ag4-+)
Mateusz Bartel 2 0 . . . e6 21. �xcS J:txcS 2 2 . 12le3 'ii' e 7+
Vladlslav Artemiev A.H orvath- Schachinger, Austria
Moscow 2016 (6) Bundesliga B 2015/16.
1.e4 cs 2 . ltJf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
4. ttJxd 4 lLlf6 S. ttJc3 a6 6. lLlb3 g6
7 . �e2 �g7 8.g4 h6 9 . �e3 ttJc6
9.gs ttJd 7 10. �e3 bS 11. 1i'd2
�b7 12.0-0-0 J:lc8 13 . �b1 ttJces
13 . . . ILldeS 14.f4 12lc4 1S. �xc4
bxc4 1 6 . 12ld4;!; 14. �d41 0-0 1S.f4
ltJc4 16. hc4 J:lxc4 17. hg7
wxg7 18.J:lhe1 ltJcS? ;, 18 . . .
b 4 ! 19 . ILldS aS ;!; 19. ttJxcS J:lxcS
20.eSI b4 20 ... �f3 21.exd6 exd6
22. 'ii' x d6+- 21. 1i'd41 wg8
22. 1i'xb4± 1i'c7 23.exd6 exd6 9 . g s ttJfd 7 10. �e3 �b7 11.a3?1
24. 1i'd41 J:lfS 2S. ttJe4 he4 11. �d4!? 11 ... ttJc6 ll... �xc3+ ! ?
2 6 . J:lxe4 J:lc8 2 7.c3 1i'c6 27 . . . d5 12.b xc3 0 - 0 oo 12.f4 J:lcSl 13.0-0
2 8 . l:teS l:txeS 29. 'ii' x eS+- 28. 1i'e3 13. 'ii' d 2 ILlaS! 13 ... h 6 1 � 14.gxh6

60
Survey SI 14.I

i,xh6 1s. 11te1? 1s . 'li'd2!?; 1s. gg4!? 16.hS ! ? 16 ... h S 17.tt:ld S bdS? l:[a4+ 48. Wb2 .tg4 49.cS e2
1s ... eSl 16. 11tg3 exf4 17. hf4 :;, 17 ... '\Wd7 18.cxdS tt:leS 19. l:[c1 49 ... J:lc4 S O . J:lxe3+- SO.c6 J:ld4
i,xf4 18. :Xf4 lLJceS 19. l:[af1 11td7 20.gx h S gxh S 20 . . . tt:lxhS S1.fSI hfS S2. :Xe2 ¢>g7 S3.d7
11te7=F 20 . .i.d1?1 2 0 . tt:ld4!?=F 21.f4+- 21. tt:ld4! e6 22. l:[g11 exdS hd7 S4.l:[e7+ "1i>f6 SS.J:.xd7 l:[c4
20 ... 11te6 21.tt:ld4 11th3 22. 11tf2 23 . .i.h6 tt:\g6 24. hg7 wxg7 S6. l:[d6+ wes S 7 . :Xh6 a4 SS. llla S
l:[h7 23.tt:ldS bdS 24.exdS :cs 2 S . tt:lfS+ ¢>g8 26. 11td4 11te6 W d S 1-0
2S. tt:lf3 11th6 26. lld4 lLJxf3+ 26 ... tt:leS 27. 'li'xdS Wh7 (27 ... 'li'e6
21 . ht3 tt:ies 2s. :e1 wts 29 . .i.d1 2 8 . l:lxg 6 + ! +-) 28. 'li'd2+- 2 7 . l:[c7 Wei Yi
llc8 30. llf4? 30.cH 30 ... 11tgS+ l:[be8 28. 11td2+- tt:lh7 29. "ifh6 Gao Rui
3 1."1i> h 1 "1i>g7 3 1 . . . lk4! + 3 2 . llf1 Wff6 30. :Xf7 1 1 - 0 China tt 2016 ( 12 )
11te7 33. l:[g1 llch8 34. llg2 lLJc41 1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4
3S. 11td4+ "ires 36. l:[gf2 3 6 .c3 l2Je3 4. lLJxd4 lllf6 S. lLJc3 a6 6. lllb 3
37.J:lgf2 fs + 36 ... 11txd4 3 7 . J:.xd4 Va riation C e6 7.g4 bS s . .tg2 .tb7 9 .gs
tt:lxb2-+ 38 . .i.e2 l:[h4 39. l:[b4 6 ... e6 b4 10. tt:ldS exd S 11.gxf6 dxe4
:Xb4 40.axb4 l:lc8 41 . .i.f1 tt:ld11 12. Wfg4 12. �e3 gxf6 (12 . . . llld 7!?)
42. lld2 tt:le3 43 . .i.e2 :Xc2 0-1 Mateusz Bartel 13. 'WhS J:lg 8 14. gh3 tt:lc6 lS .0-0-0
Radoslaw Wojtaszek tt:les 16. 'li'xh7 J:lg7 17. 'li'hs gcs
Nikita Vltiugov Poznan ch-POL 2016 (5) 1s. gfs (18. J:ld4! ?) 18 ... J:lgS 19. �xgs
Alexander Kovchan 1.e4 cs 2. tt:lf3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4 gxfS 20. ge3 �g6 21. 'li'e2 aS
Biel 2016 (6) 4. lLJxd4 tt:lf6 S. lLJc3 a6 6. lllb 3 e6 2 2 . tt:ld4± }.van Foreest-Van Wely,
1.e4 cs 2. l2Jf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 7.g4 b S 8 . .i.g2 .i.b7 9.gs b4 Amstelveen rapid 2016 12 ... gxf6
4.lL\xd4 tt:lf6 S. tt:lc3 a6 6. tt:lb3 g6 12 . . . '1Wxf6 13. tt:laS gds 14. 'Wc8+
7 . .i.e2 .i.g7 8 . .i.e3 lLJc6 8 . . . 0-0 'li'd8 1S. 'li'xd8+ Wxd8 16. Af4 fS
9.g4 bS 10.gS tt:lfd7 11.h4 gb7 11. 0-0-ogg 13 . .i.e3 h S 14. 11te2
12. gd4 tt:lc6 13. gxg7 Wxg7 14. 'fr'd2 tt:ld 7 1S.O-O-O Wfc7
b4 lS. tt:ldS aS 16.hS a4 17.tt:lcl a3!
18.b3 e6 19. tt:lxb4 tt:lxb4 20. 'li'xb4
tt:lcS 21.f3 'li'xgs + Nakamura­
Vachier- Lagrave , Leuven rapid
2016. 9 . tt:lds

10. llld S lL\xd S?l 11.exd S es


12 .a31 .i.e7 12 ... bxa3 13. J:lxa3
as 14. 0-0 ge7 1S.f4!-+ 13.axb4
hgS 14. llla SI .i.c8 1S. hgS
WfxgS 16. Wff3 0-0 17. Wfg3 Wfe7 16 . .tf41 fS 16 . . . 0-0-0 17. il.xe4
11 ... 'li'h6!? 1s.o-o-o ts 1s ... gfs ! ? tt:leS 18. gxb7+ 'li'xb7 19. J:lhel±
19.f41 e 4 20.h4 tt:ld 7 21 . .i.f1 lllf6 17 . .th31 0-0-0 18. J:ld4J?gg 18. gxfS
22. Wfe3 .td 7 22 . . . tt:lg4 23. 'Wd4 Wb8 19. 'i!l'd2gg 18 .th6 19 .txh6
•.• •

gd7 24.hS J:lfc8 2S. il.e200 2 3 . .te2 :Xh6 20.J:lc4 tt:lcS 21. "ire3
9 ... 0-0 10 . .i.b6 10. tt:lxf6+ gxf6 .teSI 24. h S h 6 2S. J:lh3 ¢> h 7 J:lf6 22. Wfd4 Wfe7 2 3 . J:ld 1 J:ld7
ll.c3 bS 12.f4 gb7 13_gf3 tt:laS 26. Wf d 4 .tf7 2 7 .c4 Wfd7 28.¢>b1 24. lLJxcS dxcS 2 S . :XcS+ Wd8
14. tt:lxaS 'li'xaS 1S.a3 'li'c7 16.0-0 Wes 2 9 . J:ld h 1 J:lgs 30. lllc Sl ;t 26. Wfxb4 J:lfd6? 2 6 . . . l:txdl+
Ilfd8 17. J:lel J:lac8 18. 'i!l'e2 es Wfd7 31.J:lg1 Wfb7 3 2 . Wfd21 .tea 27. Wxdl e3! 28. 'WaS+ We8 29. l:!eS
19. 'li'f2 exf4 20. gxf4 ges 21. ggs 3 3 . tt:ld4 J:lb8 34. J:lhg3 34. tt:lxfS ? l:!e6 3 0 . J:lxe3 l:!xe3 31. '1Wa4+ Wf8
J:le8 2 2 . Whl aS 23.J:ladl gc6 'li'd7!-+ 3 4. . . "irxb4? 3 4 ... il.d7! ;!; 32.fxe3 gf3+ (32 ... 'Wxe3 33. 'li'b4+
24. ge3 b4 2 s . gb6 'Wb7 2 6 . gxaS 3S. Wfxb4 :Xb4 36. lLJxfS lLJx h S Wg7 34. 'Wxb7 'li'xh3=) 33. @d2
bxa3 27.bxa3 ga4 2 8 . J:lcl 'li'e7 3 6 ... il.xhS 37. J:lxg7+ J:1xg7 3 8 . J:lxg7+ 'li'd6+ 34. Wc3 'WcS + = 2 7 . :Xd6
29. il.b4 'li'f6gg N akamura-Vachier­ Wh8 39. �xhS tt:lxhS 40. rtg4+- Wfxd6 27 ... J:lxd6 28. 'li'aS + We8
Lagrave, Leuven blitz 2016. 37.bhS b h S 3 8 . :Xg7+ l:.xg7 2 9 . J:leS J:le6 30. J:lxfS ± 28. Was+
10 . . . 11td7 11.f3 tt:lhS?l ll ... e 6 39. :Xg7+ Wh8 40. J:lc7+- .te2 We8 29.J:leS+ J:le7 2 9 ... WfS
12.tt:lxf6+ il.xf6 13.c3 gh4+! 14.g3 41. lL\xd6 .i.d3+ 42. "1i>a2 42. Wcl+- 30. 'li'cS Wg7 31. 'Wxd6 l:!xd6
ii.dB!= 12 . .i.e3 1 llb8 13.g4 tt:lf6 42 ... e3 43.b3 .i.c2 44. J:le7 hb3+ 32. l:!xfS ;!; 30. :Xe7+ "1i>xe7
14. tt:lb6 •c1 1S.h4 .i.e6 16.c4 4S.¢>a3 a s 46. lllb 71 .td1 47.d61 31. WfxfS Wfxh2 32.b31 ¢>f8

61
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

32 ... kc6 33. 'i!fxhS 'i!ff4+ 34.'it>dI;!; J:ld8 26 ... 'i!fd8!? 2 7 . J:lff11 'il'c7 29. 11Vc2+ �d8 30. J:lc1 ¢>e7
33. ¢>b2 °il'd6? 33 . . . h4! 34.'il'xhS 28.lt:ltSI gxfS 29.exfS 'il'e7 31. bd7 J:ld8 32.b4 1-0
°il'd4+ 3 S . Wa3 .ids 3S ... 'i!fxf2 30 . .idS J:ld 7 31. J:lg1 "ift8 32. "ifh4
3 6 . 'i!fh8+ 'it>e7 37. 'i!feS+ 'it>f8 .ib7 3 3 . .ib3+- lt:lt3? 33 ... aS Lukasz Jarmula
3 8 . 'i!fb 8 + 'it>g7 39. 'i!fxb7± 36. 11Vh6+ 34. 'ilff4' 'it>g70 3 S . J:!deI! 'i!fd8 Jernej Skuhala
'ite7 3 7 . "ifgS+ t6 38. 11Ve31 11Vd1 36.f6 + 'it>f8 37. 'i!fh4+- 34.g6 1 1 1-0 Celj e Ech tt j r 2016 (1)
39. "ifcS+ ..tea 40. 11Vc8+ 'ite7 1.e4 cs 2. lt:lt3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
41. 'il'cS+ �es 42 . .itSI +- 1fc1+ Swayangsu Satyapragya n 4 . lbxd4 lt:lt6 S . lt:lc3 a6 6. lt:lb3 e6
43. �a4 11Vt4 44. 11Vxd S e3+ 4S.b4 J Gonzalez Trlgal 7.g4 .ie7 8 . .ig2 lt:lc6 8 ... ti:Jfd7
4S . . . exf2 4 6 . 'i!fd7+ 'it>f8 47. ke6+- Pontevedra 2016 (6) 9. 'i!fe2 ti:Jc6 I0. 9..e 3 bS 11.0-0-0
1-0 1.e4 cs 2 . lt:lc3 d6 3 . lt:lge2 lt:lt6 9..b 7 I2.f4 J:!c8 13.'it>bI 0-0 I4.fS
4.d4 cxd4 S. lbxd4 a6 6. lt:lb3 e6 l:!e8 IS.eS!? exfS I6.gxfS ti:JdxeS
Evgenlj M l roshnlchenko 7 .g4 lt:lc6 7 . . . ds 8.exdS I7. ti:JcS ka8 1 8 . tiJSe4 ti:Jc4 I9. kcl
Pouya ldani tiJ6eS 2 0 . ti:JdS kxdS 21. l:!xdS
Bandar-e Anza l i tt 2016 (8) ti:Jd7 22 . '*fhS ti:Jf6 23. ti:Jxf6+ 9..x f6
1.e4 cs 2 . lt:lt3 d6 3.d4 lt:lt6 4. lt:lc3 24. l:!d3 g6 2S. 'l!fdI 9.. g S 26.fxg6
cxd4 S . lbxd4 a6 6. lt:lb3 e6 7 .g4 bS hxg6 27. 9..d S!� M arek- Steinberg,
s . .ig2 .ib7 9.gs tt:itd7 Celje tt 20I6. 9. 'il'e2 9.f4 gS?!
IO.eS!! dxeS 11. 'llf x d8+ 9.. x d8
12.fxgS ti:JdS 13. ti:JxdS exdS I4. 9..x dS
E� 'iV • .t. E �xg4 1S. 9.. e 3 9..h S I6.0-0 �xgS
.i. IA i l l I7. kxgS l:!g8 I8. l:!fS h 6 19. ti:JcS
l l l hxgS 20. ti:Jxb7 'it>d7 2I. kxf7 li:Jd4
l � (2I . . . l:!gf8 22. 9.. x hS J:!xfS 23. kg4±)
22. kxg8 ti:JxfS 23. kc4 (23 . kdS ±)
� 8 . . . kb4 9 . kd2 ti:JxdS 10. ti:JxdS 23 . . . 'it>c6 24. kd3 li:Jd4 2S . ke4+
'i!fxdS 11. kxb4 'ilfxhI (Il... 'i!fe4+ 'it>b6 2 6 . ti:Jd6 J:!f8 27. li:Jc4+ 'it>c7
12. 'i!fe2 'i!fxb4+ 13.c3 'i!ff4 14. kg2 2 8 . ti:Je3;!; V.Onischuk-Atabaev,
0-0 IS.0- 000) 12. 'i!fd4 ti:Jc6 (I2 ... f6 Kazan 2013. 9 ... 11Vc7 10.gS lt:ld 7
13.0-0-0-+) 13. 'i!fxg7 'i!fe4+ 14.'it>dI 11.f4 bS 12 .0-0 eics 13 . .ie3 b4
10 . .ie3 10.h4 lt:lc6 11. 'i!fe2 b4 'i!feS IS. 'i!fxeS ti:JxeS I6. kc3 f6 I7.gS
I2. lt:la4 aS 13. 'i!fe3 lt:lceS I4. li:Jd4 l:!g8 I 8 . ti:ld2! l:txgs ? (I8 ... kd7!?)
li:Jc4 IS. 'i!fh3 ti:Jdb6 I6. ti:Jxb6 I9.f4 l:!hS 20.fxeS fxeS 2I. ke2!
'i!fxb6 I7. ti:Je2 lk8 I8.0-0 ka6 J:!xh2 2 2 . kf3+- Thavandiran­
I 9 . J:!e I dS!? 20. li:Jf4 (20.exdS kcS Troff, Abu Dhabi 20I6; 7 ... h6
2I. 'i!fg3 0 - 0 �) 2 0 ... kcs 2 1 . ti:Jd3 8 . kg2 ti:Jc6 9 . 'i!fe2 'i!fc7 IO.f4 9.. e 7
dxe4 22. lt:lxcS 'i!fxcS 23. kxe4 0-0'i' II. 9..e 3 bS I2.a3 kb7 13 .0-0-0 J:!c8
Rasmussen-Almagro Llamas, I4.J:!hel b4 l S . ti:JdS exdS I6.exdS
Llucmajor 20I6. 10... b4 IO ... ti:JeS 0-0 (I6 . . . ti:Jb 8 17. 9..b 6 'i!fd7 I 8 . ti:JcS!
II. 'i!fe2 ti:Jc4 I2.0-0-0 ti:Jd7 13.f4 dxcS I9.d6±) 17.dxc6 kxc6
ke7 14.h4 l:!c8 1S. kd4 eS 16.fxeS 18 .axb4 .bg2 19. 'i!fxg2 ti:Jxg4
dxeS 17. kf2 'i!fc7 1 8 . kh3 l:!d8 20. 9.. d 4 fS 21. kc3 9.. f6 2 2 . ti:Jd4
I9. kxd7+ l:txd7 20. l:!xd7 'i!fxd7 9.. x d4 23. 'it'dS+ 'llf f7 24. 'llf x d4± 14. lt:ldSI? I4.li:JdI!? 14 ... exdS
21. ti:JcS 'i!fc7 22. ti:Jxb7 'i!fxb7 2 3 . l:!d I Marek-Rabatin, Ostrava 2016. 1S.exdS l0xb3 16.cxb3 lt:ld8
0-0 24.li:JdS kd6 2 S . h S ± Jolly­ a.gs lt:ld 7 9 . .ie3 .i e 7 10.h4 17. J:lac1 11Vb7 18 . .id4 ¢its
Feller, Agen 20I6. 11. lt:le2 lt:leS 'il'c7 11. 11Ve2 bS 12.0-0-0 .ib7 I8 . . . 0-0 I9 . l:!ceI J:!e8 2 0 .fs -
12. lt:led4 lt:lc4 13 . 11Ve2 lbxe3 13.f4 0-0-0?1 13 ... ti:Jb6!? 14. .ih3 19. 11Vc2 �g41 20. J:lce1 11V d 7 21.tS
13 . . . ti:Jxb2 14. 0-0� 14. 11Vxe3 lt:ld 7 l:lheS 1s. �b1 ¢>b8 16. 'il't2 .its 21. l::t e 3!?-. 21. . . .ixgs 22. 11Ve4
1S.f4 'il'b6 16. 'il'h3 e S 17.fxeS 17.J:lhe1 J:lc8 18.a41 b4 19. lt:la 2 �hS 23.f6 gxt6 24. J:lxt6 J:lgSI
lbxeS 18 .0-0-0 g6?1 18 ... aS! I9. ti:JfS tt:ias 2 0 . ttJxas 11Vxas 21. J:ld4 d S 24 . . . ti:Jb7! 2S.h4 kd2 2 6 . l:!efl l:tg8
a4 2 0 . ti:Jbd4 b3! +::t 19. ¢>b1 .ig7? 22.exdS b 3 ? 22 . . . 9..x dS 23. l:!xdS 2S. J:lxd61 11Ve7 26 . .icSI 11Vxe4
I9 . . . h 6 ! ? 2 0 . lt:le61 .its 20 .. .fxe6 'llf x dS 24. 9..g 2 ffd6 2S. 9.. a 7+ 'it>c7 2 7 . J:lxdS+ 'itg7 28. J:lxgS+ J:lxgS
2I. 'i!fxe 6 + +- 21. lbxtS �xf8 26. 'llf e 2!� 23.cxb3 bdS 24. lt:lc3 29. J:lxe4 as 30. �d4+ �g6 31.h4
22. J:lht1 .ic8 22 ... 'it>g7 23. 'i!fh6+ .ic6 2S. J:led1 J:lc7 26.J:lc41+­ .ih6 32.J:leS?I 32. 'it>fl ! ± 32 .it4 •••

'it>g8 24.h3+- 23. °il'h6+ 'itg8 .idS 2 7 . ltJxdS exdS 28. J:lxc7 33. J:le1 ¢>IS 34. J:lt1 'itg4 3S. 'ith1
24.h3 lh 7 2S.J:lt6 J:ld 7 26. lt:ld4 'itxc7 28 ... ffxc7 2 9 . J:!xdS+- .ig6 36.hSI �d3 3 7 . J:lg1 'ith4?

62
Survey SI 14.l

37.. . ..Q.g3 ! +:t 38. �f2+ �g3 39. �f3 3 0 . l:ta 1 ttJb6 31.b31? h S 32.gS! fS 39. J:[g2 l:th3'i' 40.c3 bxc3 +
fS 39 ... '<t>h3 40.d6! ..Q.b5 41 . ..Q.g2 + 32 . . . fxg5 3 3 . ttJe 6 + ..Q.xe6 34.dxe6± 41.bxc3 l:[f3 42.a3 a4 43 . l:lgS
@h4 4 2 . ..Q.e4+- 40. lbg3 :Xg3 3 3 . :XfSl lllx dS 33 . . . ..Q.xf5 34. ttJxf5 ± l:lf2+ 44.@e3 :a2 4 S . l:ld8+
41.d6 �bSD 42. Wh2 f4 43.a41 34.lbeSI lllx e3 34 . . . dxe5 35. 'i!fxdS @c4 46. l:lcS+ �b3 47. �d3
�d7 44. �e2 1 @gs 4S. hg3 exd4 3 6 . ..Q.xd4 l::te 8 37.g6+- l:la 1 47 ... l::th 2 48 .c4 Wxa3 49.cS=
fxg3+ 46. @xg3 @f6 47.h6!+­ 3 S . :Xe7+- 1i'xc3 36.lbd7+ 48.l:lbS+ @xa3 49. l:lbS l:td1+
�fS 48. Wf4 �c2 49. �c4 �ts �xd7 3 7 . 1!t'e6+ �d8 38. 1!t'f6+ 1-0 SO. @c2 l:le1 S1. @d2 l:te4 S2. Wd3
so . �dS �e6 S1. @e4 �d 7 l:lh4 S3. :Xes Wb2 S4.l:lbS+ @c1
s2 . @d4 1-0 Mateusz Bartel SS.l:laS= J:[g4 S 6 . l:la8 J:[g3+
Da riusz Swiercz S7. @c4 @c2 S8. :Xa4 J:[g4+
Poznan ch-POL 2016 (9) S9.@bS :Xa4 60. @xa4 @xc3
Va riation D 1.e4 cs 2. ttJf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 'h - '12
6 ... tt::lb d7 4. lllx d4 lllf6 S. lllc 3 a 6 6. lllb 3
lll b d7 7 .g4 h 6 8. �g2 bS 9.h4 Arturs Nelksans
Mateusz Bartel 9.e5? ttJxe5 10 . ..Q.xa8 .axg4 ll . ..Q.c6+ Robin van Kampen
Markus Ragger ttJxc6 12.f3 ..Q.f5 + 9 ... b4 10. llld S Baku ol 2016 ( 7 )
Germany Bu ndesl iga 2014/ 15 ( 12 ) lllx dS 11.exd S llle S 1.e4 cs 2 . ttJf3 d 6 3 . d 4 cxd4
1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4. lllx d4 lllf6 S. lllc 3 a6 6. lll b3
4. lllx d4 lllf6 S. lllc3 a6 6. lllb 3 lllb d7 7. �e3 bS 7 . . . es 8 . ..Q.c4
lLJbd7 7.g4 h 6 8.a41? 8 . ..Q.e3 ttJe5 ..Q.e7 9.0-0 0-0 10.a4 ttJb6
9.h3 g5 10 . ..Q.e2 ..Q.g7 11. 'li'd2 ..Q.e6 ll . ..Q.xb6 'li'xb6 1 2 . ttJdS ttJxd5
12.ttJd4 'li'c7 13 . ttJxe6 fxe 6 14.0-0-0 13 . .axdS Wh8 14. 'li'd3 fS 15.a5
lllg 6 15. '<t>bl ttJd7 16.h4 ttJxh4 'li'c7 16. l::ta 4 (16 . ttJd2!?) 16 . . .f4
17.f4 ttJg2 18.fxg5 ttJxe3 19. 'li'xe3 17. llc4 'li'd7 18 .f3 ± S. Novikov­
'l!fc5 20. 'li'xc5 ttJxc5 21.gxh6 l::! x h6 Nepomniachtchi, Noiabrsk 200S.
22. l::tx h6 ..Q.xh6 23.g5 ..Q.g7 24.b4
..Q.xc3 25 .bxc5 Wd7 1/2-1/2 Van Osch­
Karavade, Hoogeveen 2016.

12.gS 12.f3 g6 13 . ..Q.e3 ..Q.g7 14 . ..Q.d4


0-0 15.gS a5 (15 ... h5!?) 16.gxh6
..Q.xh6 17.hS �.f4 1 8 . ttJcl �g3 +
19. @fl ga6+ 2 0 . tLle2 '1Wd7oo
Kanarek-Wojtaszek, Poznan
2016. 12 . . . hxgS 13. bgS �g4
14.f3 �hS 1S. 1i'e2 1i'c7 16.0-0-0
g6 17. llld 4 �g7 18. �h3 l:tb8
18 . . . 'li'c4 19. Wxc4 ttJxc4 20. l::th elt 8 . a 4 b 4 9. llld s e6 9 . . . ttJxe4?
19.�b1 a s 20. �g4 1!t'c4 21. 'ii' x c4 10. 'li'f3! 10. lllx f6+ lllxf6 11.f3
lllx c4 22. lllc 6 l:tb7 2 3 . l:tde1 hg4 �e7 12. 'ti'd2 l:tb8 13. �d3 0-0
s 'ti' c 7 9. �g2 llle S 10.h3 gs
•.. 23 .. .f6 24 . ..Q.f4 fS 2 5 . £xh5 l::t x hS 14.0-0 1i'c7 1S.a S 'ii' b 7 16. 'ti'e2;t
11.f4 gxf4 12. bf4 �g7 12 . . . ttJc41 ? 26.b3 ttJa3+ 27. Wcl eS 2 8 . ttJxaS l:le8 17.Wh1 h6 1s. �g1 llld 7
13. 'li'cl �g7+:t 13. 1i'e2 �d7 l::tb S 2 9 . ttJc6 l::tx d5 30. ttJxb4 l::td 4 19.f4 �f6 20. l:la b 1 1i'a8 21. llld 2
14.0-0 14.o-o-o!? 14 ... :cs 1s. :12 1 3 1 . ttJd3 '<t>d7 32. �g S ± 24.fxg4 1!t'c6 22.ttJc4 �b7 23. lllb 61?
1i'c4 16. 'ti'd2 1i'c7 17. l:[af1 lllc 4 llle S 2S. �f4 2 S . ttJxaS l::tb S 2 6 . ttJc6 lllx b6 24.bb6 �d8 2S. bd8
18. 'ti'e2 �e6?! 18 . . . ttJxb2 19.e5 l::tx dS 27. ttJxb4 l::td 4!+:t 2S ... Wd 7 25. ga7!? lla8 2 6 . �d4 eS (26 ... ..Q.xaS
'l!fxc3 20.exf6 'iif xf6 21. ..Q.xb7 l::t c 3oo 2S ... l::tb S! 2 6 . ttJxeS dxeS 27 . ..Q.xeS 27. 't!Vg4g?) 27 . ..Q.e3 .axaS 2 8 .fSg?
19. llld S! lllx dS 20.exdS �d 7 ..Q.xe5 2 8 . l::t x eS f6 29. l::te 2 l:hdS 2 S ... l:lbxd8 26.c3 bxc3 2 6 ... 'li'cS !?
21.c3 �es 21... �xa4 2 2 . ttJd4 i!.d7 2 6 . �xeS hes 27.hS gxh S 27.cxb4 (27 . ..Q.xa6 ..Q.xa6 28. Wxa6
23. We4!± 22. �c1! f6 22 ... 'i!fb6 28. lllx eS+ dxeS 2 9 . :Xes h4 lla8 29. 'ifd3 llxaS=) 27 . . . 'ifxb4
23. ttJd4 �xd4 24.cxd4 'llf x d4 25 .b3 2 9 . . . @d6 30. l::te xhS l::tg 8!'i' 3 0 . l:th S 2 8 . �.xa6 kxa6 29. 'Wxa6 l::t a 8
ttJe5 2 6 . gb2 'li'c5 27 . ..Q.xe5 dxe5 l:[g81 31. l:t1xh4 @ d 6 32. @cl l:tc7 30. Wb6 'Wxb6 31.axb6 lleb8 t
28. 'li'xe5 f6 29. 'li'e4± 23. llld 4 32 ... l::tb S 33. Wd2 llxdS+ 34. We3 f6 'i' 27.bxc3 l:le 7 28. l:lb6 'ti'xc3
lLJb6 24. 1i'e4 lllx a4 2S. 'ti'g6+ 3 3 . :ts t6 34.gS! :Xgs 3S. :Xgs 2 9 . �xa6 �a81 30. 1i'd3 l:tc7
�d8 26. �e3 1i'c4 27. 1i'e4 'ii' c 7 fxgS 3 6 . l:lg4 Wxd S 3 7 . lbgS+ eS 31. 1!t'xc3 :Xc3 32. �b7 bb7
28. 1i'g6 'ii'c 4 29. 1i'e4 1i'c7 38. Wd2 3 8 . llg8 We4'i' 38 ... l:th7 3 3 . :Xb7 :as 34. l:lb6 :Xas

63
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

3 S . D.xd6 l:lc4=F 36.l:ldS+ ¢>h7 20.eS lll h S 21. .ah6 d4 22. llle 4 24. D.xcs dxcS 2 S . ll:ixc6 1i'xc6
3 7 . l:ld 7 f6 3S.h3 D.xe4 39.%113 �g4 23. �f2 .ads 24. �xd4 l:!ad8 26. D.xl7 �16 26 . . . .ad 6 ! ? 27. �14
l:la1+ 40.¢>h2 l:lee1 41. l:lc3 :as 2S. �xb6 .axe4 26.dxe4 lllg 3+ c4 27 . . . .axc3! 28 .bxc3 es 29 . .ags
41. . . @g 6 ! 'i' D. 42.g4? hS!. 42. l:le7 27.hxg3 �hS+ 2 8 . @gl �xh6 'li'g6 30. l:lfS l:lh8gg 2S. 1i'hS l:lhS
h S 43. l:lcc7 :gs 44. ¢>g3= �g6 29.e6 f6 3 0 . l:!dS± V.Onischuk­ 28 ... l:lg 8 ! ? 29. 1i'g6 �d4? 29 ... .axc3
4S. @f2 l:le4 46. @f3 fS 47.g4!= V2-1h Golichenko, Vinnitsa 2007; 8.f3 30.bxc3 es 3I. 'li°g7 l:le8 32. Ae3
.ab7 9 . .af4 l:!c8 10. llld 2 es 11 . .ags 'li'xa4 33 . .axb6 Ac6 34. 'li'g4 @b8
Kirlll Alexeenko h6 12 . .ah4 Ae7 13. lllc 4 l:tc6 14 . .af2 3S . .ag1± 30.l:lh7 3 0 . l:le7! lllc S
Lu Sha nglei 'li'c8 lS. 'li'd3 0-0 16. llle 3 lll c S 31. lll d s exdS 32. 'li'f7+- 30 . . . l:ldS
St Peters b u rg 2016 (9) 17. 'li'd2 l:!e8 18 . .ae2 llle 6 19.0-0 31. �gs ll:ies 31... l:lfB 32 . .ae7±
1.e4 cs 2 . llll3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 llld 4 20. l:!fcl l:!xc3 (20 ... dS!?) 32. 1i'16 32. tfhS l:lf8 (32 ... l:re8
4. lllx d4 lll16 S. lllc 3 a6 6. lllb 3 21.bxc3 �xc3 22. �d3 dS 23. lll x dS 33 . .af4+-) 33. Ae7 l:lg 8 34. l:lh8 +-
lll b d7 7.a4 AxdS 24.exdS .acs 2S. @hl 32 . . . l:les 33.l:lhS? 33 . .af4!+-
lllx e2 26. 'li'xe2 .axf2 27. �xf2 33 . . . 1i'd7 34. �14 lll13 3S.D.xeS+
lllx dS 28. 'li'el 'li'cs 29.c4 llJf4gg 1i'xeS 36. 1i'h6 llle 11? 36 ... .axc3
Kanarek-Nitin, Panevezys 2016. 37.bxc3 .axe4 3 8 . 'li'g7 'li'd8
s ... h6 9 . �g2 ll:ies 10.h3 g s 11.14 39 . .axf3 .axf3 + 40.@h2= 37.1i'h7
11.aS bS 12.f4 gxf4 13. Axf4 lll fd7 es 3S. �g3 lllx c2?1 3 8 . . . lll x g2
14.�e2 .ag700 11 ... gxl4 12. bl4 39. @xg2 wbsgg 39. llld S I �bS
e6?1 ::.: 12 . . . lll fd7 13. 1i'e2?1 40.1i'c7+ ¢>a7 41. 1i'xc4 llle 3
13. AxeS! dxeS 14.'li'xdS+ @xd8 42. lllx e3 he3 43. ¢>h2 �d4
lS.0-0 Ae7 16. l:!f3 :I.gs 17. l:lafl 44.b3 1i'g6 4S. 1i'c7 1i'gS 46.h4
l:lg6 18. llld 2± 13 ... �b7 14.0-0 �g1+ 47. �h3 1i'16 4S. h S 1i'e6+
lllld 7 1S. llad1 �e7 16. llld 4 hSI 49.�h4 1i'16+ SO. ¢>g4 1i'e6+
17.gxhS 1i'c7 D. ... 0-0-0, . . . l:ldg8 s1. �gs �d4 s2. tfg1 �cs?
7 . . . b6 S.g4 s . .ad3 .ab7 9.f4 es 1S. lllf3 lllc4 19. �c1 D.xh S 20. l:ld4 S2 . . . �xb3+: S3. hes �as S4.h6
10. �e2 .ae7 11.0-0 0-0 12 . .ae3 llla S 21.¢>h1 lllc 6? 2 L.. .af6! �cs SS. ¢>141 1i'xb3 S6. �d41 +­
�c7 I3.l:ladl l:lfe8 14.'it.?hl exf4 2Hld3 o - o - o :r: 22.l:lc41 o-o-o �b4 S 7 . �e3 �c3 SS. 1i'c7 �b7
IS . .axf4 lll e S 16. llld 4 g6 17. lll f3 22 . . . l:lcS 2 3 . l:lxcS bxcS 24. lllg S ! t S9.h7 1i'b2 60.1i'dS+ ¢>a7 61.aS
ll:ixd3 1 8 .cxd3 �d7 19. �c2 dS 23. llld 4 l:lcS 23 . . . l:lh7? 24. lll d S!+- �es+ 62.¢>1S 1-0

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

E * i. � i. 9 'if 9 E
..t .t. i. 8 .t. .t. ..t E .t. .t.
.t. .t. ..t .t. .t. .t. .t.
ttJ � .t. .t. .t. 8 £!:,
'if 8 8 8 � .t. 'if
'if £!:, ttJ � � £!:,
£!:, £!:, � ..t £!:, n £!:, 8 £!:, 8
� l:I l:I l:I � <iitt l:I l:I
positio n after 2 5 . llJc3-d 5 position after 29 . . . �f6xb2 position after 33 . . . tlJe5-f3

This is where White's One of White's piece is not Sometimes a tiny little pawn
calculations ended. Now the participating in the attack yet . . . can decide the outcome of the
queen and the bishop are both (solution on page 247) game!
hanging. Was the piece sac (solution on page 248)
correct?
(solution on page 247)

64
S i c i l i a n Defe n ce N aj d o rf Va riation S I 14.8 ( 890)

A co m p l ete ly n ew i d ea i n the N aj d o rf
by Pete r Lu kacs a n d La s z l o H a za i (spec i a l contri b u t i o n by M a x i m e Va c h i e r- Lagrave)

1. e4 cs Actually 12.h4!? is a useful waiting move,


2. tbf3 d6 similar to the 12 . .l:lgl line. White's main
3. d4 cxd4 idea is to play g4-g5 and then jump to dS
4. tbxd4 tbf6 with his knight. The old main line with
5. tbc3 a6 12.gS is met by 12 ... b4! and now 13. tt:ldS
6. i.e3 es ttJxdS 14.exdS �fS! and Black is fine.
7. lbb3 �e6 After 12.h4 b4 White can play 13. tt:ldS and
8. f3 i.e7 Black can't take on dS with his knight,
9 . ...d2 0-0 because the g4-pawn still controls the
10. 0-0-0 lbbd 7 f5-square. Compared to 12 . .l:lgl, sometimes
11. g4 bS the g3-square can be weak, so after g4-g5
12. h4 tt:lhS White should avoid ... tt:lg3. On the
other hand, in some lines White has the
.i ... .. . additional idea of h4-h5 with attacking
� .t i i i chances. Other motifs are similar to the
' i .t � ones in the line with 12 . .l:lgl.
' '
� � � The m ost common move
ttJ ttJ � � In Nosov-Efimenko, Ukraine tt 2008,
� � � 'fH Black played 1 2 lbb6. This is the most
...

<it> :er � l::t common and straightforward move.


12 ... �c7 transposes to another line, which
starts with ll ... �c7, and similarly 12 ... .l:lc8
transposes to the 11..Jk8 line.

The knight could be unpleasant on


Zahar Efimenko b6, because it is ready to jump to c4,
moreover Black is threatening 13 ...
65
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

b4. On the other hand, 13. hb6?! is a 14. 'ilff2 White attacks the b6-knight,
dubious move, because usually the dark­ forcing to jump to c4: 14 ... tbc4 15 . hc4
squared bishop is very important for bxc4 was Rizouk-Yotov, Padron 2004.
White: 13 ... 'ilfxb6 14. ltJd5 hd5 15 .exd5 16. tbc5 ! 'ilfc7 17. lbsa4 (17. tt:lxe6 was the
a5 16. Wbl a4 17. tbcl b4 and Black looks alternative choice) 17 . . . :ab8 with a
nicely placed. double-edged fight.
In Chacon- Dothan, er 2007, White
A typical reaction played the straightforward 14. tba5
13. tba5 is the typical reaction to 12 ... tt:lb6. l:k8. 14 ... �c7!? was the other option.
White avoids 13 ...b4, he is threatening 15 . ltJd5 fud5 16.exd5 .id7 In case
tt:lc6, and after g4-g5 he is ready to play of 16 ... �xdS 17. 'ifxd5 'ifxa5 18. �d3
tt:ldS . 13 . . . 'ilfc7 14.g5 Important, otherwise White also has compensation like in
... d6-d5 was a dangerous breakthrough. the above-mentioned variation. 17. l:tgl
14 ... tbh5 happened in Hossain­ g6 18. Wbl 'ilfc7 Both sides have played
Zagrebelny, Dhaka 1999. 14 ... tt:Jfd7?! was useful moves, so now the decision is up
also tried, but in this system the knight's to White. 19.c4 White starts to play on
natural place is on hS: 15. @bl and White the queenside, opening the c-file, as his
has a comfortable middlegame. 15 . ltJd5 rook is ready to go to cl. 19 ... .id8 20. tbc6
fud5 16.exd5 .id7 16 ... �xd5 17. 'tii x d5 hc6 2 1.dxc6 'ilf xc6 22.cxb5 axb5
'ifxa5 is a well-known middlegame 23. i.hl and White has compensation for
structure from the 12 . .ld.gl line: 18. �d3 g6 the pawn.
19. @bl and White has compensation for
the pawn. 17. i.hl is a logical move. White The main ga me
wants to exchange the light-squared 13. 'ilff2
bishop, because then the c6-square will
be a great place for his knight. The game • 'if ••
was unclear; after some inaccuracies and .t .t. .t. .t.
mistakes Black managed to win. .t. . .t. .t •
.t. .t.
A logical conti nuation � � �
13.g5 is also a logical continuation. White tLJ ttJ � �
immediately questions the knight from � � � 'ii'
f6. 13 ... tbh5 13 ... tt:Jfd7 was also played in a @ a: � %:[
few games, but usually the knight is not
best on d7, so White gains an advantage. 13 . . . :1>8?! is an inaccuracy. 13 ... tt:lc4 or
13 ... tt:Jfd7 are better options. 14.g5 tbfd7?
The natural 14 ... tt:JhS was important:
15. tt:laS 'if c7 with a complicated
middlegame. 15.f4 exf4 16. hf4
happened in our main game, Caruana­
Vachier-Lagrave, Dortmund 2016.
16 . . . l:tc8 17. ltJd5 Vachier-Lagrave suggests
17. if g3! as the best way to proceed:
17 ... tt:la4 18. tt:ldS �xd5 19.exdS and White
66
Survey SI 14.8

looks fine. 17 ... ttJxd5 18.exd5 �g4 with Black has enough counterplay for the
a difficult game, which eventually Black pawn. 19 . . . tbc:5 20. tbe4 a4 was the game,
managed to win. with a balanced position.
In Perelshteyn-Sevillano, Reno 2006,
Bl ack continued with 13 . . . tbf'd7 14. ttJd5 Conclusion
hd5 15.exd5 . The structure has slightly 12.h4 is a new attempt against the
changed, however now the black knight powerful 11 ... bS system. We can't say that
is also fine on d7. 15 . . . tbc:4 16. �d3 White this is a fantastic novelty, but of course
has to give his dark-squared bishop, White has an idea or two. Basically he
because 16. �xc4? bxc4 17. tZ:ld2 could have would like to play h4-h5 and then g4-g5,
been met by 17 ... c3! and Black has a strong otherwise Black can play ... tZ:lhS. On the
attack. 16 ... lbxe3 17. 1i'xe3 1i'b6 18. 1i'e2 In other hand, White usually doesn't get
case of the queen exchange with 18. 'ii' xb6 time for this, because Black has strong
tbxb6 the position is balanced. 18 . . . a5 A counterplay on the queenside. Positional
brave move. Black sacrifices the b5-pawn, and tactical motifs are changing here, so
because his a-pawn is like a battering­ this is a really complex line. There aren't
ram, attacking White's queenside. 19 . ttJd.2 so many new games with it yet, but it is
19 . .ixbS was also possible, to accept the likely to become more popular after this
pawn, however after 19 ... a4 20. tLld2 �ab8 Caruana-MVL game.

A useful waiting move gs llihs 15 . .ibs !:lbs 16. 'il!V d3 (16. OK for Black. 13. bb6?1 13.h5?!
12.h4 c4? (Pisk·Shtyrenkov, Karvina b4 14 . .ixb6 (14 . ll:le2? ll:lc4 1S. 'il!Vd3
199S) 16 ... l:lxbS! 17.cxbS 'il!Vb S ti:lxe3 16. 'il!Vxe3 ti:lxg4-+ Spyra·
Maxim Nosov 1S.b6 'il!VaS! (c. 19 . . . 'il!Vc6) 19.ll:lal Licina, Novi Sad 19S9) 14 ... 'il!Vxb6
Zahar Efimenko dS 2 0 . Wbl dxe4 21.fxe4 ll:lg3+) 15. ti:la4 'il!Vc7 16. 'il!Vxb4 l:lfc S t ; 13.Wbl
Ukraine tt 2008 ( 7 ) 16 . . . ll:lf4oo) 14 ... 'il!Vc7 lS. ll:lcl 'il!Vc6 ti:lc4 (13 ... b4!?) 14 . .ixc4 bxc4 lS . ll:lcl
1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 16.b3 ll:lcS 17 . .ixcS dxcS lS. 'il!Vh2 'il!VbS (Klimentov- Duzhakov.
4. lllx d4 lllf6 S. lllc3 a6 6. �e3 es ll:ld7 19.g5 c4:i: Uta· Lupulescu. Voronezh 2015; 15 . . . 'il!Vc7! ?) 16.gS
7. lllb 3 �e6 8.f3 lllb d7 9. 'ifd2 Timisoara 2006) 13 ... .ixdS 14.exdS ll:lhS 17. ti:lle2 fS00 13 'ifxb6
.•.

�e7 10. 0·0·0 O·O 11.g4 bS aS (s: 14 ... ll:lb6 lS . ll:laS! (this is the 14.llidS 14.gS !? 14 ... bdS 1S.exdS
12.h4 lllb 6 12 ... 'il!Vc7 transposes correct move, White sacrifices a a S 16. �b1 a4 17. lllc 1 b4 18.hS
to another line, 11 ... 'il!Vc7; 12 .. . l:k S pawn for a while, but he gains it tt:ld 7 1S ... h6 19 . .ic4 ti:ld7 2 0 . ti:ld3
transposes t o 1 1 . . . l:kS; 12 . . . b4 back after a few moves) lS . . . ll:lfxdS !:labs 21.l:lhel .igS 22. 'il!Vf2 'il!Vas +
(15 ... llibxdS 16. lllc 6 'il!Vc7 17. lllx e7+ Nosov- Borovikov, Alushta 2009.
ll:lxe7 lS. 'il!Vxd6± and thanks to 19. �d3 h6 20. 1"e2 �gs+ 21. �ts
the bishop pair White is clearly tt:lf6 22. 1"c4 J:la S 23. 'ifc6 'ii' b 8
better) 16. lllc 6 'il!Vc7 17. ll:lxe7+ 24.J:ld3 a3 2S. tt:lb3 J:la 7 26.bxa3
'il!Vxe7 1S . .ixb6 ll:lxb6 19. 'il!Vxd6± J:lxa3 2 7 . J:lhd1 1"a7 28. 'ifxd6
and White has a comfortable J:lxa2 29. 1"xb4 J:las 30. 1"c3 llid 7
position; ,;; 14 ... 'il!Vc7 lS.gS (lS .hS 31. �e4 tt:lb6 32.d6 J:ld8 33. 'ii' c s
ll:lb6 16. �xb6 'il!Vxb6 17.gS llld 7oo J:lb2+ 0-1
Cieslak-Talia, Stare Mesto 2 0 15)
lS . . . ti:lhS 16. 'il!Vxb4 ll:lg3 17. l:lgl ti:lxfl Enamul Hossain
lS. l:lgxfl±) lS.gS (lS . @bl? could Sergey Zagrebelny
have been met by 1S ... ti:lb6! and Dhaka 1999 (9)
13. ll:ldS (usually 13.ll:le2?! is a weak the dS ·pawn is under pressure) 1.e4 cs 2 . lllf3 d 6 3.d4 cxd4
move, because it's too passive and lS . . . ti:lhS (15 ... a4 16.ti:lal ti:lhS 4. lllx d4 tt:lf6 S. tt:lc3 a 6 6. �e3
Black gets strong play: 13 ... aS ,::t ; 17. �bS - 15 . . . ti:lhS) 16 . .ibS a4 e s 7 . ti:lb3 �e6 8.f3 �e7 9. 1"d2
13. ll:la4 as (13 . . . l:lbS!?) 14.@bl (14. 17. ti:lal a3 1S.b3 llbS ,::t should be O·O 10.0·0·0 tt:lbd 7 11.g4 bS

67
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

12.h4 lll b 6 13 . lLJa S 'it'c7 14.gS Aimen Rlzouk lLlxdS 17.exdS gf5 ;:::0 ; 15 . tLldS
14. 'i!tbl? is a mistake because Va lentin Yotov �xdS 16.exd5 tllc 4 17. 'l!!Y e l
of 14 ... dS! 15.gS d4 16.gxf6 dxe3 Padron 2004 (3) (17. gxc4?! bxc4:f 6. 18 . . . c3)
17. 'l!!Y x e3 �xf6+ and Black has 1.e4 cs 2 . lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 17 . . . tt:lxe3 18. 'l!!Y x e3 'l!!Y b 6 19. 'l!!Y e l
a wonderful position, Mihevc 4.tt:lxd4 ll:Jf6 s . ll:Jc3 a6 6 . .ie3 es f5 !00 Korneev-Sutovsky, Reykjavik
Mohr- Kokanovic, Kladovo 1990. 7 . lllb 3 .ie6 8.f3 �e7 9. 'it'd2 0-0 200 4) 15 . . . tt:lc4 (15 . . . 'l!!Y c 7 16.hS;
14 . . . ll:J h S 14 ... tt:lfd7?! 15 . 'i!tbl;t; 10.0-0-0 lllb d7 11.g4 bS 12.h4 15 . . . b4 1 6 . tLldS gxdS 17.exdS
(15 . gh3?! b4 1 6 . tLldS; 1 6 . tLle2? lllb 6 13.gS ll:JhS 13 ... tLlfd7 14. 'i!tbl tLlc4 18. gxc4 l::lx c4 19.hS 'l!!Y c 7
(Glavina- Cantalapiedra Vega, A) 14 ... 'l!!Y c 7 15.hS b4 (15 ... tt:lc5 ?! 20.g6 fxg6 21.hxg6 hS!? 22. 'l!!Y g 2l
Logrono 2 003) 16 ... dS!+) 16 . . . tLlxdS 16.g6! (suddenly the white pawn 011- Nepomnishay, St Petersburg
17.exdS gxh3 1 8 . tLlc6! (an is already on g6, so he has a quick 1996; 15 ... tt:la4 1 6 . tLld S ;!;) 16. gxc4
important intermediate move!) attack on the black king) 16 . . . bxc4 17. tLlcl 'l!!Y c 7 1 8 . tLlle2 l::lb 8
18 . . . tt:lb8 1 9 . tt:lxe7+ 'l!!Y x e7 2 0 . l::lx h3 b4 17. tLld5 tLlxdS 18 .exdS tt:lxb3 19. @al 'l!!Yb 7 20. l::lb l;!; 14. 'it'f2 For
a500 with a complex position. 19.axb3 gf5 2 0 . gd3 and White 14. tLlaS see Chacon- Dothan (next
1S. llld S tt:lxdS 16.exdS .id 7 is better, Tolnai- H enriksson, game) . 14 ... lLlc4 1S. bc4 bxc4
16 . . . gxdS 17. 'l!!Y x dS 'l!!Y x aS 18. �d3 Debrecen 1992; 15 ... l::la b8 1 6 . tLla5!l) 16.ll:lcSI 'it'c7 16 ... 'l!!Y c 8 17. tt:lxe6
g 6 1 9 . @blg? 17 . .ih3 1 6 . tLld5 gxdS (16 . . . tLlxdS 17.exdS (17. tLl5a4!?) 17 .. .fxe6 18. 'l!!Y g 2 llb8
gf5 1 8 . gd3 gxd3 19. 'l!!Y x dH) 19. 'l!!Y g 4 tLlf4 2 0 .hS (20 . ga7? 'l!!Yb 7!
17.exdS aS 18. 'l!!Y d 3! (a nice move, 21. gxb8 llxb8 22.b3 'l!!Y b 4 2 3 . Wb2
which frees the d2-square for dS-+ Baroin-Ould Ahmed, ICCF
the knight, and he prepares a 2 0 0 9) 20 ... 'l!!Y d 700 17. ltJSa4 17. tt:lxe6
beautiful trap on the next move. fxe 6 18. 'l!!Y g 2 g6 19. 'l!!Y g 4 'l!!Y d 7
18.g6!?) 18 . . . a4 (18 . . . f5 ?! 19.gxf6 2 0 . 'i!fbl Jlab800 17 . . . J:a b8 18. t2Jb6
tt:lxf6 2 0 . lLlcS!±) 19. 'l!!Y f5 ! ! (19. tLld2 ltJf4 18 ... gd8 ! ? 19. bf4?1 19.a4
a3! 20. 'l!!Y fS (20.b3 l::la S :f) 20 ... axb2 19 . . . :Xb6 20. �e3 J:b7 21. Wb1?
2 1 . gd 3 g6 22.hxg6 l::l x a2! 23.c4 2 1 . tLldS gxdS 22. l::lx dS llfb8 23.c3
(23. tLlb3!?) 23 ... tLlxdS !! 24. gd4! fS :f 21 . . . J:fbS 22. �c1 'it'aS
exd4 (24 ... 'l!!Y a 7?? 25.g7!+- l::! a l+ 23. 'it'd2 J:b4 24. wa1? 24. l::! h 2
2 6 . 'i!tc2 1-0 Grischuk-Vaulin, St 24 ... 'it'b6-+ 2S. llld S bdS 26.c3
17 ... .ieS 17 . . . l::l fc8?! 18. gxd7 'l!!Y x d7 Petersburg 1999) 25. 'l!!Y x dS 'l!!Y a 5! J:a4 2 7.exd S 'it'b3 0-1
1 9 . tLlc6± and the c6-knight is like 26.gxh7+ @h8 27. 'l!!Y x a5 l::!x aS:f
an octopus, Black can't play with Grischuk) Paulo Edison Terres Chacon
his pieces. White is much better; Yoav Dothan
17 ... fS !? 18. �g4?1 1 8 . 'l!!Yb 4;!; or Ca m a ra Memorial-B email 2007
1 8 . tLlc6 would be more accurate. 1.e4 cs 2 . t2lf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
If 18 ... �xc6 19. 'l!!Y c 3!;!; and White's 4. tt:lxd4 lLlf6 s . ll:Jc3 a 6 6 . .ie3 es
chances are better. 18. . . fS 19.gxf6 7 . lllb 3 �e6 8.f3 �e7 9.h4 lLlbd7
bf6?1 19 . . . tt:lxf6 2 0 . ge6+ @h800 10. 'it'd2 bS 11.0-0-0 0-0 12.g4
20. <i'b1 �h8 21. J:dg1?1 21.lLlc6!;t; lLlb6 13.gS ltJhS 14. lLJa S 14. Wbl
21 . . . ll:Jf4 22. lll b 3 �f7 1 23. bf4 looks a little slow: 14 ... tt:lg3! (this
exf4 24 . .ifS?l 24. �e6 24 aSI .•. is the disadvantage of 12.h4.
2S. �e4 a 4 26. ll:lc1?1 2 6 . tLld4 The g3-point can become weak,
26 ... a3 2 7.b3 :acs 28. J:g2 moreover after the capture on
'it'cs+ 2 9 . ll:le2 �es 30.J:d1 fl Black is ready to continue
b4 31. 'it'd3 �gs 32.J:c1 'it'as What a fantastic tactical move! with the unpleasant ... tLlc4.
33.J:d1 :cs 34. J:[g4 J:c7 3S. 1i'd2 White prepares for �d3 , with a 14 ... tt:lc4 15. gxc4 bxc4 1 6 . tLlcl
'it'cS 36. tt:lxf4 bf4 37. :Xf4 mating attack, so the knight is 'l!!Y c 7 17. tLlle2 l::lfb8 18. 'l!!Y e l
:Xf4 38. 1i'xf4 'it'c3 39. 'it'c1 �f7 not takeable: 19 ... l::!fc8 (19 ... axb3 ? (18 . Wal!?) 18 ... llb7 19. gcl l::la b8
40. J:d3 'it'f6 41.c4 1i'xh4 41 ... 2 0 . gd3!+-; 19 ... l::!fb8 20.g6!±) 2 0 . lLldS gxdS 21. l::l x dS ;!; Tolnai­
bxcn 42. J:d1 'it'f6 4 3 . 'it'c2 h6 20. gd3 tLlf8 21.tLlaS!±; Wachinger, Cattolica 1993) 15. l::lg l
44. J:[g1 gs 4S. J:[g2 J:e7 46. Wc1 B) 14 . . . l::lc 8 15. l::lg l (15. 'l!!Y e l b4 tt:lxfl 16. l:tgxfl tLlc4 17. 'l!!Y d 3 tt:lxe3
<i'g7 4 7 . Wd2 'it'f4+ 48. �d3 1 6 . tLld S tLlxdS 17.exdS gf5 1 8 . gd3 18. 'l!!Y x e3 f6 19.f4 fxgS 20.fxgS
�g6 49. 1i'e2 'it'eS SO. 1i'e1 'it'f6 gxd3 19. l::!x d3 as 2 0 . tLld2 'l!!Y c 7 lhfl 21. l::lxfl 'l!!Y c 700 with an
S1. J:f2? 51. 'l!!Y e 3 'l!!Y c 3+ 52. lt>e2 21. 'l!!Y d l f5 22.gxf6 t2lxf6 23. gg5 unclear fight between knights
'ital-+ S1 ... g41 0-1 lLlhS ;:::0 Wang Pin- Pigusov, and bishops. 14 ... J:cS 14 ... 'l!!Y c 7!?
Shanghai 2000; 15.hS b4 1 6 . lLldS 1S. llld S tt:lxdS 16.exd S

68
Survey SI 14.8

13 . . . llic4 14. ggs was worrying 2 1 . 4:ld4 4:le5 with unclear play.
m e , possibly without any good 19 . . . ..txe2 20. 'ifxe2 J:l.eS
reason (14. gxc4 bxc4 1 5 . llic S
'1Wc7 might have b e e n Fabiano's
idea, but it looks rather unclear
E 'if E *
to m e) : 14 . . . '1Wc7 1 5 . gxf6 gxf6 & .t .t. .t. .t.
1 6 . 12\d S gxdS 17 . .!lxdS .!labs lS.gS i .t.
ge7 and it seems I a m in time i 8 8
to launch strong counterplay
o n the queenside. 14.gS lllf d 7 ? � 8
14 . . . llihS was my original
16 ... ..td7 16 ... gxdS 17. 'IWxdS 'IWxaS intention, and is the reason why
1 8 . gd3 '1Wc7 (18 ... g6 19 . @bl '1Wc7 I didn't play 13 ... 12lfd7 in the first
20.l:thel�) 19. gfs .!lbs 2 0 . gg4 place, but I ultimately rejected
g6 21.'it>bl '1Wc4 22. '1Wd2 .!lb7 it because of 1 5 . lll a S (15 . ttJcS i s
23. gxhS gxhS 24.f4� 17.J:l.g1 another option, but it didn't 21. wt'f3?1 Here 21. '1W f2 ! Wb6
17. �d3! ? 17 ... g6 18. �b1 Wc7 bother m e much. As is o ften the 2 2 . 'IW g2! (22 . ge3? gxgS) or 'IW d2/
19.c4 ..tdS 20. lllc 6 bc6 21.dxc6 case i n these situations, I was h2 was my main concern. It's
'li'xc6 22.cxbS axbS 23 . ..th3 wrong o n both fronts: 15 . . . b4 the best and most subtle way to
:c7 24 . ..tg4 ..te7 2S. J:l.c1 'li'b7 1 6 . 12lxe6 fxe 6 17. ttJe 2 ttJc4 1S. �h3 proceed as now Black's queen is
26. :Xc7 Wxc7 2 7 . J:l.c1 wt'b7 � c s 1 9 . .!ld3 followed by 2 0 . gg4 misplaced and White is ready to
2s. Wc2 Wds 29. :d1gg 112-112 looks better for White) 15 . . . Wc7 launch his pawns at Black's king:
1 6 . gxb6 W xb 6 (16 . . . l:txb 6 17. lLldS 2 2 ... grn 23.hS l:tc4 24 . .!lhfl.
gxdS lS.exdS 4:lf4 1 9 . gd3 O n the other hand, 2 1 . '1Wg2 gfs
The main ga me followed by ge4 and 4:lc6 would 22.hS '1We7 followed by . . . '1We4
13. �f2 grant White an annoying bind or . . . 'IW e 2 looks 0 K for Black.
o n the queenside) 17. '1Wxb6 2 1 . . . Wc7 2 2 . llld 4 lllb 61 Now
Fabiano Caruana .!lxb6 l S . ttJdS �xdS 19.exd S , but preventing t2lc6 and creating
Maxlme Vachier-Lagrave apparently Black is completely counterplay against d S at the
Dortm und 2016 ( 1 ) fine after 19 . . . £6 2 0 . 4:lc 6 l:tb 7 a s right time. 2 3 . J:l.he1 2 3 . @bl '1Wc4
1.e4 cS 2. lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 he gets his counterplay. 1 S.f4 24. gel (24 . lLJc 6 4:lxd5) 24 ... WxdS
4. lllx d4 lllf6 s. llic3 a6 6.f3 es exf4 15 . . . b4 1 6 . 4:le 2 ! would help 25. WxdS 4:lxd5 2 6 . lLlxbS axbS
7. lllb 3 ..te7 s . ..te3 ..te6 9. wt'd2 White massively. 16 . ..txf4 J:l.cS 27. l:txdS l:IcS 2 S . J;lhdl f6 would
0-0 10.0-0-0 lllb d7 11.g4 bS 12 .h4 17. llld S 17.'IWg3! was the best way be close to a draw. 2 3 ... ..tfS 23 ...
A fresh idea that I had failed to to proceed: 17 . . . ttJa4 (17 . . . gxb3 g6!?, to prevent 4:lf5 , was also a
consider properly at home. 12.gS 1 S .axb3 b4 1 9 . lLld S 4:lxd5 20.exdS; decent option, as 24. 4:lc6 still
and 12 . .!lgl are the main lines. 17 . . . 4:lc4 1 S . 4:ld4 b4 1 9 . ttJd S ; runs into 24 . . . lLlxd S ! 2 5 . 'IWxdS
12.a3 was Fabiano's try against me 17 . . . .!leS 1 S . gxd 6 (lS . @bl ! ?) Wxc6 26. Wxc6 .!lxc6 27. �xd6 ?
in a recent blitz online match. 1 S . . . gxd6 1 9 . Wxd6 gg4 2 0 . gh3 gxg S + 2 8 .hxgS l:txel. 2 4 . :XeS
12 ... lll b 6 13. wt'f2 gxh3 2 1 . l:tx h 3 ± Lukacs/ Hazai) :Xes 2 S . 4:lfSI 'ifc4 2 s ... g 6
l S . tLld S gxdS 19.exdS tLldb6 2 6 . tLlh6+ gxh6 27.gxh6 would be
2 0 . gh3 .!lc4 2 1 . l:th e l and a l l this awkward to meet as White keeps
E 'if E* would grant White a very s t rong a lot of play o n the dark squares,
.t i .t. .t. position i n the centre, if n o t an so it is practically impossible to
.t. & .t. .t & extra pawn. Instead, 17.�xd6 push back the knight. 26.b3 wt'b4
i .t. gxd6 1 8 . .!lxd6 '1Wc7 1 9 . l:td 2 ttJeS 2 6 . . . '1We4 27. Wxe4 l:txe4 2 S . gxd6
would have been too hasty g 6 is met by 2 9 . 4:lh 6 + . 2 7 .c31
8 8 8 as now Black has very decent 27.hS .!:I.el would be alright for
Cjj Cjj �8 compensation after 2 0 . lLld S Black. 27 . . . J:l.cS 2 8 . J:l.d3 lllx dS
8 8 8 'iY g x d S 2 1 . e x d S 4:lbc4 2 2 . .!l d 4 aS 2 9 . ..td21 We had both seen this
2 3 . gh3 a4! 24. gxcS axb3 2 5 . axb3 position in advance, but when I
c;t> .u � .u
Was! 2 6 . @b l .!lxcS 27.bxc4 l:ta8. played 25 . . . '1Wc4 I didn't realize
13 . . . J:l.bS This is inaccurate . A 17 . . . lllx d S 18.exd S ..tg4 19 . ..te2 how dangerous my position
couple of moves later, I was 1 9 .!lel f6! would suddenly be
. would still be, as I wrongly
annoyed that I didn't answer good for Black: 2 0 . g 6 (20 . '1Wd2 assumed that I would get my own
with 13 ... llifd7 right away. After fxg S 2 1 . gxgS ttJeS) 2 0 . . . hxg 6 counterplay against White's king.

69
Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation

K .t. • 't!Ydl+) and here 39 ... 't!Ye7 would 42. '*fxfS gxfS 43. ti:\f6 + 'it.ohs 44.l:!g3
.t. .t. .t. be the only way to parry White's and suddenly White is probably
threats: 40. nxfS + (40 . 't!YfS nes winning! 41. J:l.f2 'ti'd7 42. lllfS
.t. .t. 41. �e3 ti:\g6) 40 ... 't!YxfS 41. �xe S + 1i'e6 White resigned. Of course
.t. � Ci:J � d x e S 42. 't!Y x e S + 'it.o g S 43. 't!Y e 6 + winning such a crucial game in
1k � with a draw. However, 32. �f4! the first round helped me greatly
was objectively best and would throughout the event. And even if
� �� � have granted White an advantage things were by no means smooth
� � after 3 2 ... l:!eS 33. �xd6 �xd 6 from the start, it still was a very
� 34.l:!xd6. 32 . . . l:leS 33.hS?I intense struggle.
Here 3 3 . ti:\xd6 l:!xe3 34. 't!Yxe3 Vachier- Lagrave - M/16-6-S3
29 . . . lll b 6 Forced, but now I �xd6 3 5 . 't!YeS+ �fS 3 6 . l:!d S '*Yes
had to take into account the 37.b4 't!YfS + ! would have led to Eugene Perelshteyn
possibility of lll h 6 sacs at every perpetual check: 3 S . 'it.ocl '*Vfl + En rico Sevillano
move. 30.Wb1 3 0 . tl:ih 6 + right 39. 'it.oc2 '*ffS + 4 0 . @b2 ti:\c4 + , but Reno 2006 (6)
away doesn't work yet: 3 0 ... gxh6 Fabiano wanted to take advantage 1.e4 cS 2 . lllf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
31.gxh6 't!Yxh4 32. 't!Yg2+ 'it.ohs of his initiative while we were 4. tlJxd4 lllf6 s.lLJc:3 a6 6.f3 es
3 3 . ng3 (3 3 . nxd6 b4!) 3 3 . . . �xh6 both down on increment. 7. lll b 3 .te6 s . .te3 lll b d7 9 .' W"d2
30 . . .' .c S 31 . .i.e3 1i'c7 I would 33 ... l:le6 Suddenly I manage to .te7 10.0-0-0 bS 11.g4 0-0
not have relieved my position consolidate on the kingside and 12.h4 lllb 6 13. 'it'f2 lllfd 7
with 31... 't!Yc6 32. 't!Yxc6 nxc6 White's attack comes to an end. A) 13 . . . J:!bS?!
33. lll d 4 l:kS (33 ... ncs 34. tl:ixbS) 34. Wc2 1i'c6 AI) 14.g5 lll h 5 (14. . . lll fd7?! 15.f4!
34. ti:\c2 nds 3 5 . �d4 ti:\d7 3 6 . ti:\e3. - Caruana-Vachier- Lagrave,
3 2 . 'ti'f4 But here 3 2 . ti:\h 6 + ! was Dortmund 2016) 15. lll c 5 b4
very dangerous from a practical 16. tllx e6 fxe6 17. tll e 2 tll c 4 1S. Ah3
point of view. Still, it is possible 'ifcS 1 9 . J:!dJ± 6. 2 0 . Ag4 Vachier­
to defend: 32 ... gxh6 33.gxh6 ti:\d7 Lagrave;
and now: A2) 14. tll c 5 ! ? b4 15. tll3 a4
A) 34. 't!Yfs ti:\es 35. �d4 �xh6 (15 . tllb l!?) 15 ... tll x a4 1 6 . tll x a4 'ifc7
36. �xeS dxeS 37. nd7 't!Yxd7 A21) 17. 'it.obl d5 (17 ... Ad7 1S .b3
3S. 't!Yxd7 nxc3 39. 't!YeS+ (or 39.'t!Yd6 (1S . tllb 6?! Axg4! 19. Axa6 Ae6t
�fS 40. 't!Yxa6 b4) 39 ... �fS 40. 't!YxeS Cherkasov- Pisulinski, Polanica
nc6 and in both cases Black Zdroj 1992) 1S ... Axa4 19 .bxa4
establishes an efficient fortress; 'if c 6 <=!) 1S.g5 d4 19. Acl tll h 5 =F ;
B) 34. 't!Yg4 + ! ? is the best 35 . .i.xb6?1 Correct was 3 5 . ti:\d4! A22) 17.g5 lll h 5 l S . @bI f500•
practical chance, keeping a strong '*Vg2+ 36. '*Vf2 '*Vxf2+ 37. �xf2 B) 13 ... tll c 4 14. Axc4 bxc4
attack after 3 4 ... @hS 35. 't!YgS! l:!eS 3 S . ti:\c6 l:!e2+ 39.l:!d2 l:!xd2 + 15. tllc 5 'ifc7 16. tll 5 a4 (a typical
't!Yds 3 6 . �d4+ f6 37. nf3 (37. ng3 40.@xd2, which would still have knight manoeuvre. White
�xh6 3 S . 't!Yxh6 't!Ye7 39. 't!YgS ti:\eS) been enough to enter a drawish prepares for tllb 6 and controls
37 . . . ti:\eS 3 S . nxf6 and now: endgame thanks to White's piece the d 5 -square as much as
activity. 35 . . . 'ti'xb6 36.J:l.f3 'ti'b7 possible. 16. tll x e6 fxe6 17. 'ifg3;!;)
37. llle 3 J:l.e41 38. 'ti'g3 J:l.e5 Here 16 ... l:!abS (Black tries to create
K if .t. • Fabiano failed to spot my threat, counterplay on the b-file, but
.t. but anyway a second pawn falls. usually White can avoid it
.t. .t. : � 39. 'ti'f4 Also 39.g6 hxg6 40.hxg6 without any difficulties) 17.h5
.t. � � '*Ve4+ 41.'it.ob2 '*fxg6 would lead '*Vc6 1S.h6 (an interesting
to a technical win. 39 . . . J:l.xgS attempt to weaken the
� � 40.h6 gxh 6 I didn't see anything f6- knight. 1s. tllb 6 Ad s 19.g5
� � wrong with taking the pawn. lll e S 2 0 . lllb d5 f5 21.gxf6 tll xf6
� The technical task might be 22. tllx f6 + Axf600 Szalanczy­
slightly more complicated with a Vaulin, Kecskemet 1992) lS . . .

shattered pawn structure, but still g 6 1 9 . '*Yh4 A d s 2 0 . Ag5 tlld 7
3 S . . . 't!Yd7! (3S . . . .. e7? is bad three pawns is too much. 40 ... g6 21. AxdS l:!fxdS 2 2 . 'ife7! t and
because of 39. 't!Yf4 @gs (39 . . . l::l e S 41. tl:ig4 would h ave g r a nt e d White White's action looks successful.
40. nf7) 40. 't!Y g 3 + 'it.o h s 41.l:txd6) one last sneaky trap: 41 ... l:!fS ?? 14. llld S bdS 1S.exdS lllc 4
3 9 . nfl (3 9 . �xeS dxeS 40. 'ifxeS (41 ... fS ! would still win easily) 15 . . . '*Vc7!? 16 . .td3 1 6 . Axc4? bxc4

70
Survey SI 14.8

1 7. llld 2 c3-+ 16 . . . tbxe3 17. W xe3 19. llld 2 19. �xbS !? a 4 20. llld 2 SO . .l:if1+ 'iti>eS S1 . .l:if7 .l:ih8 S2.�d7
'i'b6 18. 'ti' e2 1 8 . �xb6 lll xb6 = l:tab8 2 1.c4 1 9 . . . lllc s 19 . . . l:tab S ! ? .l:ihS S3. �h3 e3 S4.'iti>d3 'iti>xdS
18 a s
.•. 20. llle 4 20. �xbS ! ? 20 ... a4 21. 'iti>b1 SS.c4+ 'iti>eS S6. 'iti>xe3 �e1
a3 22.b3 .l:ifc8 23 . .bbS lbxe4 S7 . .l:ie7+ 'iti>f6 S8 . .l:ie6+ �f7
24.fxe4 .l:ic3 2S. �c6 .l:ib8 2 6 . .l:id3 S9.a3 :gs 60. �e2 �g3 61 . .l:ie4
:Xd3 27 . .. xd3 .bh4= 28 . .l:if1 :es 62. :Xes .bes 63. 'it>d3
�gs 29.c3 g6 30. 'iti>c2 'iti>g7 31.b4 'iti>e7 64. 'ite4 @dS 6S.@dS 'it>c7
•a1 32. 'iti>b3 �f4 33 ... e2 h6 66.cS �f4 67.a4 dxcS 68.bxcS
34. •12 •as 3S . .l:id1 �gs 36. ••1 'itb7 69. �f1 �c7 70. 'iti>c4 'ita6
•a1 3 7 . .l:id3 �e3 38. •e1 �f4 71. 'itb4+ 'iti>a7 72.'iti>bS �d8
39 . .l:if3 'iti>fS?! 39 . . . 'ti'a6= 40. •t2 ! 73.'itc6 'itbS 74.�d7 �as
•xt2 41. :Xf2 ± 'iti>e7 42. 'iti>xa3 7S. �g2 �c7 7 6 . 'iti>c6 �d8
h S 43.gxhS gxh S 44 . .l:if3 h4 77. 'it>bS 'iti>a7 78. �f1 �c7 79.aS
45 . .l:ih3 �g3 46. 'iti>b3 fS 47.exfS �dS 80.a6 �c7 81. 'iti>c6 �g3
e4 48. 'iti>c4 '1ti>f6 49 . .l:ihl 'iti>xfS 82.'it>d7 h3 1/2-1/2

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

position after 14 . . . tlJd 7-b6 position after 16. lllc 3-e2 position after 23.c2-c4

What is the best continuation How should Black continue? How can Black continue
for White? With a solid move , or does he in this highly complicated
(solution on page 248) have a breakthrough? middlegame?
(solution on page 248) (solution on page 248)

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71
Sicil i a n Defe n ce Rosso l i m o Va riati o n S I 31.7 ( 831)

Dyn a m i cs i n the Rosso l i m o


by V i s h n u P rasa n n a

1. e4 cs Black gets an active position, and good


2. tlJf3 tlJc6 counterplay.
3. �b5 g6 10.d3 is a quieter and apparently more
4. ..bc6 bxc6 testing continuation. Here Black has tried
5. 0-0 �g7 both 10 ... �b8 and 10 ... �a6. I recommend
6. l:.e1 tlJh6 the latter move, after which I believe
7. c3 0-0 Black is fine. This is confirmed by my
8. h3 f5 analysis in the Game Section. 10 ... �b8 was
tried in Caruana- Eljanov, Baku Olympiad
.i .i. 'IV .i • 2016, but White was slightly more
.l .l .l .i. i comfortable during the game and Caruana
.l i� demonstrated the way for White .
.l i
!::. Conclusion
!::. Cjj !::. The variation with 6 ... t2Jh6 7.c3 0-0 8.h3
!'!:, !::. !::. !::. !'!:, fS leads to some dynamic and interesting
jl t:jj � � � @ positions, and is very much playable for
Black.
Since the Anand- Gelfand match in 2012 Although some players, including Gelfand
in Moscow, the Rossolimo Variation has in the recent Tal Memorial, seem to have
replaced the Open Sicilian as the critical shifted to 8 ... dS, I am unable to find any
test for Black after the move 2 ... t2Jc6. It objective reason for giving up on 8 .. .fS.
is essential for black players to be well
prepared and have a solid 'recipe' against
the Rossolimo.
The critical position of the variation
that we will be discussing here arises
after 8 ... fS. The capture with the b-pawn
has become more popular than the
traditional 4 ... dxc6 capture, and also
received Gelfand' s seal of approval in his
recent g ames.
After 9.eS Ci§7 White has two main
possibilities:
10.d4 has been completely neutralized
since the game Harikrishna-Mamedov.
Boris Gelfand

72
Survey SI 31.7

Com pletely neutral ized Matej Blazeka


10 .d4 M laden Pa lac
Zagreb 2016 (3)
Pentala Harikrishna 1.e4 cS 2. ti:lf3 ll\c6 3 . �bS g6
Rauf Mamedov 4 . ..ixc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6 . .l:le1
Sham kir 2016 ( 7 ) ti:lh6 7.h3 0-0 s.c3 ts 9.es ti:lf7
1.e4 cS 2. lllf3 ll\c6 3. �bS g6 10.d4 cxd4 11.cxd4 �b7 12. ti:lc3
4. ..ixc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6 . .l:le1 cS 13 .dS This move does not
tll h 6 7.c3 o-o S.h3 ts 9.es lllf 7 trouble Black.
10.d4 In the present game
Mamedov demonstrates that
Black does not need to fear this 1 3 . . . e 6 1 This seems to be the
direct push. 10 . . .cxd4 11.cxd4 cSI most precise way for Black.
n . . . .2.b7 12.ti:lc3 cs 13.ds lk8 14.e6 13 ... °if c7 14. �f4 'ifxcS lS. 'lWxd7
(14. 'lWa4) 14 ... dxe6 1S.dxe6 ti:ld 6 .2.xf3 16.gxf3 °ifc4 17.e6 'ifxf4
16.ti:leS l:tf6 17. ti:ld7 l:txe6 18. l:txe6 18.exf7+ l:txf7 1 9 . ti:ldS 'ifgS +
'*xd7 1 9 . l:tel .2.d4 20. 'lWa4 .2.c6 2 0 . @fl es 2 1 . °ife 6 l:taf8 22. l::t a cl
21. 'lWb3+ ti:lf7 22. 'lWe6 'lWb7 23. 'iYb3 @h8 2 3 . l:tc8 l:txc8 24. 'ifxc 8 + l:tf8
'i'd7 24. 'lWe6 'lWb7 2S. 'iYb3 'lWd7 2S. 'ife6 °ifh4 2 6 . 'it>g2 e4 27.f4
26. 'lWe6 1/2-1/2 Ankit- Kiilaots, Iasi .ft.xb2 2 8 . l:te2 .ft.g7 2 9 . l:tc2 .2.d4
2014. 3 0 . l:td2 .2.g7 31. l:tc2 .2.d4 3 2 . l:td2
.2.g7 1/2- 1/2 Nepomniachtchi ­ 13 ... e6 14. �f4 .l:leS 14 . . . exdS
Kamsky, Russia tt 2016. 14. ti:ld4 l S . ti:lxdS gs 16 . .2.e3 g4 1 7. hxg4
I. .i. 'if I. . 14 . .2.f4 l:tc8 1S.b4 d6 1 6 . ti:ld 4 fxg4 1 8 . ti:lh2 ti:lxeS 19. 'ifb3 g3
l .t. l � .l l (16 . ti:lbS d x c S 17. 'ifxd8 l:tfxd8 2 0 . fxg3 1S. 'it'd2 h 6 16. h 4 'it'aS
l 1 8 . ti:lgS ti:lxgS 19 . .2.xgS l:tds 17 . .l:lad 1 .l:lacS 1S.a3 c4 19 . .l:le2
l � l 2 0 . ti:ld 6 l:tb8 2 1 .bxcS .2.c6 22 . .2.f6 �as Black has been playing
l:txcS 2 3 . l:tacl l:txcl 24. l:txcl .2.dS pretty accurately so far, and here
� 2S . .2.xg7 'it>xg7 2 6 . l:tc7+ @h6 19 ... l:tcS seems to be the simplest
27. l:txa7 l:tbl+ 2 8 . 'it>h2 l:tb2 =) 16 . . . continuation: 20.dxe6 (20 . .2.e3
d x e S 17. ti:lxe6 'if x d l 1 8 . l:taxdl l:tcc8 21. .ft.f4=) 2 0 ... dxe6 21. 'ife3
exf4 19. ti:lxg7 'it>xg7 2 0 . l:te7 .ft.c6 (2 1. ti:ld4) 2 1 . . . .ft.xf3 2 2 . 'if xf3 l:td8 = ;
21.bS .ft.as 22.c6 a6 23 .a4 axbS 19 . . . e x d S 2 0 . ti:lxdS 'ifxd2 2 1 . l:texd2
12 .dxcS 1 2 . d S d 6 1 3 . e 6 ti:leS 24.axbS .2.xc6 2S .bxc6 l:txc6 ; l:te6 = 20. 'it'e1 'it'a6 2 1 . .l:led2
14. ti:lc 3 (14.ti:lxeS .2.xeS (14 . . . 14. °ifd4 l:tc8 1S .b4 (1S. ti:ld2 'ifc7 exdS 2 2 . ti:lxdS d6? 22 ... l::t e 6
d x e S 1 S . ti:lc 3 'iY d 6 1 6 . .2.gS l::tb 8 1 6 . f4 'ifxcS 17. 'ifxcS l:txcS 1 8 . ti:lb3) 2 3 . ti:lb4 23.e6 ti:les 24. �xeS
17. 'iYa4 h 6 1 8 . .2.e3) l S . ti:ld2 .2.g7 1S . . . d 6 ; 14 . .2.e3 .ft.xf3 lS. 'ifxf3 24. ti:lxeS! dxeS 2S . .2.xh61 (this is
1 6 . ti:lf3 f4 1 7 . l:te4 .2.b7 1 8 . l:txf4 ti:lxeS 1 6 . °ifd l ti:lc4 17 . .fi.d4 what both players had probably
'lW b 6 1 9 . l:txf8 + l::t x f8 2 0 . .2.gs .2. a 8 ti:lxb2 18. 'if d2 ti:lc4 19. 'if d3 ti:lb2 missed) 2S ... .ft.xh6 2 6 . ti:lf6 + @f8
2 1 . .2.xe7 l::te 8) 1 4 . . . .2.a6 l S . ti:lx e S 14 ... �xeS 1S.f4 �g7 16. �e3 gs 27. l:td7 'ifxe6 2 8 . l:tld6+- 24 . . .
.bes 1 6 . .2. h 6 .2. g 7 1 7 . .2.xg7 17 .fxgs f4 1S. �f2 'ihgS 19.c6 d x e s 2 S . ti:lxeS? 'it' x e 6 2 6.f4
'it>xg7 18. 'iY d 2 (1 8 .a3) 1 8 ... l::tb 8 �xd4 20. 'it'xd4 �xc6 21. ti:le4 gs 2 7 . hxgs hxgs 2S.g3? :cs
19. l:tabl l::tb 4 2 0 . b 3 'it> g 8 2 1 . l::t e d l 'it'g7 22. 'it'xg7+ �xg7 23 .l:lad 1• 2 9 . ti:lc3 �xeS 3 0.fxeS .l:lxeS
'lW c 7 2 2 . 'iY b 2 1/2- 1/2 S . Kuipers­ J:lgS 24.�h4 �h6 2 S . .l:l d 2 .l:lg6 31. ti'f1 .l:le3 32 .l:ld6 'it'eS

Hill, Porto M an n u 2 0 1 S 2 6 . ti:lf6 es 2 7 . b4 �g7 2S.bS 33. 'it'xc4+ �ts 0-1


1 2 . . . � b 7 13. ti:lc3 1 3 . .2. d 2 ..ixbs 2 9 . ti:lxd7 :es 30.ll\cS
A ) 1 3 . . . 'iY c 7 1 4 . ti:la3 e 6 ti:ld6 31. ti:le4 ti:lxe4 32 .l:lxe4

( 1 4 . . . 'iY x c S l S . l:tc l 'il'b6 1 6 . ti:lc 4 �c6 33 . .l:lc4 e4 34 . .l:ldc2 .l:lee6


'if a 6 17.b3 l:tac8) 1 S . b 4 a S 3S. �e1 h S 36.�h2 �h6 37 . .l:ld4 Recom mended
( 1 S . . . .2.xf3 ; l S . . . ti:lxeS 1 6 . ti:lxeS f3 3S. �h4 e3 39.gxf3 e2 40. �e1 10.d3 �a6
.2.x e S 1 7 . ti:lc4) 1 6 . ti:lc 4 axb4 ..ixf3 41. �d2+ �h7 42 . .l:lc7 + .J:lg7
17 . .2.xb4; 43 . .l:lxg7 + �xg7 44. �g3 �c6 Tigra n Ghara m i a n
B) 13... l::tc 8 1 4 . .2.c3 (14 . .2.b4 4S. �f2 �g6 46.a4 a6 47. �e1 Igor-Alexa ndre Nataf
.2.xf3 lS. 'ifxf3 e6 16. 'iY e 2 .2.xeS �ts 4S. �d2 �g6 49. �e1 �e4 Fra nce tt 2016 (3)
17. °if d 2 °if h 4 1 8 . a3) 1 4 ... l::t x c S SO. �xe2 �fS+ S1. �f2 ..ix h 3 1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 lllc 6 3 . �bS g6
1S . ti:lb d 2 .2. h 6 1 6 . °if a 4 S2. �b4 1/2-112 4 . ..ixc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6 . J:le1

73
Sicilian Defence - Rossolimo Variation

llJh6 7 .h3 0-0 8.c3 fS 9.eS llJf7 �dS 31. �g1 �bS 32. �f2 �a4 17. llJa4 'it' f6 1 8 . li:\cS ..Q.c8 19. li:\db3
10.d3 �a6 11.c4 3 3 . � b 6 � b S 3 4 . �e1 �c4 3 S . a 4 14 g4 1s. t2Jgs llJxe s 16. hcs
..•

�b3 3 6 . a S �c4 3 7 . @f2 � b S t2Jg6 1 17.g3 J:le8 18.11fa4 �b7


3 8 . � c 7 �xd4 3 9 . hf4 � d S 19. 1Vb4 �a6 20. 1Va3 �b7
.I
40.g4 � e 6 41.�e3 � d 7 4 2 . �c 7 21. 1V b4 �a6 22.1fa3 �b7
l �f7 4 3 . �f4 � c 6 44. �es � b 7 2 3 . 1Vb4 1h·1h
.i. 4S. �c3 �c6 4 6 . �g3 �d 7
4 7 . �f4 �c6 48. @g3 � d 7
49. � f 4 1h·V2 Vlta ly Slvuk
Ed u a rd And reev
Paleochora 2016 (9)
Ernesto lna rklev 1.e4 cs 2 . llJf3 li:\c6 3 . �bS g6
Boris Gelfand 4. hc6 bxc6 S.O·O �g7 6 . J:le1
Magas m 2016 (3) llJh6 7.c3 0-0 8.h3 fS 9.eS llJf7
11 . . . d 6 1 2 . e 6 llJeS 13. llJc3 1.e4 cs 2 . lLlf3 llJc6 3. �bS g6 10.d 3 �a6 11.c4 e6 12. llJc3
1 3 . llJxeS .2.xeS 1 4 . llJd 2 (14. l::t x eS) 4. hc6 bxc6 5.0-0 �g7 6. J:le1 gs 13. �e3 hS 14. h4 14 . ..Q.xcS
14 ... .2.g7 (14 ... l::tb S I S . llJf3 ..Q.g7 llJh6 7.c3 O·O 8.h3 fS 9.eS llJf7 g4 IS . ..Q.xf8 'it'xf8 1 6 . li:\d4 li:\xeS
1 6 . llb l h6 17. 'i!t'a4 ..Q.c8 18. 'i!t'xa7 10.d3 �a6 11.c4 II. .2.f4 'i!fb6 17. llJb3 'it'f6 1 8 . li:\cS 14 ... g4
l::tb 7 1 9 . 'i!t' a 4 'i!t'b6 20. 'i!t'c2 l::tf 6 (II...e6 12. 'i!t'd2 l::te 8 13.llJa3 l::tb 8 1s.t2Jgs llJxes 16. hcs
2 1 . ..Q.d 2 !:lxe6) I S . lll f3 h6 1 6 . l::tb l 14.bJ (14. lllc 4 ..Q.xc4 15.dxc4 dS
g s 17. 'i!t' a 4 (17 . ..Q.d 2 'i!t' e 8 1 8 . ..Q.c3 16.cxdS) 14 . . . dS IS. lllc 2 'i!t'c7) 12.bJ
'i!t'g6) 1 7 ... ..Q. c s 18. 'i!t'xc6 l::tb 8 d6 13. lll a 3 1 1. . . e6 12. llJc3 12 . ..Q.e3
.I .. .
1 9 . ..Q. d 2 ..Q.b7 2 0 . 'i!t' d 7 ..Q.xf3 lllx eS 12 ... gs 13. �e3 l J.
21.gxf3 ..Q.xb2 2 2 . '1t>g 2 f4 13 . . . �c8 .i.
A s i mple improvement over the
g a m e A d a m s · Giri.
A) 13 . . . f4 14. lll x eS ..Q.xeS I S . llJe4
ms 1 6 . llJd 2 ..Q.g7 17. lLlf3 .2.c8;
B) 1 3 . . . l::tb S was played by
the Dutch N o . I , but he was
i n trouble during the e n tire
game: 14. lll x eS ..Q.xeS I S . llJa4 16 . . . J:leS 16 . . . li:\g6 ! is the move
'i!t'c7 1 6 . ..Q.h6 l::tf 6 17. l::tx eS dxeS fro m I narkiev- Gelfand, and is
1 8 . llJx c S ..Q.cs I9.d4 g S 20 . ..Q.xgS fine for Black: 17 . ..Q.xfS 'i!f xf8
l::tg 6 2 1 . 'Whs 'i!t'd6 2 2 . lle l 'i!t'xd4 17. �d4 llJf7 18. llJxf7 �xf7
2 3 . .2.e 3 'Wxc4 24.b3 'i!t'b4 2 S . l::t d l 13 . . . hS Gelfand improves over 19. hg7 �xg7 2 0 . 1Va 4 � b 7
.2.xe6 2 6 . llJx e 6 l::tx e6 2 7 . 'i!f x fS a blitz game from a few months 21. 1Vb4 J:lb8 2 2 . 1fd 6 11fe7
l::td 6 2 8 . llc l 'i!t'aS 2 9 . l::t c 4 l::tg 6 earlier: 13 ... g4 14.hxg4 fxg4 2 3 . 1fxe7+ lbe7 24.d4 �6
3 0 . l::tg 4 l::t x g4 3 1 . 'i!t'xg4+ @h8 IS. llJh2 g3 (15 . . . lllx eS 16. llle 4 'i!t'h4 2 S . l:te S �cs 26.b3 d S 2 7 . J:lae1
3 2 . 'i!t' e 6 l::t e 8 3 3 . 'i!t'xc6 l::td 8 34.a4 17 . ..Q.xcS dS 1 8 . lllg J) 16.fxg3 lllx eS dxc4 2 8 . bxc4 J:lb4 2 9 . J:lc s �d 7
'i!t'dS 3 S . 'WxdS l::tx dS 36 . .2.xa7 17 . .Q.xcS d6 18 . .Q.e3 (18 . ..Q.d4 cS 3 0 . l:te 2 �es 31.g3 as 3 2 . �f1 a4
l::td l + 3 7 . @ h 2 l::tb l 3 8 . .2.cS 19 . ..Q.xeS ..Q.xeS 2 0 . 'i!t'g4+ @h8 3 3 . J:le 3 a 3 34.lt:ie 2 J:lb1+ 3 5 . @g2
l::t x b3 3 9 . ..Q.xe7 l::tb 2 4 0 . .2.f6 + 21. lllf 3) 1 8 ... l::tb S 19. 'i!t'd2 cS J:lb2 3 6 . J:la S lba2 3 7 . J:laxa3
'1t>g8 4 1 . ..Q.xeS l::tx f2 4 2 . a S 1;,. 1;, 20. l::te 2 'i!t'f6 2 1 . ..Q.f4 'i!t'g6 2 2 . l::td l lba3 3 8 . lba 3 c s 3 9 . J:la 6 cxd4
A d a m s - G iri, Wijk aan Zee 2 0 1 6 . .Q.b7 2 3 . li:\bS l::tb d8 24. li:\xd6 4 0 . llJxd4 �es 41. llJc6+ hc6+
14. �f4 14. lll x eS .2.xeS I S . 'i!t'f3 lhd6 2 S . ..Q.xeS ..Q.h6 26. 'i!t'c3 l::td 7 42. lbc6 V2-V2
.2.xe6 1 6 . .2.h6 l::te 8 17. 'i!t'xc6 27.g4 l::td f7 2 8 . ..Q.gJ ..Q.g7 2 9 . ..Q.es
l::tc 8 1 8 . 'Wa4 'i!t'd7= 14 . . . llJxf3 + ..Q.h6 30 . ..Q.g3 ..Q.g7 31. ..Q.es 1/2-11,
1 S . 1fxf3 l:tb8 16. 1lhc6 lb b 2 Kasimdzhanov- Mamedov, Jorden va n Foreest
1 7 . lt:ibS lb b S 18.cx b S 1 8 . 'i!t'xbS Almaty blitz 2016. 14. h 4 D i m itri Relnderman
..Q.xal 1 9 . l::t x al 'i!t'b6 18 . . . h a 1 14 . ..Q.xcS basically amounts to a n Amsterd a m ch-N ED 2016 (4)
1 9 . lb a 1 �xe6 2 0 . l:te 1 1fd 7 exchange sacrifice b y Black: 14 . . . 1.e4 cs 2 . llJf3 li:\c6 3 . �bS g6
2 1 . 1fxd 7 h d 7 2 2 . lb e 7 l:tf7 g4'7 IS . ..Q.xf8 'it'xf8 1 6 . li:\d4 li:\xeS. 4. hc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6 . J:le1
2 3 . hd6 h b S 24. lbf7 �xf7 The computer thinks Black has lllh 6 7.c3 o-o B.h3 ts 9.d3 lllf 7
2 S . hc5 a6 2 6 . d 4 �e6 2 7 . @ h 2 enoug h compensation, and for 10.eS �a6 11. �f4 An attempt
f 4 2 8 . h 4 �c4 2 9 . a 3 h S 3 0 .f3 practical purposes I prefer Black: to improve over the usual ll.c4.

74
Survey SI 31.7

u . li:la3 !? e6 (11. ..d6 12. il.f4 Wb8) Alternatives for Black after Wc2+ 3 3 . @gl Wd3) 2 8 . . . l::t x e3
12. lllc 4 il.xc4 13.dxc4 We7 looks 10.d3 29.fxe3 f4 30.a6 fxe3 31.a7 cS
okay for Black. 32. Wb8 e2 33. @f2 �fS + 34. @xe2
Fa biano Caruana We4+ 26. 1i'a1 f4 2 7 . J:le4 f3
Pavel Elja nov 2 S.g4 2 8 .g3 was also possible
I 'ii' 1 • Baku ol 2016 (6) here, where White is slightly
.t. .t. .t. � .i. .t. 1.e4 cs 2. tbf3 tbc6 3 . �bS g6 better: 2 8 ... @gS 2 9 . Wdl (29 . l::te 3
.i. .l .t. 4. hc6 bxc6 S. 0-0 �g7 6. J:le1 l::t x e6 30. l::t xf3 l::te 2 3 1 . @ g 2 �)
.t. � .t. tbh6 7 .c3 0-0 S.h3 fS 9.eS tbf7 29 ... Wa6 3 0 . cS dS 31. l::t e H
10.d3 J:lbS 2s . . . wgs 29.'irdl .:.Xe6?! The
i. computer shows a few variations
� � tLJ � where Black is okay, but it is
l .i. 'if 1 •
�� �� hard for Black to come up with
.t. .t. .t. � .i. .t. a good plan that equalizes.
� tlj � : @
.t. .t. Meanwhile White can maintain
11 ... 1i'b6 ll ... e 6 12. �d2 (12. lll a 3 .t. � .t. the pressure. 2 9 ... cs 3 0 . l::tb s Wf8
gS =i=) 12 ... h6 13.h4 c4! 14.dxc4 (14. 31.aS Wh6 32. @h2 Wh4 33. Wgl
d4 cs IS. We3 l::tb 8 16 .b3 il.b7) l::tff8 34. Wg3 Wgs 3 5 . l::te 3 Wf6
14 . . . il.xc4 1S. We3 cS! (this pawn 30. 'ifxf3 .:.Xe4 31. 'irxe4 'irc7
sacrifice gives Black an equal 32.cS dxcS 33. 11fc4+ wg7
game) 16. lllb d2 (16. WxcS £dS) 34. 'irc3+ 34.WxcS 34 ... wgs
16 ... £dS 17. l::ta dl (17. �xcS gS) 3S. 'irc4+ �g7 36. 'ifxcS 1i'd6
17 ... We7= 12.b3 d 6 13.h4?! 13. lll a 3 11. tba 3 ll. lilbd2 was Bok­ 36 ... l::ta S 37. We3� 3 7 . 1i'c3+ 1i'f6
l:!ad 8 14. lllc 4 £xc4 1S .bxc4 leads Kotronias, M oscow 2016. See 3S. 'ire3 J:lfS 3 9 . J:le4 J:lf7 40.J:leS
to unclear positions - maybe below. 11 . . . �a6 ll...d6 12. tt:lc4 Caruana is painfully precise after
slightly preferable for White. il.a6 1 3 . e 6 £xc4 14.dxc4 tt:leS this and does not give Elj anov
13 ... dxeS 13 ... l::t a dS 14.e6 (14. 1 5 . lLlxeS £xe5 1 6 . £h 6 simply any chance. 40 ... 'ird6 41.aS
exd6 exd6) 14 ... tt:JeS ! =F 14. �eS transposes to the game. 12. tbc4 1i'd1+ 42. �g2 1i'a1 43. 'ire2 e6
heS 1S . .:.XeS lS. £xeS! ? l::ta d 8 �xc4 13.dxc4 d6 14.e6 tbeS 44.a6 'ird4 4S . .:.Xe6 cs 46. J:le7
16.c4 £xc4 17. £c3 il. d S ( 1 7. . . il.a6 1S. �es �xeS 16. �h6 �g7 'irdS+ 47 .f3 c4 4S . .:.Xf7 + 'irxf7
18. l::tx e7 l::tx d3 19. Wel c4 2 0 . tt:Ja3 17. �xg7 Wxg7 1S. J:lb1 Caruana 49. 'ires+ Wh6 so. 'ire3+ wg7
cxb3 2 Lixb3 Wxb3 22. il.f6 = ; takes a slightly slower approach. S1. 'ird4+ Wh6 s 2 . a 1 'if b 7 S3.h4
1 7... £xd3 18. l::tx e7 Wb8 19. Wel�) The position is deceptively 1-0
18. l::tx e7 l::td e8 19. We2 1S . . . �eS simple. Black always has to
lS ... Wc7 16. l::t xfS es 16. hes f4 watch out for the possibility of Benjamin Bok
17.c4 J:lfS 17 . . .£3 was slightly White creating a passed pawn Vasll los Kotronlas
better. 1S. 'ire1 J:lafS 19. tt:Jd2 on the queenside. 18 .b4!? i s a Moscow 2016 (3)
'ii' d S 20.tbf3 �cs 21.J:ld 1 After forced variation but Black is 1.e4 cs 2 . tbf3 tbc6 3 . �bS g6
21.We4!? l::th S (21 . . . il.d7) 22. £xf4 doing okay after a few accurate 4. hc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6.J:le1
£fs 23. We3 Wxd3 24. Wxe7 �d7 move s : 1 8 ... cxb4 19.cxb4 l::t x b4 tbh6 7.c3 0-0 S.h3 fS 9.eS tbf7
25. Wxd7 �xd7 2 6 .g3 I believe (19 ... aS 20.a3 axb4 21.axb4 l:txb4 10.d3 J:lbS 11. tbbd2
White has compensation and 2 2 . l::t a 7) 20. Wd4+ @g8 21. Wxa7
the position is even. 21 . . . J:lhS l::te 8 2 2 . l::te bl (22.a3 l::tb 2) 18 . . . 'ii' a S
22. �c3 eS! 23. 'ire4 �g4 24.tbgs 1 9 . a 4 J:lf6 2 0 . J:le3 1i'a6 2 0 . . . f4
l .i. 'if 1 •
bd1 2S. 'ifxeS J:lf6 26. 'irxf6 2 1 . l::te 4 f3 (21 . . . Wa6 2 2.b4) 22.g3 .t. .t. .t. � .i. .t.
1i'xf6 27. hf6 �c2 2 S . tbe4 l::tb f8 23. l::te 3 21.b3 'ir e s 2 2 . 'ir e 1 .l .l
J:lts+ 29. �b2 bd3 3 0 . tbf6+ a s 2 2 . . . f4 23. l::t e 4 f3 24.g3 (24.g4?! .t. � .t.
'l;t7 31.�h7 �b1 3 2 . tbgs+ hS) 24 ... Wa6 2 S . @h2 h 6 2 6 .h4
�e7 33.a3 �a2 34. tbf3 hb3 l::t d 8 27.b4 cxb4 2 8 .cxb4 dS 2 9 .bS
3S.tbes gs 36.hS �ts 3 7 . 'l;h 2 cxbS 3 0 . cxbS Wd6 31. l::td l 2 3 . b4
g4 3S. tbg6+ 'l;f7 3 9 . tbeS+ We6 axb4 24.cxb4 cxb4 2S . .:.Xb4 J:laS
40. tbd3 hc4 0-1 25 ... l::tx b4 2 6 . �xb4 l::t x e6 27.aS
(27. l::tx e6 �xe6 2 8 .aS Wes 29. Wb6
�al+ 3 0 . @h2 '!Wes+) 27 ... wf7 11...d6 11 ... 'iW c7 12. tt:lc4 il.a6
2 8 . �b6 (2 8 . cS llxe3 2 9 . fxe3 dS 13. We2 dS 14.exd6 exd6 1S. il.f4
3 0 . @f2 Wa6 31. Wb 6 Wc4 32.a6 Wd7 16. Wd2 12.e6 tbes 13. �es

75
Sicilian Defence - Rossolimo Variation

hes 14. lllf3 14. '1Wa4 might 21. 1i'e2 as 2 2 . J:lab1 a4 23.a3 c4 did not manage to solve his
objectively be a stronger move. 24.dxc4 cs 2S.Wh2 �b7 26.b4 opening problems over the board.
I am not sure how the rook is �c6 2 7 . lllf3 J:lfS 28. bxcS J:lxb1 Moreover, this move has not been
useful on b8 in these variations: 29.J:lxb1 dxcS 30. lllh 4 1-0 repeated, so I am not sure if I can
14 ... Ag7 (14 ... '1Wc7 1S. tlif3 Ag7 recommend it. 11. h4 d 6 ll ... llb8
16. l:le2 (16 . '1Wh4) 16 . . . llf6 17. '1Wh4 12.b3 '*fas 13. Af4 e6 14.c4 dS
hS 18. tllg S) lS. '1Wxa7 llbS 16. tllc4 Mikhail Antl pov lS.cxdS; ll ... e6 12. Ae3 gS 13 . ..Q.xcS
f4 17. '1Wa4 f3 18.g3 llf6 19. 'l!t'dl Emil Sutovsky lle8 14.hxgS hxgS 1S.d4 g4 16. tllh 2
h 6 2 0 .a4 l:lb7 14 . . . �g7 1S. 1i'a4 Jerusalem Ech 2015 (2) '1Wh4 17. '1Wd3 l:tb8 18 .b3 ..Q.f8
h 6 16. 1i' h 4 f4? After this Black 1.e4 cS 2 . lllf3 lllc 6 3 . �bS g6 19. �xf8 12. �f4 gS 13. hxgS hxgS
is simply worse. 16 ... gS was 4. hc6 bxc6 S.0-0 �g7 6. J:le1 14. lllxgS lllxgS 1S. hgS dxeS
critical. though of course it looks lllh 6 7.c3 O·O 8.h3 ts 9.es lllf 7 16. 1t'b3+ 16. 'ifhS '1We8 17. '1Wh4
extremely scary from a practical 10.d3 h6 @f7 18. tlld 2 llh8 19. 'ifc4+ �e6
point of view: 17. tllx gS (17. AxgS 20. 'IWxcS 'Wd7 21.f4 exf4 22. tll f3 ±
hxgS 1 8 . tll x gS l:lf6 19. '1Wh7+ @f8 16 . . . J:lf7 17. llld 2 1t'd6 18.f4
20. 'l!t'hs wg8=) 17 ... llf6!! (1 7 hxgS
... 1 8 . tllc 4 'ifc7 18 ... �e6 19. lllc4
1 8 . AxgS llb7 1 9 . lle3-) 18. tllf7 1i'd 7 19 . . . '1Wxd3 20. tll x eS ..Q.xb3
'1Wf8 19. 'ifc4 'ii' e 8 (although I 21. lll x d3 Ads 22. tllx cS 20. 1i'a4
am unable to find an advantage J:lb8 21. lllx es hes 2 2 . J:lxeS
for White , Black has to play J:lxb2 23. 1i'a3 J:lc2 24.J:lae1
a number of computer moves ha2 2S.J:l1e3 1t'b7 2 6 . J:lxe7
to survive) 2 0 .b3 llb6 21.g3 f4 J:lxe 7 2 7 . he7 �dS 28.J:[g3+
22. Axf4 ..Q.xe6 2 3 . llxe6 dS 24. l:lxf6 wt7 2 9 . �dS 1i'b1+ 30.Wh2 1i'b8
dxc4 2S. tllx h6+ @h8 (2S . . . Wh7 31. �gs J:la2 32. 'ifxcs 1t'h8+
2 6 . llf7 cxd3 27. llel) 26. tllf7+ 33. wg1 J:la1+ 34. wt2 J:la2 +
wgs 11. ht4 J:lts 1s. 1i'g4 Black must have definitely 3S. Wg1 J:la1+ 36. Wf2 J:la2 +
1i't8 19. �g3 1i't6 20. lllh 4 :gs prepared this at home, but he 3 7 . wg1 112-112

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

.t I I • 'it' •• I i. 'it' I •
' i. ' � i. ' i i � .! i
'if · � ' ' ' ' ' '
tt:J � i � � ' ' ' � ·
' � � � �
� tt:J tt:J �
� l:I � � � �
lI � <it> ll.
position after 23 . . t2Jf7-e5
. position after 14 . .2.e3xc5 position after 11.c3xd4

White t o move. Black to move. Black to move.


(solution on page 248) (solution on page 248) (solution on page 248)

76
S i c i l i a n Defe n ce Ea rly Dive rge n ces SI 43.2 (827)

A i m i ng fo r d o u b l e-edged play - Pa rt I
by O l i v i e r P u c h e r

1. e4 cs the game is likely to transpose into a


2. tbf3 b6 Hedgehog after 3 ... �b7 4. tbc3 e6 5 .d4
3. d4 cxd4 cxd4, which is obviously outside the
4. tbxd4 i.b7 scope of this article, but if you don't have
5. tbc3 a6 the Hedgehog in your repertoire as Black,
you might want to work on a specific line
.. � 'i+' • .t � .I to deviate, e.g. 4 ... tbf6 5.e5 (5.d3!?) tbg8!? .
.t i i i i i After 3.d4 cxd4 4. tbxd4 �b7 5.tbc3 the
i i main line starts with the always useful
waiting move 5 ... a6 (although 5 ... tbf6 is a
0, � noteworthy alternative) , after which we
0, reach the starting position of this Survey.
� � � � � � In order to control eS and develop his
1:1 � � <;ti � l:[ kingside (an immediate ... tbf6 is countered
by e4-e5) , Black's main plans are:
A nice point of the rare 2 ... b6!? is that A) the Taimanov-like ... e7-e6, ... 'ifc7,
White has few options to play for an ... tbf6, ... �b4;
advantage except by entering an Open B) the Dragon-like ... g7-g6, ... �g7, ... d7-
Sicilian with 3.d4. d6, ... tbf6;
3.�b5? a6 is an obvious waste of time, C) giving full priority to the queenside
while on 3.c3, 3 ... �b7 targets e4 at once and addressing the tbg8 question later:
and reduces White's choices. After 3.c4!? ... d7-d6, ... e7-e6, ... tbd7, .. Jk8;
D) In some variations it is also useful to
offer a knight exchange with ... tbc6.
On move 6 the ball is in White's court,
and he has a wide choice.

I l logical
In my own practice, I've been surprised
to encounter the illogical 6.a4? so often:
Black was obviously not going to play
... b6-b5 and lose a tempo anyway, and
he can already think about seizing the
initiative after this weakening of b4.

Ch ristian Bauer

77
Sicilian Defence - Early Divergences

Slow moves
Against slow moves like 6.�e2 or 6.f4, the
Taimanov System is recommended. In
case of 6 . �c4 it can even be refined with
6 ... e6 7.0-0 tLif6!? (before ... 'i!fc7) and if
8.e5 'i!f c7 9. 'i!f e2 tLic6!, with full equality.
Be careful in the line 6. �e2 e6 7.0-0 'i!f c7
8 . �el!?.

10 ... dS ! (see Gallardo Garcia- Fedorchuk,


Middelburg-Bauer and the German email
game Fischer- Matz) .

Conclusion
2 ... b6!? is an interesting move, especially
at club level, to reach original and
ambitious positions in which the player
with the better understanding of open
It is tricky! Sicilians is likely to win - in other
words, a great line to trap the ever-more­
Engl ish schemes numerous 3. �b5 (+) aficionados with.
White often tries English Attack schemes White has a wide choice of systems on
starting with 6. �e3 or 6.f3, probably move 6, and Black needs flexibility to
because it is so popular against the Najdorf adapt to his opponent's actions and
and the Scheveningen. develop his kingside accordingly.
But here the extra control of d5 provided The systems discussed in this first part
by �b7 helps Black to engineer the break of the Survey should be fine for Black.
... d7-d5 after 6. i.e3 e6 7. 'i!fd2 'i!fc7 8.f3 tLif6 White's most dangerous idea is 6 . �e2 e6
(my recommended move order, although 7.0-0 �c7 8 . l:rel!?.
8 ... i.b4 is more common) 9.0-0-0 �b4
IO. t2ide2 In Part II of this small series we will
(see diagram) take a detailed look into White's other
Now Black gets full counterplay with ... tries: 6.g3, 6. �d3 and 6. �g5.

'ifc7 8 . 0 - 0 tt:Jf6 9 . �d3 d6 10.f4 tt:Jd7 10.0-0 'ifc8 ll.g4 eS! 0-1 (42)
Slow m oves
tt:Jbd7 11. 'ife2 �e7 (White is Heiduczek- Platzgummer, Austria
at least one tempo down here Bundesliga B 2 0 12/13) 9 ... l:ta7
Inna Gaponenko compared to a regular Paulsen) 10. �xb7 (10.e6!? fxe 6 l l . tt:Jxe6?!
Ch ristia n Bauer 12. �d2 and Black was very fine �xc3+ 12.bxc3 'ifc8 13. �g4 'ifc4)
Biel 2007 ( 2 ) in Prandstetter- Berzinsh, Prague 10 . . . l:txb7 11. 'iff3 l:tc7 12. tLldS
1.e4 cs 2 . ltJf3 b6 3 . d 4 cxd4 2014. 6 ... e6 6 ... d 6 7.f4 g6 is a l:tc4 13.c3 (13 . �e3) 13 . . . dxeS
4 . lbxd4 �b7 5. tllc 3 a 6 6. �e2 riskier way to meet the plan 14.fxeS .Q.xeS 15.0-0 with strong
6 . a4?! is illogical: Black won't with �e2/f2-f4: 8 . �f3 �g7 (8 . . . compensation. 7.0-0 1i'c7
play . . . b6 -b5 anyway: 6 ... e6 7 . .Q.e2 eS!? 9 . ltJb3 ttJd7) 9.eS!? (9 . �e3

78
Sicilian Defence - Early Divergences Survey SI 43.2

Fa bien Llblszewskl 17 ... 'ifc6; 17 ... .Q.e7 8 ... �4 9. �d2


Ch ristian Bauer 0ie7 9 ... tllc 6; 9 ... tLJf6 10.es tl:ids
San Sebastian 2012 (5) 11. tllxdS hd2+ 12. 'i!Vxd2 hdS
1.e4 cs 2 . tllf 3 b6 3.d4 cxd4 10.l:if1 An interesting gambit,
4 . tLJxd4 �b7 S . lDc3 a6 6.f4 e6 fighting for the dark squares,
7 . �d3 is 10.a3!? hc3 ll. hc3 'i!Vxf4
12.l:tfl (12.g3) 12 ... 'i!Vxh2 13.0-0-0
10 ... 0bc6 11. lLJxc6 lDxc6=
12.0-0-0 bS 13. c;tb1 �cS 14.eS
tlld 4 1S. 'ifg4 g6 16. &iJe4 he4
17.he4 0-0-0 18. �e3 dS 19.c3
8.f4 S . llel! is a very rare but lLJfS 20.hcs dxe4 21. �d4 hS
dangerous idea: 22. 'ife2 'ifc6 23.l:ide1 e3 24.he3
A) S ... .Q.d6!? 9 . tlld bS (9.g3 §J.cS) lLixe3 2S. 'ifxe3 'ifxg2 26. 'ifcS+
9 ... axbS 10. tllx bS §J.xh2+ 11. @fl c;tb8 27.l:id1 lies 28. 'it'b6+ 'it'b7
(11. @hl 1tf eS) 11 ... '*f c6 12.g3 hS00; 29. 'it'd6+ c;ta7 30.l:id4 l:ic6 31. 'it'b4
12 ... 'it>e7; l:ihc8 32.l:ifd1 l:i6c7 33.'it'd6 1/2-¥2
B) s ... .Q.cs 9 . tlla 4 d 6 10 . .Q.hs !?;
C) S ... .Q.b4 9 . '*fd2!? (threatening gra ndesergl
1 0. tllc bS) 9 ... .Q.xc3 (9 ... .Q.e7) 7... 'ifc7 7 ... tllc 6 takes advantage Evarga loPuch
10.bxc3 tllf6 (10 . . . .Q.xe4 11. '*fgS) of the unprotected tlld 4. S . .Q.e3 Live Chess 2014
11.£3 d 6 12.a4 0-0 13.c4;!;; §J.cS 9 . tllx c6 .Q.xc6 10 . .Q.xcS bxcS 1.e4 cs 2 . tllf3 b6 3.d4 cxd4
D) S ... tllc 6 9 . tllx c6 dxc6 10 . .Q.d3; when a possible continuation is 4. lLJxd4 �b7 s. tllc 3 a6 6 . �c4
E) S ... tllf6 ?! 9.eS! '*fxeS?? (9 ... tlld S 11. '1Wg4 tllf6 12. 'li'gs (12. '1Wxg7 llgS e6 7.0-0 tllf 61? After 6 . .Q.c4, this
10. tlle 4! 'ifxeS 11. tllg S 1Wc7 12 . .Q.hs 13. '1Wh6 llxg2) 12 ... c4! 13. §J.xc4 '1Wb6 move is possible even before
g6 13.1tff3; 9 ... tlle 4 10. tllx e4 §J.xe4 (13 ... h6 14. '1Wxg7 llgS IS. '1Wxh6 controlling es.
11 . .Q.£3 .Q.xf3 12. '*fxf3 tllc 6 13.c3 Iles llxg2 16.0-0-0 tllx e4 17.fS 'li'f6 A) 7 . . . 'i!Vc7 is standard: S . .Q.b3
14 . .Q.f4;!;} 10 . .Q.xa6 '1Wc7 11. tllc bS IS. 'il!Yxf6 tllxf6 19.fxe6±; 13 ... tllxe 4 tllf6 9 . l:tel .Q.d6 ! ? 10.g3 (10. tllf3 ?!
'ifcS 12. tllfS 1-0 cOnchina- Evargalo, 14. tllx e4 §J.xe4 1S. 'il!Yxg7;!;) 14.0-0-0 tllc 6 11. 'ii' e2 tZleS 12.h3 tllx f3 +
Buho21.com 2013. 8 �cSI S ... .Q.b4
•.. l:fuS 1S . .Q.b3 0-0, relying on the 1 3 . 'i!Vxf3 §J.eS =F Mustaps- Berzinsh.
9 . .Q.f3 §J.xc3 10.bxc3 tllf6 11.eS queenside open files to compensate Riga 2012) 10 ... .Q.cs (10 ... .Q.es 11.f4
(11. '1Wd3 0-0 12.es tlld S 13 . .Q.a3 for the missing pawn. 8. 'ife2 §J.xd4+ 12. 'ifxd4 tll c 6 13. 'i!Vf2 tllg 4
lkS 14. tlle 2 aS 1S . .Q.d6 ;!;) ll... .Q.xf3 S. 'il!Yf3!? can be met in three ways: 14.'ife2 hS00; 10 ... 0-0?? 11. tlld bS±)
12. llxf3 tlle 4 (12 ... tlld S 13. 'li'd3 ;!;) A) S ... tllc 6 9. tllx c6 '1Wxc6 10 . .Q.d2 ll. .Q.f4 d6 12.eS ilxd4 13.exf6 §J.xc3
13 . .Q.a3 tllc 6 14. lle3 (14. 'li'el;!;) tllf6 (10 ... llcS 11.0-0-0 bS 12.a3 .Q.cs 14.bxc3 'i!Vc6 1S.f3 gxf6 16. 'i!Vxd6
14 ... tllc S IS. §J.xcS bxcS 16. tllx c6 13.g4 lLJe7oo) 11.0-0-0 bS 12.a3 iJ.e7 'i!Vxd6 17. §J.xd6 tllc 6=;
'li'xc6 17. lld3 lla7 1S. '1Wg4 0-0 13.g4 (13.eS 'il!Yxf3 14.gxf3 tlld S) 13... B) I like 7 . . . bS?! less: S . .Q.b3
19. llg3 g6 20. '*fh4 llb7 21.llh3 (:. d6 with a typical Sicilian, e.g. 14.gS tllc 6 9 . l:tel ilb4 10. tllx c6 dxc6
21. 'li'h6) 21...hS 22.g4 llfbS 23.gxhS tlld 7 IS. @bl 0-0 16.h4 !lacs 17.hS 11. 'i!Vg4 tllf6 12. 1tfxg7?! (:. 12. 'i!VgH)
'ife4 24.hxg6 (24. lld3D+) 24 ... llbl+ tllc S lS.llhel (lS.fS tllx d3 19. 'il!Yxd3 12 ... l:tgS 13. '1Wh6 .Q.fS ?! (13 ... cS! ?�)
2S. Wf2 'li'el+ 0-1 Magalashvili-B. 'il!Yc4} lS ... llieSoo; 14. 'il!Yh3? (14. 'il!Yh4} 14 ... c s t Kusiak­
Savchenko, Baku 2009. 9. Wh1 d6 B) S ... tlle 7 9 . .Q.d2 tllb c6 10. tllb 3 Bokros, Slovakia tt 2014. 8.eS
10.�f3 0ie7 10 ... tllf6 with pressure dS 11.a3?! dxe4 12. tllx e4 tllfS 13 . .Q.c3 S. 'i!Ve2 'i!Vc7 8 ... 'ifc7 9.exf6 9. 'i!Ve2
on e4; 10 ... tlld 7 11. tllb 3 11.fS ! eS .Q.e7 (13 ... tllh 4?! 14.'li'e2 'i!Vxf4? tllc 6 10. tllD (10. tllx c6 'i!Vxc6 11.£3
12. tllb 3 .Q.b4 13. tlle 2t 11... tllb c6 1S.g3 00+ 16. @f2+-) 14.g4 tllh 4 dS 12.exf6 (12 . .Q.d3 tlld7) 12 ... 'i!Vxc4
12.&iJe2 0-0 13.c3 fS 14. lLJg3 IS. '1Wg3 'i!Vxf4 (1S ... tllg 6 16.0-0 13. 'i!Vxc4 dxc4=) 10 ... tllg 4 11. .Q.f4 bS
:C.e8 1S. 'ifd3 tllb 8 16. �e3 fxe4 eS=F) 16.llil 'il!Yxg3+ 17.hxg3 tllg 6 12 . .Q.d3 (12 . .Q.b3 b4 13. tlle4 tllg xeS
17. he4 he4 18. 'ifxe4 tZlfS 1S. §J.xg7 l:tgS 19. tllf6+ §J.xf6 20 . .Q.xf6 14. tllx eS tllx eS lS.lliel §J.e7! (1S ... d6?
19. lLJxfS exfS 20.'it'dS+ 'iff7 tllg eS 21 . .Q.xh7 llxg4 1/2-V2 (31) 16. l:tadl) 16. 'i!VhS d 6 17. tllxd6+=)
21. 'ifxf7+ Wxf7 22. hcs dxcS Inarkiev- Hou Yifan, Petropavlovsk 12 ... b4 13. tlle 4 tllg xeS 14. l:tfel hS!
23.:C.e1 :Xe1 24. :Xe1 l:id8 Kamchatsky 2016; (prevents any 'i!VhS checks, so that
2s. wg1 lDc6 26. W.2 c4 27.lLia1 C) S ... tllf6 9 . .Q.d2 (9.g4 dS) 9 ... tllc 6 ... f7-f6 becomes an option. 14 ...
lid s 28. tLic2 libs 29. l:ib1 :a s 10. tllx c6 §J.xc6!? 11.0-0-0 bS 12. llhel d6?! lS . l:tadl tllx f3+ 16. 'i!Vxf3 tlld 4
30.:C.1 l:ibS 31. l:ib1 g 6 32.lLie3 (12.g4 b4 13. tlle 2 dS} 12 ... 'i'Hb7!= 17. 'il!Yg3 eS 1S. §J.e3 tlle 6 19. tllg St;
lies 33.l:id1 we6 34. l:ie1 wd7 13. wbl b4 14. tlld S lLixds lS.exds 14 ... .Q.e7 1S . tllx eS tllx eS 16. 'i!VhS d6
3S.l:id1+ We6 V2-'h §J.xdS 16. iJ.e4 he4 17. llxe4 dS; 17. tllx d6+ .Q.xd6 lS. §J.xeS §J.xeS

79
Sicilian Defence - Early Divergences

19. �xeS �xeS 20.l:lxeS @e7 should 20 . . . 0 - 0 + Tan-Czebe, Canberra e6 7 . 'ifd2 1i'c7 S.f3 �b4 8 . . . li:Jf6
lead to a draw) 15.c4 f6 (15 ... iLe7 2013. 9 . li:lb3 9.0-0-0 gb4 9 . lbde2 9.a3 gxc3
16.cS) 16.cS h4 17. li:Jd6+ iLxd6 10. 'llt' x c3 �xc3+ ll.bxc3 (when
18 .cxd6 �xd6 19. l:!.adl 'i!Vc7oo; White has not castled queenside,
9. iLxe6 dxe6 10.exf6 li:Jd7!? (10 ... this queenless middlegame gives
gxf6=) ll.fxg7 iLxg7g? 9 ... 1i'xc4 him a pull since b6 is as much
10. �gs h 6?1 10 ... l:!.g8!t ll.g3 li:Jc6 a target as the doubled pawns,
12. li:Jf3 gxf6 13. li:Jd2 (13 . .Q.xf6 ? and the dark-squared bishop is
�f4) 1 3 ... �d4 14 . .Q.e3 �hH strong) ll. . . li:Je7 (11...d6 1 2 . l:tbl
1s. gxb6 tt:JeS 11. �h4 ll. ti:Jxe6!? li:Jd7 13.a4 gcs 14. li:Jb3 li:Jgf6 1S.a5
fxe6 12. �hS+ g6 13. �xg6+ @d8 bS 1 6.c4;!;) 12.J:lbl li:Jc8 13.a4 li:Jc6
14 . .Q.e3 @c7 lS. l:!.fdl\!? 11... tt:Jc6 14. tt:lb3 d 6 15.aS bS (15 . . . bxaS
12. ti:JfSI gSl 12 ... exfS ? 13.l:!.el+ ge7 1 6 . tt:lcS dxcS 17.l:lxb?;!;) 16.c4 bxc4
14. li:JdS ! (14.fxg7 l:!.g8 1S. gxe7 li:Jxe7 17. �xc4 tt:leS Vz- 1/z (4S) Fressinet­
16. 'ii' d 6 0-0-0 0-1 (31) grandesergi­ Maybe not the best place for Bauer, Ajaccio blitz 2007.
EvargaloPuch, Chess.com 2014) the knight, even if Black should
14 . . . 0-0 (14 ... 'iYxh4 1S. ti:Jxe7 li:Jxe7 watch out for the idea �d4,
16. l:!.xe7+ @f8 17. �xd7 �xf6 forking b6 and g7. 9 ... li:lf6 All
18. �xb7±) 1S.fxe7 l:tfe8 16. li:Jxb6 Black's minor pieces fight for
(16. gf6 1-0 (2S) grandesergi­ the light squares in the centre.
EvargaloPuch,Chess.com 2014) 10.a3 10. 'iYd4!? gxcJ+ 11.bxc3 b5
16 . . . �xh4 17. li:Jxa8+- 13. �g3? 12.a4 ti:Jc6 13 . �b6 �xb6 14. �xb6
13.li:Jg7+! gxg7 14.fxg7 l:tg8 1S . gg3 bxa4 (14 . . . @e7 15.axb5 axbS
l:txg7\!? 13 ...exfS 14. lbdS f4-+ 16.l:txa8 l:txa8 17. gxbS) 15. l:txa4
14 ... li:JeS! - + 15 . l:tel (lS . gxeS �xdS; 0-0 16. ge2 ;!; 10 ... bc3 11. 'ifxc3
15 . li:Je3 �e6; IS ... 'iYc6 16.gxeS f4) 'ifxc3+ 12. bxc3 dS= This break
1s ... gxdS 1S. l:le1+ �dS 16. ti:Jxb6 is the point of Black's system.
1i'd4 17. 'tWxd4 ti:Jxd4 18. l:lad1 �cs 13.exd S ti:JxdS 14. �d4 li:lc61? 9 ... tbc6 9 ... li:Jf6 is a bit slow now
19. ti:JxaS has 20.c3 liJe6 0-1 Offering a pawn for speeding up since White can push back the
his development; a common idea gb4: 10.a3 gc5 11. gf4 ;!; 10. �f4
in this line, but not necessary in 10.a3 is less strong now: 10 . . . gcs
this case. 14 ... li:Jd7!?= 6. 1S. gxg7 11. gf4 tt:le5!00; 10.0-0-0 10 ... eS
English schemes
l:tg8 l 6 . gd4 es 17. gf2 li:Jxc3 and 11. �g3 tbge7 11... tt:lf6 12.0-0-0;!;;
b6 is covered. 1S. bg7 l:lgS 12. �h4 tt:laS 12.a3 b c 3 13. ti:Jxc3
Vesel l n Topalov 16. �d4 ti:Jxd4 17.cxd4 liJe3 d6 14. �c4;!; Carlsen with the
Ch ristian Bauer 17 ... l:tc8 1 8 . @d2 (18.c4 li:Je3 19. @f2 bishop pair in a stable position:
B i l bao ra pid 2004 ( 10) li:Jxc4=) 18 . . . aS\!? 1S. Wf21 ti:Jxf1 a few years later Black wouldn't
1.e4 cs 2 . ti:Jf3 b6 3.d4 cxd4 18 . . . li:Jxc2? 19. l:ta2 �dS (19 . . . l:tc8 stand a chance, but in 2005 it
4 . ti:Jxd4 �b7 s . tt:Jc3 a6 6. �e3 20. gd3) 20Jhc2 gxb3 2 1 . l:tb2 was still a game. 14 . . . 0-0 1S. �a2
A very common scheme of .Q.d5 2 2 . l:txb6± 19. l:lhxf1 l:lcS bS 16.l:ld1 l:ladS 17. �h4 l:ld 7
development against all Sicilians. 20.l:lfc1;t l:lc3 21. lbd2 �e7 18.0-0 Wh8 18 ... li:ld4 19.f4 19.a4
6 e6 7 . 'ifd2 1i'c7 Black controls
•.. 22.l:la b 1 bS 23.a4 l:ldS 24. l:lb4 19 . . . exf4 20.�gs 'ifb6+ 21.�h1
eS in order to play ... li:Jf6. S.f3 l:ldcS 2 S . l:lb2 �dS 26.axbS axbS liJeS 22. bf4 li:l7g6 23. �e3
8.a3?! li:Jf6 9.f3 li:Jc6 1 0 . li:Jb3 d6 2 7 . li:lf1 l:lSc4 2S. liJe3 l:lxd4 2 3 . i!.g3 J:le 8 24. �e2 ;!; 23 ... 1i'dS
11. 'iYf2 li:Jd7 12. ge2 (in case of 29.l:lxbS �c6 30.l:la S l:ld2+ 23 . . . �c7 24. �d4 l:leS 2 s . lbds
12.0-0-0 bS the a3-pawn helps 31. �e1 l:ld 7 3 2 . We2 fS 3 3 . tbd 1 'ifh4 26.l:lde1 h6 2 7 . l:le3 27. l:tfS ! ?
Black to attack on the queenside) l:lc4 34. li:lb2 l:lc3 3S. lbd3?? (threatening 2 8 . ti:Jf6 ! w h e n the
12 ... ge7 13.0-0 0-0 and Black has 3 S . li:Jd l l:tc4 36.c3;!; 3S ... l:ldxd3 �h4 will no longer have any
a nice Scheveningen, Muminova­ 36.cxd 3 l:lxc1 and Black won on squares) 27 ... li:lf8 (27 . . . @g8 2 8 . li:Jf6 +
Koneru, Tashkent 2013. S . . . �b4 move 103. gxf6 29. gf2 �g4 30.h3 +-) 28 .h3
8 ... li:Jf6 9.0-0-0 gb4 1 0 . li:Jb3 dS (2 8. ti:Jf6 ?? gxf6 29. gf2 �g4
11.es li:Jfd7= (11. . . �xeS?? 12. gf4) Magnus Carlsen 30.h3 �g6 -+) 28 ... tt:lh7! 29. gf2
12.f4 li:JcS 13. �el li:Jc6 14.a3 li:Jxb3+ Ch ristia n Bauer �d8 3 0 . gb6 �c8 31. iLd4;!;
1S.cxb3 �cs 16. gxcS bxc5 17. @bl Biel 2005 (9) keeps strong pressure. 27 ... �gS
li:Ja5 18.b4 cxb4 19.axb4 li:Jc6 1.e4 cs 2 . li:lf3 b6 3.d4 cxd4 2S. �c3 tbg4 2 9 . l:lh3 1i'gs
2 0 . li:Ja2 (2 0.b5 li:Jb4 2 1 . l:td4 aS=F) 4 . ti:Jxd4 �b7 S . ti:Jc3 a6 6. �e3 30. 'ifd4 30. �xg5 hxg5 31. l:!.hS

80
Survey SI 43.2

:xe4 32. lhgS ttJ4.eS00 30 ... lll6 eS When White has castled (17. l:lhgl fxgS 18. ft.xgS ft.xan ;
31. lllf4?1 31.a4!? .31 ... llic4 31... lllf6 ! queenside and Black gets in 17.gxf6 ! lllxf6 18.h4 (18. l:lhgl
32. llld S (32. l:lg3 llle g4; 32. ft.dS . . . d7-dS, these endgames are fine lllh S) 18 ... lllh S I9. ft.h2 li:Jf4
�xdS) 32 ... ft.xdS 33. ft.xdS lllx dS for Black. 12 . . . dS 13.exdS lllx dS 20.@bl (20. ft.xf4 l:lxf4 21. "i¥xf4
34 .exdS °i¥g4= 32.J:lhS 32. ft.xc4 14 . .id2 0-0 1S.c4 lllf6 16. lll b 3 llld 3+ -+) 20 . . . lll x e2 21. "i¥xe200)
l:lxe4 33. 'ifxg7+ 'ifxg7 34. ft.xg7 lllb d7 17 . .ie3 J:lfc8 18 . .ie2 as 17 .. .fxgS 18. ft.xgS ft.xa3! 19 .bxa3
bxc4 3 S . ft.c3 fS should be equal. 18 ... llle S!? 19. J:ld6 .ia6 19 ... a4 "i¥xc3 20. "i¥xc3 l:lxc3 0-1 (39)
32 ... 1Wf6 33. 1Wxf6 lllxf6 34. hf6 20. llld 2 ft.c6 2 1 . l:ldl lllc S= 2 0 . J:lhd1 Houska-Hamdouchi, La Roche­
gxf6 3S. hc4 bxc4 36. J:lxh6 a4 20 ... lll e S 21. lll d 2 h6 22. l:lxb6 sur-Yon 2007. 11 ... 1Wc8 12 .a3
:X e4 37. J:lxf6 White has won ft.xc4 23. lllx c4 lllx c4 24. ft.xc4 .ie7 13. llla 4 13 . li:Jg3! 13 llla SI?
•..

a pawn, but the strong bishop l:lxc4 2 S . l:ld4 l:lc7= 21. J:lxd 71? An 13 ... °i¥d8!? 14. ft.e3 bS IS. tt:lcS °i¥c7
and the possibility to advance enterprising exchange sacrifice. (IS ... ft.c8!?) 14. llle c3 14. tt:lxb6
che d-pawn offer compensation. 21 . . . tlixd7 22. J:lxd7 axb3 2 3.axb3 lllb 3+ IS.@bl li:Jxd2 + 14 ... "ti'c6
37 ... J:lde7?1 37 ... l:leSfg (heading J:ld8 24.J:lxd8+ 24. l:lc7 24 . . . J:lxd8 1S . .ie3 bS 16. lll b 6 J:ld8 17.eS
for bS) 38.h4 (38.c3 J:tbs 39. l:tf2 2S. hb6?1 2S .b4fg 2 S ... J:ld2 lllh S 18.g4 18 .b4 d 6 19.bxaS dxeS
'it>g7=) 38 ... l:lbS 39. l:lf2 l:lxb2 26 . .id3 J:lxg2=F 2 7 . b4 J:lxh 2 20. ft.dJ fsrg 18 tt:lt4 19. ht4
•..

40. lllh S !:lbs 41. lllg 3 l:leS= 38. �g1 27 . . . @fS ; 27 ... ft.b7 2 8 .bS ft.xf3 29.cS 1Wxb6 20. llle 4 he4 21.fxe4 0-0
38.h4 c3 39 .bxc3 l:lc7 40. @h2 fS (29 . . . @fS 30. ft.c7 @e7 31.b6 l:lg4 22 . .id3 b4 23.a4 b3 24 .ie3 •

:Xc3 41. l:lf2 l:lec4 42.l:lxd6 l:lxc2 32. fid6 + @d8 33. ft.a6=) 30.c6 .ics 2S. �cs 1Wxc5 26. 1Wc3
43. lhc2 l:lxc2 44. l:lb6;!; 38 ... J:ld4! l:lxh200 is very sharp. All three 1i'b6 2 7 . .ic4 llixc4 28. 1Wxc4 J:lc8
Black finds a route to the second results are possible. 28.bS .ic8? 29. "ti'd4 J:lxc2+ . . . 0-1 ( 3 8 )
rank. 39. lllh S J:ld2 40. J:l6f2 J:lee2 Too passive. 28 . . . ft.b7 29.cS ft.xf3
41. lllf4 J:lxf2 42. J:lxf2 J:ld1+ (on the long diagonal the bishop M a x i m Vavu l l n
43.J:lf1 J:ld2 44. J:lc1 dS= 4S. �f1 can slow down White's passers Atti la Czebe
d4 46. we1 c3 47. llle 2 as 48. bxc3 and Black's pawns can start Buda pest 2013 (8)
dxc3 49.h4 .ia6 SO. tlixc3 J:lxg2 moving too) 30.c6 f6 (30 ... l:lhS00) 1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 b6 3.d4 cxd4
51. llld S wg7 S2.c4 J:lg1+ S3.wd2 JI. ft.cs J:l.hs 32. ft.d6 @f7 33.c7 ft.b7 4. lllx d4 .ib7 S . llic3 a 6 6 . .ie3 e6
:Xc1 S4. wxc1 hc4 55. lllf4 �f6 34. @cl ft.cs 3S .c4 es 3 6 . ft.e4 'it>e6 7. 1i'd2 1Wc7 8.f3 lllf6 9.0-0-0 .ib4
56.Wd2 wts 57. we3 .ib3 58. llld 3 37. ft.fS 'it>d7 38.b6 fS 3 9 . ft.d S l:lh6 10 . .if41?
wg4 59. llle S+ wxh4 60. lllx f7 40.cS l:lg6=i= 29.cS± h S 30.c6 h4
'h-'h 31 . .ic7 J:lh1+ 32. Wb2 h3 33.b6
h2 34.hh2 J:lxh2 3S.b7 1-0
Marle Sebag
Humpy Koneru
Beij i ng W Basq ue 2013 (3) Robin Swl n kels
1.e4 cs 2. lllf3 b6 3.d4 cxd4 Ch ristian Bauer
4. lllx d4 .ib7 S . llic3 a6 6 . .ie3 Dresden 2007 (3)
e6 7 . 1Wd2 7.f3 'ifc7 8. "i¥d2 lll f 6 1.e4 cs 2. lllf 3 b6 3.d4 cxd4
9.g4 h6 10.0-0-0 ft.b4 ll.a3 ft.xc3 4. lllx d4 .ib7 S . llic3 a 6 6 . .ie3 e6
12. "i¥xc3 °i¥xc3 13.bxc3 dS 14.eS 7.f3 1Wc7 8. 1i'd2 lllf 6 9.0-0-0 .ib4
lllfd7 1S.f4 li:lcS = Aryan Chopra­ 10. llld e2 llic6 10 . . . ds
Popov, Alhena 20IS. 7 ... 1Wc7 This is a valid alternative to
8.0-o-o .ib4 9.f3 lllf6 10. Wb1 10. llld e2. 10 ... 1Wc8 IO ... ft.xc3
�c3 11.1Wxc3 1Wxc3 12. bxc3 II. ft.xc7 ft.xd2+ 12. l:lxd2 bS
13 . tt:lb3± 11. llld e2 dS 11...0-0
12.a3 ft.cs 13.es lll d S 14. li:JxdS
.I � kxdS IS. lllc 3 ft.c6 1 6 . @b l;!; 12 .a3
i. Vavulin finds an interesting
, . move order. 12.exdS tt:lxdS 13. °i¥d4
ft.xc3 14. lllx c3 tt:lxf4 IS. "i¥xf4
0-0= 12 ... hc3 12 . . . kcS 13.exdS
kxdS (13 ... li:JxdS?! 14. lll x dS kxdS
1S. tt:lc3 kc6 16. kd6) 14. tt:la4
11 . .if41 ll.a3?! ft.e7 12.g4 llle S' tt:lbd7 lS. tt:lxcS bxcS (l S ... lllx cS
13. llld 4 l:lc8 14. ft.e2 0-0 IS.gs 16. °i¥b4 t) 16. lllc 3 0-0;!;; 12 . . . ft.e7'?
llle 8 (IS . . . lll h S) 16. fi.f4 f6 17.@bl?! is an idea for Black, to g ive a

81
Sicilian Defence - Early Divergences

pawn instead of taking one: 3S . . . tt:lxd3+ 3 6 . J:lxd3 es 37. 'it'd6 12.exdS (12.a3) 12 . . . lLlxdS 13. 'it' d4
13.exdS tt:lxdS 14. tt:lxdS AxdS 'it'xd6 3 8 . J:lxd6 @b7 3 9 . J:lxh6 f4'f Axc3 14. l2Jxc3 l2Jxf4 lS. 'it'xf4 0-0;
1S . tt:lc3 Ac6 (1S . . . Ab7 16. tt:la4 '1Wc6 36.l:[e2? 3 6 .l:lxe6! J:lxe6 37. AxfS 10.a3 �xc3 (10 . . . Ae7!? intending
17. '1Wd4±) 16. '1Wd4 (going for the Ad7 3 8 . Axe6 Axe6 39. l:tf3+- ... b5 -b4) 11. 'it'xc3 'it'xc3 12.bxc3
pawn before Black consolidates 36 ... 1i'c7? 3 6 ... i::td s 37. 'it'xa4 dS is harmless with the white
with ... 0-0 and ... tt:ld7) 16 ... 0-0 bxa4 3 8 . i::txb8 + @xb8 3 9 . J:lxe6= king on cl. 10 . . . d S Thematic.
17. '1Wxb6 eS! (17 . . . tt:ld7 18. '1Wc7 3 7 . b h 6 37.J:lxe6! 3 7 l:[dS
.•. Black exploits the Ab7 to create
Ags 1 9 . '.t>bl Axf4 20. '1Wxf4 i::tb 8 38. 1i'f6 3 8 . 'it'b4!= 38 ... ..idS? tension in the centre. 10 ... l2Jc6
21. Ac4 ;!;) 18. AxeS (18. '1We3 tt:ld7 3 8 ... l2Jf4!+ 39. l:[b4 39. �xfS ! has been played, but it is risky
19. AxeS tt:lxeS 20. 'IWxeS Af6 and 39 . . . tt:Jcs 40. �b1 .it3 40 . . . 'it'd6 due to 11. Af4!. 11.exd S 11.eS is
White's king is still on cl, which 41. 'it'c3;!;; 40 ... f4! 41.l:lxg2 l2Jxd3 only a trap: 11 ... l2Jfd7! (11 . . . 'it'xeS??
is probably no improvement; 42.cxd3 �xg2 43. �xf4 'it'h7= 12. �f4 'IWhS 13.g4 'it'g6 14. Axb8
18. Ae3 tt:ld7 19. 'IWaS Ads 20. '1Wb4 41. :Xe61 Presumably the time Axc3 (14 ... J:lxb8 lS. 'it'f4 forks b8
l:tb8 21. '1Wc4 'it'b7 22.b3 Ae7 - control had passed. White and b4) 1S.l2Jxc3 l:txb8 16. Ad3
Black has compensation here as doesn't miss his first opportunity and the queen is trapped) with
well, but whether it is enough now. 41 lLJxe6 42. 1i'xe6+
•.• a very fine French-like position:
for the pawn is unclear) 18 . . . tt:ld7 �b7 43. 1i'xfS± .ic6 44. J:lg4 12.f4 l2Jc6 13.'it'el J:lc8 14. @bl lLlaS f
19. 'it'c7 AgS + (19 ... tt:lxeS? 20. 'it'xe7) l:[d 7 4S . .ie4 4S. Ad2 4S lLJxh4.•• Middelburg· Bauer, Kallithea
2 0 . @bl (20.f4 tt:lxeS 21. 'IWxeS 4S ... �xe4 46. '*'xe4+ 'it'c6 47. 'it'e2± 2008; 11.a3 �e7!? (11... Axc3!?
Af6!!?) 20 ... tt:lxeS 21. 'it'xeS Af6 46. :Xh4 g2 47 . .ie3 l:[e7 1-0 12. tt:lxc3 l2Jbd7) 12.exdS AxdS!
22. 'it'cS l:lb8 . Black has strong (12 ... lLlxdS? 13. lLlxdS AxdS 14. 'it'c3
pressure for his pawns. A possible Detlev Fischer 'it'xc3 1S. l2Jxc3) 13. l2Jg3 (13. lLlxdS
follow-up is 23.b3 J:le8 24. Ad3 Erich Matz lLixdS 14. Af2 0-0) 13 ... Ac6 14. Af4
J:leS 2 S . 'ifc4 i::ta S 26. Ae4 'it'f8 (or Germa ny Email 2011 'it'b7 1S. Ad3 l2Jbd7 16. l2Jce4 0·0=
26 . . . Aa8 27. 'it'xc8+ J:lxc8 2 8 . Axa8 1. tt:lf3 b6 2.e4 .ib7 3 . tt:lc3 cs 4.d4 Gallardo Garcia· Fedorchuk,
l:txa3 2 9 . tt:la2 J:lxa8) 27. Axc6 cxd4 S. lLJxd4 a6 6 .ie3 e6 7 . 1i'd2
• M adrid 2012; 11.@bl dxe4
'it'xa3 2 8 . Aa4 l:tcS 29. 'it°f4! l:lbc8 1i'c7 8.f3 8 . �f4 d6 (11 ... 0·0); ll. �f4 is no problem
30. 'it°cl 'it'xcl+ 3 1 . l:lxcl J:lxc3;!;. at this point: 11 ... eS 12. �g3 l2Jbd7
13. lLJxc3 d x e 4 1 4 .id61? 14.fxe4
• 11 ... lLJxd S 11 ... AxdS 12. Af4 'it'b7
tt:lbd7 1S. Ad3 es 16. Ag3 0-000 13.a3 �e7 14. l2Jd4 O·O lS. lLlfS !
14 exf3 1S. 1WgS lS. 'it'f2!? fxg2
..• should be less difficult with the
16. Axg2 tt:lbd7 17. l:ld4 bS 18.l:lhdl queen on b7 rather than c8, but
Ac6g? 1S tt:l b d 7 16.gxf3 ht3
.•. 11 . . . lLlxdS is more natural. 12 . .id4
17. J:lg1 l:lg8 17 ... g6 18. i::td 2g? lllc 61 I think this sacrifice of
18. l:ld4 1i'b7 1 8 ... 'it'c6 19 .id3
• the g7·pawn is a good solution
h 6 19 ... bs 2 0 . Axh7 J:lh8 21. Ae4 to defuse White's pressure.
Axe4 2 2 . tt:lxe4 0-0-0= 20.1i'h4 13 . hg7 J:lg8 Black's plan is
.ic6 20 ... bS00; 20 ... tt:lcS 21. tt:le4 ... lLJce7, ... O·O·O, ... @b8 , ... J:lc8 ,
o-o-o 2 2 . l:lc4?1 bS 2 3 . l:[c3 tt:ld s a n d targeting t h e weak square
24 . .ig3 tt:l7b6?1 24 . . . tt:l7f6 'f ; 8 . . . ll:lf6 I consider this move to be on e3. White has to defend his
24 ... tt:lfS 'f 2S. l:[b3 l0a4 26. tt:ld6+ more precise than 8 ... �b4, which �g7 and to find a way to develop
:Xd 6 2 7 . bd 6 l:[d8 28 . .ib4 fS is often played, because of 9.a3, his kingside. 13 ... 0-0-0 14. Axh8
28 ... tt:lxb4 29. i::tx b4 fSg? 29. 1i'e1 which is a bit annoying when lLJxc3 lS. °*'xd8 + l2Jxd8 16. Axc3±
tt:lf4 30. 1i'es gs 31 . ..ias :es? White hasn't castled yet, since the 14. 1i'h6 14. Ah6 o - o - o 1s. 'it'el
The position is very complex, endgame after 9 . . . �xc3 10. 'it'xc3 lLJce7 14 . . . tt:lce7 1S. lLJxdS
and both sides, certainly under 'it'xc3+ 11.bxc3 lLJe7 (11 . . . d 6 12.a4 A) lS. 'it'xh7 O·O·O 16.lLlxdS lLlxdS
time pressure, commit mistakes l2Jd7 13.aS bS 14.c4l) 12. l:lbl l2Jc8 17. Ad4 @b8 18.a3 Ae7 (18 ... �f8)
in the next ten moves. 31 ... °*'a7! is quite passive: the bishops are 19.h4 (19. 'it'xf7 AgS+) 19 ... es 20.Af2
32. i::td l J:ldS =F 32.h4 1i'b8 33. 1i'd4 strong and b6 is no less weak than AcS (fighting for e3) 21. �xcS 'it'xcS
g4 33 ... AdS ?! 34.@bl! 'it'd6 the doubled pawns on the c-file. 22. 'it'd3=; 22.@bl? l2Jf6!; 22. 'it'xf7
3S.hxg5± 34. l:[e1 34. @bl 34 . . . 9.0·0·0 9.g4 h6 followed by . . . �b4 li:le3-+;
g 3 34 . . . tt:lg2 0 3 S . J:lxe6 J:lxe6 or . . . l2Jc6-eS. 9 .ib4 Fighting
.•. B) lS. Ad4 O·O·O 16. lLlxdS lLixdS
3 6 . AxfS 'it'f4+ 37. 'it'xf4 tt:lxf4 for the light squares, and aiming 17. @bl es 18. Af2 @bs with similar
3 8 . l:lb4 @b8 39. �xe6 (39 .l:lxf4 l:lf6 for ... d7-dS. 10. tt:lde2 10.'it>bl compensation;
40. �d2 g3) 39 . . . tt:lxe6 40. i::tx g4± Axc3 (10 ... dS? 11.lLlcbS!) 11.bxc3 C) 1S.a3? li:lfS 16. 'it'h3 l:lxg7
3S . .id2 3 S . �xfS!+- 3 S ... tt:lg2 dS; 1 0 . Af4!? °*'c8 11.lLlde2 dS 17. lLlxdS �xdS 18.axb4 l2Je3 19.l:Id2

82
Survey SI 43.2

a5 20 .b5 'i!t'c4 21.b3 'i!t'c5 22. 'i!t'h6 armour (17 . . . @b8 , going for the {31 ... ttJxf4 32. gxb6 +) 32. ttJg6
:g6 23. 'i!t'xh7 �xb3 24. 'i!t'h8+ c-file, is less logical when White ttJel 33. gf2 ttJxd3 34.cxd3 gf3 = .
'i;e7 25. 'i!t'b2 (25. 'i!t'xa8 'i!t'a3+) has strengthened c2) 18. lt>bl �e3 T h e strong light-squared bishop
2 5 . .. �c4-+ 1S ... �dS 19. 'i!t'xh7 f5 20. ttJxf5 (otherwise denies White any serious winning
the �g7 is just lost) 20 ... exf5 chances. 23. ha6+ 'iti>b8 23 ... lt>d7
21. 'i!t'xf5 + 'i!t'd7 22. 'i!t'xd7+ llxd7 24. llfl ttJh4 25. ttJaH 24. l:lf1 �hS
23. �e5 llg5 ! (23 ... llxg2? 24. gf5) 2S. lLJbS 'ifi>a8 26. l:lg1 l:lg6 26 . . .
24. jl,g3 ttJf4 2 5 . gxf4 gxf4 2 6 .h4 f5 !? 2 7 . tLJd6 lLJf4 27 . . . lLJh4! 2 8 . llxg6
lleS ; the dark-squared bishop jl,xg6= 28. l:lxg6 hg6 29. �b7+
stops the passed pawns fro m �b8 30. �f3 f6 3 1. tLJc4 'ifi>a7
going anywhere a n d Black has 32.a4 tLJd S 33.c3 �c7 34.aS 'ifi>a6
achieved full equality. 16 �e7 ..• 3S. �b6 �b6 36.axb6 �f4+
16 ... gc5 17. gd4 0-0-0 18. gxc5 Black decides against grabbing
'i!t'xc5 1 9 . lld3 lt>b 8 2 0 . @bl 17. l:ld3 back the pawn. 36 . . . jt,xh2
O·O·O 18. lLJc3 Giving back the 37. ge3 gd3 3 8 .b3 f5 39.c4 ge4
pawn after a forced sequence. (otherwise the c-pawn runs)
It is not so easy for White to But after 1 8 . @bl lt>b8 1 9 . ttJc3 40. gxe4 fxe4 41.c5 @b7 42. lt>dH
reorganize his kingside and finish lk8 2 0 . gd4 (20 . @al f6 21. lLJxd5 should be defensible. 3 7 . 'iti>d1 es
his development. Chess engines jt,xd5\!'.?) 20. .. jl,g5 21. 'i!t'xh7 ttJf6 38. �g1 e4 39. �e2+ 'iti>b7 40.c4
are not convinced at first by 2 2 . gxf6 (22. 'i!t'h3 llh8 23. gxb6 fS 41.b4 �es 42.bS f4 43.cS �fS
Black's compensation because he (23 . 'i!t'g3 'i!t'xg3) 23 . . . 'i!t'e5 44.c6+ 'iti>bS 4S. �cs �e6 46. 'iti>d2
needs some time before he can (23 ... 'i!t'xb6 24. 'i!t'g3+) 24. jt,d4 'i!t'c7 f3 47. �f1 �f4+ 47 . . . gxh2 doesn't
create threats, but after combining 2 5 . jt,b 6 'i!t'e5 is a funny repetition) save Black: 48. gd4 gf5 (48 . . . h5
the slow plan of ... 0-0-0, ... lt>b8 , 2i... gxf6 23. 'i!t'h6 jl,g5 is only 49. @e3 �f5 loses to the beautiful
. . . :cs with threats t o White·s dangerous for White: 24. 'i!t'h5 mating idea 5 0 . jt,f6! jl,gl+ 5 1 . Wf4
queen and dark-squared bishop gf4 and Black wins back a pawn gxb6 5 2 . jt,e5+ lt>c8 (52 . . . jt,c7
and the invasion of the weak on h2 and keeps strong pressure 53.b6+-) 53. @xf5 e3 54. �h3 e2
square e3, I believe he has his full on the dark squares. 18 ... 1iff4+ 55. '.tf6 + ! 'it>d8 5 6 . @f7! e l = 'IW 57.c7+
share of chances. 16.a3 16. ttJg3 19. 1i'xf4 �f4 20. l:lxdS+ bd8 jt,xc7 5 8 . jt,f6+ 'i!t'e7+ 59. jt,xe7#)
0-0-0 17. �d3 (17. �e2 @b8 1 8 . @bl 21. �d4 �g2 This endgame 49. gf2 jt,f4+ 5 0 . �e3 jt,d6 51. Wc3
llc8 (18 . . . �d6\!'.?) 19.c3 (19 . �d3!?) should lead to a draw. 22.l:lg1 h5 52.b7 h4 53.b6 f2 (53 . . . h3
19 ... llxg7 20. 'i!t'xg7 �xc3 2 1.bxc3 �xf3 22 . . . gg5 + 2 3 . lt>bl ttJh4 54. �a6 h2 55.c7+ gxc7 5 6 .bxc7+
tLJxc3+ 22. lt>b2 ttJxdl+ 23. llxdl 24. ge2 llg6 25 . ttJe4 jt,d8 2 6 . lLJd6+ lt>xc7 57. �f4 + +-) 54. jt,a6 48. �e3
e5= leads to another draw by @c7 27. ttJxf7 (27. llxg6 fxg6 2 8 . jt,e5 bh2 49. 'ifi>c3 �a2 SO. 'iti>b4 �e6
perpetual check) 17 ... �c5! e3 is ttJxf3=) 27 ... llxgl+ 2 8 . gxgl jt,f6 S1.b7 �c7 S2. 'iti>cS 'ifi>a7 S3. �gs
again the soft point in White 's 29.f4 ttJg2 30. gd3 h5 31.lLJe5 b5 1-0

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

I •
.t. I .t. .t.
.t. .t. � .t.
.t. ttJ � l:[
�� 'ii'

� � � 'if � �
: �
position after 24. l:th l-fl position after 27. . . 'it>h8-g8 position after 2 0 . �d4-f2

Make use of Black's active White to play and win. Black is active but down two
pieces. (solution on page 248) pawns. Where is White's soft
(solution on page 248) spot?
(solution on page 249)
83
Fre n ch Defe n ce Ta rrasch Va riati o n F R 14 .4 (C03)

A b it of p ressu re i n the 3 . . . .ie 7


Ta r rasch - Pa rt I
by L u i s Rod i

1. e4 e6
2. d4 d5
3. llJd2 1l..e 7
4. e5 c5
5. c3 tbc6
6. i.d3

because of the reply 8. 'tW g4!.


Compared with the alternatives, the
move 6. �d3 has advantages that mainly
concern move order, for instance the
possibility of choosing which of the
knights goes to f3, depending on Black's
plan, and very quick castling.
The variation 3 ... �e7 against the Tarrasch
was introduced into practice in the 1970s, Statistics
with contributions by players like Hans In the databases White shows an
Ek and Oleg Romanishin, but its entrance appreciable advantage: 67,9% against
into main theory is a phenomenon of our 32,1%, with almost 100 games considered.
century, with high-level practitioners like This means that White won S6,S% of the
Alexander Morozevich, Wesley So and games.
Hikaru Nakamura. White's main motifs:
While the main lines appear after 4. �d3 * The use of the squares d4 and eS for his
and 4. tt:lgf3, in recent months a new pieces and, after some opportune pawn
plan has been gaining ground, based on exchanges, creating activity that can
the sequence 4.eS cS S .c3 tt:lc6 (or 4.c3 develop into an initiative.
cS S .eS tt:lc6) and now, instead of 6 . tt:ldf3 * Against ... tt:Jh6-fS, the trade on fS ,
(which sometimes transposes, and is the doubling Black's pawns; in many cases
main option in the statistics) , the move Black's structure becomes static and his
6. �d3, which aims to enable harmonic light-squared bishop doesn't play an
development with tt:le2 and 0-0. A tactical active role.
justification of this idea is that after 6 ... * The exchange of dark-squared bishops
cxd4 7.cxd4 Black should not capture on is usually good for White, but in the
d4 positions with the trade on fS it is
84
Survey FR 14.4

particularly positive, because it deprives


the adversary of the bishop pair.
* Against ... t2Jh6, White can double
the black pawns on h6, weakening the
structure in that sector. While this
preserves the better bishop of the pair, it
also opens the g-file for Black.
Black's main motifs:
* Pressure against the enemy centre with
ideas like ... c5xd4, ... f7-f6, ... tllh 6-f5 and
... �b6.
* The possession of the bishop pair after
Erik va n den Doel
an exchange on fS or h6 by one of the
white bishops.
* The idea . 0-0-0 in connection with actions
.. Adva ncing the f-pawn is premature
on the kingside, usually pawn advances. In my opinion, the various possible
* After the exchange on d4, the fight for advances of the f-pawn are not well­
the light squares with ... tllb 4, followed timed for Black. For instance, 6 . . . f6 can
by ... �d7-b5. This is one of the most be met by 7. tllg f3 or 7. 'iVhS+, with a white
promising plans for Black in the fight for advantage, while the tentative blockade
the balance. with 6 .. .fS does not work well, as witness
Game 1, Van den Doel-Farago, Edinburgh
Strategic resume 2015.
This variation offers very rich positions
from the strategic point of view. The H u rried lady
results of the pawn breaks and the 6 ... 'iWb6 is a more logical option, with
exchanges of minor pieces in the centre immediate pressure against d4. Here I
will be very important for the assessment, like Timofeev's plan with 7.dxcS, allowing
so much so that these critical moments a future occupation of d4 by the white
early in the opening will have a strong pieces (see Game 2, Timofeev-Gonzalez
impact on later events. As opposed to Vericat, Barcelona 2016) , but the most
other lines, where both sides can simply common move is 7. tlld f3. Now the trade
develop and wait for the middlegame, the on d4 transposes to the line 6 ... cxd4,
timing of the resolution of the central while independent lines are 7 .. .f6 (see
problem is vital here. Game 3, Libiszewski-Swayams, Barcelona
In the long term, Black should have 2016) and 7 ... �d7 (Game 4, Howell-Taher,
sufficient resources to keep the balance, Baku 2016) , in both of which White can
but for the moment the logic of White's fight for the initiative.
system, added to the surprise element,
gives White a statistical advantage and, on Knight on the edge
the board, slight pressure on the enemy In recent times, the move to h6 has
position. Although it is a relatively new become a very common choice for the
line, some of the main practical paths can knight in different lines of the French.
be identified already: This is also the case here, where the
85
French Defence - Tarrasch Variation

manoeuvre can be made immediately: Nikolic, Sarajevo 2016, and 7, Van den
6 ... tt:Jh6. Mostly, an exchange on d4 Doel- Sadler, Haarlem 2016. In both cases,
leads to the 6 ... cxd4 line (this line will White fights for the initiative, but Black is
be discussed in Part II of this Survey) . close to equality, especially in the second
for example in the sequences 7. tt:Jdf3 case where, after 7. tt:Je2 f6, White should
cxd4 8.cxd4 or 7. tt:Je2 tt:JfS (7 ... cxd4 try 8.f4 instead of the popular 8.M.
8.cxd4 also transposes) 8 . tt:Jf3 cxd4
9.cxd4. Independent lines seem to be Conclusion
slightly better for White; see Game 5, While in the long term Black should have
Abdusattorov-Reshetnikov, St Petersburg sufficient resources to keep the balance,
2016, for more details. for the moment the logic of White's
system added with the surprise element
The flexi ble 6 i.d 7 ••. gives the first player a statistic advantage
This is one of the most popular plans at (67,9% against 32,1% in my database) and,
master level, connected with an exchange on the board, some pressure.
on d4 and ... tt:Jb4 (fighting for the light
squares) or pressure against the enemy In Part II of this small series we will
centre with a quick ... f7-f6 or ... 'ti'b6. These take a detailed look into Black's most
ideas can be seen in Games 6, Kadric- popular try: the quick exchange on d4.

Adva n c i n g the f-pawn is 14 ... ll\xd4? 14 ... lk8 15 . .Q.d2 Wd8


premature: 6 . . . f6/6 . . .f5 16.b4;t 1S. ll\xd4 �xa4 16. �d2+-

Erik va n den Doel 1


Iva n Farago
• K �K
Ed i n b u rgh 2015 (4) .t. .t. i. .t. .t.
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d S 3 . ttJd2 �e7 .t.
4.eS cs S.c3 lllc 6 6. �d3 fS 'if .t. LS .t.
Blockade strategy. The problem
is that B l ack's position will be
.! ttJ
a bit static. The other try with LS � LS
the f-pawn, 6 . . .f6, can be met 7 . ttJdf3 1 cxd4 7 . . . li:\h6 8 . .Q.xh6 LS � LS LS
with the disruptive 7. WhS + ! ? gxh6 9 . li:\e2;!; 8.cxd4 'ifaS+
� iY � It
(7. li:\gf3 is t h e only move tested 8 . . . li:\h6 9 . .Q.xh6 gxh6 10. li:\e2
in practice, where 7 ... li:\h6 !? (7 . . . .Q.d7 11.0-0;t 9 . ..tf11? Keeping Yes , the d4-pawn was poisoned!
fxeS 8 . li:\xeS li:\xeS 9.dxeS as i n the pieces on the board seems 16 'it'a6 16 . . . .Q.xdl 17 . .Q.xaS
.•.

Delgado-Salinas, Asuncion 2 0 1 5 , like a good idea for White. ka4 18 . .Q.xd8 .Q.xd 8 19 . li:\xe6+-
is better for White, who can The alternative is 9 . .Q.d2 .Q.b4 is also terrible . 17. ba6 bd1
create play on the light squares) 10.li:\e 2 .Q.xd2+ 11. Wxd2 Wxd2+ 18. �d3 �a4 19. lllx e6 g6 19 ... lk8
8 . 0 - 0 (Ceschia-M encinger, Forni 12. li:\xdH 9 . . . �d 7 10. llle 2 'it'b6 20. tilxg7+- is no better. 20. lllx dS
di Sopra 20 15) 8 ... fxeS (8 ... 0-0!?) 11. h31? 11.gH with the idea of bd8 I will give the rest without
9 . dxeS 0-000 seems OK for Black) 'it>g2 is the standard method. comments. White's technical
7 . . . 'it>f8 8. li:\df3 , which looks a bit 11... 0-0-0 11... li:\b4 12 . .Q.b1 .Q.bs job is not difficult here. 21.g4
better fo r White, for instance: 8 . . . 13.'it>gU 12. lllc 3 ..tb8 13. llla 4 llle 7 22 .gxfS ll\xfS 23. bfS gxfS
c x d 4 9 . cxd4 W a s + ( 9 . . . li:\b4 10 . .Q.bl 'ifas 13... Wc7 14 . .Q.d2 ;t 14.a31? 24. l:lg1 �bS+ 2S . ..tg2 d4 26 . ..tf3
Wc7 1 1 . li:\e2 li:\c2+ 12 . .Q.xc2 Wxc2 With this move White fights for �c 6+ 27 . ..tf4 �e4 28.f3 �d3
13 . ..Q.d2 ;t) 10. ©fl!? li:\b4 11 . .Q.d2 fS the initiative on the queenside, 29. �b4 h 6 30. �d6+ ..tea 31.e6
12.g4 li:\xd3 13 . .Q.xaS li:\f4 14. li:\h3 planning to follow up with �gs+ 32 . ..tes �c2 33 .f4 �d8
li:\xhS 15 .gxhS ;t b2-b4. But it's also an ambush ... 34. l::ra c1 d3 3 S . l:[gd1 1-0

86
Survey FR 14.4

H u rried lady This is the most natural move , example: 9 . . . lLlh6 (Black can start
6 ... �b6 and it is generally preferred in with . . . ft.d7, but sooner or later
practice. Usually it is this knight the knight has to be developed,
Artyom Tlmofeev 2 that goes to f3 , and the other and there is only the h6-square
Se rgio Gonzalez Verlcat one is developed via e2. 7 . . .f6 for it) 10. ft.xh6 gxh6 11.0-0 it.d7
B arcelona 2016 ( 1 ) At this point, this break is more (11... 'iWxb2 12 . l:!bl 'iWxa2 13. 'iWcl± -
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d 5 3. llld 2 �e7 4.e5 purposeful than on the previous it is difficult to find a good place
c5 5.c3 ti:lc6 6. �d3 'iFb6 7.dxc5!? move. For instance, White cannot for the black king in this type of
Not the most popular try, but give check on hS here. Still, I positions) 12. 'i!!Y d 2 0-0-0+' While
very interesting. White wants to think that White can fight for the position offers chances to
use the d4-square for his pieces. the initiative with the game both sides, I would prefe r to play
7. IL\df3 is the alternative - see the continuation. The alternative 7 ... it with white; in the long term
next two games. cxd4 transposes to the main line, his superior structure should cell.
and 7 . . . ft.d7 will be the subject of 9 ... cxd4 This exchange allows
the next game. 8. llle 2 the development of the lllg 8 via
e7 after the check on b4. Some
natural alternatives are:
A) 9 ... lLlxeS 10.dxeS l!Jh6
where ll. ft.xh6 gxh6 12.0-0 ft.d7
(12 . . . 'iWxb2 13. l:!bl 'iWxa2 14. 'iWcl±)
13. 'i!fd2 0-0-0 14.a4 offers an
initiative to the first player;
B) 9 ... tllf6 !? is probably balanced,
e.g. 10.0-0 0-0 11.h3!? (a useful
move, asking to Black to show
7 ... hc5 8. 1We2 a5?1 l l is not his cards; the direct ll. gf4
necessary to weaken the queenside also deserves consideration)
in this way. Critical is 8 . . .f6 where 8 . . .fxeS After 8 ... l!Jh6 White can ll . . . �d 6!? 12. �f4 �xeS 13.dxeS
9.b4 ft.e7 10.f4 fxeS 11.fxeS IL\h6 seize an advantage in either of l!Jd7 14. 'iWc2 h6 15 . ft.g3 lLldxeS
12. IL\df3 IL\f7 (12 ... 0-0!?) 13. IL\h3 two ways: exchanging on h 6 or 16. ft.h7+ Wh8 17. tll f4 and White
0-0 14. it.f4 a6 offers chances playing 9.exf6 ft.xf6 10.0-0, as has compensation, but not more,
for both sides. 9. lllb3 �f8 9 ... a4 Sergey Kasparov did in one of for instance: 17 ... 'i!!Y d 8 1 8 . l:!ael
10. ILJxcS 'i!fxcS 11. ft.e3± 10. lllf 3 his games with this line. After 'iWgS 19.h4 'i!!Y g 4 2 0 . lLlg 6 + lLlxg6
�d 7 11.0-0± With a great lag in 10 ... ft.d7 11.a3 (11. tllf4!?) 11... tllf7 21. ft.xg6 eS 22. §t.xeS it.fS 23. §t.xfS
development, Black's position is 12.b4 cxd4 13.cxd4 0-0 (13 ... tllx d4 'iWxfS 24. 'iWxfS llxfS = 10.cxd4
very bad. 11... a4 12. lllb d4 ll\xd4 14. lLlexd4 ft.xd4 1 5 . l!Jxd4 'ilt'xd4 �b4+ 11. �d2 lllf6 Perhaps this is
13. lllxd4 llle 7 14. �e3 'iFas 1 6 . l:!bl, threatening it.b2 with not accurate. Black might prefer
15.f4 g6 16. 'iFf2 J:[c8 17.g4 The great compensation) 14.ft.e3 g6 the alternative 11 ... lLlxeS 12.dxeS
standard French plan, aiming for 15. 'i!fd2 ft.g7 1 6 . l:!abl l:!ae8 17.a4 �xd2 + 13. 'i!!Y x d2 lLle7 14.0-0 0-0
the f4-f5 break, works very well 'i!!Y d 8 1 8 .bS lLlaS 19. it.f4 ;!; White 15.lLld4 §t.d7 when he is close to
here. 17 ... �g7 18.f5 gxf5 19.gxf5 is better on both sides of the balancing the game. 12. hb4
ll\xf5 20. hfS exf5 21.�h1 0-0 board , S.Kasparov-Johansson, 1Wxb4+ 13. W'd2;t �d 7 14. J:[c1
Not a good place for the king: Hoogeveen 2012. 14. lLlxc6 'i!!Y x d2+ 15. Wxd2 §t.xc6
now death is coming on the dark Other games have seen 8 . . . fS , but 1 6 . llacl± 14 ... ll\xeS 15.dxeS
squares. 21...ft.e6 22. ILJxfS ft.f8 after this waste of time with the W'xd2+ 16.@xd2 lLJg4 17.f4 lllf2
23. IL\d4 ft.e7 24. l:!gl± 22.J:[g1+­ f-pawn moves, Black's position 18.J:[he1 ll'lxd3 19. �xd3 �b5+
@h8 23.:Xg7! @xg7 24. 1Wg3+ doesn't impress. White can get 20. @d4 20.We3!? §t.xe2 2 1 . l:!xe2
�ha 2s. �gs ts 2s. ht6+ :Xts an improved version of the Wd7 22.J:lec2 J:lhc8 23. J:lxc8 J:lxc8
27.exf6 J:[g8 28. 'iFes 'iFd8 29.f7+ previous game with 9.dxcS ft.xcS 24. J:lxc8 Wxc8 25.fS exfS 26. Wd4±
J:[g7 30. J:[g1 1·0 10.0-0 aS 11. l:!bl 'iWc7 12. lLled4± 20 ... he2 20 ... wd7!? 21.:Xe2 The
Daulyte- Fataliyeva, Turkey tt ending seems to be very good
Fa bien Liblszewskl 3 2015. 9 . ll\xe5 This capture allows for the first player, because he
Mishra Swaya ms some attacking ideas on the has the better pieces. But now
Barcelona 2016 (7) kingside ideas by opening files. we will see a typical example of
1.e4 e6 2 . d 4 d 5 3. llld 2 � e 7 4.e5 But of course , the alternative Tarrasch's adage that 'all rook
cs 5.c3 ti:lc6 6. �d3 'iFb6 7. llld f3 9.dxeS!? is also possible, for endings are drawn'. 21 ... J:[f8

87
French Defence - Tarrasch Variation

22 .g3 .J:[f7 23 . .J:[ec2 .J:[dS 24.a4 h 5 o r c3-c4 was also possible. 1 7 . . . transposes to the main line.
25.h4 .J:[fd 7 2 6 . a 5 26.b4 and 26.fS h6 18. h 5 ti:lc6 19.c41± dxc4 8. tllf 3 0-0 9.0-0 9 .dxcS !? gxcS
deserve consideration. 26 ... @e7 19 ... ti:le7 20 .cxdS ti:lxdS 21. l::! x c8 10.0-0 is a decent alternative.
2 1 . :cs g6 2s. :1c3 .J:[bS 29 . .J:[b3 'i!t'xc8 22. l::!c l 'i!t'b8 23.bS± 20.:Xc4 9 ... l:lb8 9 . . . b6 10. l::!e lf 10. �f41?
@dS 30 . .J:[c6 @e7 31.a61? 31. l::!c 2!? �e7 20 . . . ti:le7 21. l::!g 4± 21.b5 Threatening 11. gxfS and 12.e6.
with the idea of l::!b c3 and moving l/Jds 22. l::rg4+- This position Also possible is 10.dxcS gxcS
the b-pawn might have been his speaks for itself. White has full 11. gxfS exfS 1 2 . ggs ± . 10 ... :as
last chance. 31... �7 32. l::rc 5 domination, and the rest doesn't 10 ... b 6 11. gxfS exfS 12.e6 l::!b 7
@e7 33. l:lcb5 b6= 34. l::rc 3 l::rd d8 require any comment. 22 . . . �fS 13.exf7+ l::!xf7 14. ti:leS ;!; 11. hf5
35. J::rc 7+ l:ld 7 36. J::rc 6 .J:[dd8 23.a5 'ti'c7 24. J::rc4 'tWbS 25 . .J:[g4 exf5 12.dxc5 hc5 13. 'tWd3;t
37 . .J:[c7+ 37. l::!b 3 l::!b c8= 37 ... .J:[d 7 Wfc7 26. l::rc 1 'ti'bS 27. l::rd 1 Wfc7 After the exchanges on cS and
38. l::rc 6 112-'h 28. l::rc 1 'ti'bS 29. l::rd 1 'ti'c7 fS - a standard plan in this type
30. 'ti'e1 b6 31.a6 'ti'c5 32. �b4 of position - White's advantage
David Howell 4 'ifd5 33. hfS lbf8 34. �f1 is evident; he can realize direct
Yoseph Ta her Wfc5 35. 'ifd2 'ife7 36.:Xg7 play against Black's structural
Baku al 2016 ( 2 ) J::rc 5 37 . .J:[g4 l::rd 5 38. l::rd 4 lbd4 weaknesses. 13 ... �e6 13 . . . .l:te 8
1.e4 e6 2 .d4 d5 3 . l/Jd2 �e7 4.e5 39. 'ti'xd4 J::rgs 40. 'ti'd2 .J:[hS 14 . .l:tadl;!; 14. �e3 �e7 15. tlle d4
c5 5.c3 li:lc6 6 . �d3 'iYb6 7 . l/Jdf3 41 . .J:[c1 l::r h 7 42 . .J:[c7 1-0 'tWd7 16. l::ra d1 tlla 5 1 6 . . . l::! a cS
�d7 8. tlle 2 cxd4?1 An instructive 17.'i!VeU 17. �g5 hg5 18. lbxg5
mistake. If Black wants to tllc 4? A tragic mistake that
exchange on d4, then he must do Kn ight on the edge immediately decides the game.
so on the previous moves, because 6 . . . ti:lh6 18 ... tlJc6 19. '1Wg3 ± 19. ll:idxe6 Next
now White can recapture with a White wins a piece with 20. 'i!fxc4.
piece. 8 . . . f6 (Vanroose- Feys, Lille Nodlrbek Abd usattorov 5 1-0
20 10) 9 . 0 - 0 fxeS 10. ti:lxeS ti:lxeS Ruslan Reshetn lkov
11.dxeS ti:lh6 12.c4;!; St Petersburg 2016 (2)
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d 5 3.ll:id2 �e7 4.e5 Flexible
c5 5.c3 llJc6 6. �d3 tllh 6 Like 6 , . , jLd 7
... 'i!Vb6, this is a standard move
within Black's plan. Here there is Denis Kadric 6
a high probability of transposition Predrag N i kolic
to the main lines after an Sa rajevo 2016 (9)
exchange on d4, but in this game 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3 . ll:id2 �e7 4.e5
we will explore the independent c5 5.c3 llJc6 6 . �d3 �d 7 In the
lines. 7 . tlle 2 databases, this is the second most
popular try. It can lead to an
original fight for the light squares
or b e part of the standard plan of
9 . ti:lexd4 Better than the pressure against the white centre.
recapture with the pawn, which 7 . tlle 2 cxd4 8.cxd4
is the most popular here. 9 ... �c5
9 ... ti:lxd4 10. ti:lxd4 gcs u. ge3 If
now 11... 'i!Vxb2 White has good
compensation after 12.0-0 b6
13. 'i!Vg4 @f8 14.c4 t. 10. lbxc6
'ti'xc6 11.0-0 tlle 7 12. 'ti'e2;t
Space, development and better
pieces. 12 ... .J:[cS 12 . . . 0-0 13 . ti:lgS ! ? ± 7 ... tllf 5 7 . . . f6 is doubtful here:
13 .b41 � b 6 14.a4 �d8 Of 8 .exf6 gxf6 9 .dxcS and is difficult
course not 14 ... 'i!Vxc3? lS. gd2 to prove adequate compensation
'i!t'c7 16.aS+-; 14 . . . a6 1s . gd2±; for the pawn, for instance: 9 . . .
14 . . . aS 1s. ga3 ! ;!; 15. �d2 'ti'c7 es 10.0-0 0-0 11. gc2 !? gg4
16. l::rf c1 'ti'b8 17.h4 The English (11 . . . ti:lfS 12. tllg 3 tllx g3 13.hxg3 8 ... lll b 4 With this move Black
grandmaster plays on both sides ge6 14. 'i!fe2±) 12.f3 ge6 13. tllb 3;!; shows that he opts for the former
of the board, but exclusive play Satyap ragyan- H eredia, Barcelona plan. 9. �b1 �b5 10.0-0 J::rc 81?
on the queenside with b4-bS 2013; as mentioned, 7 ... cxd4 An independent continuation.

88
Survey FR 14.4

10 ... �b6 11. lt:lf3 � a6 is a the sequence 27. l::tx e8 l::tx e8 lt:lxd4 14. ge3 '!Wxb2 1S. gxd4�)
very logical alternative, with 2 8 . :d l lt:le2+ 2 9 . lt:lxe2 l::tx e2 11...fxeS 12.dxeS. I like White's
tra nsposition to the main line. 30. l::tx dS l::tx b2 3 1 . lt:le6+ @h6 position; with his active pieces
11.a3 lLJc6 12 . lt:lf3 gSI? I n similar 32. lt:lxf4 l::tb S 33. l::tx bS gxbS leads he can build an initiative on
positions of the French this to a ending where White has the kingside. M eanwhile, Black
advance is now standard (think, good practical chances to win. A is not without counterplay.
for instance, of the line 3 . lt:ld2 possible continuation is 34.f3 as Another interesting try is 8. lt:lf4
�e7 4. lt:lgf3 lt:lf6 S.es lt:ld7 6 . �d3 3 S . @f2 ge8 3 6 . We3 bS 37. Wd4+-. (Heimann-Buhmann, Switzerland
cS 7.c3 lt:lc6 8.0-0 gS) . 12 ... �as is 2 1 . :e 1 + 'lt;g6 28.ll\xdS fxg2? tt 201S) with difficult positions
an alternative, when 13. �d2 '!Wb6 28 . . . lt:le2+ 2 9 . @h2 fxg2 3 0 . l:l.xe2 after 8 ... cxd4 (or 8 ... g 6 9 . lt:lf3
14. �c2 hS is complicated, maybe gxe2 31. lllf4+ @f6 3 2 . lt:lxe2 cxd4 10. lt:lxd4 1!fc8 ll.exf6 lt:lxf6
a little better for White because l::tc 4 33. lt:lf3 l::tc 2 34. lllg 3 l::tx b2 12. �e2 0-0 13.0-0 l::te 800) 9 . '!WhS+
of his space advantage in the 3 S . l::te l± 2 9 . lt:lf4+ White's attack @f8 10. lt:lf3�. 8 . ..fxeS 9. ll\xeS
centre and better development is now decisive: he will soon win 9 .dxeS '!Wc7= with the idea
and coordination. 13. �e3 lt:lh6 material. 29 ... 'lf;fS Or 29 ... @f6 . . . 0-0-0. 9 ... ll\xeS 10.dxeS 1t'c7
14.:e1 lt:lfS 1S. lLJc3 lS. �xfS 3 0 . l::tf7+ @es 3 1 . lt:lg 6 + . 30.:11+ 11. �f4 11.0-0!? could be tried.
exfS 16. lt:lc3 transposes to the 'lt;g4 30 ... @es 31. lllg 6 + @ds After ll ... 1!fxeS 12. l::te l 0 - 0 - 0 (or
text, but it is the better move 3 2 . lt:lxh8+- 31.ll\g6 lllf S 32.f3+ 12 ... 1!fhS 13. 1!fb3 lll f 600 Sanal­
order, not allowing Black the �g3 33. :XfS �d3 34.lt:le4+ 1-0 Anton Guijarro, Gj akova 2016)
possibility we will show in the 13. llld 4 1!fd6 14. lll f3 lt:lf6 White
next comment. 1S. . . �a6 Now Erik van den Doel 7 has decent compensation in
White can realize his plan. Better Matthew Sadler the form of control of eS, but
is 1S ... lt:lxe3 16.fxe3 ga6 although H a a rlem 2016 (6) perhaps it is not sufficient. 11. . .
White can fight for the initiative 1.e4 e6 2.d4 dS 3 . llld 2 �e7 4.eS g S I ? 11...0-0-0 (Xiong - H olt,
also here with 17.lt:ld2!?. 16. bfS cs S.c3 lllc 6 6 . �d3 �d 7 7. llle 2 Washington 2 014) is a decent
exfS 17.e61 The key to White's f6 In this game I present one of alternative. 12. �g3 0-0-0 Black
idea. 17 .. .f4?1 Risky. 17 .. .fxe6 the most critical ideas for Black, has at least easy equality here.
18. lt:lxgS gxgS 19. 1!i'hS + ± ; 17 . . . 0 - 0 involving a quick development 13.b4?1 13.1!fd2 @b8 14. 0-0-0
18.exf7+ (18.h4!?) 18 . . . l::txf7 1 9 . ttJeS of the queenside together with l::tf8 = 1 3. . . hS 14. h 3 lt:lh6'F
l:lg7 20. 1!i'b3;!; 18.exf7+ 'lf;xf7 pressure against the centre, 1S.1i'd2 Better is lS .bxcS . At least
19. �d2± Now the main feature especially the es-point. In White gets access to the d4-point
of the position is the exposed practice this plan works well. here, although Black's position is
black king. 19 . . . 'lt;g7 20. ttJeS �f6 always better, for instance: 1S . . . h4
20 . . . lt:lxd4 21. gxf4± l 6 . gh2 g4 17. lt:ld4 g3 1 8 . fxg3 hxg3
19. gxg3 l::th g8=F 1S . . . h4 16. �h2
g4+ With a great initiative. In
the long term, White's king
will be in danger because it
won't find a safe place. 17. �f4
gxh3 18.gxh3 1 8 . gxh6 hxg2
1 9 . l:lgl h3-+ 18 . . . lt:lf7 19. 1t'e3
�c6 20.:,1 d4 21.cxd4 cxd4
2 2 . ll\xd4 hb4+ 2 3 . 'lt;e2 �cs-+
24. ll\xe6 he3 2 S . ll\xc7 bf4
8. lllf 3 The most popular. 26. llle 6 hes 27. lllx dS 'lt;xd8
Meanwhile, in light of what Black's positional advantage
21.ht4! gxt4 22. 1t'g4+ �gs happens in the game, I think has given way to a material one.
22 . . . @f8 2 3 . lt:ld7+ @f7 24. lt:lxdS +- White should play differently With good technique, Sadler
23. lt:\f3 hS 23 ... h6 24.h4+- in this scheme. 8 . f4!? deserves converts it: 28.:adl 'lt;e7 29. �c4
24. 1t'xgs+ W'xgS 2S. ll\xgs consideration, when a possible ll\ds 30.�d s �d 7 31.:gs :Xgs
Although the queens ar� gone, continuation is 8 ... 1!fb6 (8 ... c4!? 32. hgs �h3 3 3 . :h 1 �g4+
the problems continue for Black: (Santos Ruiz- Plazuelo Pascual, 34.f3 lllf SI 3 S . :g1 ll\d4+ 36. 'lt;e3
his king remains exposed, his La Roda 2016) 9 . gc2 bS 1 0 . 0 - 0 bf3 3 7 . :t1 �g2 3 8 . :f7+ �d6
pawns are weak and his pieces s e e m s better for White) 9 . lt:lf3 39.:h 7 h3 40. 'lf;f2 lt:lfS 41. �c4
passive. 2S ... ll\xd4 26.h4 f3 lll h 6 10.0-0 0 - 0 11. @hl!? (11.exf6!? �g3 + 42. 'lt;gl ttJh4 43. �e2 h2#
26 ... l::th e8 is an alternative. Now gxf6 12. @hl cxd4 13. lll e xd4 0-1

89
French Defence - Tarrasch Variation

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

position after 12 . . . '*Vd8-d 7 position after 13 . llJc6xd4


.. position after 8 . . . c5xd4

Best move for White? Whit e just sacrificed the What is the best way for White
(solution on page 249) d4-pawn for an initiative. to recapture?
How should he continue? (solution on page 249)
(solution on page 249)

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90
Ca ro- Ka n n Defe n ce Adva n ced Va riatio n CK 4.15 ( 8 12 )

Sol i d , b ut sti l l tricky


by M i l os Pe ru n ov i c

1. e4 c6 variations we concluded that White has


2. d4 d5 the better chances.
3. es i.f 5 In this Survey we will analyse a very solid
4. h4 h5 alternative to the queen sortie: 7 ... £.e7,
5. i.d3 bd3 which was played in a couple of games
6. 'ii'x d3 e6 last year.
7. .igs i.e7 After 8 . 00 tlJh6 White has a choice. He
can take on h6: 9. £.xh6 �h6 10. tt:Jbd2,
-� ... . �K
.l .l .i. .l .l -� ... .
.l .l .l .l .i. .l .l
.l � � .l .l .l E
� � ' � .l
'iV � �
� � � � � 'il' ttJ
� tt:J @ tt:J � � � � tt:J � �
'.:[ <it> �
In Yearbook 120, we analysed the move
7... �b6 in this line, which creates two and now I propose the move 10 ... cS
possibilities for Black: either to take on instead of 10 ... tt:Ja6 ll.c3 c5 12.a3 �c8 13.b4,
b2, with a very complicated position, or when White is slightly better, as witness
to play very solidly with ... �a6. In both the game Sutovsky-David, Novi Sad tt
2016.
After 10 ... cS , if White takes on 11.dxcS
then Black can play ll ... tt:Ja6, after which
he is OK. If White plays ll.c3 cxd4 12.cxd4
tt:Jc6, there is a difference: the black
knight is better positioned on c6 than on
a6 or d7.

The kn ight manoeuvre


The second possibility for White is 9.tt:Jc3,
with the idea of tt:Jc3-e2-g3 to eliminate
the black knight that is coming to fS.
There can follow:
9 ... tlJfS 10. tlJe2 cS 11.dxcS
Vlktor Laznicka

91
Caro-Kann Defence - Advanced Variation

E• 'if * E keep the pawn on cS, and if Black plays


i i .t i i 14 ... 0-0 then, after 0-0-0, my next move
i will be g2-g4, with a direct attack on the
� i � ·� i black king. Maybe a better choice for Black
� is 14 ... �c8 to play for compensation after
15.b4 0-0 16.c3 b6!?. My suggestion for
Black, instead of ll ... tt::la 6, is 11... �aS+ 12.c3
�xcS, when I think Black can equalize.

11... tt::la 6 was played in three games, but Conclusion


after 12. �xe7 �xe7 13. �b5+ �d7 14. �a5!? 7 ... �e7 is far more solid than 7 ... �b6,
(14.a4 was seen in Rodi-Roiz, Baku but Black has to play very precisely to
Olympiad 2016) my plan for White is to equalize.

The c a pt u re 21.bxa4 J;[xa4 22.@bl l:Iba6 23. @c2 Wh6 S7. 'lft4+ �hS SS. Wt6 1i'g2
9.�h6 J;[c6+ 2 4 . @bl J;[ca6 2 S . @c2 l:Ic6 + S9. 'ifg3 1-0
2 6 . @bl 1/2-1/2 Potapov-Alekseenko,
E m l l Sutovsky Russia tt 2016. 11.c3 cS 12.a3
Alberto David l:lcS 13.b4 cxd4 14.cxd4 The kn ight m a noeuvre
Novi Sad tt 2016 (6) 9. tllc 3
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d S 3.es �ts 4.h4 h S
s. �d3 h d 3 6. 'lfxd3 e6 7. �gs Alexa nder Morozevich
�e7 S. tllt 3 tll h 6 9. hh6 :Xh6 Va lentina Gunlna
10. tll b d2 tt:la6 M aybe better is 10 . . . Cheboksary ra pid 2016 (9)
cS 11.dxcS (11.c3 cxd4 12.cxd4 li:lc6: 1.e4 c6 2.d4 dS 3.es �ts 4.h4 hS
s. �d3 �xd3 6. "thd3 e6 7. �gs

E ... . �e7 S. li:lt3 lllh 6 9. lllc 3 lllt S


10. tt:le2 tlld 7
i i .t i i
• i E E 'if * E
i � i i i • .t i i
White is better. Black's knight
� � on a6 and rook on h6 are very i i
'i' t2J badly placed. 14 ... WfS 1S. We2 i � ·� i
� � t2J � � g6 16. 'IVbS l:lc7 17. l:lac1 lll b S
� �
1S. tllb 3 a6 19. 'lfd3 wg7 20.:Xc7
: � :g 'i' t2J
'lfxc7 21. l:lc1 'lfd7 22. lllc S hes
Here White's knight is on d2 23.bxcS lllc 6 24. l:lb1 l:lhS 2S. 'lfd2 � � � tLJ � �
instead of c3, so I think Black 1i'e7 26. 'lft4 l:lbS 2 7 . l:lb6 l:lcS
� � �
does not have any problems) 2S.lLJgS tt:la S 29 .g4 l:lhS 30.gxhS
11... lll a 6 1 2 . WbS + (12. lllb 3 lk8 :XhS 31. l:lb1 l:lh6 32. Wt1 l:lhS 11. lllt4 11. lllg 3!? is the main idea.
13.0-0 li:lxcS 14. li:lxcS l:txcS 1S.g3 33. Wg2 l:lhS 34. Wg3 l:lhS 3S. l:lb6 After 11... li:lxg3 12.fxg3 White"s
@f8 (1S ... J;[g 6 ! ? 1 6 . @h2 @f8 with l:lhS 3 6 . l:ld 6 lllc 6 37. 'lft6+ open f-file can be very dangerous
the idea ... @g8 and ... J;[g4) 16.c3 1i'xt6 3S.exf6+ wxt6 3 9 . l:ld 7 for Black; or if Black plays 11...
g 6 followed by . . . @g7 and . . . J;[h8) tt::ie 1 40. Wg4 l:l h S 41. :Xb7 :es g 6 then after 12. lll xfS gxfS White
12 . . . Wd7 13. Wxd7+ @xd7 14.c4 42.l:la7 a s 43.a4 wg7 44. wt4 has the better pawn structure:
li:lxcS 1S. @e2 J;[g6 16.g3 J;[g4=; Wt6 4S. lll h 7 + wg7 46. lllg S wt6 ll ... li:lxg3 (11. . . gxgS 12. li:lxgS li:lxh4
10 . . . li:ld7 ll.g3 cS 12.c4 cxd4 13.cxdS 47.l:ld 7 wg7 4S. WeS t6+ 49. Wxe6 13.Wd2 lllfS (13 . . . li:lxg2+ 14. l.t>fl+-)
Was 14. Wxd4 WxdS lS. WxdS txgs 50.:Xe7+ :Xe7+ S1.Wxe7 14. lllx hS J:lg 8 lS.0-0-0±) 12.fxg3
exdS 1 6 . 0 - 0 - 0 li:lcS 17. lllb 3 li:lxb3+ gxh4 S2.c6 h3 S3.c7 h2 S4.cS'lf Was+ (if 12 ... cs 13.0-0 cxd4
18.axb3 J;[b6 1 9 . J;[d3 as 2 0 . J;[hdl a4 h11" SS. 'lfts+ Wh7 S6. 1i't7+ 14 . ..Q.xe7 Wxe7 lS . J:lael 0-0 1 6 . li:lgS

92
Survey CK 4.15

g6 1 7.J:!e2 Whice has che iniciacive) .I 'if • .I 1 2 . 'it'bS+ 12. tll e d4 tll x d4 13. 'i!Vxd4
13. c3 'i!Va6 14. 'i!Vc2 cs 1S. gxe7 i i � .t i i tllx cS 14.0-0 bS 1S .b3 0-0 16.J:!'.adl
(lS . J:!fl cxd4 16.cxd4 'i!Vc4 17. J:!cl tlle 4 17. gxe7 'i!Vxe7 1S .c4 bxc4
'it'xc2 1S. J:!xc2) lS ... Wxe7 16. @f2 i 19 .bxc4 l:tfdS 2 0.cxdS exdS 21.llcl
11 ... cS 12 . be7 lLJxe7 13 .0-0 LS i LS • .i i l:tabS 22.l:tc2 l:tb4 23. 'ir'e3 'i!Vb7
cxd4 14. lLJxd4 'it'b6 14 . . . tll x eS LS 24. tlld 4 l:teS 2S. tllc 6 llbl 2 6 . l:txbl
1S. 'it'g3 tllg 4 1 6 . J:!fel eS 17. J:!xeS 'i!Vxbl+ 27. 'it'cl 'ir'b6 2 S . l:tb2 'ir'c7
(17. tllx hS J:!xhS lS. 'ir'xg4 g6 29.l:tc2 'i!Vb6 30. l::tb 2 'ir'c7 3 1 . l:tc2
19. tllf300) 17 ... tllx eS lS. 'ir'xg7 tllS g6 'i!Vb6 32. l:tb2 'it' c7 33. l::tc 2 'ifb6
19 . J:!el @d7 20. tllx g6 fxg6 21. 'it'f7 1/2- 1/2 Nisipeanu- Rodshcein,
lk S 22. 'ir'e6+ Wc7 23. 'i!VeS+ @d7 Baku 2016. 12 . . . 1i'd7 13 . 'ifxd 7+
24. 'it'e6+= 1S. J:lte1 g6 16.a4 lDcS 12. be7?1 12.b4 aS (12 . . . 'ir'c7 @xd 7 14. be7 ..to>xe7 1S.b4 b61
17. 'ife3 a6 1S.aS 'ifc7 19.b3 13.0-0±) 13.c3 'ir'c7 (13 ... 0-0 14.0-0 16.cxb6 lLJxb4 17. tlle d4 17."1;>d2
0-0 20.J:lad1 'ifxaS 21. tllh 3 tlle 4 tll x h4 1S. �xh4 �xh4 16. tlle d4 axb6 lS. l:thbl tllc 6 19. l:txb6 tlla S
22.'ifh6 'it'b6 23. J:lxe4 t6 24.ext6 ge7 17.a4±) 14. 0-0 0-0 1S. tll e d4 20.l:tb4 l:ta7= 17 ... lLJxd4 1S. lLJxd4
J:lxt6 2S. J:lxe6 J:lxe6 26. lLlgS �xgS 16.hxgS axb4 (16 ... tllx eS axb6 19. J:lb1 J:lxa2 20. @d2
J:lt6 21. 'it'h7+ @ts 2s.J:le1 tLigs 17. tllx eS 'ir'xeS lS. l:tfel 'i!Vf4 !Lia6 21.J:lxb6 lbcs 2 2 . J:lc6
29. ti:\de6+ @es 30.lDcS+ 1·0 19. tll xfS exfS 20.bS ±) 17.cxb4 tlle 4+ 23. @e2 J:lbS 24.J:lc7+
tllx d4 lS. 'i!Vxd4± 12 ... 'ifxe7 @es 2S.J:ld1 J:la3 2 6 . J:ld3 J:lxd3
A nte Brklc 13 .b4 a s 14.c3 axb4 1S.cxb4 b6 27 .cxd3 J:lb2+ 2S. J:lc2 J:lxc2+
Valentin Dragnev 16. lLled4 lLJxd4 17.lLJxd4 0-0?1 2 9 . lLJxc2 tllc S 30.d4 lLle4 31. tlle 3
Bad Wiessee 2016 ( 7 ) 17 ... l:tcS 1s. 'ir'bs o-o 19. tllc 6 Wes 1h-V2
1.e4 c 6 2 . d 4 dS 3 . e s .tts 4.h4 20.a4 bxcSoo 1S. lbc6 'ifeS 19.cxb6
hS s . .td3 bd3 6. Wt'xd3 e6 lLJxb6 20.bS± J:la4 21.0-0 'it'd7 Luis Rodi
7 . .tgs .te7 s. tllt3 tllh 6 9 . lbc3 22. Wt'e3 22. 'it'f3! g6 23. 'i!Vf6± 22 ... M ichael Roiz
lbtS 10. lLle2 cs 11.dxcS ti:\d 7?1 d4 23. 'it'gS g6 24.J:ltd1 tlld S Baku ol 2016 (2)
Incerescing is 11... 'it'aS + ! ? 12.c3 2 S . J:lxd4 J:lxd4 26.lLJxd4 lbc3 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d S 3.es .tts 4.h4 hS
'it'xcS 13. tlle d4 tllx d4 14.cxd4 2 7 . tllf3 'it'xbS 2S.'it'h6 1i'c4 29.g3 s . .td3 .txd3 6. 'it'xd3 e6 7 .tgs •

(14. tllx d4 tllc 6=) 14 ... 'ir'b4+ lLle4 3 0 . J:le1 J:lcS 31. @g2 'ti'dS .te7 S. tllt3 tllh 6 9 . lbc3 tllt S
(14 ... 'i!VaS+ 1S. @e2 tllc 6 (if 1S ... Wa6 32. 'ife3 J:lc4 33.a3 @g7 34. J:lc1 10. lLle2 cs 11.dxcS llla 6 12 . .txe7
16. 'it'xa6 tllx a6 17. J:!acl @d7 tlld 2 3S. 'ifxd2 'ifxd2 3 6 . J:lxc4 1Wxe7 13. 'ti'bS+ 1i'd7
1S. �xe7 @xe7 19.J:!c3 J:!acS 20. l::t h cl 1i'b2 3 7 . J:lf4 1Wxa3 3S.!Ligs @gs
llxc3 21. l:txc3 While is slighcly 3 9 . J:lxt7 1Wc3 40.J:lt6 'ifxeS
bener) 16.a3) lS. �d2 'ir'b6 16.0-0 41. J:lxg6+ @ts 42. J:lxe6 'ti'dS+ . . .
.I
'h·'h (92) i .I.
.I � • .I M ichael Adams
i i .i i i David Navara
'if i Wij k aan Zee 2016 ( 2 )

.I. LS i 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d S 3.es .tts 4.h4 hS


s . .td3 bd3 6. Wt'xd3 e6 7 . .tgs
LS LS .te7 S. tllt3 tll h 6 9 . lDc3 tllt S
� ttJ 10. lLle2 cs 11.dxcS llla 6
LS LS .i LS LS 14.a4 14.'ifa5 ! ? , keeping che pawn ,
for example:
1::1 n <it> .I 1¥ • .I A) 14 ... 'i!VdS 15. 'i!Vc3;
A) 16 . . . tllc 6 17.b4!? tllx b4?! (17 . . . a6 i i .i. i i B) 14. . . 'it'cS 15 .b4 0-0 16 .c3 b6
1S.a3oo) 1S. �xb4 'ir'xb4 (1S . . . �xb4 • i (afcer 16 . . . tllb S 17. tll e d4 b6 lS. tllxfS
19. l:tabl 'i!VaS 20. tllg S! (che chreac LS i LS • .i i exfS 19. 'it'bS bxcS 20.0-0 tlla 6
is 21. 'i!Vf3) 20 ... ge7 21. tllx e6! 21.a3 Whice is bener) 17.cxb6 d4
fxe6 22. 'ir'g6+ @fS 2 3 . l:tb3 l::t h 6 LS (17 . . . axb6 lS. 'ifxb6 'i!Vc4 1 9 . tllfd4
(23 ... 'i!Vds 24. l:tg3+-) 24. l::tf3+ wgs l:tfbS 20. 'i!Vc6 'ifd3 21. tll xfS 'it'xfS
25. 'i!Vf7+ "1;>h7 26. 'ir'xe7+-) 19. l::t a bl 22.0-0 'i!VxeS 23. l:tfe l) 1S.b7 'ir'xb7
'i!Va4 20.l:txb7-: 19. tlle xd4 tllx d4 20.cxd4 'ifxb4+
B) 16 . . . 'ir'a6 17. 'i!Ve3 tllc 6 1S.a3 0-0 21. 'ifxb4 tllx b4
19. c;t>hl!?oo 6 l:tgl and g2-g4.

93
Caro-Kann Defence - Advanced Variation

E E* not enough. 17 . lDxfS+ exfS 9.dxcS


1 1 18. lLJd4 g6 19J:lh3 tlle 6 20.lDxe6 A) 9 . tlJc3'?;
1
@xe6 2 1.f4 l:thc8 22.l:tc3 l:txc3 B) 9.c3 and now:
1 23.bxc3 @d7 24.l:td1 @e6 2 S . l:ta 1 Bl) 9 ... tlJc6 10.dxcS ! ;
� 1 f 6 26.exf6 @xf6 2 7 . @d2 @e6 B 2 ) 9 . . . 'il!f b 6 10.t2Jbd2 cxd4
� � � 28. �d3 �d6 29.c4 as 30.bxa6 (10 ... 'il!fxb2? 11. l:!bl 'il!fa3 12. l:!xb7
l:txa6 31. l:tb1 dxc4+ 'h-'h tlJc6 (12 ... 'il!f cl+? 13. We2 'li'xhl
tLJ 14. 'il!fbS + 'Ot>d8 1s. nxb 8 + l::tx b8
� � � 16. 'il!fxb8+ 'Ot>d7 17. 'li°b7+ 'Ot>d8
a: � : The new idea 18.dxcS +-) 13.0-0±) 11.cxd4 tlJc6
8 . . . cS!? 12.0-0 �xgS 13.hxgS t2Jge7 14. tlJb3;
White is one pawn up, but Black B3) 9 . . . cxd4 10.cxd4 tlJc6 ll. tlJc3
has some compensation, because Zbynek H racek tlJh6 12. �xh6 l:!xh6 13.g3 with the
of the strong knight on dS and Vi ktor Laznicka idea 0-0, l:!cl, a2-a3/b2-b4, tlJa4.
the passed pawn on d4; Prague ch-CZE blitz 2016 (9) 9 ... lLJd 7 10. lLic3 lLJxcS 11. 1i'd4
C) 14 ... 0-0 15 . tlJed4 tlJxd4 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.es .i.f5 4.h4 hS lll h 6 12.0-0-0 lllf S 13. 1i'f4 f6? 13...
16. tlJxd4 'li'c8 (16 ... tlJb8 17.0-0-0 S . .i.d3 .i.xd3 6. 1i'xd3 e6 7 . .i.gs g600 14.exf6 gxf6 15. lDxdSI fxg5
(17. 'il!fc3 ! ? tlJc6 18. tlJf3-+) 17 . . . tlJc6 .i.e7 8. tllf3 cS!? The new idea. 16. 'it'eS? 1 6 . tlJc7+ 'Ot>f7 17. tlJxgS+
18. tlJxc6 'li'xc6 19.g4-+; 16 ... l:!ac8?! �xgS 18.hxgS+- 16 ... 0-0!
17.c6) 17.0-0-0 tlJxcS (17. . . 'iWxcS 17 . lLJxe7+ Wxe7 18.hxgS lLJg7
18. 'il!fd2 tlJb4 (18 ... 'il!fc7 19. 'il!fgS±
'IV • � E 19. lll h 4 l:tfd8 20.lLJg6 1i'f7 21. lllf4
with the idea g2-g4) 19.g4!±) .*- 1 1 l:txd 1+ 2 2 . l:txd1 llld 7 23. 1i'd6 lllf8
1 8 . Wbl f6 19.exf6 l:!xf6 20.f3 and i 24.lLJd3 Wts 2S.f4 lLJg6 26.g3
White is s lightly better because 1 1 � l:tc8 2 7 . 1i'd7 eS 28. 1i'd5+ @h7
of his superior pawn structure. 29.fxeS 'ti'xgS+ 30. @b1 'ihg3
14 . . . 'ih b 5 15.axb5 lLJxc5=
� 31.e6 1i'c7 32.c3 Wc6 33. Wgs
16. �d4 @e7 After 16 ... t2Jxd4 � 1i'xe6 34. l:th1 We4 3 S . l:td1 l:tf8
17. t2Jxd4 @d7 18. l:!h3 Wc7 White � � � 36.a3 l:tf3 37. 1i'bS a6 0-1
has some pressure, but probably
1:1 tLJ

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exe rcise 3

E • E E E*
1 1 .*- 1 1 1 �1
1 1 1 1
... · � t2J 1 'if � 1 � i
� � tLJ �
� � � tLJ
� � � � � �
1: :=: @ a: a: �
position after 47. . . �6-g7 position after 20 . . . �b4-e7 position after 2 1 . lLJf4-h3

White to move. White to move. Black to move.


(solution on page 249) (solution on page 249) (solution on page 249)

94
R u y Lo pez N eo-Ark h a n gelsk RL 12 . 6 (C78)

I n the footste ps of Se rgey Ka rj a ki n


by Ro b e rt R is

1. e4 es in the 9th game of their recent World


2. ttJf3 ttJc6 Championship match in New York may
3. i.bS a6 have come as a surprise to many, and in
4. �a4 ttJf6 fact it could have ended badly for him
5. 0-0 bS (Game 1) .
6. i.b3 i.cs On move 13, White has tried various
7. a4 l:[bS ideas, but of all his options 13. �c2 seems
8. c3 d6 to be the most challenging,
9. d4 i.b6
10. ttJa3 0-0
11. axbS axbS
12. ttJxbS i.g4
13. �c2 exd4
14. ttJbxd4 ttJxd4
15. cxd4 bf3
16. gxf3 ltJhS

protecting the pawn on e4 and removing


the bishop from the b-file.
About 10 years ago I was intrigued by
the dynamics of this opening and spent

The Neo-Arkhangelsk is not an opening


choice that is to every black player's taste.
Whereas in the mid-90s the opening used
to offer a lot of scope for dynamic and
creative players like Anand and Shirov,
nowadays it serves as battleground for
sharp theoretical duels in which Black
needs to be very well prepared. Hence
the decision by Magnus Carlsen to use
this opening against Sergey Karjakin Sergey Karjakln

95
Ruy Lopez - Neo-Arkhangelsk

endless hours analysing the variations in However, another common idea is to


depth. Only once did I have to deal with let the rook return to the a-file. If Black
13. �c2, in a game versus Kotronias. I tried succeeds in deflecting the white queen
to solve all Black's opening problems from the protection of f3, a perpetual
with 13 ... dS?!, but it seems Black isn't check is almost inevitable.
ready for this central break. Back then,
13 ... �xf3 14.gxf3 tt:Jhs Ideas for White
1) White is a pawn up and his primary
goal is to consolidate the situation in the
centre.
2) Rooks can be deployed on the 4th
rank (�al-a4 or 'itihl, �gl-g4) to support
the pawn centre.
3) The rook on a4 not only protects the
pawn on d4, but also prepares tactical
ideas related to e4-e5.
4) If White manages to play f3-f4 and
used to be a common response, but it e4-e5, then the extra pawn can become a
soon fell out of use in view of 15.f4!. serious problem for Black.
Attention shifted to 13 ... exd4 14. lt:Jbxd4
lt:Jxd4 15.cxd4 �xf3 16.gxf3 li:JhS , which is
the topic of this Survey. Main line after 17. @h1 'it'f6 18 . .te3

Ideas for Black K ••


1) White's kingside has been weakened. .t. .t. .t. .t.
Particularly the pawn on f3 is a target for .l .t. 'if
the black queen, which is well placed on �
f6, exerting pressure against the pawn on � �
d4 as well. i. �
2) Black obtains excellent play on � i. � �
the dark squares and the knight is well : � 11 @
placed on h5, controlling the f4-square.
Sometimes the knight intends to go to A) The latest trend is Kasimdzhanov' s
e6 via f4 to provoke White into playing idea 18 ... cS!?, which he tried against
d4-d5. The a7-gl diagonal will be opened Nakamura (Game 2) . White has several
in that case and the pawn on f2 will interesting ways to proceed here, but
become a target. If White has already the most challenging move is 19.eS,
placed his bishop on e3, it's very likely and now, after 19 ... 'ii' e 6 20.exd6 c4
that the dark squared-bishops will be 21.b3, Kasimdzhanov overestimated the
traded. In the ensuing positions White is strength of his c-pawn by advancing it.
left with a passive light-squared bishop Instead, 21...cxb3 22. �xb3 'ii' x d6 23. �a6
hindered by his own pawns. was tested in Karjakin-Carlsen, and now I
3) The rook is well placed on b8, and think 23 ... 'ii' d 7!? would have offered Black
in some cases it can even take on b2. better chances of equalizing.
96
Survey RL 12.6

B) 18 ... tt:Jf4?! was seen in the game One of the problems for White in this
Harikrishna-Caruana (Game 3) , but with line is the hole on f4, enabling Black's
the powerful 19 . .l:ra4! White secures the knight to get a firm grip on White's
protection of the pawn on d4 and is centre. In Kobalia-Kasimdzhanov (Game
ready to put the rook on b4 if needed, 7) the interesting idea of returning the
preventing Black's counterplay. The plan gift with 17.f4 was tested, but the former
with ... tt:Jf4-e6 seems to be too time­ World Champion refused this gift, and
consuming. after 17 ... 'ti'h4 18 . .l:ra3 he was once again
C) A solid alternative is 18 ... .l:ra8, but able to play his favourite 18 ... cS!?, with a
now, after the natural sequence 19 . .l:rxa8 perfectly fine position for Black.
.l:rxa8 20 . .l:rgl tt:Jf4 21. �b3 !, I feel Black Special attention should also be paid
lacks counterplay to compensate for to the position after 17 . .l:ra4 �f6, since
the minus pawn. In case of 21 ... g6?! the White can try to exploit the slightly
tactics starting from 22.eS! favour White; misplaced knight on hS by opening the
see Kryvoruchko-Caruana (Game 4) . A centre with 18.eS. Objectively it shouldn't
more solid continuation is 21... tt:Je6, but pose Black too many problems, as you can
this allows White to trade his bishop see in Vallejo Pons-Anand (Game 8) , but
for the knight. The resulting positions an unprepared player may fall victim to
are still playable for Black, perhaps, but this surprise weapon.
in Karjakin-Adams (Game 5) you can In the game Inarkiev-Leko (Game 9)
witness the torture Black is facing. White opted for 18. �e3, aiming to get
an improved version of the Main Line
Deviations from the m a i n l i ne by omitting Whl. However, Leko wasn't
In Karjakin-Anand (Game 6) White went caught napping, and with the accurate
for 18 . .l:ra4, which is less accurate than the 18 ... g6! he showed the right path to follow
main move 18. �e3, since White wastes a for Black.
valuable tempo.

K x• Conclusion
.l .l .l .l The Neo-Arkhangelsk contains a lot of
.i. .l 'ii' forced drawing lines, so you should be
� ready to accept that result against anyone
� £!:, £!:, who comes to the board well-prepared.
£!:, Attentive readers will certainly enjoy
£!:, ii £!:, £!:, those long and forcing variations, but
ii 'iV � � they will sometimes also have to accept
positions in which White is playing for
After 18 ... .l:ra8! Black is doing alright, e.g. two results. I'm expecting a lot of white
19 . .l:rxa8 .l:rxa8 20. �e3, and now the key players to follow in the footsteps of
idea 20 ... .l:ral 21. 'ti'xal 'ti'xf3 leads to a the leading expert Sergey Karjakin, so I
draw. Instead, Karjakin played 19. �e3, would recommend theoreticians to take a
but he didn't get anywhere either. closer look at 23 ... 'ti'd7!?.

97
Ruy Lopez - Neo-Arkhangelsk

M a i n l i n e after B) For 25. gc4 l:lfc8! 26. 'l!:Yd3 'l!:Yh3 @xf7 3 5 . l:lxh7+ followed by
17. @ h 1 �f6 18. �e3 27. gd5 l:ld8 see 25. 'l!:Yd3; 36. l:lxc7. 33. Wc2?1 For better
C) 25.d5 gxe3 2 6 .fxe3 'l!:Yb5 or worse, White should have
Sergey Karjakln 1 27.l:la3 'l!fb4 28. 'l!fal 'l!:Yd2 gives tried the critical continuation
Magnus Carlsen Black counterplay; 33. ga4! and now 33 ... 'l!ff5 34. 'l!:Yfl
New York Wch m 2016 (9) D) 25. 'i!:Yd3 'i!:Yh3 2 6 . gd5 l:lfd 8 l:lbl! (34 . . . 'l!:Yxf3 + 35. 'l!:Yg2 wins
1.e4 es 2 . ll'lf3 lllc 6 3. �bS a6 27. 'l!:Ye4 l:lxd5! 2 8 . Wxd5 gc7 29.f4 an exchange) 35. 'l!:Yxbl Wxf3 +
4. �a4 ll'lf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 lllxf4 30. gxf4 gxf4 31. 'l!:Yg2 'l!:Yd3 36. l:lgZ ttJc3 3 7 . Wfl ttJxa4. White
�cs 7.a4 l:.b8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 and I think Black has sufficient is better thanks to his material
�b6 10.axbS axbS 11. llla 3 compensation for the exchange. advantage, but the unusual
0-0 12. lLJxbS �g4 13. �c2 The d-pawn is likely to fall and piece configuration offers Black
exd4 14. ll'lbxd4 ll'lxd4 1S.cxd4 the white king seems to be too chances to hold. 33 ... J::ca S?I A
bf3 16.gxf3 ll'lhS 17.@h1 vulnerable for White to pose strange decision, as 33 . . . l:lb4!
•ta 18. �e3 cSI? 19.eS We6 Black any serious problems. I looks more natural , to get out of
20.exd6 c41 21.b3 cxb3 Carlsen's think these lines illustrate Black's the pin on the a4-e8 diagonal.
improvement upon the game resources to hold the balance Perhaps in the upcoming time
Nakamura- Kasimdzhanov (Game quite well. 24. :g1 ...d 7 2S. l:.g4 trouble Carlsen missed that
2) , where Black continued with An original way of developing the 34. gd2? is strongly countered by
21...c3. 2 2 . hb3 •xd 6 White rook and protecting the d-pawn. 34 ... l:le2!. 34. �c41 34. ga4 leads
is a pawn up and he enjoys After 2 5 . gc4 gxd4 2 6 . gg5 by force to a draw after 34 . . . l:lxa4
the pair o f bishops, but the l:ldc8 27. l:la4 l:lc7 28. gxf7+ 'l!:Yxf7 35. 'l!fxa4 'l!:Yf5 ! 36. 'l!:Yxb5 (3 6 . 'l!:Ya3?
weakened kingside offers Black 2 9 . l:lxd4 l:lf8 White's winning gd 6 ! and Black even wins!)
some counterplay. With his next chances are close to zero. 2S . . . ll'lf6 3 6 . . . Wxf3+=. 34 . . . J::c b aS 3S. �d2
move Karjakin prevents 23 ... gc7. 26. l:.h4 •bs 2 1 . i:a 1 ga 2s. J::cb 1 J::ca 4 36 . ... d3 J::ca 1 3 7 . :Xa1
2 3 . l:.a 6 •d7 2 9 . •d3 lLJd s 30. J::cg 1 �c7 :Xa 1+ 38. @g2 llle 7? Carlsen
31. �gs underestimates the weakness on
f7 and instead should have opted
.I .. . for 3 8 ... gd 8 ! 3 9 . l;te4 ttJf6 40. l:leZ
' ' ' .I .I • gc7, when it's still not easy to
: .t. 'ii' .t. 'if ' ' make further progress with white.
ll ' An important defensive resource
� � � White should reckon with is
. . . ttJh5 -f4, when the opposite­
� �� � � coloured bishops will make
� � � 'ii' � Black's defensive task easier.
� : @ � � 39. hf7+? Right before the time
control Karjakin missed the best
�@
chance to extend his lead in the
23 . . . l:.fdS?I An understandable White has managed to consolidate match to +2. Far stronger would
decision by Carlsen, but more the position. His pieces are on have been 39. 'l!fb3! ttJf5 (39 ... '1Wf5
accurate seems to be 23 ... 'l!:Yd7!?, reasonable squares and Black is 4 0 . l;te4! gd6 41. 'l!:Yb7! and Black
which i s more flexible than lacking any counterplay like in is in huge trouble) 40. gxf7+!
the text as Black keeps several the lines arising from 23 ... 'l!:Yd7. Wxf7 (40 . . . @g7 41.l:lh3 'l!:Ye7
options open for his rook. After Suddenly he has to be extremely 42. gg8 h5 43.d5! looks incredibly
24. l:lgl g 6 we reach the critical careful not too fall for any tricks. dangerous for Black) 41. 'Wxf7+
position for the objective 31 ... J::ce S Not that it makes any @xf7 42.l:lxh7+ and the endgame
evaluation of 18 ... c5 . White has a sense to remove the knight gives White at least excellent
lot of possibilities here, but with from the blockading square d 5 , practical winning chances.
accurate play Black seems to be b u t after 3 1 . . . ttJb4? t h e beautiful 39 ... @xf7 40. Wc4+ @g7 41.dS
doing fine, e.g. 32. 'l!:Yxg6+! hxg6 33. gf6 decides 4 1 . l:lxh7+? doesn't work in view
A) 25 . l:lg4 'l!:Yb7 26. gc4 (2 6. l:lal the game. 32. •c4 J::cb SI Black is of 41... @xh7 42. 'l!ff7+ @h8 43. gh6
gxd4 27. gxf7+ l:lxf7 2 8 . l:lxd4 facing some difficulties to hold and now Black solves the mating
'l!:Yxf3+ 29. 'l!:Yxf3 l:lxf3=) 26 ... l:lfc8 the blockade on d5 and comes threat by 43 ... 'l!fxd4!. 41 ... ll'lfS
27. 'l!:Ye2 l:lxc4 2 8 . l:lxb6 'l!:Yxb6 up with a very tricky rook move. 4 1 . . . �e 5 ? fails to 42. �c3 'l!fd6
29. 'l!:Yxc4 'l!:Yb5= and despite the 32 ... ttJb6? can be strongly met 43. 'l!ff4! l:lel 44. 'l!:Yh6+ and White
minus p awn Black is doing fine; by 33. 'l!:Yxf7+! 'l!:Yxf7 34. gxf7+ takes the rook next. 42. �c3+ 'iPf8

98
Survey RL 12.6

43 ,,ba1 l0xh4+ 44. 'tfxh4 'tfxd S 19 ... dxeS ? 20.dxcS! .ac7 21 . .ae4 have some drawing chances by
Very likely this is the position i::t x b2 22. Wd7 looks really bad. setting up a blockade on the dark
Karjakin had in mind when he 20.exd6 Ideally White would squares. 26 ... l:lfd S 2 7 . l:ld 1 'iff6
decided to sacrifice his bishop strengthen his central pawn 28.l:lc4 �d6 2S ... .axf4 can be
on f7. However, the position is chain with 20.f4?, but here this strongly answered with 29.Axf4
not as promising as it may look is tactically met by 20 ...cxd4 tlixf4 30.Wxh7+ @fS 31.�hS+ @e7
and Black is able to defend. 21. WxhS g6!. 20 ... c41 This is 32.l:tc7+ @d6 33.l:tc6+ @e7 34. i::txf6
4S. 'iff6+ If White captures the the point of Black's play. I n an i::tx hS 35. i::tx f4+-. 29. 'ifxc3 'ifxc3
second pawn with 45. Wxh7 then earlier correspondence game 30.l:l.xc3 l0xf4 31.l:lc61 The two
45 ... WgS+ ensures a perpetual. Black opted for 20 ... cxd4 21. .axd4 bishops, the active rooks and the
4S ... 'ift7 46. 'if d4 �es 4 7 . WV e4+ Wxd6 22. Ac3 Wh6 23.Wcl � xcl two passed pawns are simply too
'ife7 48.'ifdS �d8 49. �f1 ... 1/2-V2 24. i::ta xcl and managed to hold a strong for the black pieces. White
(74} draw in Hybl-Suto, er email 2013. is winning. 31 ... �eS 3 1...tlig6 is
H owever, I think Black is far met by 32 . .ab6 l:td7 33 . .afs i::td b7
Hlkaru Nakam ura 2 from having fully equalized and 34.l:txd6 i::tx b6 35.l:txb6 i::t x b6
Rustam Kasi mdzha nov it's a nightmare to play such an 36.d6+-. 32.d6 tLJe6 33. �fS l:l.xb3
Troms0 ol 2014 (7) ending with black. 21.b3 34. �b6 l:l.xb6 3 S . l:l.xb6 lbd4 36.f4
1.e4 es 2.�f3 lDc6 3. �bS a 6 �f6 3 7 . �h3 lLJe2 38. l:lb4 g6
4. �a4 �f6 S.O·O bS 6. �b3 39.d7 �f8 40. l:lc4 lDc3 41. l:ld3
�cs 7.c3 d6 8.a4 l:lb8 9.d4
K K*
�e7 42. l:lcs 1-0
�b6 10.l003 0-0 11.axbS axbS .t. .t. .t.
12.lOxbS �g4 13. �c2 exd4 .t LS 'if Penta la Harikrishna 3
14.�bxd4 l0xd4 1S.cxd4 .bf3 I) Fa biano Caruana
16.gxf3 �hS 17. �h1 'iVf6 18. �e3 Wij k aan Zee 2014 (6)
cSI? This move is the latest trend
.t. LS 1.e4 es 2.�f3 lDc6 3 . �bS a6
in a line where Black is trying to LS � LS 4. �a4 �f6 5.0-0 bS 6.�b3
obtain full equality. The other � LS LS �cs 7.a4 l:lb8 8.c3 d 6 9.d4
moves are worse in my opinion. �b6 10.axbS axbS 11.'003 0-0
J:[ 'if :a: 'it>
19.eSI The most principled 12.lOxbS �g4 13. �c2 exd4
continuation. Other moves allow 21 . . . c3?1 A very ambitious 14.tlibxd4 l0xd4 15.cxd4 .bf3
Black to take sting out of the attempt by Kasimdzhanov, but I 16.gxf3 �h5 17.�h1 'iff6 18. �e3
position: don't think it's a good one as the �f4?1
A} 19.dxcS ?! dxcS gives Black c-pawn can't be further advanced.
fantastic control over the dark Carlsen improved Black's play
squares;
K K*
with 21...cxb3!, see Karjakin­
B} 19.dS c4! looks fine for Black, Carlsen (Game l} . 22.dS 'ifxd6 .t. .t. .t. .t.
but not 19 ... Wxb2?! 20.f4 and 2 3 . l:la 6 ! An important resource .t .t. ...
White may get some initiative for White in this variation. White
going on the kingside; is pinning the bishop on the 6th
C) 19.l:tgl cxd4 20 . .ags Wes rank and prevents Black from
LS LS I)
21.f4 tlixf4 22.Wg4 �g6 23 . .adJ? creating mating threats with �LS
(better would have been 23.f4!?, ... Ac7. 23 ... �f4? The start of a LS � LS LS
but it only seems to lead to a weird-looking knight manoeuvre.
n � l:l �
draw: 23 ... WbS 24.fS d3 25.fxg6 Possibly more stubborn would
hS 26. WxhS fxg6 27. Wxg6 have been 23... g6, but even then This move has been played by
�xgl 2S.i::tx gl dxc2 29 . .af6 i::tb 7 after 24. Wd4! Axd4 25.i::tx d6 .aes experts Caruana and Leko, but I
30.Wxg7+ i::tx g7 31. i::tx g7+ @hS 26.i::tc 6 it isn't much fun playing think it's a very unfortunate one
32. i::tf7 +=) 23 ... AdS ? (instead, Black. 24. l:la41 lt:\g6 24... �xdS ? is in view of White's response. The
Black should have prevented losing, in view of 25. Axb6! i::t x b6 idea is to bring the knight to e6,
White from gaining a tempo by 26.i:td4 i:tdS {26 ... l:l.bS 27.Wd3+-) from where it attacks the pawn on
attacking the queen with f3-f4. 27.Ae4 i:tbS 2S.�d3 and White d4. I quite like the knight on e6
Hence, 23 ... We6! 24. Wg3 .ads+ wins material. 2S. 'ifd3 �c7 26.f41 if it succeeds in provoking White
and Black is in control) 24.f4 Nakamura's move is probably to play d4-d5, but otherwise I feel
'ties 25 . .axdS WxdS 26.fS and stronger than the 1st line of the that some time has been wasted.
White won a piece in Darini­ engine, which goes 26.�f4 �xf4 On hS the knight is generally
Nezad, Sharjah 2014. 19 ... 'ife6 27.i::txf4 �xf4. and Black might not so badly placed, with White's

99
Ruy Lopez - Neo-Arkhangelsk

vulnerable pawn structure and abandons the control over the up and he retains · p ractical
the hole on f4. Often it's more open a-file and prefers to keep winning chances. I'm not sure
efficient to control a square rather the pawn on d4 protected. In if it's winning at all, and it's not
than occupying it. 19. l:la41 The case of 21. l:txa8?! l:txa8 White has relevant for the evaluation of
rook is well placed on a4 as it difficulties with the pawn on d4. the line, so forgive me for not
protects the pawn on d4 and It's important to note that after going into further detail. 41. l:lc1
also prepares to undermine the Harikrishna's move White doesn't .lbc4 42 . .lbc4 �es 43.l:lcS+ �h7
knight on f4 with the idea e4-eS. have to worry about the drawing 44. l:lfS l:lfS 4S. l:lc4 lLJe6 46. l:lh4+
19 . . . �6 19 ... l:ta8 20. l::tb 4. Now: mechanism 21...l:tal 22. 'l!Vxal 'l!Vxf3 �g7 4 7 . l:leS ... 1/2-1/2 (132)
A) 20 ... li:Je6 2Ulgl! transposes to since there is 23. l:tg2!. 21 �a 7•..

2 1 . l:tb4 (game) ; An important predecessor game Yurly Kryvoruchko 4


B) The spectacular 20 ... l:tal ?! nicely demonstrates how quickly Fa biano Caruana
backfires: 2 1 . 'l!Vxal li:Jd3 22 . ..Q.dl! Black's position can fall apart: Plovd iv Ech 2012 ( 11)
li:Jxb4 (threatening 23 ... li:Jc2!) 21. . . l:tfb8 22.f4! cS (22 ... li:Jxf4? loses, 1.e4 e5 2 . li:Jf3 lLJc6 3 . �b5 a6
23. 'l!Va4! cS 24. 'l!Vd7! and Black is in in view of 23.eS! 'l!Vh4 (23 ... dxeS 4. �a4 lLJf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3
trouble, since 24 . . . cxd4 runs into 24.dxeS and both the queen and �cs 7 .a4 l:lbS 8.c3 d6 9.d4
2S . .Q.d2!+- ; knight are hanging) 24. l:tg4+-) �b6 10. lLJa3 0-0 11.axbS axbS
C) 20 ... li:JdS? 21.exdS l:tal 22. 'i!Ye2 23.eS 'l!Vd8 24.dxcS (the engines 12 . lLJxbS �g4 13. �c2 exd4
l:txfl + 23. 'l!Vxfl 'l!Vxf3+ 24. 'it>gl! even point out 24.fS ! cxb4 2S.fxe6 14.lLJbxd4 lLJxd4 1S.cxd4 bf3
(24. 'l!Vg2? 'l!Ve2!=) 24 ... 'l!Vg4+ with a crushing attack) 24 ... ..Q.xcS 16.gxf3 lLJh S 17.�h1 Wf6 18. �e3
2 S . 'l!Vg2 'l!Ve2 26. 'l!Ve4 and White 2S.l:txb8 l::tx b8 26.fS .Q.xe3 27.fxe6 l:la8 19 . .lba8 .lbaS 2 0 . l:lg1 20.f4?!
wins. .Q.h6 28. 'l!VhS 'it>h8 29.'l!Vxf7 dxeS doesn 't work because of 20 ... li:Jxf4
30.e7 'l!Ve8 31. 'l!Vxe8+ l:txe8 3 2 . l:td l 21.eS (21. 'l!Vf3 li:JdS 22. 'l!Vxf6 lii xf6
.Q.gS 33 . .Q.a4 1-0 Adams- Leko, is fine for Black) 21...dxeS 22. 'l!Vf3 ,
Miskolc rapid 200S. 22.l:lc4 �b6 threatening to take t h e rook,
2 3 . l:lb4 �a7 24.f41 cS 24 ... li:Jxf4? or 23.dxeS when the knight is
2S.eS! wins a piece. 2S.eSI We7 hanging on f4, but Black still has
After 2S ... dxeS? 26.dxeS 'l!Ve7 22 ... 'l!Vd8! 23.dxeS li:Jg6 24 . .Q.xb6
27. l:te4 White obtains a massive cxb6 with equality in K.Szabo­
attack with f4-fS-f6 etc. 26.exd6? Pavasovic, Hungary tt 2007/08 ;
White could have obtained an 20 . .Q.b3 allows 20 ... l:tal!=. 2 0 . . . lLJf4
even bigger advantage with 21. �b3 g6 For 2 1 . . . li:Je6 see
26.dxcS! .Q.xcS 27. l:tb3 and when Karjakin-Adams (Game 5).
the bishop arrives on e4 White
With the king on hl, Black could will be totally dominating the
E •
have played 2 6 ... 'i!Yfl#; board. 2 6 ... Wxd6 27 .dxcS hes
D) 2 0 ... l:tab8 2 1 . l:tgl li:Je6 22.f4 28. Wxd6 2 8 .l:k 4!? 'l!Vxdl 2 9 . l:txdl ' ' '
(22 . l:txb6! with the idea of d4-dS gives White a better version of .! ' 'ii' i
and .Q.d4 is even stronger) 22... the endgame. 28 ... b d 6 2 9 . l:le4
cS 23.eS 'i!Ye7 24.dxcS .Q.xcS l:lfcS 3 0 . �b1 g6 Trading off
2S. l:txb8 l:txb8 26.fS .Q.xe3 27.fxe3 the dark-squared bishops with
� ��
'l!Vb7+ 2 8 . l:tg2 li:Jf8 29. 'l!Vg4 g6 30 ... ..Q.cS ! 31.fS .Q.xe3 32.fxe3 li:JcS � ��
30.e6 l:ta8 31.h4 l:tal+ 32.'it>h2 might have been a better idea. In � � �
'l!Vxb2 33. 'l!Vf4 'l!Vb7 34. 'l!Vxd6 1-0 view of the limited material left
� �w
Vocaturo-Nezad, Gibraltar 2014. on the board I think Black has
2 0 . l:lg1 l:laS 20 ... cS? would be a excellent drawing chances. 3 1.fS 22.eSI The critical test of 21 ...
strategic error now. Normally li:Jg7 3 2.fxg6 hxg6 3 3 . �d2 l:lcS g6. I n an earlier game Caruana
Black plays ... c7-cS with the idea 34.l:lh4 l:lbS 3S.b4 l:lcbS 3 6 . �a 2 faced 2 2 . l:tg4 li:Je6 23 . .Q.xe6 'l!Vxe6
to follow up with ... cS -c4 and b b 4 3 7 . �f4 l:l8b6 38. �c4 24. l:tgl l:ta2 2S. 'l!Vd2 'l!Vh3 26. 'l!Ve2
either activate the dark-squared l:lhS 3 9 . l:lhg4 �c3 40. �e3 l:lc6? l:txb2 27. 'l!Vxb2 'l!Vxf3 + 2 8 . l:tg2
bishop or trade it off against its Overlooking a tactic on the last 'l!Vdl+ 2 9 . l:tgl 'l!Vf3+ 1/2-l/2 Alexeev­
counterpart. After 21.dS li:Jd4 22.f4 move before the time control. Caruana, Khanty- Mansiysk
li:Jxc2 23. 'i!Y xc2 l:ta8 24. l:txa8 l:txa8 Had C aruana played 40 ... ..Q.eS ! = , 2009. 22 ... dxeS The only move,
2S .b4 Black was close to losing in then t h e g a m e wouldn't have since after both 22 .. 'l!VfS ? 23 . .Q.c2
.

Berbatov - Sandalakis, Rijeka 2010. lasted so long. After the text and 22 ... 'l!Vh4? 23.l:tg4 Black
21. l:lb41 A very strong idea. White White will be an exchange is losing the knight. 23.dxeS

100
Survey RL 12.6

'it'fS 23 ... 'li'xeS 24 . .axf7+! 'it>xf7 pawn on b6. 36.b3 :n 3 7 . l:l.e4 'it>h7 37. l::td 8 l::td 7 38. l::tx d7 'i!Vxd7
2S. �xf4 'i!Vbs (2S ... 'i!Vxf4? 26. 'i!Vds+ bS 3S.:d4 :e1 39. 'it'd3 :n 39. 'i!VcS 'it>g7 40. 'i!Vd6 'i!Vb7 41.'it>g3
and White captures the rook) 40. :d6 'it'ts 41.'it'd4+ �h6? @h7 42. Wf4 'i!Vc8 43. 'i!VxdS 'i!Vcl+
26. l::tg S (26.b4 'i!Vc4? was seen in 41 . . . @h7! would have been a more 44. We4 'i!Vel+ 4S. @d3 'i!Vdl+
Kurnosov- Kazhgaleev, Astana stubborn defence. 42. 1i'hS+ :h 7 46. Wc4 'i!Ve2+ 47. @cS 'i!Vxf2+
rapid 2012, and now 27. l::tg 4! 43. 'it'c3 Protecting the pawn on 48. @c6 'i!Vc2+ 49.@d6 @g7 SO.bS
would have been very powerful, f3. 43 . . . :n 44. :b61 :g1 4S. 'it'c6 'i!Vf2 Sl.@c6 'i!Vxh4 S2.b6 'i!Vb4
highlighting the vulnerable 1i'f4 46. 1i'e41+- Now Black is S3.b7 h4 S4.'i!Vd6 'i!Vc4+ s s . @b6
pieces in Black's camp) 26 ... 'i!Vc4 forced to give up a second pawn. 'i!Vb3+ S 6 . Wc7 'i!Vc3+ S7. @d7 1-0
27. l::tg 4 .axf2 2 8 . 'it>g2 .ad4 29 . .axc7 46 ... 1i'c7 4 7 . :XbS :e7 4S. 1i'd4 Fier-Ganguly, Spain tt 2 0 12.
'i!Vxc7 30. l::tx d4 Langer- Hartmann, wh7 49. :d s 'it'b7 so.b4 :n 22 ... fxe6?1 More accurate is
er email 2011. 24. hf7+ �g7 S1.bS 'it'c7 s2.:ds :g1 S3. 'it'f6 22 ... 'i!Vxe6! 23.dS and Black is very
Black is recommended to take 'it'cs S4. 1i'c6 1-0 active to compensate for the
White 's light-squared bishop slight material deficit: (23. 'i!V d3
with 24 ... 'i!Vxf7! and after 2S . .axf4 Sergey Karjakln 5 'i!Vh3 24. 'i!Ve2 l::ta 2 2S.dS g6; but
�xf2 26.J:m;1; it's clear that the Michael Adams not 2S ... l::tx b2? 26. l::ta l! - a nice
extra pawn is quite pleasant for Baku 2008 (3) counter-trick) 23 ... 'i!Vf6 24. 'i!Ve2
White, but a lot of work still 1.e4 es 2. lllf 3 lllc 6 3. �bS a6 Axe3 2S.fxe3 h6 26. l::tc l l::tb 8
needs to be done to convert. 4. �a4 lllf 6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 27. l::tc 3 l::ta 8 Vi- 1/2 Craciunescu­
2S. �dS?I Not sure why White �cs 7.c3 d6 s.a4 :bs 9.d4 Parushev, er email 2011. I n the
wants to voluntarily trade off his �b6 10.axbS axbS 11. llla 3 0-0 endgames with queen and rook
powerful light-squared bishop. 12 . lLJxbS �g4 13. �c2 exd4 the white king is too weak,
Better seems to be 2S . .ab3! ± . 14. lll b xd4 lLJxd4 1S.cxd4 bf3 which makes it difficult for the
2 S. . . lLJxd S 26. 'it'xdS :as 2 7 . 'it'c6 16.gxf3 lllh S 17.Wh1 'it'f6 1S. �e3 white pieces to get activated.
:XeS? Caruana missed an :as 19. :Xas :Xas 20.:g1 lllf4 23.:g3 WhS 24. wg2 eS?I There
important resource here. He 21. �b3 llle 6 is no need to force matters yet,
should have gone for 27 ... �xe3! but Adams felt this should be
28.fxe3 (28. 'i!Vf6+ 'i!Vxf6 29.exf6+ K • holdable for him. 2S.dxeS dxeS
'it>xf6 30.fxe3 l::tc S= and Black is .l .l .l .l 26. hb6 cxb6 Well, it's not the
too active) 28 ... l::tx eS 29. 'i!Vxc7+ .i. .t. •tv greatest extra pawn for White,
@h6 and even though White but still it is one. Black needs to
temporarily has two extra pawns, take care of his weak pawns on
he can't make any progress here £!:, £!:, b6 and es. 27.'it'd7 :ds 2S. 1i'c7
as his king is too unsafe, e.g. � � £!:, :ts 29.h4 g6 30.b4 h6 31.bS :n
30. l::tg 2 'i!Vxf3 31. 'i!VxeS 'i!Vfl+ 32. l::tg l 32. 'it'cs+ �g7 3 3 . h S gs 34. :h3
£!:, £!:, £!:,
'i!Vf3+=. 2S.�xb6 cxb6 2 9 . 'it'c3 1 1i'd6 3S. 'it'c3 :c1 36. 'it'e3
White is now in control and will � :@ :cs 3 7 . :h1 :Xbs 3 s . :a 1
slowly start improving his major 22. �xe6 In a later game White's :a s 39.:Xas bxaS 40. 'it'a7+
pieces and create new threats. play was refined by 22. �dS!?, WfS 41. 'it'xaS 'it'f6 42. 'it'a3+
The extra f-pawn has the function depriving the rook from the wgs 43. wt1 'it'e6 44.we2
of a shield to protect the white a-file: 22 ... l::tb 8 23 . .Q.xe6 'i!Vxe6 �7 4S.'it'a 7+ �6 46.Wd2 g4
king. I'm not sure if this position 24. 'i!Vd3. The position could be 46 ... 'i!Vd6+! 47.Wel 'i!Vd3!= is the
is objectively winning for White, discussed in greater depth, but active defence. 47.fxg4 Wxg4
but what matters are the practical the evaluation remains the same: 47 ... WgS 48.f3 @f4 looks drawish
chances. White is more active, has White is slightly better. From a too. 4S. 'it'b6+ wgs 49. 1i'g6+
the safer king, and the pawn on practical point of view it's just Wh4 S0. '1tc3 'it'f3+ S1. Wc4 'it'xf2
b6 could become a target as well. very unpleasant for Black as there S2.'>PdS 'it'd4+ S3. we6 Wb6+
29 ... 1i't6 30.:d 1 Wh6 31.:d4 is no perspective to play for a S4. �xeS 'it'cS+ S S . We6 Wc6+
:e1 32. wg2± :n 33. 'it'e3+ '>Pg7 win. Brazilian G M Fier managed S6. @f7 1i'd7+ S7. wfS 1i'dS+
34. :b41 Without the b-pawns on to win a nice game against one SS. @g7 S8. 'i!Ve8! would have led
the board it would be relatively of the leading experts in this to a study-like win for White after
simple for Black to defend. variation: 24 ... g6 2S . .Q.d2 l::ta 8 S 8 ... 'i!Vf6+ S9. 'i!Vf7 'i!Vd8+ 60. @g7
34 ... :b7 3S.h4 h S A new target 26. �c3 dS 27.eS cS 28. l::td l cxd4 'i!VgS+ 6I.@h7 'i!Ves (61... 'i!VxhS
has been created on g6. White is 29 . .axd4 .Q.xd4 30. 'i!Vxd4 l::tb 8 62. 'i!Vf4+ 'it>h3 63.eS +-) 62. 'i!VdS
able to combine threats against 3 1 . 'it>g2 l::tb S 32. l::t a l Wg7 33. l::ta 8 'i!VxhS 63.eS 'i!VfS + 64. @xh6 and
the weak king and the vulnerable h6 34. 'i!Vc3 l::tb 7 3S.h4 hS 36.b4 White wins. SS . . . 1i'e7+ S9. @xh6

101
Ruy Lopez - Neo-Arkhangelsk

1i'ts+ 60.�h7 1i'e7+ 61. �gs 20 tllf 41 The knight is heading


••. E •
1i'd8+ 62. �f7 'ifc7+ 63. �fS for e6. The alternative 20 ... l:taS .t. i i
'ifdS+ 64. 1i'e8 'iff6+ 6S. �g8 has been played before , but is less
�gS?? A huge blunder. Instead, accurate: .t i 'if i
Black could have saved himself A) 21.b3 g6 (21... ti:lf4?! 22. gc6!
by means of 65 ... '1Wg5+ ! 66. @h7 might be a bit unpleasant as £::, £::, l:[
(66. 'li'g6 'li' d 8 + =) 66 ... 'lifxh5+ there is no longer the ... l:tal trick.
1i £::,
67. '1Wxh5+ @xh5 with a drawn This explains why Black keeps
pawn ending. 66.eS And Black the knight on h5) 22.f4 ti:Jxf4 £::, £::, £::,
resigned, in view of 66 ...'liff5 67.e6 23. 'liff3 ti:Jh5 24. 'lifxf6 ti:Jxf6 25.f3 � @
followed by 68. '1Wg6. @g7 26. �f2 ti:Jh5 and a draw was
agreed in Wang-Adams, Liverpool 2S.l:lg1 cS 26.dS 1i'f6 2 7 . b3 c41?
2007, as neither side can really 28.bb6 Also after 28.bxc4 gxe3
improve; 29.fxe3 �k8 30. 'life2 l:txc4 31. l:lbl
Deviations from the main l i n e
B) 21. �b3 l:tal 22. 'lifxal 'lifxf3 + (31. 'lifxc4 'lifxf3+ 32J:!g2 �dl+=)
23.@gl 'lifg4+ 24. @hl 'liff3+ 2 5 . @gl 31 ... l:tc3 Black should be able
Sergey Ka rjakln 6 '1Wg4+ 26.@hl 1/2- 1/2 Tkachiev­ to hold on. 28 ... l:lxb6 29. bxc4
Viswa nath a n Anand Kazhgaleev, Astana rapid 2012; l:lb2 30.c5?1 It seems Karjakin
Wij k a a n Zee 2 0 10 (1) C) 21.l:tgl allows 21...l:txa4! missed an important resource
1.e4 es 2. ltJf3 lbc6 3. �bS a6 22.'lifxa4 '1Wxf3+ 23. l:lg2 h6! for Black. Safer is 30. l:tfl when
4. �a4 lt:lf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 24.�xh6 '1Wd3! 2 5 . �e3 (25 . '1We 8 + Black has nothing better but to
�cs 7.c3 d6 8.a4 l:lbS 9.d4 @ h 7 26. �e3 'lif d l + 27. l:lgl 'liff3 + =) give a perpetual with 30 ... l:lbl
�b6 10.axbS axbS 11. lba3 0-0 25 ... 'lifbl + 2 6 . l:tgl 'lifxe4+=; 31. 'lifxbl 'lifxf3+= 30 ... l:lxf2 3 1. l:lf1
12 . lbxbS �g4 13. �c2 exd4 D) However, after 21. l:lel!? Presumably, White forgot that
14. lt:lbxd4 lbxd4 1S.cxd4 bf3 there are no longer any ideas of in case of 31.cxd6? Black can
16.gxf3 ltJhS 17. 'it>h1 1i'f6 It's a perpetual, as the king is able decide the game on the spot
important to realize that the other to escape: 21 ... g6 (21... l:txa4?! with 31 ... '1Wb2! and h2 can't be
thematic move 17 ... c5?! has never doesn"t work: 22. '1Wxa4 '1Wxf3+ defended. 31 ... l:lb2 32. 1i'e1?1
been played in this particular 23.@gl 'lifxe4 24.f3 '1Wg6+ 25. @f2 The engines prefer 3 2 . l:lgl with
position, and for a reason. At and Black's compensation is the point that after 32 ... dxc5 the
this moment Black doesn't have insufficient) 22. �b3 ti:lf4 23.e5 white queen supports the advance
control over the dark squares dxe5 24.dxe5 21.l:g1 2 1 . �b3 of the passed pawn: 33.d6 l:tb8
on the kingside, which invites ti:Je6 22. �xe6 fxe6 23.f4 d5! is 34. l:tg2 followed by l:td2 and the
White to play the powerful 18.f4! fine for Black. 21 . . .g6 Although game remains balanced. 32 ...
'lifh4 19. 'li'f3 cxd4 20. �d3;!; and there isn't anything wrong with dxc5 33.eS 1i'f4 34. l:lf2 l:lxf2
even though Black has regained the text, it seems more natural 3S."irxf2 c4 36.d6 1i'xe5 3 7. d7
the pawn, his position is quite to me to clarify the situation in 1i'c7 38. 1i'd4 1i'd8 39. �g2 c3
miserable. 18. l:la4 I think this is the centre with 21 ... ti:Je6!, which 40. 1Vxc3 1i'xd 7 And a draw was
a rather harmless continuation, leads to a draw by force after agreed, though I guess most
which explains why 1 8 . �e3 has 22.d5 �xe3 23.dxe6 (23.fxe3?! ti:Jc5 players would still have tried for
been considered the main line. can only favour Black) 23 ... �xf2 a bit.
18 . . . l:la81 19. �e3 19. l:lxa8 l:ha8 24.exf7+ @xf7 25. '1Wd5+ @e7 26.e5
20. �e3 l:tal! 21. 'ifxal 'lifxf3+ with a 'lifxf3+ 27. '1Wxf3 l:txf3 28. l:lxg7+ Mlkhall Koba lla 7
repetition. 19 ... l:lxa4 20. ba4 l::tf7 29.J:txf7+ @xf7 30.exd6 cxd6= Rustam Kasl mdzhanov
22. �b3 l:lbS 23. l:g4 Other moves Turkey tt 2012 (4)
could have been considered as 1.e4 es 2 . tllf3 lbc6 3 . �bS a6
x•
well, but I think that in any 4 ..b4 tllf6 s.o-o bS 6. �b3 �cs
.t. i .t. i case Black has a comfortable 7 .a4 l:lbS 8.c3 d6 9.d4 �b6
1. .t. if position and he doesn't have to 10.axbS axbS 11. lba3 0-0 12.lbxbS
� fear being a pawn down. 23 tlle 6 •.• �g4 13 . �c2 exd4 14. tllb xd4
24.be6 1i'xe6 Black is still a tllx d4 1S.cxd4 bf3 16.gxf3 tllh S
1i £::, £::, pawn down, but his pieces are 17.f4 17. �e3?! has been played in
1i £::, better coordinated than White's. a few games, but is considered to
£::, £::, £::, Particularly the rook on g4 be inaccurate. So far Black hasn't
looks misplaced, which explains shown the most precise response,
'ii' l:[ @
Karjakin's next move. which is 17 ... c5! (17 ... °iff6 18. @hl
102
Survey RL 12.6

would transpose to the Main Line over the dark squares. 21 ... •xh3 1 8... dxeS 19.dxeS •xeS 20.f4
starting with 17. Whl) 18.dS c4! 22 . .lhh3 g6 More accurate than The point of White's 17th move
is absolutely fine for Black, e.g. 22 ... tlJf6?1 23. l:!dl �xb2 24. �xb2 becomes clear: the rook protects
19.'ili'd2 'Wf6 20.l:!a6 'Wxf3 21. l:!xb6 l:!xb2 2S. l:!c3;!; when Black still the pawn on f4. Black needs co
'iWg4+ with a repetition of moves. faces long corcure. With che cexc find a safe place for the queen,
17 ... 'tfh4 18.lh3 Black maintains the knight on where ic protects the knight on hS
hS and keeps an eye on f4. 23.b3 or from where ic counteraccacks
23.l:!dl?! doesn't make sense, in any of the white pieces. 20 ... 'tfbSI
view of 23 ... �xb2 and now White In my opinion Anand's choice is
can't really trade the dark-squared more precise and ac lease avoids
bishops as otherwise f4 drops. some unnecessary complications.
23 ... J:lfc8 24. J:lf3 cxb3 2S . .i.xb3 The alternative is 20 ... 'iWcS 21.b4
tlJf6 And a draw was agreed , since 'Wc6 22.bs 'Wc3 (both 22 . . . 'WxbS?
after 26.eS l:!c3! 27. l:!xc3 �xc3 23.�d3 'Wes 24. �a3 and 22 ... 'WcS ?
Black regains the pawn when 23. �a3 gain material for
there isn't much left co play for. White) 23.l:!a3!? (an important
improvement upon 23. �xh7+
Fra ncisco Va llejo Pons 8 @xh7 24.'WxhS + Wg8 2S.l:!a3 'Wc2
18 . . . cSI Another important Vlswa nath a n Anand 26.l:!h3 'Wg6+ 27. 'Wxg6 fxg6, which
contribution co the existing Sao Paulo/ B i l bao 2012 (6) didn't pose Black any problems
theory by Kasimdzhanov. In 1.e4 es 2.tlJf3 tlJc6 3 . .tbS a6 in Karjakin-Shirov, Wijk aan
earlier accempcs Black failed co 4 . .ta4 tlJf6 s.o-o bS 6 . .tb3 .tcs Zee 2010. The extra pawn is coo
obtain full equality: 7.a4 J:lb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 .tb6 weak) 23 ... 'iii' cS (23 ... 'iii' c4? loses co
A) 18 ... tlJxf4? 1 9 . l:!g3 'iWf6 20. 'iWf3 10. tLJa3 0-0 11.axbS axbS 12. tLJxbS 24. �xh7+ @xh7 2S. 'WxhS+ Wg8
tLJg6 21. 'Wxf6 gxf6 gave White .tg4 13 . .tc2 exd4 14.lbbxd4 26. l:!h3) 24. l:!h3 g6 2S. �a3 'WxbS
a dream position in Ganguly­ lLJxd4 1S.cxd4 .i.xf3 16.gxf3 lOhS 26. �xfS l:!xf8 27. l:!f3, intending to
Nezad, Dubai blitz 2014. Now, 17.lh4 'tff6 Other moves, like play 28.fS , should certainly give
with 22.l:!dl± White consolidates 17 ... 'Wh4 and 17 ... cS, have been White che beccer prospects. After
che centre and thanks co his cried here as well, but chis is by all, he is an exchange up, but will
favourable pawn structure and far the most natural choice. The it be enough? In any case I don't
bishop pair he is clearly beccer; queen puts more pressure on both understand why Black would
B) 18 ... dS?! 19.exdS and a draw was d4 and f3, restricting the mobility like co play chis position with
agreed in Grigoryan-Gustafsson, of the white pieces. 18.eS A direct material down, and hence Anand 's
Rogaska Slatina 2011, but it seems accempt to take advantage of che move is a safer option. 21 . .td3
co me that White retains the beccer vulnerable knight on hS. The •cs 21 ... 'WdS ? 22. �xh7+! drops
chances, e.g. 19 ... tlJxf4 20.l:!g3 tlJg6 drawback is that White gives up the queen. 22.J:lc4 ..,d6 Once
21. �e3 fS 22. l:!gS! and thanks co his massive pawn centre and once again, the only move, as 22 ... 'WaS?
the original rook manoeuvre the the tactics are over not much runs into 23.b4! and Black can't
white king is well protected. 19.dS remains. With a few precise moves keep the knight on hS protected.
In case of 19.dxcS �xcS 20. l:!f3 Black should be able co hold rather 23 . .i.xh7+ 23. 'iWxhS? 'iWxd3 favours
l:!fe8 Black is coo active; hence, I easily. For 18. �e3 see Inarkiev­ Black. 23 ... Wxh7 24.'tfxhS+ wgs
fail to find a useful plan for White Leko (Game 9) ; 18.Whl transposes 2S ... f3 After 2S. l:!c3 �d4 26.l:!h3
here. 19 ... c4 A typical mistake is to Karjakin-Anand (Game 6) . Black easily neutralized White's
19 ... tlJxf4? 20.l:!g3! and suddenly attacking plans on the h-file with
Black is losing his coordination 26 ... 'Wg6+! 27. 'Wxg6 fxg6 28.b3
E ••
on the kingside. White threatens �cs 29. l:!dl �d6 30. l:!d4 l:!fs
co play 21.l:!g4 and if the knight l .l l .l 31.Wg2 l:!fbs 32. l:!dd3 ..t>f7 with
moves away from f4 then there is .! l 'if equality in Anconov- Parushev, er
21. �gs. 20. •t3 .td4 This is che � � email 2011. The extra pawn isn't
position Black has been aiming worth much, and the ensuing
for after 17.f4 cS. The pawn
ll � endgame is a comfortable draw
deficit is compensated for by the � for Black. 2S ... J:lfd8 26.fS ..d3
active pieces, White's weakened � i. � � 27. 'tfxd3 .lhd3 28 . .tf4 f6 29 . .i.xc7
kingside, and the vulnerable .i.xc7 30 . .lhc7 .lhb2 31.J:lal J:lf3
i. 'iY � <;t>
pawn on b2. 21 ... h3 21.l:!a6 �xb2 32.J:laa7 J:lbxf2 33 . .lhg7 + Wh8
22. �e3 gS!+=' ensures nice control 34. l:lh7+ wgs 3S.J:ihg7+ whs

103
Ruy Lopez - Neo-Arkhangelsk

36.:gb7 :11+ 3 7 . Wg2 :112+ material thanks to the double l:!e8 28. i.h6 J:!xel 29 .... xel Wf7=
38. Wg1 :1 1+ 39. @g2 Vi-'h attack; Zemlyanov-Walter, er email 2012;
B) 18...lbf4?! 19.@hl! transposes C) 20.f4 J:!xa4 21. i.xa4 lbxf4
Ernesto l narklev 9 to Game 3. 22 .... f3 llJhS 23 .... xf6 lbxf6 24.f3
Peter Leko l:!a8 2S.b3 llJhS! with the idea to
Astra khan 2 010 (3) play ... lbg7-e6 and ...f7-fS at a
.I .1•
1.e4 es 2 . lLJl3 lbc6 3 .i.b5 a6 suitable moment. Soon a draw
4.i.a4 lLJl6 5.0-0 b5 6.i.b3 i i i was agreed in Lukasova-Lupini,
i.c5 7 .c3 d6 8.a4 :bs 9.d4 j_ i 'if .l er email 2012. 20 lLJl4 Another
•••

i.b6 10. lba 3 0-0 11.axb5 axb5 � correspondence game went 20 ...cS
12.fub5 i.g4 13.i.c2 exd4 21.dS l:!fb8 22.i.d3 i.aS 23.f4 i.c3
14. lbbxd4 fud4 15.cxd4 bl3
ll £::, £::, 24 .... g4 i.d4 2S.i.cl ... d8 26. i.c2
16.gxf3 tbh5 17.:a4 916 18.i.ea ii £::, l:!xa4 27.bxa4 i.b2 28.i.e3 i.d4
g61 Securing the knight on hS £::, ii £::, £::, 29 ....gs ... c8 Vi-111 Vohl-Gavrilakis,
and avoiding any sharp tactical er email 2010. Although there
'ii' It@
sequences starting with e4-eS . isn't much wrong for Black in
Alternatives are inferior: 19. Wh 1l:taS 1 9 ... cS 20.dS !? (20.eS this line, I prefer the simplicity of
A) 18 ...J:!aS? was seen in Bellia­ ... e6! 21.exd6 cxd4 22.i.xd4 l:tfd8 the plan chosen by Leko. 21.:g1
Lagno, Paleochora 2010, and 23.l:!el ... xd6 24.i.c3 ... cs 2S .... e2 21.eS ... h4! is unproblematic, but
now both players overlooked the ...xf2 26. lli'xf2 i.xf2 and soon of course not 21...dxeS ? 22.dxeS
following line: 19.eS! 'i'h4 (19 ... a draw was agreed in Steinke­ and Black drops a piece. 21.. J:lxa4
dxeS 20.dxeS ... xeS (20... 'i'e6 Hitzegrad , er email 2008. The 22.bxa4 lbe6 23.d5 be3 24.dxe6
21.J:l.xa8 l:!xa 8 22.f4 ensures pair of bishops looks nice, but the 24.fxe3?! llJcS offers Black excellent
White a stable edge) 21.J:l.xaS b-pawn can't be pushed forward) compensation for the pawn. The
l:txaS 22.f4 lli'xb2 (22......bS loses 20 ...... xb2 21.f4 and although knight has a wonderful outpost on
a piece in view of 23.i.d3! ... as Black might still be doing fine cS, the white bishop is out of play,
(23 ... lli'ds 24. i.xh7+! +-) 24.b4 here, I don't see any reason for and Black is ready to infiltrate on
... xb4 2S .... xhS) 23.i.e4 l:te8 him to enter this doubled-edged the b-file with his rook. 24 ... .i.cS
24. i.c6 i.xe3 2S.fxe3 lbf6 26. i.xe8 variation. 20.b3 25.exl7+ Wxl7 26.9d5+ �g7
lbxe8 27.... d3± and the material A) 20.l:tb4 allows 20 ... l:!al! 27.e51i'xl3+ 28.9xf3 :X13
advantage should decide the 21.... xal (1/i-1/i J.Tan- Mulyar, 29.exd6 cxd6 Black has clearly
game in the long run) 20.l:!xaS Chicago 2016) 2 1...... xf3+ 22.Wgl won the opening battle, but his
J:l.xa8 21.f4!± and White's extra ...g4+= ; advantage in the rook endgame
pawn starts to tell. The tactical B) 20.J:!gl J:!xa4 2I.i.xa4 lbf4 with opposite-coloured bishops is
justification is that 21...lbxf4? can 22. i.d7 J:la8 23.i.fS ti:le6 24. i.xe6 minimal and should be insufficient
be met by 22 .... f3! and White wins 'i!fxe6 2S.@g2 fS 26.exfS 'i!fxfS 27.J:!el for victory . ... V2-'h (56)

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

.I .1• .I .1•
' ii i ' ii i
j_ i 'if j_ i 'if
� �
ll £::, £::, l:[ £::, £::,
ii £::, ii £::,
£::, ii £::, £::, £::, ii £::, £::,
'ii' n <it> 'ii' l:[ <it>
position after 20 . . . lLif4-d 5 positio n after 17. .ac 1-e3 pos ition after 18 . . . l:tb8-a8
Black intends to exploit the 17 . .ae3 isn't as popular as Instead of 18 . . . l:ta8 ? , the
weakness on f3. How does the the main move 17. 'it>hl. How common move here is 18 . g 6 . . .

game end? should Black respond? Do you s e e why?


(solution on page 250) (solution on page 250) (solution on page 250)

104
Ruy Lopez Arkhangelsk Variation RL 12.9 (C84)

Play ... t2Jd41 versus t h e 7.d3


Ark h a ngelsk
by Lu is Rodi

1. e4 es The latest news


2. tbf3 tbc6 Recently, Carlsen, who had seemed
3. i.bS a6 comfortable on the white side of this line,
4. i.34 tbf6 opted to defend the black side in the old
5. 0-0 b5 variation.
6. i.b3 i.b7 His first attempt was against Fabiano
7. d3 i.e7 Caruana, in Saint Louis 2015 , where White
played 7.d3, and after 7 ... �e7 8.t2lc3 0-0
.i 'if • .i 9.a3!? the game transposed to the main
.! ... ... .! ... ... ... lines of the Ruy Lopez with an early
... '-' � d2-d3. Magnus then played 9 ... d6 (the
... ... usual order is l.e4 eS 2.ffi t2lc6 3.�bS a6
� 4. �a4 t2lf6 5.0-0 �e7 6.d3 b5 7. �b3 d6
� � tlJ 8.a3 0-0 9.t2lc3 �b7, although Black's last
��� ��� move is not very popular - Black usually
l:t tlJ � � :i:;t <;t; prefers 9 ... �g4 or 9 ... t2la5).
In his next games, the World Champion
In the past 29 years, the real came well prepared against the less usual
Arkhangelsk (6 ... �b7) has languished line 9.a3, playing 9 ...t2ld4! twice in the
in the shadow of its youngest sister,
the Neo-Arkhangelsk (6 ... �c5) . This
is partly because the modern version
of the idea behind this line is very
interesting and dynamic, and partly
because in the old line the variation
with 7.d3, engineered by Garry Kasparov
and Magnus Carlsen, has proved to be
a difficult scheme for black players,
especially in the 7 ... �c5 variation.
Therefore black players tend to prefer
the most solid move 7 ... �e7, with
positions that are more closed and in
the spirit of some anti-Marshall lines. Magnus Carlsen

105
Ruy Lopez - Arkhangelsk Variation

rapid tournament in Paris, 2016. The associated with the jump to d4, which is
result: two wins, of which that against much less popular but still interesting
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave is the Main because it has some surp rise value.
Game (1) of this Survey. Magnus's other
victim was Caruana.
I hope that these games will increase the
popularity of the good old Arkhangelsk,
but I am also very curious to see what
Magnus intends to play against the other
critical variation, 7.c3.

Some theory
Practical evidence shows that Black is
fine in the line 7.d3 £.e7 8.ll:Jc3 0-0 9.a3 As in the 9.a3 line, White can accept
ll:Jd4!. the pawn sacrifice or fight in purely
positional style.
In the first case, Black's compensation is
sufficient for equality - see e.g. Game 4,
Asgarizadeh-Derakshani, Teheran 2014.
The second option seems more critical,
and 10.ll:Jxd4 and 10. £.a2 are analysed in
the context of Game 5, Malik-Kriebel,
Czechia tt 2014/15. Des pite White's early
initiative, Black can gradually work
towards a balance.
If White takes the offered pawn, Black
can count on good compensation Th ree cool cats
and easy play. See Game 2, A.Vovk­ There are basically three alternatives to
Boruchovsky, Riga 2013. the moves with the a-pawn:
White can also decide to decline the offer A) For some reason, 9. £.d2 is the most
and play the game with ideas like 10. £.a2 popular move in practice. The topical
or 10.ll:Jxd4 (as in our Main Game) , which continuation 9 ... d6 10.a4 ll:Jd4 is analysed,
are covered in Game 3, Caruana-Carlsen, together with some white alternatives
Paris rapid 2016. Here, too, Black is in on the 10th move, in Game 6, Gallagher­
good shape. Lenic, Rijeka Ech 2010.
The critical test in this line is the move B) If White is very fond of the main
9.a4 (instead of the more timid 9.a3) , lines with d2-d3 in the Closed Ruy
which constitutes the so-called 'Kasparov Lopez, his move will be 9.l:f.el, and now
plan' against the Arkhangelsk scheme 9 ... d6 10.a3 transposes to the first game
(d2-d3, ll:Jc3, a2-a4) . we mentioned, the Arkhangelsk game
I think 9 . . . ll:Ja5 i s the best reply, and also between Caruana and Carlsen.
the preference of the strongest players,
while 9 ...b4 is the most popular. In this
Survey I want to show the possibilities

106
Survey RL 12.9

show one idea: 10 ... tt:Jd4!? - see Game 7,


A. Kovacevic-Vujosevic, Yugoslavia tt 1998.
C) Against 9.tl:idS the most popular
reply is 9 ... tl:iaS, which was first played in
the old game Sergeant-Vidmar, Hastings
1929/30. Despite the initial evaluation
of the machines, I think that Black can
achieve equality, as shown in Game 8,
Van Riemsdijk-Milos, Recife 1991.

The World Champion went for the move Conclusion


10 ... °ifd7 in that position, then balanced Do as Magnus Carlsen did - give ...tl:id4 a
the game, and later won after a big chance in the d2-d3 Arkhangelsk! In the
mistake by White on the 40th move. main lines with 9.a3 and 9.a4 Black can
Another popular try is 10 ... tt:JaS. A count on equality; other tries can be met
full coverage of this interesting and in different ways, but in these cases, too,
fashionable line is not my aim here, as Black can consider the knight jump to
it is beyond the scope of this article. But the centre.
in the spirit of this Survey, I want to

The latest news this type of pawn sac is standard. 11. llld S The fight for the d5-point
9.a3 tl:id4 Black offers his e-pawn to get the is standard in this variation.
bishop pair and the possibility to The alternative option, perhaps
Maxlme Vachler-Lagrave 1 open the centre with ...d7-d5. In critical, is ll.ti:le2. More on this
Magnus Carlsen 2015, Carlsen played the natural move in the notes to Game 3.
Paris rapid 2016 (2) 9 ...d6 here, effectively transposing 11 ... tllx dS 12.exdS This was the
1.e4 e5 2. tllf3 lllc 6 3 . �b5 a6 to the fashionable d2-d3 Ruy novelty of the game, moving
4. �a4 tllf6 5.0-0 b5 6 . �b3 �b7 Lopez. After 10.l::te l °*Yd7 11.lll e 2 away from the previously played
7. lllc 31? 7.d3 is the standard lLJdS! (11...l::ta e8 12.lLJg3;!; Adams­ 12.gxd5 gxd5 (12...c6 deserves
move. 7 ... �e7 Other developing Svidler, Paris/St Petersburg consideration: l3.ga2 c500• If
moves are possible with this 2013) 12. lllg 3 llle 6 13. ga2 l::tfe8 White insists on the exchange
piece, but they always lead to the position is approximately of the light-squared bishops,
transpositions after 8.d3 (an balanced , Caruana-Carlsen, St the position after 14.gd5 gxd5
independent path can be found Louis 2015. 10. tllx d4 I suspect 15.exd5 gd6 is OK for the
in the line 7... gc5 8.lllx e5). With this is not the best solution; second player, with ideas like
the bishop on e7 the structure Black obtains a strong pawn ... '1Wh4 or ...f5 -f4, ... °*Yf6) 13.exd5
after the next move is very similar majority on the queenside. The f5 (n ... gd6!?) 14.gf4. Now in
to the modern lines with d2-d3 main alternatives are 10.ti:lxe5 and T.Gara- Zhukova, Serbia tt 2015,
in the closed Ruy Lopez. 8 . d 3 10.ga2 - see next games. 10 ... exd4 Black was a bit optimistic with
O·O An important alternative is 14...g5, and after 15.ge5 White was
8...d6, where play can transpose slightly better. Instead, 14... gd6
to standard lines after 9.a3 0-0 15.gxd6 cxd600 gives a picturesque
(see later). A more independent scheme with five pawns closing
possibility is 9.a4. 9.a31? Probably the d-file. The position is close
with the aim of transposing, to balanced. 12 ... cS 13.dxc6 dxc6
but Black can play differently' 14.J:1e1 c5 Black is better after
Curiously, in three games by the opening, considering his
Carlsen with this position White space advantage on the queenside
continued with this move. and the excellent activity of the
9 ... llld 41 Without transposition! gb7 on the long light-squared
In the Arkhangelsk Variation, diagonal. Meanwhile, White's

107
Ruy Lopez - Arkhangelsk Variation

position is solid, and he should theme. Black's attack progresses, 16.h3 After 16. tlle 2!? d4 17.gf4
be able to resist the enemy forcing White to make one it would be more difficult to
initiative. 1S.a4 Typical of rapid concession after another. 21. J:le3 show compensation. 16 . . . bxc3?1
play. In my view 15. �f4 should Or 21. i::td l cxb2 22.�xb2 J::!e 2-+. 16 ... i::tc S ! 17.'ll!Ye 2 tt:lxeS 18. tt:lxeS
have received priority, not giving 21 ... cxb2 22. hb2 c3 23.�c1 No (18. �xeS bxc3 19.bxc3 gf6=i=) 18 ...
the important diagonal h2-b8 to better is 23. �a3 axbS-+. 23 ... axbS bxc3 19 .bxc3 J::! x c3 with Black's
Black, while the own dark-squared 24. J:lxa8 24.J::! x e8+ J::t x e8 25.ge3 initiative. 17.hxg4 d4 18.bxc3
bishop - White's best minor piece gds-+ 24 ... J:lxa8 White has no J:lc8 18 ... dxc3 19. �xc3± 19.
- is actively positioned, and finish defence. With a minus pawn and c4± Here Black has a tough job
development, although 15... �f6 passive and poorly positioned justifying the two-pawn deficit.
looks fine for Black. 15 ... �d6'i= pieces, it is not possible to fend 19 . . .fS 20.exf6 J:lxf6 21. 1!fe2
Obviously. The dark-squared off Black's multiple threats. 1!fd7 21... �xf3 22.gxf3± 22. tlle S
bishop does a very good offensive 25. �b3 �f4 26.J:le1 J:la10-1 1Wc7 23. �b2 23.f4+- 23 . . . J:ld8
j ob on this diagonal. Now the The game was somewhat one­ 24.�a3? Now the course of the
threat is 16 ... 'll!Y h 4, inducing sided, but it is still a good example game changes. Instead of the
some weaknesses on the white of what can happen in this line text move, 24.f4 was very strong:
kingside. 16. 1Wh5 The queen if Black can without problems 24 ... .l::t e 6 25.'ll!Yd 2 gS 26 . .l::t a el±
will be slightly out of play here. develop his initiative, based on 24 . . . ha3 25.J:lxa3 J:le8 26.f4
Also not good is 16. �g4 due to the active bishop pair - which is 26. i::te l i::tfe6 27.f4 gS� 26 . . . gs�
16 ... �c7 with the idea of ... c5-c4. If the main objective of the pawn 27. 1!fd1 27. �d2 J::t xf4 28. tll f3 J::! e 3
17. �h6 �xh2+ 18.lt>hl ges + and sacrifice 9 ... tlld 4. 29. �aS !;:t 27 ... J:lxf4 28. J:lxf4?
Black wins a pawn, and White's 28.tllf3 J::! e 3 29 . .l::t a 2 �xf3 30.gxf3
kingside play does not provide And rey Vovk 2 i::tf6!?f 28 . . . gxf4 29. tllf3 J:le3 -+
enough compensation. Perhaps Avita! Boruchovsky 30.J:la 1 11fe7 31.1!ff1 J:le2 32. Wh2
the lesser evil was 16.h3, although Riga 2013 (4) 1!fe3 33. Wh3 J:lf2 This is clearly
Black is a bit better after 16... �en. 1.e4 es 2 . tllf3 lDc6 3. �bS a 6 not bad, but the amazing 33 ...
16 ... 1Wc71 Pressing on both 4. �a4 tllf 6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 �b7 h6!! was strongest: 34.gS .l::t f2-+
sides of the board. Also, Black 7.d3 �e7 8 . lDc3 0-0 9.a3 tlld 4 34.11fh1 �xf3? 1 34 ... 'll!Y e 6 35. i::t a S
has better development and a 10. tllx eS In this game White h6! 36 . .l::t fS 'll!Y e 3-+ 35.gxf3 J:lxf3+
terrifically active bishop pair. The accepts the pawn sacrifice on eS. 35 ... h6!?+ 36. Wh4 Incredibly, the
threat of ...c5-c4 must be attended 10 ... tllx b 3 11.cxb3 white king survives here! 36 ...
to; maybe White can consider h6 37 .gS? But not in this way!
17.axbS or the immediate 17. gds. 37. i::ta SD lt>f7 38.b4 'll!Y e 7+ 39.gS
But the next move has an adverse
.I 'if ... J::t x d3 40.'ll!Y d S+ lt>g7 41.'ll!Ye S+
effect on the structure. 17.c3?1 i. .\ .\ i. .\ .\ .\ 'll!Y x eS 42.gxh6+ lt>xh6 43.J::! x eS
c4+ Gaining space. 18. �c2 No .l � should be a draw. 37 . . . hxgS+?
better is 18.dxc4 bxc4-+. 18 ... .\ ttJ Now it is Black who doesn't take
g6 19. 1Wh3 dxc3 20.axbS?I The his chance: 37... i::th 3+! 38. 'll!Y x h3
relatively best 20.bxc3 cxd3+ � hxgS+ 3 9.lt>g4 'll!Ye 6+, winning;
is still clearly better for Black, or the more complex 37 ... 'll!Y f2 +
because of the poor coordination 38.lt>hs �e2-+. 38. �g4 J:lg3 +
of White's army. 39.@fS 1We7 39 ...f3!?'i' 40. 11fdS+
1Wf7+ 40...lt>g7 41. 'll!Y x d4+ lt>f8
11 ... dSI The standard reaction, 42. 'll!Y h 8 + lt>f7= 41. 11fxf7+ wxf7
.I ...
opening the game for the bishops. 42 . J:lxa6 J:lxd3 42 ... .l::t g l 43. i::t a 7+
i.'it' .\ .\ 12.11fc2 12.i::te l!? dxe4 13. �f4 exd3 lt>e8 44.lt>e6 J::t e l+ 45.lt>fS f3
.\ i. .\ 14. 'll!Y x d3 ti:lhS f ; 12.exdS tt:lxdS 13.d4 46 . .l::t a 2 J::! e 2 47.J::! a l l:tg2 48.lt>e6
� (Fuchs-Boruchovsky, Pardubice i::te 2+ 49.lt>fs i::tg 2= 43. wxgs
2015) 13 ... .l::t e 8� 12 ... cs� With f3 44.J:lf6+ we7 45. J:lf4 wd6=
.\ standard compensation: bishop 46. �g4 wcs 47.J:lxf3 J:lc3
.\� 'ii' pair and weaknesses in White 's 48. J:lfS+ @b4 49.J:ld S d3 50. Wf4
�� ��� structure. 13 . tllf3 13. i::te l dxe4 wxb3 S1.c5 wc2 52.@e3 J:la3
14. tllx e4 J::t e 8� 13 ... b4 14.axb4 53.c6 J:lc3 54. J:ld6 d2+ A humpty­
� � l:[ @
cxb4 15.eS tllg 4?115 ... llld 7!? dumpty game, with too many
20 ... J:lfe81-+
Combining the seems more accurate: 16. tlla4 mistakes, but still interesting.
attack on b2 with the back rank d4� with chances for both sides. 'h-'h

108
Survey RL 12.9

Fa biano Caruana 3 2007) 13 ... 'i!Vc7= 12 ... 'ii' d 71? most 'theoretically correct' move
Magnus Carlsen 12 ... llld 7 is another possibility, is 9 . . . ti:laS , which can transpose to
Pa ris ra pid 2016 (4) after which White should retreat our game, except in case of 10 . .Q.a2
1.e4 es 2. lllf3 lllc6 3 . �bS a6 with his bishop. 13. llle 2? The when 10 ... b4 1 1 . ti:Je2 dS is the
4. �a4 lllf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 �b7 standard knight trip to the main line, as in Safarli- Halkias,
7.d3 �e7 8. lllc3 0-0 9.a3 llld 4 kingside, but in this concrete Legnica 2013. 10.axbS The next
10. �a2 In my view this is the position this is a tactical mistake. game will be dedicated to the
most logical treatment, keeping Instead White can play 13.i::t fel h6 more critical options 1 0 . ti:Jxd4
the Spanish bishop. 10. li:Jxd4 was (13 ... li:Jxe4? does not work here: and 10 . .Q.a2. Here 10. ti:JxeS is less
the choice of Vachier- Lagrave in 14 . .Q.xe7 ti:JcS 15. ti:JdS+-) 14 . .Q.d2 good than in the 9 . a3 variation:
our Main Game. After 10 ... exd4 (14 . .Q.h4 i::ta e8=) 14 ... cS 15. i::t a dl 10 ... ti:Jxb3 ll.cxb3 b4 12.ti:Je2 dS
the critical move seems to be i::ta c8 with chances for both sides. with a dangerous black initiative.
1I.li:Je2 (for 11.liJdS see Vachier­ 13 ... lllx e41 Winning a pawn. 10 ... lllx b3 11.cxb3 axbS 12. :XaS
Lagrave-Carlsen, Paris rapid 2016) 14. he7 lllc S 1S.�dS Black's
and now 11...cS (11...dS!? deserves job will be easier now. If 15. 'i!Ve3
consideration) 12. lllg 3 (12.c3 as 'i!Vxe7 16.f4 i::ta e8'F 1S ... bdS
in Mikalsen-Getz, Oslo 2015, can 16. 'ii' x dS 'ii' x e7+ 17.d4 exd4
be met with 12 ... dxc3 13. lllx c3 (13. 18. lllx d4 l:lfe8 19.c4 'ii' e 4 With
bxc3 c4! Vos- Docx, Vlissingen more material, simplify! 2 0 . l:lfd1
2016) 13 ... dS with easy play for 'ii' x dS 21.cxdS l:les 22.ti:Jf3 22.
Black) 12 ... dS (12 ... d6 is another b4 ti:la4+ 22 ... l:le4 23. l:lacl b41
possibility) 13.eS llld 7 14. i::te l!? 24. llld 4 bxa3 2S. bxa3 l:lb8 26.l:ld2
(better than 14.f4 c400, Jaracz­ gs 2 7 .g3 wg7 2s. wg2 l:lb6 29.h4
Furhoff, Stockholm 2005/06) h S 30.l:lcd1 a s 31. l:lc2 a4 32. Wf1
14 ... i::te 8 is reasonable for Black, :es 33. lllc6 :ts 34. ti:lb4 34.Wg2
for instance: 15.liJfS .�.f8 16 . .Q.f4 i::tb 3+ 34 . . . l:lf3 3S.l:la2 l:lb3 12 ... �xaSI? 12... 'i!Vxa8 is perhaps
i::te 6 (16 ... 'i!Vb6!? is a decent option) 35 ... ti:le4!? 36.l:le1 l:lb8 Not bad, more accurate. I chose this
17. llld 6 (17.c3 g6 18. llld 6 gxd6 but 36 ... Wf8! looks even better. game with the bishop recapture
19.exd6 Wf6 20. 'i!Vd2 i::ta e8=) 3 7 . l:le7 l:lc8 38. We2 3 8 . Wg2 c;t;>f8 because the compensation
17 ... .Q.c6 18.c3 dxc3 19.bxc3 'i!Va500 3 9 . ti:lc6 i::td J+ 38 ... WfS 39. l:le3 themes are standard here. After
10 ... lllx f3+ 11. 'ii' xf3 l:le8-+ Now it is over. White has 13. ti:lxeS (13. ti:lxbS dS 14. lllx c7
to exchange his most active piece. 'i!Vas 15. ti:JxdS ti:JxdS 16.exdS
Black won on move 48. WxdS'F with great compensation,
Jakubowski-Getz, Portugal tt
2015) 13 ... b4 14. ti:Je2 (14.lll a4 dS
Some theory 15.exdS .Q.xdS 1 6 . fJ .Q.d6@!?) 14 ...
9.a4 ti:ld4 dS 15.exdS (15 . .Q.gs dxe4 16.li:Jg3
exd3 17. ti:JfS .Q.d8 (Mista- Piorun,
Ahmad Asga rlzadeh 4 Czechia tt 2015/16) RR 18 . .Q.xf6!N
Dorsa Derakhsha n i .9-xf6 19. ti:Jd7 .Q.xb2 20. ti:Jxf8 Wxf8
Teheran 2014 (9) (20 ... gxg2 21. 'i!VhS! h6 2 2 . ti:Jxh6+
1.e4 es 2. lllf3 lllc6 3. �bS a 6 gxh6 23. 'i!Vg4+ Wxf8 24. 'i!Vxg2
4. �a4 lllf 6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 �b7 'i!Vd8=) 21. 'i!Vxd3 .Q.a6 22. 'i!Vd2
11 ... d6 Easy play. Also possible 7.d3 �e7 8.a4 0-0 9 . lllc3 The .bfl 23. 'i!Vxb4+ @gs 24. @xfl=;
is ll ... c6 12. 'iW g3 d6. In Saltaev- combination of the moves d2-d3, 15 . ti:Jg3 dxe4 16. ti:JfS .9-d8 (16 . . . i::te S
Bacrot, Elista 1998, after 13 . .Q.e3 ti:Jc3 and a2-a4 is very popular. In 17. 'i!Vd2 'i!Va6 18. ti:Jxg7 Wxg7
(13 . .Q.h6 llle 8 14 . .Q.e3 .Q.h4 15. 'i!Vf3 similar positions the 13th World 19. 'i!VgS+ c;t;>f8 20. 'i!Vh6+ Wg8 111-1/i
li:Jc7=) 13 ... 'i!Vd7 (13 ... 'i!Vc7!?) 14.h3 Champion Garry Kasparov used Velimirovic- Planinc, Umag 1972)
(14. i::ta dl!?) 14 ... i::ta e8 15. i::ta dl 'i!Vc8 it. Theory considers this scheme 17 . .9-gS (RR 17 . .9-h6 ! ? N 'i!VaS (17 ...
16 . .Q.h6 liJhS a draw was agreed . as the most critical. This concrete gxh6 18. 'i!Vd2 ti:le8 19.li:Jd7 .9-c8
After 17. 'i!Vf3 lllf6 18 . .Q.d2 'iWc7 position was first employed in 20. ti:Jxh6+ Wg7 21.ti:JfS + = Wg6??
the position is close to balanced. Matanovic-Camilleri, Leipzig 22.g4+- ; 17 ... J::t e 8 18.d4 g 6 (18 . . .
12. �gS A new idea, putting this 1960. 9 ... llld 41? In this Survey gxh6 19. � d 2 ti:J d S 2 0 . ti:Jxh6+ Wg7
bishop on a more active square. I've aimed to show this idea 21. ti:lfS + =) 19. ti:le300) 18 . ..Q.xg7 'i!VxeS
12 . .Q.d2 cS 13. i::tfel (Czarnota­ where possible. But here the most 19 . ..Q.xf8 'i!VxfS 20.dxe4 'i!Vxe4
Krysztofiak, Grodzisk Mazowiecki popular move is 9 ... b4, while the 21.f3 'i!Ve3+ 22.Whl ..Q.ds 23 . ..Q.xb4
109
Ruy Lopez - Arkhangelsk Variation

c600} 17 ... J:leS (17 ... exd3 - Mista­ Respecting the threat of . . . fl-fS .
Piorun) 1 8 . tt:lg4 (Perunovic­ B u t 18. 'llf a 7! with t h e i d e a of J:lal
Efimen Perunovic- Efimenko, is better for White. If 18 ... fS then
Qatar 2014; :::. 18.d4} 18 ... tt:lxg4! 19.eS (19.exfS llxfS 20. J:lel ;!;} 19 . . .
19. 'llf x g4 g6=F} lS ... tt:lxdSg? dS (19 ... ggs 2 0 . e 6 h6 21. J:lal±)
Englisch-Pavasovic, Pula 2006. 20.c3 c4 21. �c2 dxc3 22.bxc3 Ac6
13 . �bS dSI? Geenen's 13 ... cS 23.l:lal±. 1S ... �xd S 19.exdS �gs
and Baron Rodriguez' 13 ... d6 are 20. bgS 20. Ag3 'llf b 6 21.llel
also interesting. 14. �eS dxe4 h6= 2 0 . . . 'ifxgS= 21. 'it'a6 'it'xd S
1S.dxe4 be4� A typical position 22. 'ifxbS 'ifes
for this variation. Black's bishop
pair and piece activity give him 10. �d4 An interesting and
critical option, like in the
.I •
good compensation, as does the
fact that the b-pawns are doubled. variation with 9.a3, is l O . ga2. i i i
16. �gs 16. tt:lc3 �b7 17. l:lel tt:ldSg? Then 10 ... tt:lxf3 + (10 ... dS 11. tt:lxeS
16 . . . l:leS Easiest seems the line (Iordachescu-Karakehajov, Galatzi
16 ... h6 17. gh4 gs 1 8 . gg3 'llf x dl 2007) 11... �d6 12.f4;!;} 11. 'llf xf3 c6
1 9 . J:lxdl J:lb8 20. tt:lxc7 J:lxb3g? 17. is logical. Despite some white
h3 17. 'llf x d8 J:lxd8 1 8 . tt:lc3 �b7 initiative , Black should gradually
19. tt:lc4 h6 2 0 . l:lel @f8 21. gh4 balance the game, e.g.: 12. l:lel
gS 2 2 . gg3 J:ld7g? 17 ... h6 1S. �h4 (12. gb3 d 6 13. tt:le2 gc8 14.h3 ge6
'ifcS 18 ... 'llf b 8 ! ? looks better, 1S. gxe6 fxe6 16.d4 dSoo) 12 ... gcs
e.g.: 1 9 . tt:lc3 ga8g? 19. tt:lc3 �b7 13. gb3 (13. ggs h6 14. gxf6 'llf xf6 The ending is balanced. Black
The rest of the game is of lesser lS. 'llf xf6 g xf6=} 13 ... d6 14. ggs fights for the initiative and gets
quality, and in the end probably h6 lS . gxf6 'llf xf6 16. 'llf xf6 gxf6 some advantage, but doesn't
time was a key factor. I will show 17. tt:le2 J:lab8 18.h3 gc8 19.axbS manage to break White's defence;
it with light notes. 20.l:le1 l:ldS?I axbS 20.c3 @g7 and the bishop after the rook exchange the result
20 ... gS 21. �g 3 gf8g? 21. 'ifc2 ;t pair offers Black compensation is not in doubt. 23.l:la 1 g6 24.g3
21. 'llf e 2!± 21 . . . 'ifaS 21... 'llf e 6! for the weakened structure. 10 ... @g7 2 S.b4 l:leS 26.bxcS dxcS
22.lLlg6 2 2 . tt:lg4! J:le8 23. gxf6 exd4 11. tbd S More critical also 2 7 . 'ifc6 l:le6 2S. 'iff3 l:lf6 29.'it'd1
gxf6 24. tt:lxf6+ gxf6 2S.J:lxe8+ here seems to be 11. tt:le2 where 'it'ts 30. 'ifd2 gs 31. l:le1 h S
'llf x e8 26. 'llf fs ± 22 � d 6 23. bf6
•.. 11 ... cS 12.tLlg3 (12.eS (M. Petrov­ 32.J:[e4 l:le6 33.l:lxe6 fxe6 3 4 . 'ife2
gxf6 24. tt:lh4 �f4 2S. 'iffS Bunis, Plovdiv 2013} 12 ... tt:lg4! ? h4 3S.f3 @16 36. @g2 h3+ 37. @12
2s. 'llf e 2!? 2S . . . �gs 26.tt:lf3 �cs 13. tt:lxd4 tLlxeS 14. tt:lfS Af6 1S.c3 °ifdS 3S. 'ife4 'it'a2 39. 'ife2
2 7 . 'ifcs b h 3 2 S . tt:le4 �e6 dS+=' ; 12. �f4 dS 13.es tt:lhS 14.gd2 'ifas 40. 'it'e4 'it'a4 41. 'ife2
29. tt:lfxgs fxgs 30. 'ifes 30. 'llf x c7± g6oo) 12 ... d S is similar to the line 'it'aS 42. 'ife4 'it'as 43. 'ife2
3 0 ... @h7 31. 'ifxc7 'ifcS 32. 'ife7 seen after 9 .a3 (9 ... tt:ld4 10. tt:lxd4 'it'c7 44. 'it'e4 'ifas 4S. 'it'e2 'it'aS
@g7 33. 'iff6+ 3 3 . tt:ld6+- exd4 11.tt:le2) , for example: 13.eS 46.'it'e4 'ifxe4 47.fxe4 g4 4S. @e2
33 . . . @ h 7 34.b4 34. tt:lcS !± tt:ld7 14.f4 c4 1S. ga2 g6 (lS ... �cS ! ?) @es 49. @d2 c4 SO. @c1 �d6
34 . . . 'ifd7 3 S . 'it' e S 'it'd4 36. 'ifc7 16. gd2 J:le8 with chances for both S1.@b2 @cs S2.@a3 �bS S3.eS
3 6 . tt:lcS 'llf x eS 37. J:lxeS ;!; 3 6 ... 'ifxb4 sides. 11 ... �dS 12 . bd S As in cxd3 S4.cxd3 @aSI It's never too
3 7 . l:le3 37. tt:lc3 J:ld7t 37 ... l:ld 1+ the Main Game, the recapture late to go wrong: S4 ... @cS ? SS. @a4
3S.@h2 'it'xb2 39. l:lc3? 3 9 . tt:lf6+ ! with the pawn is not dangerous @ds S 6 . @bs @xeS S7. @cs+­
@ g 7 4 0 . J:lxe6 'llf xf2 41.tt:lhS+ for Black: 12.exdS cS 13.dxc6 dxc6 SS.�b3 @bS S6.@a3 @as
@h7 42. tt:lf6+ @g7= 39 ... 'it'e2 14. gf4 cS lS .axbS axbS 16.J:lxa8 S7. �b3 @bS V2-112
39 . . . 'llf b l-+ 40. lLlg3 40. tt:lf6+ @g6 'llf x a8= 12 . . . c6 Also good is
41. J:lf3 J:ld3+ 40 ... 'it'xf2 41. tt:lhS 12 ... �xdS 13.exdS gd6= with easy
'it'g1+ 42. �g3 'it'e1+ 43 . @h2 play for Black. 13. �b3 cs 14.axbS Three cool cats
'ifh1+ 0-1 14. gf4!? J:lc8 lS.axbS axbS= 14 ... 8 . . . 0-0
axbS 1S. l:lxaS baS lS ... 'llf x a8=
Jan Malik 5 16. �f4 d61? 16 ... ds 17. gxds (17. Joseph Gal lagher 6
Tadeas Kriebel eS 'llf d 7=F) 17 ... �xdS 18.exdS Luka Lenic
Czechia tt 2014/ 15 ( 7 ) 'llf x dS 19.J:lel �f6= 17. 'it'a1 @hS R ijeka Ech 2010 (3)
1.e4 es 2 . tt:lf3 tt:lc6 3. �bS a6 Preparing ... fl-fS , but this threat 1.e4 es 2 . tt:lf3 tt:lc6 3 . �bS a6
4 . �a4 tt:lf6 S.d3 bS 6. �b3 �b7 proves to be a paper tiger. 17 ... 4 . �a4 tt:lf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 �b7
7.0·0 �e7 S.a4 0-0 9 . tt:lc3 tt:ld4 dS= is the correct way. 1S. �d S 7.d3 �e7 8 . tt:lc3 0-0 9. �d2 The

110
Survey RL 12.9

most popular try in practice, but 13.exdS l:!b8 , Meribanov- Socko, 28. "tlt'f6+?1 28. �xe6 Wxe6
a rare guest on high level. 9 . . . Riga 201S, deserves consideration) 29. 1Zlxd4 'ife4 3 0 . 1Zle6+ c;!;>g8
d6 Black threatens to play the 13.exdS cS 14.c3 b3 1S. gxb3 1Zlxb3 31. Wxe4 gxe4 32.1Zlc7 bH
classical ... ILJaS , catching the 16. 'ifxb3 l:!b8g? A.Zhigalko- 28 ... '1ti>g8 28 ... Wh7! 2 9 . l:!dl
S panish bishop. Van der Wiel , Groningen 2 0 04. 1Zlf4 30 . .axd4 1Zle2+ 31. @fl
11. lLJxd4 11. ga2!? 1Zlxf3+ (11... 1Zlxd4 32.1Zlxd4 .ads + 29. hd4
b4 12. ILJdS 1Zlxf3+ 13. 'ifxf3 ILJxdS 1Vxd41 29 ... tllx d4?? (the move
14. gxdS gxdS lS.exdS aS 16.c3 erroneously given in the
bxc3 17. gxc3 fS +:!) 12. 'ifxf3 'ifd7= database) 30. Wxg6++- 30.lLJxd4
11 . . .exd4 12. lLle2 The most �g7 31. "tlt'h4 lLJxd4 32 . .l:tb1 .l:te4
popular move here. 12. IZldS is the 33. "tlt'gs 112-112
standard option, when 12 ... ILJxdS
13. gxdS (Harley- Ken, England Aleksandar Kovacevic 7
2012) 13 ... c6 14. gb3 cS is balanced. Vladi m i r Vujosevic
12 . . . cs 13. tl\g3 dSI? A Lenic Yugoslavia tt 1998 (3)
speciality, first played by M alich 1.e4 es 2 . lLlf3 lLJc6 3. �bS a6
in 196S! 13 ... c4!? 14.dxc4 bxc4 4. �a4 lLlf6 S.0-0 bS 6. �b3 �b7
10.a4 A standard try. But with the 1S. gxc4 1Zlxe4 16. gf4 dS 17. gd3 ;!;; 7.d3 �e7 8 . lLJc3 0-0 9 . .l:te1 Now
bishop on d2, White has, e.g.: 13 ... g6!? 14.eS tlld 7 1S . .l:te1 1S.f4 there is a great chance that the
A) 10. ILJdS ILJxdS 11 ..bdS (11 . c4 16. ga2 (Grgic- Krivec, Croatia game transposes to anti- Marshall
exdS 1Zlb8 12. gas 1Zld7= Garcia tt 2013) 16 ... g6!? 17. 'it'g4 t 1S . . . .l:te8 schemes. We will deal with the
Martinez-Mikhalchishin, 1S ... c4 16. ga2 ILJcS 17. ILJfS ;!; Gao independent possibilities here.
Baku 1980) 11 ... 'ifc8 (11 ... l:!b8 ! ? , Rui-Salem, H o Chi Minh City 9 . . . d6 Preparing ... ILJaS as usual.
a s played b y Khalifman and 2012. 16. "tlt'f3 16. IZlfS ! ? gf8 10.a3 10.a4 is the alternative,
A.Onischuk, is an alternative) 17. gf4 l:!e6!?+:! 16 . . . tllfS After when 10 ... ILJd4 (10 ... ILJaS is more
12. l:!el (12.c3 1Zld8 13. gxb7 'ifxb7 16 ... c4!? 17.dxc4 dxc4 18. 'ifxb7 common, transposing to a well­
14. l:!el 1Zle6= Studer- Pogonina, cxb3 19.cxb3 l:!b8 20. 'iff3 Black's known line of the anti - M arshall)
Gibraltar 2014) 12 ... gf6 (12 ... tlld 8 compensation may be insufficient. 11. 1Zlxd4 exd4 12. 1Zle2 cS is another
i s a l s o popular) 13.c3 1Zlb8 17. tllf S lLle6 18.c3 dxc3 19. bxc3 anti- Marshall line: 13. tllg 3 g6oo
(13 ... 1Zle7 14. gxb7 'ifxb7 1S.d4 �f8 20. "tlt'g4 2 0 . 'ifg3! ? Motylev­ Nisipeanu- Kaidanov, Bled 2002.
1Zlg 6 16. 'ifc2 l:!fe8 17. l:!adl, draw Tomashevsky, Moscow 200S. 10 ... tal4 On higher levels,
agreed in Nijboer- Fedorchuk, 20 . . . '1ti>h81? 20 ... g6!?00 21.d4 cxd4 black players prefer 10 ... 'ifd7!?
Maastricht 20 10) 14. gxb7 (14. 22.cxd4 "tlt'd7 23 . .l:te31? 23.1Zle3!?;!; (Caruana-Carlsen, St Louis 201S) .
d4 1Zld7 lS.dxeS dxeS=) 14 ... 'ifxb7 23 . . . lLJxd41 24.e6 24. Wxd4 Indeed, this should be preferred.
1S.h3 1Zld7 16. 'ife2 (16. 1Zlh2 ILJcS00 WxfS 2S.axbS axbS 2 6 . l:!ael with 11. lLJxd4 exd4
Hauenstein- Biicker, er 20 12) some compensation. 24 ... lLJxe6
16 ... ILJcS !? (16 ... cS 17. 1Zlh2 (Oger­ 2 S . .l:th3gg g6 In "The postman
Boldysh, er 20 13) 17 . . . g6 1 8 . 1Zlg4 always rings twice' fashion, Black
gg7 19. 1Zle3 1Zlb6 20.b3 t ; 16 ... ge7!?) can fight for the advantage with
17.d4 (17. t2lh2 1Zle6 1 8 . 1Zlg4 ge7=) 2S ... ILJd4! ? although he has to do
17 ... 1Zld7 18.b3 l:!fe8 19.dS l:!ec8 some very fine calculation here.
20.c4 c6 21. l:!acl gd8!?+:!; 26. �c3+ d4?! 26 ... 1Zlg7!? 27. gc2 d4
B) 10. 1Zle2 loses control of dS, 28. gxd4 'ife6 29.J:!flgi 27. "tlt'h4?1
so Black can reply 10 ... dS when 27. 1Zlxd4! �g7 2 8 . l:!dl± 2 7 ... hS
11.exdS (11. 1Zlg3 dxe4 12.dxe4
1Zld4= Ni Hua-Tomashevsky,
Sochi 2009) 11 ... ILJxdS 1 2 . l:!el Wh8
• I .t •
13.a4 f6 is balanced, Brkic-Sulava, .t .t.
'it' 12. lLle2 This is critical , bringing
Opatija 2009; .t. ll .t. the knight to an offensive
C) As usual, Black can meet 10.a3 .t. lLJ .t. position on the kingside. Black's
with 10 ... 1Zld4!? (10 ... 'it'd7 Carlsen­ job is easy in case of 12. IZldS
Svidler, London 20 13) 11. 1Zlxd4
� .t. 'ij' tllx dS 13.exdS gf6= Schmindiel­
exd4 12.1Zle2 cS00• 10 . . . tal41? Our i. i. n Mikhalchishin, Bern 19 94. 12 ...
favourite try. 10 ... ILJaS is the most � � � cs 13 . tl\g3 g6 13 ... ds 14.eS lLle8
popular here, and seemingly best: (Leko- Rodriguez, Cienfuegos
n 'it>
1i. ga2 b4 12. ILJdS ILJxdS (12 ... gxdS 1997) lS . ILJfS ! ? ;!; 14. �h6 :es

111
Ruy Lopez - Arkhangelsk Variation

15. 'iff3 �f8 16. �g5 �e7?1 16.g4 @h8!? 17. �h4 f6 18. tlle 3 aS=
16 ... �g7!? 17. "iff4 llc8 with the Mrva- M alaniuk, Pardubice 1997.
idea ... cS-c4 and ... "ifd8-e7-e6, 15 . . . tDd6 16. �c5 l:lfe8 17.bd6
although I still prefer White. cxd6
17.a4;t Now White 's advantage
is evident. 17 . . . �g7 17 ... b4
.I .I •
18. "iff4±; 17 . . . llc8 18.axbS axbS
1 9 . lla7±; 17 ... bxa4 1 8 . llxa4i .i. l l l
18. 'it'f4 d 5 19. �h6+?1 19.axbS .t. l 'if
axbS 20. l:lxa8 �xa8 21.exdS+- l l tl:'i
19 ... �h8? 19 . . . @g8 20.eS tll d 7
21. tllfS i 20.exdS tlJg8 21.d6+­ 9 ... lDs S With eS undefended,

'ifxd6 22. 'ifxd6 22. �xf7 tll x h6 ... tlld 4 is not possible. If 9 ... d6 � � �
23. "ifxd6+- 2 2 ... bd6 23. Jhe8 10. tllx e7+ (10.c3!?) 10 ... tllx e7 11. �gS �� ��
Jhe8 24. bf7 l:lc8 2 5 . �gs± tllg 6 12. tllh 4 t Suarez Pousa-Jepson,
: 'if Ii @
h6 2 6 . �d 2 �g7 2 1 . hg8 Jhg8 Mondariz 1994. 10.fue7+ 11Vxe7
27 ... @xg8 28.axbS axbS 29. lla7 llc7 11. lDh4 The main alternative is 18.c4 An interesting novelty
3 0 . �xh6± 28.axbS axbS 2 9 . l:la 7 11. �gS h6 12. �h4 (12. �xf6 ifxf6= by Herman Claudius. White
l:lb8 3 0 . �4 �e7 31.h4 White Kurajica-Mikhalchishin, Sarajevo played 18. �d2 in Sergeant­
continues with �f4, when ... lla8 2006) 12 ... d6 13. tlld 2 (13. �d2 Vidmar , Hastings 1929/30. This
won't work. 1-0 tllx b3 14.axb3 �e6 15. llfel tlld 7= is favourable for Black after
Tarrasch-Schlechter, Berlin 1918} 18 ... llac8 19. llacl f6 20. llfdl g6
Herman van Rlemsdljk 8 13 ... l:!ae8 14. �xf6 �xf6 IS . �d5 21. tllg 3 llc7 22.c4 bxc4 23.exdS
G i l berto M i los �xd5 16.exd5 cS 17.c3 'ii' g 600 �xd5 24.dxc4 �xd2 2S . llxd2
Recife 1991 ( 7 ) Spassky- Short, Linares 1990. d5'F. 18 . . . dxc4 19.bxc4 19.dxc4!?
1.e4 es 2. tllf 3 tlJc6 3 . �bS a 6 11...fub3 12. fDfS 12.axb3 d5 bxc4 20 .bxc4 �xc4 21. �xd6
4.�a4 lDf6 5 .0-0 b S 6. �b3 �b7 13. tllfS �e6 transposes. 12 ... 11Ve6 g6 22. J:lfcl �e6 23 . �xe6 llxe6
7.d3 �e7 s. t2Jc3 0-0 9 . tDd s It 13.axb3 d S 14.f3 �8 Very solid. 24. tlle 3 and White has some
is better to make this move The main alternative is 14 ... g6 initiative, but Black is close to
immediately. In the previous IS. tllh 6+ @g7 1 6 . �el± tllg 8 17. tllg 4 equality and should not lose. 19 ...
games we saw that in other f6 1 8 . �e3 hS 19. tllf2 tlle 7 20 . �c5 ;!; g6 2 0 . �3 fS Black has sufficient
circumstances it is better to move Vallejo Pons- Kravtsiv, Berlin counterplay, and the draw was
the knight to the kingside (e2-g3) . rapid 201S. 15. �e3 15. �el tlld 6 agreed here. 1h-1h

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

.I .I .i. • .I •
.i. if l l l .i. l l l
l l l
l l tLi l 'if tLi
� � 'if �
� � � 'if �
� ��� �� ���
: @ : @
position after 25 . . . tlle 6-d4 positio n after 23 . . . l:le8-e6 position after 21 . . . l:la8-e8

Black did not play the knight What is the best move for I s it a good idea for White to
to d4, preferring 25 ... g6 White? take on c7?
instead. Try to find the best (solution on page 250) (solution on page 250)
continuation for White.
(solution on page 250)

112
Ruy Lopez The 6 . d 3 Line R L 13 . 5 ( C84)

A venomous way to avo i d t h e ma i n


l i nes
by Benja m i n Bok

1. e4 e5 longer get in ... llla S and ... c7-cS. I won a


2. tlJf3 ttJc6 game with this line against }elmer Jens.
3. ..ib5 a6 However, Jens had a fine position in the
4. ..ia4 ttJf6 opening; he made some mistakes later on.
5. 0-0 ..ie7
6. d3 b5 The slow sta rt
7. ..ib3 d6 First I am going to examine how Black
8. a4 ..id 7 should play if White plays slowly with
9. c3 tlJa5 10. �c2 cS and now 11. lllb d2, for example,
followed by typical Spanish manoeuvres
E 'ii • E such as �el, lllfl -e3/g3. After that we will
1 1. .i. l l l have a look at 10. �c2 cS ll.d4 'ifb8 (as
l l lj well as two other options) 12.axbS axbS
� .\ l 13. �gS, as played by me against Jens, and
!'!:, !'!:, 13.b3, as played by Robin van Kampen.
!£ !'!:, !'!:, t2J
!'!:, !'!:, !'!:, !'!:, Black deviates
� t2J f£ 'if � @ After 1 0 . �c2 cS ll.d4 'ifb8 12. �gS
E 'ii' * E
In the recent World Championship .i. .i. l l l
Match between Magnus Carlsen and
l l lj
Sergey Karjakin in New York, we saw
�l l l !£
many games with the 6.d3 Spanish. White
!'!:, !'!:, !'!:,
aims to avoid big main lines like the
!'!:, ttJ
Marshall, the Breyer and the Zaitsev. The
!'!:, !£ !'!:, !'!:, !'!:,
challenger, Sergey Karjakin, exclusively
� lLJ 'if � @
played the system with 8.a3 (followed by
9. lllc3) . In this Survey we will take a look the main line continues 12 ... h6. In some
at the other main move 8.a4, which is also games Black deviated with moves like 12 ...
quite venomous. The main line continues b4?! and 12 ... �e6, but I believe White can
8 ... �d7 (the bishop may look a bit passive, get a (slight) edge in either case.
but it has a better future here than on b7
or g4) 9.c3, and here 9 ... llla S. If Black were The critical main l i ne
to delay this move with 9 ... 0-0, White So now we arrive at the main line, in
would play 10. �c2!?, and Black can no which both sides have to know what they
113
Ruy Lopez - The 6.d3 Line

are doing. After 12 ... h6 13. �xf6 �xf6


14.dxcS dxc5 , White can either challenge
Black with 15. �d5 or go 15.axbS axbS first.

The latest word


The latest word in this line is 10. �a2,
introduced by Fabiano Caruana, who
could have got a slight advantage against
Veselin Topalov. Some months later, Ivan
Cheparinov improved on this game with
10 ... bxa4 and got a fine position. More
practice after 10. �a2 may be needed to
get a real idea about this line. Fa biano Caruana

Conclusion and might even take over the initiative,


White has some interesting ways to play so I believe 8 ... �d7 9.c3 tl:JaS is a good
in this line, but if Black studies them all line that I would definitely advise black
carefully, he will have nothing to fear players to include into their repertoire.

The slow start comfortably get in ... b5-b4: 14 ... b4 14.cxb4 tllc4 lS. tiJfd2 tiJxd2
9 ... ti:la s 10 . .2.c2 cs 15.cxb4 tll xb4 16. �xb4 cxb4 17.aS 16 . .Q.xdH. 12 ... cxd4 13.cxd4
with slight but annoying pressure. �g4= 14.dxeS tiJxeS 15.tbbd2
Luke McShane 14... b4 1S.h3 J:lb8= 16. tbc4?! �e6 J:lcS 16.axbS axbS 17. �bl 0-0
Levon Aronlan 17. �b3 h6 18. �e3 bxc3 19.bxc3 18.h3 �hS 19. �f4 tiJxf3+ 20. tiJxf3
London 2012 (4 ) dS 20.exd S tiJxdS 21. "ifc2 e41-+ J:la8 21.J:lxaS W'xa8 22.J:le1
1.e4 es 2. tbf3 tbc6 3. �bS a6 22 .dxe4 tiJxe3 23.J:lxe3 J:lxb3 J:ldS 23. "ii' b 3 �g6 24. �gs J:les
4 . �a4 tbf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS 24. 1t'xb3 llla S 2S.tiJxaS bb3 2S. W'xbS J:lb8 26. W'e2 "ifb7 27.eS
7. �b3 d 6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 0-0 26. tiJxb3 .. b6 ... 0-1 ( 7 6 ) dxeS 28. hg6 hxg6 29.tiJxeS
10. tbbd2 With this move order W'xb2 3 0 . tiJxg6 •xe2 31. tiJxe7+
White could have played 1 0 . �c2. Vlad i m i r Baklan •xe7 3 2 . J:lxe7 ... V2-'h ( 134)
10 . . . tba s 11. �c2 cs 12. J:lel Hjorva r Stelnn G reta rsson
Iceland tt 2012/13 ( 7 ) Arya n Ta ri
1.e4 es 2 . tllf3 tbc6 3. �bS a6 S h a h i n Lorparlzangeneh
4. �a4 tbf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS Baku ol 2016 ( 10)
7. �b3 d 6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tba S 1.e4 es 2 . tbf3 tbc6 3. �bS a6
10. �c2 cs 11.d4 tbc6?! 4. �a4 tllf 6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS
7. �b3 d6 8.a4 �d7 9.c3 tba S
K 'if * K 10. �c2 cs 11.d4 cxd4 12.cxd4
.i .i. .\ .\ .\ exd4 13. tiJxd4 0-0
i � .\ �
.\ .\ .\
� � �
12 ... J:leS A very small inaccuracy. � CiJ
More precise was 12 . . . tll c6 13. tll fl
b4, which could eventually
�� � � �
transpose to the game, for example: l:[ CiJ � 'if l:[ w
14. tiJe3 l:te8 15 . .Q.b3 l:tb8 16 . .Q.d2 h6 12. �gS?I White could have
17 . .Q.c4 'i!Yc8 13 .tbfl tbc6 14. tlle3 profited from Black's inaccuracy
14 . .Q.d2! Here Black can no longer by playing 12.dS tlla S 13 .b4 cxb4
114
Survey RL 13.5

14.axbS 14.h3 l:te8 15.axbS axbS believe this is a first small step 19.'il'a1 19.'it'el tlld 7; 19.dxeS
16.b3 is a touch more comfortable in the wrong direction. 2 3 . J:lc1 dxeS 20. 'it'e2 Wa2 21. WxbS tllb 4
for White. 14... axbS 1S. lllc 3 b4 �bS 24. 'il'c3 i.a6 2S. 'il'b4 llld 7 22. WxeS tllx c2 23.l:tcl �xf3 24. l:txc2
16. lLJd S 16. tll c e2!? l:te8 16 ... lllx d S 26. J:lc3 J:lb8?! 26 . . . W a l + 27. Wh2 .Q.xe4 19 ... �6?! 19 ... 'it'b7 20.dxeS
17.exdS �f6= 18. �e3 g6 19. �d3 l:tb8 2 8 . l:ta3 l:txb4 2 9 . l:txal �bS dxeS 20.dxeS 'il'xa1 21.lha1
tllb 7 20. •t3 lha1 21.lha1 tt:lcS The difference with the game: dxeS 22.heS;t Now Black had
22. �c4 �es 23. lllc 6! Not fearing now the b2-pawn is under attack. insufficient compensation for
Black's hidden tactic. 23 ... hc6 2 7 . J:la3 lhb4 28. lha2 �b7 the pawn. White came very close
24.dxc6 •h4 2S.g4! Capturing on On 28 ... �bS , 2 9 . tllb l! is a very to winning but didn't manage
h2 doesn't harm White at all; his nice way of regrouping White's in the end. 22 ... J:lcS 23.i.b2
strong c6-pawn will decide the pieces; the c4-pawn is doomed in i.b4 24. �d3 llla S 2S. hbS
game. 2S ... .. e7 25 ... 'it'xh2+ 2 6 . Wfl many lines. 2 9 . J:la 7 Black's loose J:lb8 26.i.d3 J:ld8 2 7 . �c2 hd2
26. J:le1 llle 6 2 7 . b3 'il'h4 28.h3 minor pieces on the 7th rank are 28. hf6 gxf6 29.J:ld 1 lllx b3
@g7 29. �xe6 1-0 bound to cost him material. 29 ... 30. hb3 �as 31. lhdS+ hdS
fS 30. lllx c4 fxe4 31. lllf d2 i.gs 32. �c2 ... '12-112 ( 8 1 )
Benjamin Bok 32 .i.xgs hxgs 3 3 . tt:lxd6 tt:lcs
Jelmer Jens 34. lllx b7 lllx b7 3 S . tt:lxe4 lhe4
Netherlands tt 2015/ 16 (8) 3 6 . lh b 7 The dust has cleared Black deviates
1.e4 es 2. lllf3 tt:lc6 3. �bS a6 and I am two pawns up in a 12. �gs
4. �a4 lllf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS rook endgame. The rest was not
7. �b3 d6 8.a4 �d7 9.c3 tt:la s difficult. 36 ... J:ld4 3 7 . J:lbS Wf7 Penta la Harlkrlshna
10. �c2 cS 11.d4 'it'b8 12.axbS 38.f3 J:ld2 39.b4 Wf6 40. Wh2 @ts Gabriel Sa rglsslan
41. J:lcs J:lb2 42.bS J:lb4 43. d 6 J:ld4 Douglas 2015 (8)
44.b6 lhd6 4S. J:lbS 1-0 1.e4 es 2. lllf3 tllc 6 3 . �bS a6
E 'if * .i 4. �a4 tt:lf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS
.t .t .t. .t. .t. Robin va n Kampen 7. �b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 llla 5
.t. .t. lj H rant Melkumya n 10.i.c2 c5 11.d4 •bS 12. �gS
lj � .t. .t. Basel 2013 (5) b4?!
1.e4 es 2 . lllf3 tt:lc6 3.i.bS a 6
�� 4 . �a4 lllf 6 S.0-0 i. e 7 6 . d 3 bS
� ttJ 7.i.b3 d6 8.a4 �d7 9.c3 tt:la s
�� ��� 10. �c2 cS 11.d4 •bS 12.axbS
axbS 13 .b3
l:t ttJ � 'if a: w
I now think this is inaccurate as it
limits my options a bit. 12 . . . axbS
13. �gs �e6 14. lllb d2 14.b4 cxb4
15.cxb4 tllc4 1 6 . l:txa8 Wxa8 17. tllc 3
Black has problems defending the
bS-pawn. But that doesn't matter,
he just sacrifices it! 17 ... 0-0 13.cxb4 cxb4 14. lllb d2 h 6 1S. �h4
18. tllx bS l:tc8 Black's pressure 0-0 16.dxeS It would have been
along the (half-)open files on the better to keep the options open
queenside should guarantee him in the centre: 16. tllb 3N tll x b3
at least enough compensation. 17. �xb3 �c6 1 8 . l:tel;!; 16 . . .
For example: 19. �xf6 gxf6 20. Wal 13 ... i.g4 13 ... 0-0!?N 14. tllb d2 dxe5 17. lllb 3 lllx b3 18.hb3
'i!t'xal 21. l:txal dS. The bishops are (14. .Q.b2 exd4 15.cxd4 c4 16.tt:lbd2 �c6 19. J:le1 J:la 7 2 0 . J:lc1 he4
coming to life and it will be hard dS�) 14 ... exd4 15.cxd4 tllc 6 1 6 . l:txa8 21. �xf6 �xf3 22. hes bd1
for White to keep his extra pawn. 'll!Y x a8 17 . .Q.b2 'll!Y a 2 18 . .Q.c3 cxd4 23. hbS lhb8 24. J:lcxd1 Wf8
14...cxd4 1S.cxd4 0-0 16.dS I 19. tllx d4 l:tc8� with good play 2S.�c4 J:ldS 26.b3 as 2 7 . JhdS+
would now prefer to keep the for Black, for example: 20. tllx c6 �xd8 28.J:ld1 We7 29. hf7 Wxf7
tension in the centre for some (20. tllx bS ?? llle S-+) 20 ... l:txc6 30. lhdS J:lc7 31.g3 J:lc3 32. J:ld S
time with 16. 'it'e2. 16 . . . �d 7 17.h3 21. .Q.bl Wa3 22 . .Q.d4 l:tc8 14. lllb d2 lh b 3 33. lhaS J:l a 3 34. J:la 6 b 3
J:lc8 18.i.d3 h6 19. �e3 tt:lc4 cxd4 1S.cxd4 O·O 16.h3 16. �b2 35. Wg2 b2 36. J:lb6 lha4 3 7 . lhb2
20.lhaS •xa8 21. hc4 bxc4 tllc 6 17. l:txa8 Wxa8 16 ... �hS h5 38. J:lbS g6 39. Wh3 @g7 40.f4
22. •c2 'il'a2 Not too bad, but I 17.i.b2 tt:lc6 18.lha8 •xa8 Wh6 41. J:lb6 wg7 42.Wh4 Wh6

115
Ruy Lopez - The 6.d3 Line

43. l:le6 l:lb4 44. l:lf6 l:la4 4S.h3 1S. 1t'dS 1i'c8 16. tt::lx e S �e6
l:lb4 46.g4 l:lxf4 V2-1h 17. 1i'd6

Arya n Ta ri
Ta pani Sammalvuo
Sweden tt 2016/ 17 ( 1 )
1 . e 4 es 2. tt::lf3 tt::lc 6 3. �bS a6
4 . �a4 tt::lf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS
7 . �b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tt::ia s
10. �c2 cs 11.d4 1i'bB 12. �gs
�e6 With this move Black avoids
the forcing lines, but with precise It is good for Black to lure the
play White can hope for a slight bishop to this square, because it
advantage. might get misplaced, especially
when the centre is closed with The advantage of not including
d4-d5. 13 ... �e6 14. tt::lb d2 0-0 axbS axbS: here 17 ... na6 is not
1S.h3 l:lc8 16. �g3 16.axbS axbS possible! 17 ... �e7?1 Black had
17. gd3 b4 16 ... cxd4 16 ... tLlhS to prevent White consolidating
17. gh2 17.cxd4 tt::lh S 18. �h2 tt::lf4 by playing 17 ... b4 18.f4 (18 . tLld3
19.axbS 19. gxf4!?N exf4 2 0 . ne1 ge7 19. '*Vg3 0-0 2 0 . tLld2 b3
gd7 21.axbS (21.eS dS 22.axbS 21. gb l nd8) 18 ... gxeS 19. '*VxeS
axbS 23.tLlb3 tLixb3 24. gxb3 o-o 2 0 . nf2 tLic4 21. '*Vhs gg4
nxal 25. '*Vxal '*Vb7 26. '*Vdl gfs 22. '*VdS ge6. 18. 1i'd1 1 8 . '*Vd3
27. tLlh2 gb4 28. nfl '*Va7 29. gxdS tLlc4 19. tLixc4 gxc4 20. Wg3
gc2 30. '*Ve2 '*Vxd4 31. '*VxbS gxfl 21. '*Vxg7 Wd7 22. Wxfl '*Vg8
nd8 32. gc4 '*VcS; 21.dS bxa4 23. '*Vxg8 nhxg8 18 . . . 1t'c7 18 ...
13. tt::l b d2 13 .b4 (I advise this move (21 ... gf6 22.eS) n. gxa4 gbs b4 19.axbS axbS 20. tt::lf3 O·O
order. limiting Black's options 23. gxbS (23 . tLld4 '*Vb6) 23 ... axbS 21. tt::l b d2 l:lad8 22. 1t'e2 lllc 4
somewhat) 13 ... cxb4 14.cxb4 tLlc4 24. tLld4 '*Vb6 25. tLJ2f3 (25 . tLlfS 23.eS g6 24.l:lfe1 l:lfeB 2S. tt::lx c 4
1 5 . tLlbd2 0-0 16.dS �d7 transposes gf8 26. tLlf3 g6 27. tLJSd4 gg7) �xc4 26. 1t'e3 �fB 2 7 . tt::ld 2 �dS
to the line after 15 ... cxb4. 13 . . . 0-0 25 ... gf6 2 6 . '*Vd3 tLlc4 27. nxa8 28.f4 fS 29.h4 h S 3 0 . l:la6 l:le6
14. d S �d 7 1S.b4 tLlb7 15 . . . nxa8 28.b3 tLleS 2 9 . tLlxeS gxeS 31.l:lea1 1i'b7 32. l:lxe6 he6
cxb4 16.cxb4 tLlc4 17. tLlxc4 bxc4 3 0 . tLlc6 '*Vcs 31. tLlxeS dxeS 3 2 . ndl 33. tt::lf 3 �d S 34. �d1 �e7 3S. �e2
18. '*Ve2 l:k8 (18 ... '*Vxb4 1 9 . nfbl f6) 21 ... axbS 22. gb1 tLic6 (22 ... '*Vb6 Wg7 36. �h2 1i'b6 3 7 . tt::lg S
'*Vc3 (19 ... '*VcS 2 0 . ge3 '*Vc8 23.eS; 22 . . . '*Vb7 23.eS) 23. nxa8 �b3 38. �f3 �c4 3 9 . l:ld 1 l:lxd 1
21. nbH) 2 0 . na2 '*Vas 21. '*Vxc4±) '*Vxa8 24.tLlb3 g6 25. '*Vd2 (25.eS 40. hd1 1i'c6 41. Wg3 1i' d 7
1 9 . nfbl 16. •e2 -.ds 17. �h4 dxeS 26.dS tLlb8 27. tLixeS gf6) 42. �e2 �xe2 4 3 . 1i'xe2 �xgS
g6 18.axbS axbS 19.h3 1t'c7 25 ... '*Va4 19 . . . axbS 20. hf4 exf4 44.hxgs Wf7 4S.b3 We6 46.Wh2
2 0 . �d 3 c4 21. �c2 l:lfc8 22. �gs 21. �d3 tt::lc 4 21...dS!?N 22. 1t'e2 Wf7 4 7 . 1i'a 2 1i'b7 48. 1t'd2 1We4
1t'd8 23. �e3 l:lxa 1 24. l:lxa1 l:lxa 1 2 3 . l:lxa1 �f6;:t 24.l:lc1 49. 1i'd7+ �gs so. •es+ wg7
l:la8 2S. 1t'f1 tt::l h S 26.1i'b1 1t'b8 tt::lx d 2 2 S . l:lxc8+ hes 26. 1i'xd2 S1. 1i'e7+ �gs 52. 1t'e6+ �g7
2 7 . tLlf1 f6 28. tt::lg3 tt::lg 7 29.l:la 2 gs 27. 1t'e2 g4 28. hxg4 hg4 S3. 1i'f6+ Wh7 54. 1t'f7+ �hB
tt::ld B 3 0 . 1i' a 1 V2-V2 29.eS dxes 30.dxes hf3 3 1.gxf3 ss. 1i'f8+ Wh7 S6. 1fh6+ wgs
1WxeS 32. 1fxeS hes 3 3 . �xbS S7. 1t'xg6+ WfB S8. 1i'h6+ We7
hb2 34. Wg2 Wg7 3S. �c4 S9.g6 1-0
The critical m a i n l i n e wgs 36. �b3 �g7 37. �c4 wgs
1 2. . . h G 38. �b3 �g7 39. �c4 V2-V2 Alexa nder Morozevlch
N i kita Vitlugov
Ruslan Ponomariov lldar Khairullin Novi Sad tt 2016 (4)
Fa biano Caruana Jan Gustafsson 1.e4 e s 2. tt::lf3 tLlc6 3 . �bS a6
Thessa loniki 2013 (1) Ba ngkok 2 0 16 (8) 4. �a4 lllf6 S.O·O �e7 6.d3 bS
1.e4 es 2. tt::lf3 tt::lc 6 3 . �bS a6 1.e4 es 2 . tt::lf3 tLlc6 3. �bS a6 7 . �b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tt::ia s
4 . �a4 tt::lf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS 4. �a4 tt::lf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS 10. �c2 cs 11.d4 -.bs 12. �gs
7 . �b3 d 6 8.a4 �d7 9.c3 tt::ia s 7. �b3 d 6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tt::ia s h6 13. hfG hf6 14.axbS axbS
10. �c2 cS 11.d4 1t'b8 12. �gs h6 10. �c2 cs 11.d4 -.bs 12. �gs 1S.dxcS dxc5 16. 1i'dS 1t'c8 17.b4
13 . �h4 h6 13. hf6 hf6 14.dxeS dxeS 17.tLixeS?

116
Survey RL 13.5

best chance of survival was 13 . tlJa3 'it'b8 14. tllc 2 h 6


14 ... c4
probably 26 ... ge7 27. 'l!VxeS 'l!Vxb2 15. ttJe3 1S.�h4?1 After 1 s . gxf6
28. 'l!Vxg7 l:!f8 2 9 . gd3 f6 30. llJd2 £xf6 16. tlle H White has nice
'l!Vxc3 31. @eH. 2 7.g3 h S 28.h4 control of the d S -square and
Sooner or later Black will have enjoys a slight initiative. 1S ... c41
to give up some pawns to get out White's centre is undermined.
of the bind, but the resulting Black quickly takes over now.
endgame won't be a lot of fun 16. tllb4 �e6 17 . J:le1 't1Vb7 18.d4
for Black. 28 . . . �e 7 29. 'it'xeS �g4 19. �b1 tllb 3 2 0 . :Xa8 :Xa8
'tlVxeS 3 0 . lLJxeS gs 31. �a4+ 21. �a2 lLJxe4 22. he7 tlle d2
wt8 32. hxgs hgs 33. �c6 h4 23. hb3 lLJxf3+ 24.gxf3 hf3
17 ... ge6 18. 'l!Vd6 l:!a6+ - the 34.gxh4 :Xh4 3 S . lLJxc4 fS 36. tlle S 2S. hd6 hd1 2 6 . h d 1 exd4
point that proves why including :hl+ 37. We2 :bl 38. tlld 3 fxe4 2 7 .cxd4 't1Vd7 28. �g3 't1Vxd4
14.axbS axbS doesn't help White 39. �xe4 A very interesting Here Black could have obtained a
much. 17 ... �e6 18. 'tlVxcS 'tlVxcS endgame has arisen. I find it winning advantage with 28 ... l:!e 8.
19.bxcS Wd71 20. tlJa3 Wc6 hard to say whether White is Instead, the game peters out
21.l:labl :hb8:f Black will regain winning or not, but in practice to a draw. 29. �f3 'it'd2 30. J:ld1
the pawn and will press without such positions are very tough 'it'xd1+ 31.hd1 :a 1 3 2 . Wg2
any risk. 22.:tdl tllc4 2 3 . lLJxc4 to defend. 39 . . . We7 40.f4 ..Q.h6 :Xd1 3 3 . �es f6 34. �c3 �f7
bxc4 24. :Xb8 :Xb8 2s.:a 1 :b2 41.b4 �g7 42. Wd2 :a 1 43. �d S 3S. tllc2 gs 36.h3 wg6 3 7 . tlJa3
26. �d l wxcS . . . 0-1 (63) Wd6 44.c4 ..Q. d 4 4 S . W c 2 l:la3 J:ld S 38. Wf3 fS 39. Wg3 f4+
46.fS J:lc3 + 4 7 . Wd2 J:la3 48. �e4 40. @g2 WfS 41.f3 hS V2-1h
David Navara :a2+ 49. Wdl ..Q.e3 so.cs+ we7
Fa biano Caruana Sl. tlle s J:lb2 S2. �c2 �gs S3.c6
Rhodes tt 2013 (6) :a2 S4.bS �e3 SS.f6+ Wd8 S6.f7 Nils Grandelius
1.e4 es 2. tllf3 lLJc6 3. �bS a6 �cs S7.b6 :a 1+ S8. @e2 l:la2 Ivan Chepari nov
4. �a4 tllf6 S. 0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS S9.Wd3 J:lb2 60. lLic4 :bs 61. �dl Doha Wch ra pid 2016 (5)
7. �b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tlla S 1-0 1.e4 es 2. tllf3 tllc 6 3 . �bS a6
10. �c2 cs 11.d4 't1V b 8 12. �gs 4.�a4 tllf6 S.0-0 �e7 6.d3 bS
h6 13. �xf6 hf6 14.dxcS dxcS 7 . ..Q.b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tlla S
1S. 'tlVdS The latest word 10. �a2 bxa4 Ivan Cheparinov
10. ka 2 improves on the game of his
countryman, Veselin Topalov.
Fa biano Caruana
Vesel l n Topalov
St Louis 2016 (2)
.I 'if • .I
1.e4 es 2. tllf3 lLic6 3. �bS a 6 l .t .t l .t. l
4 . �a4 tllf 6 S.0-0 ..Q. e 7 6 . d 3 bS l l �
7 . �b3 d6 8.a4 �d 7 9.c3 tlJa S � l
10. �a2
l f!:,
f!:, f!:, l2J
.I 'if • .I
� f!:, f!:, f!:, f!:,
1S... tllb 7 16.axbS 16.lldl �e6 l .t .t l l l
l:l ttJ � 'if : �
17. °ll!Y c 6+ We7 18.axb5 l:!c8 19. 'l!Vb6 l �
aS! 20. tlla 3 @f8 :f 16 ... �e6 l 11. tll b d2
ll.d4 0 - 0 12. lle l tll c 6
17. 't1Vc6+ �d7 18. 'it'dS �e6 also looks fine for Black. 11 . . . 0-0
19. 'it'dl axbS 20.:Xa8 'ifxa8
f!:, 12. �b1 c s 13 . ..Q.c2 �b5 14.c4
21. tlJa 3 'tlVaS 21 ... b4 22.cxb4 cxb4 f!:, f!:, l2J �c6 15. ha4 'it' b 6 16. lt:ib1
23. tllb S 'l!Vd8 24. �xd8+ @xd8 � f!:, f!:, f!:, f!:, h a 4 17 . :Xa4 lt:ic6 18 . lt:ic3
25.l:!cl tllc S; 25 ... @e7 22. lLJxbS :tb8 19 . :a 3 'it'b7 2 0 . :e 1
� ttJ � � :t. �
�c4? 22 ... 0-0 23. 'l!Ye2 c4 24. tll a 3 .i.d8 2 1 . :e2 li:Jd 7 The start of
llJd6� 23. tlld 6+ lLJxd6 24. 'it'xd 6 10 ... cS
10 ... bxa4!? will be seen in a nice plan. 2 2 .g3 tllf 8 2 3 . tlld S
hfl 2S. Wxf1 'it'bS+ 26.Wel the next game. 11. �gS 11.axbS tlle 6 = I n t h e remainder of t h e
26. Wgl was even stronger, e.g.: is better, eliminating ... bxa4 g a m e it s e e m s that not much
26 ... 'l!Vd7 27. 'l!VxcS ± 26 ... c4 Black's for good. 11 ... 0-0 12.axbS axbS happened, but if anyone was

117
Ruy Lopez - The 6.dJ Line

under pressure it was definitely 3 0 . J:lc2 J:la 7 31. J:lb3 :Xb3 3 9 . J:lcl a4 40. J:la l J:la 7 41.Wfa3
White. 2 4 . .lle 3 0.c7 25. tt:lc3 3 2 . Wfxb3 l:lb7 3 3 . Wfa3 l:lb4 .llc s 4 2 . Wfxb4 b b 4 4 3 . tt:lc2
tt:ld4 2 6 . b d 4 cxd4 2 7 . tt:ld S a s 34. "if a 2 "if c s 3 5 . J:lcl g6 3 6 . tt:lel .llc s 4 4 . tt:la 3 ba3 45.:Xa3 l:lb7
2 8 . Wfa4 'iti>f8 2 9 . tt:lxc7 Wfxc7 l:lb7 3 7 . J:lc2 Wt'b4 38. 'iti>fl .ll b 6 46.J:lxa4 l:lxb2 V2-V2

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

I.

• i i
.t .t i
'ii' ttJ i i

� ttJ
�� � � �
� l:r @
position after 15 . . . tl:la 5-b7 position after 22. tl:la3xb5 position after 16. 'l!Hd 1-d 5
Should Black fear 1 6 . �dl ? Should Black go after the What is the best way for Black
(solution on page 250) exchange with 22 . gc4 ? . . to protect himself against
(solution on page 250) White's threats?
(solution on page 251)

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118
Cata l a n Open i n g Open Variation 6 dxc4 CA 5 . 5 ( E0 5 )
. . .

T h e Bu kavs h i n Va r i ation -
a prom i si ng su rprise wea pon
by Istva n Almasi

1. d4 lt:Jf6 to name this line the Bukavshin Variation


2. c4 e6 in memory of the Russian player, who
3. g3 d5 passed away at a tragically young age.
4. .i.g2 .i.e7 He was only 20 years old when he died
5. lLif3 0-0 slightly more than a year ago.
6. 0-0 dxc4
7. 'Wc2 b6 The most natu ra l reaction
White has three main choices to
challenge 7 ... b6. The most natural move
is, of course, 8. 'iY xc4, regaining the pawn.
However, after 8 ... Ab7 9 . tl:lc3 tl:lbd7 10 . .lld l
cs

Against the Open Catalan, 7. '1Wc2 is the


most popular move nowadays. Black
usually plays 7 ... a6, when White has a
choice between two main lines: 8. 11Wxc4
bS 9. 'iYc2 Ab7 or 8.a4 Ad7 9. 'iY xc4
Ac6. In 201S and 2016, however, a very Black has no problems. The position after
interesting and so far unknown idea move 10 can arise from several different
appeared for Black: 7 ... b6. Although openings, e.g.: l.d4 tl:lf6 2.c4 e6 3 . tl:lf3 dS
the first game with this move in my 4.g3 Ae7 s . �g2 o - o 6.0-0 b6 7. 'iYc2 (here
database dates back to 1992, and a few 7. tl:lc3 Ab7 8.cxdS or 8.tl:leS are critical) ,
games were played in the 1990s, the or l.d4 tl:lf6 2.c4 e6 3.tl:lf3 dS 4.g3 dxc4
real breakthrough came two years ago. s. 11Wa4+ tl:lbd7 6. '1Wxc4 b6 7. Ag2 Ab7,
Ivan Bukavshin, the young and talented or 1. tl:lf3 tl:lf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 dS 4. Ag2 dxc4
Russian grandmaster, adopted this line, S. 'iYa4+ tl:lbd7 8.0-0 cS 9. 11Wxc4 b6 10.d4
and it is due to his efforts that it has �b7. These systems are old and trusted,
found followers among 2700 players so the position after move 10 should be
(Fressinet, Bacrot) . Therefore I would like by no means worse for Black.
119
Catalan Opening - Open Variation 6 dxc4
...

More tricky � · .! .1 •
More tricky is 8 . �g5 , after which White i .! i i i
is hoping for the naive 8 ... �b7?. The point i i i•
is 9. �xf6 �xf6 10. ttJgS , which leads to a 'if
winning position for White. � 'fll
8 ... �a6 and 8 ... t2Jd5 are equivalent options �
for Black. 8 ... �a6 is more in the spirit � �� �
of the opening: Black leaves the long l:l t2J � l:l @
diagonal open until there is some specific
threat. 8 ... t2Jd5, on the other hand, forces his own a6-pawn prevents him from
the exchange of the dark-squared bishops playing ll ... �a6, preventing him from
(in my opinion, this is the drawback of taking the e2-pawn! After inserting ... a7-
8 . �g5) , and later Black puts the c8-bishop a6 and a2-a4, Black meets 9. t2Je5 with
on b7 instead. 9 ... �a7 (Ragger-V.Karpov, Minsk blitz
2015).
Critica l The other line the idea is worth
The most critical continuation is 8 . t2Je5, of comparing to is 7 ... b5 8.a4 b4.
course. However, this is also what Black
is hoping for! Here Black sacrifices the
exchange with 8 ... 'iVxd4 9. �xa8 'iVxeS.

� · .! .1 •
i i .! i i i
i i•
'if
i

��'fll �� � Here 9. tt:le5 'ti'xd4 10.�xa8 'ti'xe5 leads to
l:l t2J � �@ a very similar position, but this version

Black has two pawns for the exchange


and some pressure on the queenside.
As the game Cheparinov-Bacrot
demonstrates, Black can even give the
c4-pawn, creating enough compensation
after 10. �f3 t2Jd5 ll. 'iix c4 �a6 12. 'ii a4
�f6. The weakness of the b2-pawn and
the bishop pair forced White to escape
with a draw by repetition very soon.
It's worth comparing this 7 ... b6 idea to
first 7 ... a6 8.a4 and then 8 ... b6. In the
latter line, Black cannot sacrifice the
exchange after 9. t2Je5 , because after
Iva n B u kavsh l n (1995-2016)
9 ... 'ii x d4 10. �xa8 'ii x e5 11. 'ii x c4
120
Survey CA 5.5

is even better for Black in view of his The answer is obvious: in the latter case,
outpost on b4. However, White has other the a6- and bS-pawns control more space
alternatives on move 9, e.g. 9.ttJbd2, or even on the queenside, and if White develops
9. ttJfd2!?. These moves cause more problems his knight to c3, there is always the
for Black, and White keeps an eye on the possibility of ... b5-b4.
weakened c4-square (this is the drawback However, the line 7 ... b6 8. 'tWxc4 gb7
of the early b-pawn push). In the Bukavshin should rather be compared to the
Variation, White has no such possibilities. position after the move sequence 7 ... a6
8.a4 gd7 9. 'tWxc4 gc6,
Conclusion
A question may come to mind: in what
sense is 7 ...b6 8. �xc4 Ab7

which makes it clear that the version


with ... b7-b6/. .. gb7 is better for Black,
since he can play for ... c7-c5. As it is
better for Black than 7 ... a6 8. Wk'xc4 bS White who decides which position he
9. 'tWc2 gb7 ? goes for (8. 'tWxc4 or 8.a4) , it is a logical
option to take this choice away and play
according to your own taste.
I think Black should not worry until
White finds some improvement - a
decent set-up in the line 8.ll:JeS.
The modest alternatives (8. 'tWxc4, 8 . ggs ,
8 . ll:lbd2, 8 . .!:ldl) promise White no edge at
the moment.

Wh ite a lternatives B) ,;; 8 ... .Q.a6 9. tt:leS tt:ldS 10. tt:lxc4


7. . . b6 (the move 10.a3! (6. e2·e4) is too
deep to find ... ) 10 . . . bs (10 ... ti::id 7)
Ta mir Nabaty 11.tt:lc6 �e8 12.e4 tt:l5f6 13.tt:lc3±)
La urent Fressinet ll.a4! ;!;; ll.e4 tt:lb6) 10 ... tt:ld7
Gjakova 2016 (6) (Kozul-Quintiliano Pinto, Doha
1.d4 lllf6 2.c4 e6 3. lllf3 dS 4.g3 rapid 2016) 11. tt:le3 (11.e4 tt:lb4
�e7 5. �g2 0-0 6.0·0 dxc4 7. °tt' c 2 12. �b3 cS 13.dS bS 14. tt:le3oo)
b6 8. lllb d2 8 . nd1 and now: ll . . . tt:l7f6 12.a3!? (12. tt:lxdS exdS
A) 8 . . . .Q.b7 9. �xc4 transposes 13 . .Q.f4 �d7) 12 ... nc8 (12 ... lllx e3
into 8 . �xc4 .Q.b7 9 . ndl - see the 13 . .Q.xe3 nc8 14. tt:lc3 ;!;) 13.lLlxdS
game Artemiev- Bukavshin; exdS 14 . .Q.h3;!;

121
Catalan Opening - Open Variation 6 ... dxc4

8 . . . .i.b7 12. '1Wb3 gxcS) 12 ... gxg2 13. @xg2 (6 ... c7-cS) 14.dS (14.e3 cS lS.dS
There are other alternatives too: (Unuk- Repkova, Baku 2016) bS 16.axbS t2lb6 17. 'l!!Y fl) 14 ...
A) 8 ... bS (7 ... bs 8 .a4 gb7 (here 8 ... 13 ... l::tc 8 14.dxcS (14. t2lxd7 '1Wxd7 bS lS.axbS tLib6 = Yemelin·
b4 is the usual move) 9.axbS a6 lS.dxcS 'ii' c 6+) 14 ... l::tx cS 1S . t2ixd7 Esipenko, Helsinki 2016. 10.dxcS
10. t2lc3 is better for White. But here t2ixd7 16. ge3 '1Wa8+ 17.f3 l::td S=; 11Vc8 :;, 10 ... ..axcS ll.t2lc3 '1We7=;
White already has developed the ttJ B) 10 ... '1Wc8!? 6 ... c7-cS ; ... ge4- ll... t2lbd7= 11.tLlbd2 'ihcs 11 . . .
to d2 ...) 9.a4 gb7 10.axbS a6 ll.bxa6 '1Wb7; bxcS ! ? 12 . tLleS?I L e k o h e a d s for
t2ixa6 12. tLlxc4;!; and although Black C) 10 . . . cS 11.dxcS ge4 12. '1Wb3 mass trades and a draw, as usual.
has some compensation for the gxcS 13. tLifeS (l3. gf4 l::tc 8 :;, 12. J:!.acl; :;, 12. 'IWxcS 12 . . . tLld S
pawn the opening has turned out (13 ... gds ! ?) 14.t2ld6? gxd6 12 . . . '1Wxc4 13. t2lexc4 .axg2 l4. \t>xg2
in White's favour; lS . .axd6 gc2) 13 ... ..ads !? l4. t2lxd7 t2lc6= 13. 11VxcS hes 14.%lac1
B) 8 ... t2lc6!? If now White calmly '1Wxd7 ls . .ags '1Wb7= 10. 1i'b3 tbc6 l4. t2le4 t2la6 14 . . . gS?I :;, l4 ... l::td 8 ;
takes back the c4-pawn, Black must 10 ... ..ads ! ? 11 . .i.f4 lt:ld s 12 . .C.td 1 :;, 1 4 ... tLia6 1 S. .i.e3 l S . �xgS!
play 9 ... gb7 anyway. So from this lDcb4 12 . . . t2ixf4 13.gxf4 'i!!Y d S+:! f6 16. �xf6 l::t x f6 l 7 . t2le4 l::t f8
aspect 8 ... t2lc6 is not better than 13 . tLle1 tLlxf4 14.gxf4 'iVdS 1 8 . ttJxcS bxcS 19. l::t x cS ;!; 1S . . . .i.e7
8 ... gb7, but in the spirit of 7 ...b6 14 ... .axg2 lS. ttJxg2 'i!!Y d S= 1S.a3 lS ... ttJxe3? 16 . .axb7+- 16. tLle4
he invites White to play 9.ttJeS and 1S.f3 .ag 6 l6.e4 (6 tLleS) 16 ... '1Wb7! l6. l::tc 7!? t2lxc7 l7 . .axb7 f6 1 8 . l::t c l
wants to create chaos on the board: 17.ttJeS ?! cS ! 1S ... hg2 16. tLixg2 t2iba6 19 . .axa8 l::t x a8oo 16 ...
9.tLleS!? (9. "i!fxc4 gb7=; 9. t2ixc4 lDc6 17. 'iVc3 .i.f6 18. tLies tLle7 ! f6= 1 7 . tLlc4 .C.d8 18. tLic3 tLixc3
gb7=) 9 ... tLixd4 (9 ... t2lb4 10. '1Wbl 1 9 . .C.ac1 .C.ac8 2 0 . 'iVc4 'h-'h 19. :Xc3 hg2 20. 'it;>xg2 lba 6
'1Wxd4 11. t2ldxc4 ga6 (11..J:tbS 21.a3 .C.ac8 22 . .C.fc1 .C.c7 2 3 . tLld2
12.a3±) 12.b3 (6 gb2; a2-a3; 12. ge3 .C.dc8 24. tLie4 'it;>f7 2 S .f4 gxf4
'1Wd8 13. gxa8 '1Wxa8�) 12 ... gxc4 The most natural reaction 26.gxf4 h6 27 . .i.d4 fS 2 8 . tLlf2
n. gb2 '1Wd2 14.bxc4�) 10. 'ii' xc4 8. �xc4 :Xc3 2 9 . :Xc3 :Xc3 3 0 . hc3
bS (10 ... l:fu8? 11.e3+-) ll. 'i!!Y d 3 l::tb 8 tLlcS 31 . .i.d4 lt:ld 7 3 2 . tLld 3 .i.f6
12.e3 ttJfS 13. '1Wxd8 gxd8 (13 ... l::tx d8? Peter Leko 3 3 . bf6 'it;>xf6 34. Wf3 es 3S.e4
14. t2lc6) 14. tLlb3�; Ivan Bu kavshln 'it;>e6 :;, 3S ... hS= 36.exfS+ 'it;>xfS
C) 8 ... c3! is an unexpectedly Moscow rapid tt 2015 ( 1 ) 3 7 . tLixe s tLixes+ 38.fxeS 'it;>xeS
strong move! 9 .bxc3 (9 . '1Wxc3 1.d4 d S 2 .c4 e6 3. tLlf3 tLlf6 4.g3 39. wg4+- 'it;>f6 40. 'it;>f4 40.'<t>hs?
ga6!? (9 ... �b7=) 10. t2lc4 cS 11.dxcS .i.e7 S . .i.g2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4 7. 'iVc2 '<t>g7 4l.a4 aS= 40 . . . 'it;>g6 41. Wg4
t2ibd7 12.c6 ttJdS (12 ... l::tc 8 13. t2ld4! b6 8. 'iVxc4 .i.b7 9 . .if4 Wf6 42 . 'it;>h S 'it;>g7 43.a4 W h 7
ttJdS 14. gxdS exdS 1S . t2ie3;!;) 4 4 . b 4 44. \t>h4! 44 . . . a 6 4 5 . b 5
13. '1Wc2 l::tc 8 +:!) 9 ... gb7 10.e4 axb5 46.axbS 'it;> g 7 4 7 . 'it;>g4 'it;>g6
cs (10 ... t2ibd7?! 11.c4! cs (11 ... es 48. 'it;>f4 'it;>f6 49. 'it;>e4 'it;>e6 50.h3
12.dxeS t2lg4 13. gb2) 12.dS ;!;) 11.eS 'it;>d6 51. Wd4 'it;>e6 52. 'it;>e4 'it;>d6
ttJdS (11 ... tLifd7? 12.tLlgS+-) 12.a3 S3.Wd4 We6 54. 'it;>e4 'h-'h
(6 c3-c4; 12.c4 t2lb4) 12 . . . cxd4
(12 ... t2id7 13.c4 t2ic7 14. tLlgS gxgS Vladislav Artemlev
1S. gxb7 l::tb 8 16. ge4 gxd2! (16 ... Ivan B u kavsh l n
h6? 17.f4±) 17. gxd2 h600) 13. t2ixd4 Ch ita 2 0 1 5 ( 6 )
(13.cxd4?!=i=) 13... '1Wc8+:! 9. tLlxc4 1 . d 4 tbf6 2.c4 e6 3. tbf3 d S 4.g3
.ie7 5 . .ig2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4 7. 'iVc2
b6 8. 'iVxc4 .ib7 9 . tbc3
9 . . . cs 9 . . . ttJdS ! ? (if Black is going
to play for a win and wants to
avoid piece exchanges) :
A) 1 0 . lLieS cS ll. tLlc3 f6! ? (11 ...
cxd4 12. tLlxdS gxdS 13 . ..axdS
'IWxdS 14. 'IWxdS exdS lS. l::ta cl)
l2. t2ld3 (12 . t2lf3 t2lc6) l2 ... cxd4
13. tLlxdS �xdS 14 . ..axdS 'IWxdS
lS. 'IWxdS exdS l6 . .axb8 l::ta xb8
17. l::t fdl = ;
9 . . . .i.e4
9 . . . t2ibd7 10. l::td l and now: B ) I O . tLlc3 t2ixf4 ll.gxf4 t2id7
A) 10 ... ge4 11. '1Wb3 cS 12. ttJfeS (12. (11.. .cS 1 2 . l::t fdl '1Wc7) 12. l::tfdl a6
dxcS gxcS - 10 ... cS 11.dxcS ge4 (l2 ... t2if6 6 ... ttJdS) 13.a4 '1Wc8 9 . . . tLlbd7 9 ... cS and now:
122
Survey CA 5.5

A) 10.l:tdl 'i!fc8 (10 ... lLibd7 - 9 ... @h7 29. 'i!fhS+ 1/2- 1/2 Andreikin­ 15. �e2 'i!fe7) 13 ... 'i!fxf4 14. ilxf4
tLibd7 10.l:tdl c5) 11 . .Q.f4 (11 . .Q.gs Vitiugov, Plovdiv 2008. 10 . .igS l:tfd 8 15.lLiel .Q.xg2 16. @xg2=
cxd4 12. 'i!fxd4 h6 13 . .Q.f4 l:td8 A) 10 . .Q.f4 cS 11. l:tfdl cxd4 Miles- Beliavsky, Tilburg 1981.
14. 'i!fa4 lLibd7 15. 'i!fc2 lLidS 16. l:tacl (Topalov- Carlsen, Bilbao rapid 10... J:lc8 I really cannot see what
tt:lxc3 17. 'i!fxc3 'i!fxc3 1 8 . l:txc3 tt:lcS 2007; ;,, ll...l:tc8 Strutinskaya­ was wrong with 10 ... cS 11. l:tadl
19.l:tccl 1/z-1/z Prohaszka-Sipos, Solozhenkina, Moscow 2016) (Kanep-Schuurman, Cappelle­
Hungary n 20 16) 11. . . lLibd7 (11 . . . 12. lLixd4 ilxg2 (12 ... l:tc8 13.lLic6!? la-Grande 2008; 11.dxcS l:tc8)
cxd4=) 12.lLibS (12. l:tacl cxd4 .Q.xc6 14 . .Q.xc6 es 1S . .Q.e3 'i!fc7 ll...l:tc8 6 12. 'i!fa4 ilc6! 11. tLlbSI?
13. 'i!fxc8 l:taxc8 14. lLixd4 .Q.xg2 16. lLidS tLixdS 17 . .Q.xdS ;!;) 13. @xg2 .ids 12. 'ifc2 .ie4 13. 'ifc1
15. @xg2 a6= Dragomirescu­ 'i!fc8 14. 'i!fxc8 (14. lLic6 'i!fb7 15.f3 13. 'i!fa4 a6 13 ... c6 14. tt:lc3 .ig6=
Peptan, Tusnad 2004) 12 ... .Q.ds .Q.c5) 14 ... l:tfxc8=; 1S. J:ld1 lbds 16 . .if4 tbxc3 16 ...
13. 'i!fc2 (Andersen-Glud, Svend ­ B) 1 0 . l:tdl bS!? 1 7 . 'ifxc3 .ie4 17 ... cs 18.d5!
borg 2016; 13. 'i!fcl a6 (13 ... 'i!fb7 18. J:laci bS 1 9 .'if e 3 .id s 2 0 . 'ifd3
14. tt:lc7 l:tac8 15 . lLixdS tLixd5=) ts 21. tLies tbxes 22. hes hg2
14. lLic7 .Q.xf3 15 . .Q.xf3 l:ta7) 23. @xg2 'ifdS+ 24.f3;t a6 2S. 'ifb3
13 ... 'i!fb7!? (13 ... a6 14. lLic3 (14. lLic7? 25. 'iW e3;!; 2S ... J:lfd8 26. 'ifxdS?
ile4 15. 'i!fb3 l:ta7; 14.tt:ld6 'i!fc6) 26. 'i!fe3;!; 6 'i!fxa2 27.b3! 26 . . . J:lxd S
14 ... cxd4 15. l:txd4 ilxf3 (15 ... ilb7=) 2 7 . J:ld3 c 5 = 2 8 . J:la 3 J:lc6 29.e4
16 . .Q.xf3 es 17. l:txd7 'i!fxd7 18. ilxa8 J:ld8 30.dxcS J:ld2 + 31. �hi fxe4
exf4=; 32 .fxe4 J:le2 33.b4 J:lxe4 34 . .ic3
B) 10.dxcS ilxcS 11. ilgS lLibd 7
12.l:tadl l:tc8 1 3 . 'i!fh4

.i. ' .\
Bl) 10 ... lLid5 11.lLieS ;!; tLixc3 ? .\ .I .\
(Luyks- Dantas, Portugal 1992) i t::,
12 . .Q.xb7± ;
B2) 10 ... 'ii' c 8!? 11 . .Q.gs (11 . .Q.f4 c s
t::, .I
- 9 ... cs 1 0 . l:tdl 'ii' c 8 11 . .Q.f4 tLibd7) l:1 .i £::,
11 . . . cS 12. l:tacl h6 (12 ... l:td8=) t::, t::,
13 . .Q.xf6 tLixf6 14.dxc5 ilxc5 (if
lI �
Black is going to play ... c7-c5
anyway, there is no need to 34 ... hcSI 35.bxcS b4 36. bb4
'prepare' it with ... 'i!fd8-c8. Now 36.l:ta4?! l:txcS 36 . . . J:lxb4 3 7 . J:lb3
the queen would be bener placed J:ld4 38. J:lb6 J:lxb6 39.cxb6 J:lb4 . . .
Bl) 13 ... 'i!fe7 14.e4 (14. l:txd7!? on e7) 15. 'i!ff4 l:td8 1 6 . lLie5 .Q.xg2 V2-1h ( 5 5 )
'i!fxd7 15. lLieS 'i!fc7 (15 ... 'i!fe7? 17. @xg2 l:txdl 1 8 . l:txdl= Erdos­
16. lLig4+- ; 15 ... 'i!fd4? 16 . .Q.xf6 Bartel, Katowice 2016;
gxf6? 17. lLig4+-) 16 . .Q.xf6 gxf6 B3) 10 ... cS 11.dxcS (11.tLieS .Q.xg2 M o r e tricky
17. ilxb7 (17. lLig4 .Q.e7 18 . .Q.xb7 12. @xg2 'ii' c 7 (12 ... cxd4 13.lLic6 a . ii.gs
fS 19.lLif6+ .Q.xf6 20. 'ii' xf6 'ii' x b7 lk8 14. lLixe7+ 'ii' x e7 15. 'i!fxd4
21. 'i!fg5+=) 17 ... 'ii' x e5 (17 ... 'i!fxb7? l:tfd8 16. 'i!fh4 h6= D. Benjamin­ Levon Aronlan
1 8 . lLie4 .Q.e7 19.lLig4±) 18 . .Q.xc8 Kaliksteyn, Philadelphia 1993) La urent Fresslnet
l:txc8=) 14 ... h6 (Antic-Livaic, 13.tt:lxd7 'i!fxd7 14.dxcS 'ii' c 6+ 15.e4 Paris b l itz 2016 ( 1 1 )
Skopje 2016) 15. l:txd7 'i!fxd7 (D.Fridman- Rambaldi, Bergamo 1. lLif3 d5 2.g3 lllf 6 3. �g2 e 6
16 . .Q.xf6 gxf6 17.eS ! ? fS 18. 'ii' x h6 2016) 15 ... l:tac8=) 11 ... .Q.xcS There 4.0-0 � e 7 5.c4 0 - 0 6 . d 4 dxc4
.Q.xf3 19 . .Q.xf3 l:tfd 8 20. 'ii° g 5+ @f8 was a game Topalov-Carlsen, 7 . 'ifc2 b6 8 . .igS .ia 6
21. 'i!fh6+= 'it>e8 22 . .Q.e2; Linares 2007, where Black was A) 8 ... .Q.b7? 9 . .Q.xf6 .Q.xf6 10.lLig5!
B2) 13 ... 'ii' e 8 14.e4 h6 15 . .Q.xh6 to move here! White played .Q.xg5 11 . .Q.xb7 lLid7 12 . .Q.xa8 'i!fxa8
gxh6 16. 'ii' x h6 lLih7 17. lLig5 !:tel at one point and then later 13. 'i!fxc4+- Cheparinov-Bekker
tLixg5 18. 'i!fxg5+ @h7 19.e5 went co dl with the same rook. Jensen, Croatia n 2016;
.Q.xg2 20. 'i!fh5+ Wg7 21. '.t>xg2 12 . .Q.gs (12 . .Q.f4 Cebalo- Karaklajic, B) 8 ... tLibd7?! 9 . tt:leS tt:lxeS
(21. 'ii' g 4+=) 21... 'i!fe7 (21 . . . l:th8!) Pula 1971 12... 'i!fe7=) 12 ... 'i!fc7 10 . .Q.xf6! gxf6 (10 ... .Q.xf6?
22. 'ii'g 4+ '.t>h8 23. 'ii° h S+ 'iti>g7 24.b4 (12 .. Jk8 13. 'i!ff4 (13 . .Q.xf6 'ii' xf6) 11.dxeS+-) 11.dxeS J:lb8 12.J:ldl
.Q.xb4 2S. 'i!fg4+ @h8 26.l:lxd7 13 ... 'ii' e 8=; 12 ... 'i!fc8!? 6 ... h7- h6) 'i!fe8 (12 ... .Q.d7!? 6 13 . .Q.c6
'i!fxd7 27. 'ii' h s+ @g7 28. 'figs + 13. 'i!ff4 (13.e3!? l:tac8 14 . .Q.f4 'i!fd8 .Q.xc6 14. l:lxd8 l:tfxd8) 13. 'i!fxc4

123
Catalan Opening - Open Variation 6 . . . dxc4

�b7? 14. �xb7 l:lxb7 IS. ifg4+ Novi Sad 2016) IS ... ifxe2 1 6 . li:JgS Cl) 12. li:Jc3 c6 13. li:Je4 li:Jd7
@h8 16. iff3 J:tb8 17.exf6 1-0 ifhS (16 ... ife7 17. l:tfel iff6 18. li:Je4 14. li:lxc4 cS 15.dxcS li:lxcS
Stefansson - Giannatos, Reykjavik ifg6 19. ifd6!±) 17. �f3 ifg6 (1S . . . l:!c7!= t:. ... li:JxcS ; 15 ... .Q.xc4
2016; (17 ... li:JeS 18. ifxb7 ifxgS 19. ifxa8 16. 'ifxc4 li:JxcS 17. J:tacl l:!ab8 =)
C) 8 ... li:lds l::tx a8 2 0 . �xa8±) 18. �e4 li:JaS 1 6 . li:Je d 6 l:!c7 (Vitiugov- Brkic,
(18 ... li:Jd8 ? 19. ifd7+-) 19. �xg6 Biel 2016; 16 ... li:Jd7 17. 'ifa4 �xc4
.Q.xdS 20 . .Q.xh7+ ±; 1 8 . li:Jxc4±) 17. �xdS exdS 1 8 . J:txdS
C32) 10 ... .Q.a6!? 11. ifc2 cS li:Jb7 19. 'ifa4 �xc4 (19 ... li:Jxd 6
(Il... li:Jd7 12. li:Jc3 li:Jxc3 13.bxc3 2 0 . li:Jx d 6 .Q.xe2 (20 ... 'ifxe2
cS+:t) and now: 21. l:!adl+-) 2 1 . l:!el �f3 22. l:!xe7
C321) 12.li:Jc3 �b7 (12 ... li:Jxc3 l:!cl+ 2 3 . l:!d l l:!xdl+ (23 ... �xdm
13. ifxc3 J:tc8 (13 ... li:Jd7 14. li:JeS! 24. l:!eS + l:!xe8 2S. 'ifxe8#)
li:JxeS 1S. �xa8± �xe2 16. t!fel; 24. 'ifxdl .Q.xdl 25. li:Jxf7±)
13 ... �xe2 14. l:!fel �a6 lS.dS!±; 20. li:Jxc4 'ifxe2 2 1 . li:Jxb6 ± ;
13 ... li:Jc6!? 14.dxcS (14.li:JeS? C 2 ) 1 2 . li:Jd2 c S (12 ...c 3 ? ! 13.bxc3
li:Jxd4-+) 14 ... bxcS00) 14. l:!acl .Q.xe2? 14. l:!el .Q.a6 IS.c4+-)
(14. li:JeS .Q.b7) 14 ... li:Jd7 IS.li:JeS 13.dxcS l:!xcS (::. 13 ... li:Jc6 14. li:Jxc6
9. �xe7 ifxe7 li:JxeS 16 . .Q.xa8 .Q.xe2 17. l:tfe l li:Jd3!) l:!xc6 1 S . li:le4 l:!b800) 14. li:le4 l:!c8
Cl) 1 0 . li:JeS �b7 11. ifxc4 cS = ; C3211) 13. li:JxdS .Q.xdS 14.dxcS IS. li:Jc3 .Q.b7 (15 ... li:Jxc3 16. 'ifxc3
C2) 10.li:Jbd2 bS!? (Fantinel­ l:!c8 1S.b4 bxcS 16.bS li:Jd7 17.a4 �b7 17 . .Q.xb7 'ifxb7 1 8 . l:!d 6 ! ;!;)
Borgo, Bratto 2016; 10 ... �a6 a6= 18.e4 �b7 19.li:Jd2 c4! f 1 6 . li:JxdS exdS 17. �xdS �xdS
11. li:Jxc4;!; - 8 ... �a6 9 . li:Jbd2 li:JdS Fressinet-Quintiliano Pinto, 1 8 . llxdS± Maletin-Goganov,
10. �xe7 ifxe7 ll. li:Jxc4) 11.a4 (11. Doha blitz 2016; Khanty- M ansiysk 201S. 9 . . . tlx!S
e4 li:Jb6 12. l:tfcl �b7 13.b3�) 11... C3212) 13.dxcS bxcS ; 13... ifxcS ?! 9 ... c3!? 10.bxc3 (10. 'ifxc3?! li:JdS)
c6 12.e4 (12.axbS cxbS 13.b3 li:Jb4 14.li:JgS ! g 6 lS. l:!acl;!;; IS. ifc4!? ife7 10 ... �xe2 11. l:tfel �a600 12. �xf6
14. ifc3 li:JdS lS. ifc2 li:Jb4 16. ifb2 16. ifh4 hS 17. li:JxdS ;!;; (12 . li:JeS c60) 12 ... .Q.xf6 13. li:JgS
cxb3 17. li:Jxb3 �b7 18.li:JcS�) C322) 12.dxcS bxcSoo; 12 .. Jk8 .Q.xgS 14. �xa8 c6 (14 ... �xd2
12 ... li:Jb6 13.aS (13.b3 cxb3 14. li:Jxb3 13.li:Jc3 l:!xcS (13 ... 'ifxcS 14. li:JgS g6 IS. 'ifxd2 c6 16. 'ifc2 'ifc8 17.c4 t:.
li:Jxa4; 13.axbS cxbS 14.b3 cxb3 IS.li:lge4±) 14. li:JxdS exdS IS. 'ifdH li:ld7 1 8 . 'ifa4) 15. li:lf3 �f600 1 6 . l:!adl
1S . li:Jxb3�; 13J 1fbl!? a6) 13 ... li:J6d7 (16.c4 cs) 16 ... 'ifc8 17. 'ifa4 (17.
14.b3 cxb3 1S. li:Jxb3 .Q.b7 6 ... li:Ja6; c4 li:Jd7 18. 'ifa4 bS 19. 'ifaS �d8)
C3) 10. ifxc4 and now: 17 ... bS 18. 'ifa3 l:!e8 6 ... �e7;
C31) 10 ... �b7 11.li:Jc3 (11.e4? .Q.a6; I8 ... li:Jd7 1 9 . li:JeS± 10. be 7 'tlt'xe7
11.li:JeS cS ; 1 1 . l:tel!? (t:. eH) ; lU[dl!? 11. li:Jxc4;t tlld 7 11 ... cs 12. l:!fcl! (s
(t:. e4;!;) 11 ... cs (11 ... li:Ja6 12.li:JeS 12. l:!acl l:tc8 13.e4 li:Jb4 14. 'ifb3
J:tad 8 13.li:Jc 6 .Q.xc6 14. ifxc6 li:lab4 cxd4) 12 ... li:Jd7 (12 .. .l:tcS 13.e4! li:Jb4
lS . li:JxdS exdS 16. ifa4 aS 17.a3 li:Ja6 14. 'ifb3 cxd4 IS.a3 li:J4c6 16.eS!)
18.e3± was played by a 12-year­ 13. 'ifa4 �xc4 14. 'ifxc4 ;!; 12 . Aac1
old M agnus Carlsen in Carlsen­ :;;, 12. 'if a4 .Q.b7 (12 ... .Q.xc4 13. 'ifxc4
Arngrimsson, Lysaker 2002) cs 14. l:tacl;!;) 13.l:!acl;!; 12 . . . cS ::.
12.dxcS lk8 ? ! (:;;, 12 ...bxcSoo) 12 ... J:lac S t:. 13. 'ifa4 liJbS ! 13. 'ti'a4
9 . li:Jbd2 � b7 13 ... �xc4 14. 'ifxc4;!; 14. 'ti'a3
A) 9 .b3?! cxb3 IO.axb3 li:JdS 14. li:Jfe S ! ? 6 li:JxeS 15.dxeS ! ± d6
• ll. �xe7 'ifxe7=F Perez Ponsa­ 14. . . liJSf6 1S.l:ifd1 l:ifd 8 16. li:JfeS
'if .t i .\ Quintiliano Pinto, Buenos Aires 16.dxcS liJxcS 17. li:Jd4 �xg2
2016; 18. 'it>xg2 'ifb7+ 19.fH t:. e2-e4;
B) 9 . l:!dl li:JdS 10. �d2!? (10 . .Q.xe7 b2-b4 16 . . . h g 2 17. �xg2 li:JxeS
'ifxe7 11. li:leS - 9 . li:JeS li:JdS 18.dxeS;t 'ti'b7+ 19.f3 li:le8 20.e4
10 . .Q.xe7 'ifxe7 11. l:tdl) 10 . . . li:Jd7 'ti'c7 21. 'ti'a4 h6 2 2 . l:lxd 8 l:lxd8
ll.e4 li:JSf6 1 2 . li:Jc3 .Q.b7 (12 ... c 6 +:t) 2 3 . l:ic2 �8 24.b4 l:id4 2S. 'ti'bS
13 . .Q.gS h 6 (::. 13 . . . a600; :;;, 13 ... c6oo) cxb4 2 6 . 'ti'xb4+ 'ti'e7 2 7 . 'ti'b2
14 . .Q.xf6 li:Jxf6 lS. li:JeS c6 16. li:Jxc4;!; l:id 1 2 8 . li:le3 l:id 7 29.h4 l:ic7 3 0.f4
Gupta- Daulyte, Douglas 2 0 1 6 ; l:icS 3 1 . �3 liJc7 3 2 . l:id2 li:le8
13.c6! li:Jxc6 (13 ... .Q.xc6 14.li:JxdS C ) 9 . li:Je S ! ? li:J d S IO . .ixe7 'ifxe7 33. 'ti'b3 l:ic7 34. 'ti'd1 :ca 3 S . l:id3
exdS IS. iff4±) 14. li:JxdS exdS 11. l:!dl (11. li:lxc4 cS) ll ... l:!c8 and l:lxd3 3 6 . 'ti'xd3 'ti'cS 3 7 . liJc4
IS. ifxdS± (Wojtaszek-Oparin, now: �e7 38. 'it>g2 a s 39. 'ti'b3 'ti'd4

124
Survey CA 5.5

39 ... f6! ? 40. Wf3 f61 41. l!Jxb6 fxeS ka6 11. �c3 �xe2+; 10.kg2 lll d S 9 ... Aa7 Ragger-V. Karpov, Minsk
42.fS exfS 43.exfS e4+ 44. c;t;>g2 11. �xc4 (11.l:tel!? ka6 12. lLld2 lLlb4 blitz 201S; 9 ... �xd4?! 10. gxa8
lllf6 4S. 'ife6+ �f8 46. lllc 8?? 13. �bl lLl8c6�) 11...ka6 12. �e4 �xeS 11. �xc4;!;; 7 ... bS!? 8 . a4 b4
46. lllc 4=; 46. �c8+= 46 . . . 1i'd3?? (Michalik- S.B. Hansen, Germany 9 . tt:leS (9. tt:lbd2 kb7 IO. tt:lxc4
46 ... �d2+ 47.@gl '!Wei+ 4 8 . Wg 2 Bundesliga 201S/16) 12 ... �xe4 Ragger-Vallejo Pons, Aix-les­
� e 2 + 49.@gl e 3 - + 47. llle 7 'iff3 + (12 ... lLld7!?) 13. kxe4 Ad8 (13 ... kxe2 Bains 2011; 9 . tt:lfd2!? c6 10. lLlxc4
48. wg1 'ifxg3+ 49. �t1 'ift3 + 14. Ael kc4D IS. lLld2 (IS.b3? kd3! D. �xd4 11.Adl �cs 12. ke3 (12 . lLlbd2
SO. We1 'ife3+ S1. Wf1 1i'd3+ 16. kxd3 kf6) IS ... kb4D 16.a3 kxd2 Aronian-Nakamura, St Louis
S2. �e1 1i'c3+ S3. Wf1 'iVd3+ 17. kxd2 cS�) 14. Ael00 D. kd2 - lLlc3; 2014) 12... �hs 13. tt:lbd2 lLig4
S4. we1? S4.Wgl= S4 . . . 'iVb1+1 lLld2-f3 10 ... 'iVxe2 11. �f3 'iVd31 Gelfand- Ponomariov, Russia tt
ss. we2 s s . @d2?? �b4+-+; 12. 'iVxc4 h 6 12 ... �d7!?, keeping 2011) 9 ... �xd4 10. kxa8 �xeS
S S . @f2?? lllg 4+-+ SS ... 'iVbS+ the queens on the board, also had 11. kf4 'IWhS 12. kf3 tt:lg4 13. kxg4
S6.Wd1 'ift1+? S 6 ... �d7++ its point. 13. 'ifxd3 bd3 =/'F �xg4 14. tt:ld2 �xe2 IS. �xc4
S 7 . Wd2 'ift2+ S 8 . W d 1 'iVd4+ 14. J:te1 'ba6 1S.a3 J:[d8 16. lllf1 �xc4 16.lLlxc4 1/2- 1/2 Hernandez
S9. �e2 ... V2-1/2 (72) �16. ke2 16 ... lLJcS 17. �f4 lllb3 Leon- Molina Rodriguez, Santa
18. J:tad1 cS 19. �c7 J:td 7 20. �es Cruz de Tenerife 201S. 8. llle S
�bS 20 ... c4'F 21. lLle3 (21. ke2?! 'ifxd4 9. ha8 'iVxeS 10. �f4 'iVhS
Critica l kxe2 22. Axd7 lLlxd7 23. lhe2 lLlxeS
8 . tlJeS 24.AxeS kf6 2S. l::!.e 2 bS) 21 ... l::td 8
21.:Xd7 l!Jx d 7 22. �c3 llld 4
� � .t 1•
Alexey Goga nov 23. hd4 cxd4 24. J:tc1� lLJcS l l .t l l l
Ivan Bu kavsh l n 2S.b4 �SD 26. J:td1 lllb3 27.h4 l ·�
Kha nty-Ma nsiysk 2 0 1 5 (9) �h6 27 ... kcl!+ D. 28. ge4 ke2 'ii'
1. lllf3 dS 2.g3 lllf6 3. �g2 e6 28. �e4 �e2 29.J:tb1 lllc 1 30.f4
4.0-0 �e7 S.c4 0-0 6.d4 dxc4 'ba2 31.�2 lllc 3 32. J:tc1 �bS
l �
7. 'iVc2 b6 8. llle s 'ifxd41? 33. llld 2 es 34. �f3 exf4 3S.g4 g6 12
36. llle4 �7 37. llld 6 �d 7 38. We1 12 12 'fll 12 12 12
c;t;>f8 39.Wd2 <;f;>e7 40. lllc4 �e6
l � .t l:! ttJ :@
41. J:te1 h6 42. Wd3 �f6 43. h S gxhS
l l 44.gxhS bS 4S. ibaS �d7 46. lllc 6 11. �f3 ll. �xc4 tt:lg4 (ll ... ka6
l �ts+ 47.Wd2 lllb1+ 48.:Xb1 12. �xc7 kxe2 13. tt:lc3 kxfl 14. Axfl
hb1 49. l!Jxa 7 �es SO.l!JxbS ts tt:lbd7 1S . kg2 kcS<=) 12.h4 eS
S1.a4 �e4 S2. �e2 f3 S3. �f1 wc6 13.�xc7 tt:ld7 (13 ... gcs 14. gd2)
S4.aS d3 SS. lllc 3 �f4+ S6. We1 14. kd2 gxh4 IS .gxh4 �xh4
�e3 S7. �h3 d2+ S8. Wd1 �d3 l6. gf40 exf4 17. �xf4 lLldf6
S9.a6 f2 60.bS+ Wd6 61.b6 hb6 1 8 . �g3 �gs -; 11. gxc7 tt:lg4 12.h4
0-1 tt:la6 13. �xc4 (l3. gf4 eS-+) 13...
eS! 14. gf3 lLlxc7 IS. �xc7 kxh4
9.ha8 9.lLlxf7!? lLids (9 ... l:txf7 Alexander H i lverda 16. kxg4 �xg4 17. �c6 (17. lLlc3
IO. kxa8±) 10.lLlgS kxgS 11. kxgS Rainer Buh man n kxg3 18.fxg3 �xg3+ =) 17 ... kxg3
(Fiori·G.Franco, Buenos Aires Austria Bu ndesl iga 2015/16 ( 7 ) 18.fxg3 �xg3+ 19. �g2 �e3+
2016) ll ... gb7�; 9. lLlxc4 lLldS 1. lllf3 d S 2.g3 lllf6 3. �g2 e6 20. �f2 �gS += 11. .. lllg4 12. hg4
IO.Adi �cs ll.b3 lLlc6 12. ka3 lLlcb4 4.0-0 �e7 S.c4 0-0 6.d4 dxc4 'ifxg4 13. llld 2 ?1 13. �xc4 ka6
(White does not have enough 7. 'iVc2 b6 7 ... a6 8.a4 b6?! 9 . tt:leS (13 ... eS? 14. �xc7±) 14. �xc7 �xe2
compensation for the pawn) IS.lLld2 kcS 16. l::ta cl l::!.c 8 17. �xa7
13. �d2 aS (13 ... ka6 14. kxb4 tt:lc6 18. '1Wd7 gS 19. kxgS (19.b4)
(14. kxdS �xdS+; 14.e4 lLlf6+ IS.e57 19 ... tt:leS 20. �a7 gbs !?- D. ... kc6;
Aad8-+; 14. Acl Aad8) 14 ... �xb4 20 ... lLlg4 21.AxcSD l::!.x cS 22. �xb6=;
15. �xb4 kxb4 16. kxdS exdS 17.a3! 20 ... kxf2+ 21. l::txf2 l:txcl+ 22.Wg2=;
(17. AxdS7 Afd8-+) 17 ... ke7 18. l::!.x dS 20 ... lLlc6 21. �d7 tt:leS= 13 ... 1i'xe2
l::!.fd 8 19. Ad2'F) 14.e4 lLlf6 IS.es lLlfdS 14. 1i'xc4 1i'xc4 1S. l!Jxc4 'ba6�
16.lLlc3 (16. Acl! D. lLle3�) 16 ... lLlxc3 16. J:tac1 f6 17. 'ba3 es 18. �e3
17. �xc3 Aa7 18.Aacl bS 19. lLld6 �d7 19. lLlb1 wt7 20. lllc 3 c6
�xc3 20.l:txc3 cxd6-+ Edouard­ 21.f4 exf4 22. hf4 lllc S 23.J:tcd1
Libiszewski, Grosseto Prugna �g4 24. J:td2 :es 2s. wg2 bS
2016. 9 ... 'iVxeS 10. llld 2? 10. �xc4? 26.b4 lLlb7 27.a3 a s 28.lba2

125
Catalan Opening - Open Variation 6 dxc4 ...

�e6 2 9 . J:le 1 gs 30. �c7 axb4 � .i. .l w 'i!fa500 11. 1i'xc4 �a6 12. 1i'a4
31. lLJxb4 cs 32. �6 �f8 33.�8+ 12.'i!fe4!? 'i!fxe4 n. gxe4 l:ldsgg;
l l .l l l l
lLJxd 8 34 . .l:lxdS .l:lxd8 3S. bd8 c4 12. '1Wc2 (b. gd2; tllc3) 12 ... gf6gg
36. J:lb1 �d 7 3 7 . .l:la 1 �cs 38. c.Pf3
l l� b. ... c7-c5/ . . . tllc6 12 ... �fSN 12...
�c6+ 39. �e2 �e6 40.�as �d4 'if c5!? (Nyback· Pihlajasalo, Finland
41. J:ld1 �es 42.�d2 fS 43. �c7+ l tt 2015/16) 13. tlla3 l:lc8 (13 ... gxe2?
�e6 44. �d8 h6 4S. J:le1+ �e4 14. l:tel gb5 15. '\Wdl (15. l:txe5 gxa4
46. �as �dS 47. �c3 �cs
.§L � 16.gxdS gf6 17. l:te4+-) 15 ... ga4
48. �b4 bb4+ 49.axb4 �d4 � � WI �� � 16.l:lxeS gxdl 17. gxdl+- ; 13 . . . gf6
SO. J:le3 f4 51.gxf4 gxf4 S2 . .l:la3 n ttJ JL .: <Jt 14. tllb S) 14. tllbS ! 13. J:le1 13. tll a3
f3 0-1 gxe2! 14. l:tel gbs 15. 'i!fdl ga4!
10 ... llld S With 10 ... ga6!? Black 13 ... cS Black has pressure here.
Iva n Cheparl nov keeps the c4-pawn, however he The Bulgarian top GM decided
Etienne Bacrot gives White time to complete not to test how strong Black's
Spa i n tt 2016 (3) his devel opment: 11. gf4 'i!fc5 compensation is. This is a critical
1.d4 lllf 6 2.c4 e6 3 . lllf3 d S 4.g3 12. tlld2 (Arslanov-Chigaev, St position, which needs further
�e7 S. �g2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4 7 . 1i'c2 Petersburg 2016; 12. tllcH t:; tlld5 testing. 14. llla3 14. tlld 2!? b. gg2-
b6 8. llle s 1Vxd4 9. ba8 1i'xeS (12 ... c6 13. l:lfdl;!;) 13. tllxd5 exd5 tll f3 14... bSl 1S. lbxbS lLlb6 16. 1i'aS
10. �f3 14.b4!; 14. l:lfdl c6) 12 ... tlld 5! 13. tlle4 lLlc4 17. 1i'a4 lLlb6 18. 1i'aS Y2-V2

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exe rcise 3

� .1 •
l l l l l
.i. l l .l
� 'ii'
WI
<1J .§L �
�� �� �
J: 1L :g @
position after 8 . . . �c8-b 7 position after 13. t2Jb1-a3 position after 14. t2Jb 1-a3
A t move 8 Black usually plays Does 13 ... �xe2 work for Black Black has strong compensation
8 . . . �a6 or 8 . . . tZJ<l5, but not here? Or does it just lose a for the exchange here. Bacrot
8 . . . �b7. What is wrong with piece after 14. l:rel ? decided to play 14 ... b5. What
this natural move? (solution on page 2 5 1) did he have in mind after
(solution on page 2 5 1) 15. tlJxb5 ?
(solution on page 2 5 1)

126
Q u ee n 's G a m b it Decl i n ed Blackbu rne Va riation QO 2 . 10 ( 037 )

A retu rn to dyn a m i sm
by Erw i n l 'Ami

1. d4 dS but the results are no longer the same.


2. c4 e6 Recently, both Eljanov and Nakamura
3. tlJc3 tl:if6 got overwhelming positions against him
4. tllf3 i.e7 by using the space-grabbing 7.c5. Eljanov
s. i.f4 0-0 contented himself with a draw because
6. e3 cs it secured his team an important victory
7. dxcS hes over Russia in the Olympiad, while Big
8. a3 tlJc6 Vlad's escape against Nakamura can be
9. 'ifc2 rightly called miraculous.
In short, Black is definitely under some
I !. 'if :1 • pressure in this line. Readers interested
i i i i i in 6 ... tllb d7 should carefully study the
� i• games mentioned above; however, this
!. i line is somewhat outside the scope of this
� � article. For now, I merely want to point
� t2J � tlJ out the reason for the recent trend to
�� � � � return to the old main line (6 ... c5) .
a: @ � :s
Carlsen's World Cham pionshi p i n n ovation
In 2011, Alexander Grischuk played his Back in Yearbook 114, Igor Stohl
semi-final match of the Candidates' mentioned the return of the old main
tournament against Vladimir Kramnik. line 6 . . c5 in the QGD with 5 . �f4. At
.

There was a lot of debate after this the time, Carlsen had just introduced
match, and not particularly because of this rare move 9 ... .U.e8 at the highest
the chess content! In all his black games, level, in the 8th game of his 2014 World
Kramnik used the Queen's Gambit Championship match against Anand.
Declined (QGD) , meeting 5 . M4 with Stohl, in his notes to the Anand-Carlsen
5 ... 0-0 6.e3 tllb d7. This solid variation game, mentions that the most aggressive
drove Grischuk to the extremes of simply way of handling the position is 10.0-0-0,
giving up on his white games, offering which brings us back to the present!
draws on moves 8 and 14 in two of the Presumably liking what he was seeing,
rapid-tiebreak games. After the match he Anand himself played 9 ... l:r.e8 in the
tweaked a famous quote: 'God created men, London Classic that finished just a few
but the Queen's Gambit made them all equal'. months ago. Topalov, true to his style,
Now, six years down the road, the continued with the sharp 10.0-0-0, and
situation has changed quite a bit! Yes, a sharp battle ensued. It became obvious
Kramnik is still playing the same line, fairly quickly that Anand had come better
127
Queen's Gambit Declined - Blackburne Variation

prepared. His novelty 12 ...b5, courtesy of The Ka rjakin-Naka m u ra mystery


his second Grzegorz Gajewski, stirred the The following year, playing against Sergey
waters to such an extent that they were Karjakin in Bilbao, Nakamura came
way too muddy for Topalov to find his better prepared, and played 10 ... l:le8. This
way in. move, first played back in 1978 by Anatoly
For the moment, Black seems to be in Karpov in his World Championship
excellent shape after 9 ... l:le8. match against Viktor Kortchnoi, must
have come as an unpleasant surprise for
The classical 9 . . . 'ifaS Karjakin, who immediately started peace
While Anand and Carlsen chose to move talks after 11. tlld 2 e5 12 . .tg5 tlld4
their rook on move 9, Hikaru Nakamura
insists on the classical 9 ... 'if a5. :i .t
Here, too, a lot of theoretical ... i
developments have taken place. White
has three main moves in this position:
1) 10.0-0-0 is the most demanding
move, but it has seen little action of late.
2) 10. tlld 2 !? is a tricky attempt that we
will have a look at in the Game Section
(Gelfand- Nielsen, Turin 2006) .
3 ) The absolute main line these days i s 13. 'ifa4 'ifxa4 14. fua4 tlJc2+ 15.@e2 tlJd.4+
1 0 . l:ldl, and i t will also b e a t the centre of 16. @el tlJc2, etc. The remaining question
our attention. was why Karjakin decided to deviate from
that famous Kortchnoi- Karpov encounter?
:i .t •• Instead of 13. 'ifa4, Viktor Kortchnoi
... ... ... ... ... had continued 13. 'ifbl, and after the
ll ... � further 13 ... M5 14 . .td3 e4 15 . .tc2 (later
'if j_ ... analysis showed that 15. Ml! is even more
� convincing) 15 ... fuc2+ 16. 'ifxc2 it turned
� t2J out Black was somewhat overextended.
�� � � � Kortchnoi continued to win a fine
n w � l::t technical game that we will have a look at
in the Game Section as well.
In the game Carlsen- Nakamura, Saint I assume that both Karjakin and
Louis 2015 , Hikaru continued 10 ... .te7, Nakamura were well aware that the
but the endgame after 11 . .te2 llle4 above-mentioned game was improved
12.cxd5 fuc3 13. 'if xc3 (13.bxc3!?) upon by the German IM Martin
13 ... 'ifxc3+ 14.bxc3 exd5 15. l:lxd5 ha3 Zumsande. On move 14, rather than
16. tlld 4 is rather cheerless. If not for 14 ... e4, the improvement is 14 ... hd3
an uncharacteristic error later on in 15. 'ifxd3, and now the stunning 15 ... llle4 !.
the game, it would have been a typical In the stem game Tarjan-Zumsande, Isle
Carlsen endgame grind rather than the of Man 2015 , 16. ttJcxe4 dxe4 17. 'if xe4
draw that Hikaru eventually managed to 'ifb6! followed, when it is important
grovel. that 18. 'ifbl llle 6 19 . .th4 he3! 20.fxe3
128
Survey QO 2.10

1!fxe3+ 21. @fl 1!ff4+ 22 .tn J:.ad8 gives


.

Black enough play for the piece. More on


that in the Game Section.
This huge theoretical discovery enables
us to answer the question I asked before.
Karjakin didn't follow into Kortchnoi's
footsteps because he was well aware of
14 ... hd3 15. 1!fxd3 lbe4!.

The futu re
It is time to draw some conclusions. 6 .. .

c5 is a much more dynamic alternative


to 6 ... tiJbd7 and it's likely we will see Vlswanathan Anand
a lot more of it in the near future. For
now, the main line as discussed in this will we see theory develop from here?
Survey paints a beautiful picture for Personally, I believe that White will have
Black. 9 . . l:te8 is in excellent shape, owing
. to start looking for an advantage earlier,
to efforts of Magnus Carlsen and Vishy be it 8.cxd5, Aronian's latest ploy s . .td3!?,
Anand. However, the classical 9 ... 1!fa5 is or perhaps something completely new. In
also a cause for concern for players aiming this Survey we have seen that Black has
for an advantage with white. Where very little to fear after 8.a3 lbc:6 9. 'ifc2.

Carlsen's World C h a m p i o n s h i p eS, but 13 ... b6! breaks White's 19.t2le4 gg7 is perfectly viable
i n n ovation 9 . . . .!le8 queenside pawn chain and gives as well) 19.axb4 Wxb4 20.t2ld4
good counterplay, for instance: gb7 21.0-0 l::le c8 22. t2la2 l::l x c2
Vlswa nathan Anand 14. t2la4 (14.bS tt:laS 15.c6 'i!Yxa3!) 23. t2lxb4 when I think Black has
Magnus Carlsen 14 ... eS 15 .cxb6 e4 16 . ..Q.bs (16 . °li'xc6 enough compensation to keep
Sochi Wch m 2014 (8) gd7 17. °li'c2 gxa4 18. 'i!Yxa4 exf3 the balance) 17 ... gb7 1 8 . t2le4
1.d4 lLJf6 2.c4 e6 3 . lLJf3 d S 4. lLJc3 19.gxf3 axb6 with compensation) t2lxe4 19. Wxe4 l::la d8 20 . ..Q.xe7
�e7 S. �f4 0-0 6.e3 cs 7.dxcS 16 ... t2lxb4 17. axb4 'i!Yxb4+ 1 8 . t2lc3 l::lx e7 21. 'i!Yh4 l::lx dl 22. l::lx dl Wg7
hes 8.a3 lLJc6 9. 1i'c2 l:leS exf3 19. gxe8 fxg2 20. l::lg l axb6 23. ge4 'i!Yc7 and Black gradually
21. l::lb l 'i!YaS 22 . ..Q.c6 ..Q.fs ! 23. °li'd2 equalizes. 1S ... bS 16. �a 2 �b7
l::lc 8! and White has to start 17. �bl l:lad81 Since the threats
shedding material to keep the on the bl-h7 diagonal are of
balance. This line is by no means a non-existent nature, Black
forced but is a nice illustration offers a rook exchange. As White
of the nature of the position. can't strengthen his posi tion
10 ... �e7 11. l:ldl 11.0-0-0 gd7! further, it's clear that Black has
with the idea 12. gxf6 ..Q.xf6 equalized. 18. bf6 bf6 19. lLJe4
13.cxdS exdS 14. l::lx dS l::lc 8 is very 19. 'i!Yh7+ @f8 leads nowhere.
dangerous for White. 11 ... 1i'aS 19 ... �e7 20.lLJcS The start of
12. �d3 h6 13 . �h4 dxc4 14. hc4 rapid simplifications. 20 ... �xcS
a6 lS.0-0 1S. ga2 would have been 21. 'it'xcS b4 22. l:lcl bxa3 23. bxa3
10. �gs somewhat more venomous as now 1i'xcS 24. l:lxcS lLJe 7 2S. l:lfc1
A) 10.0-0-0 - Topalov-Anand, the natural 15 ... bS 16 . ..Q.bl gb7? l:lc8 26. �d3 l:led 8 27. l:lxcS l:lxcS
London 2016; loses to 17 . ..Q.xf6 gxf6 18. °li'h7+ 28.l:lxcS+ lLJxcS 2 9 . lLJd2 lLJb6
B) 10.b4 gd6 n. gxd6 'i!Yxd6 Wf8 19. l::ld 7. Better is 16 ... g6 30. lLJb3 lLJd 7 31. lba s �cs 32. @fl
12.cS 'i!Ye7 13. l::ld l looks nice, (16 ... l::ld 8!?) 17.0-0 (17 . ..Q.xf6 gxf6 'itf8 33. @el @e7 34.'itd2 @d6
as White has managed to stop 18 .b4 allows 18 ... t2lxb4!? (18 ... Wc7 3S. 'itc3 lLJeS 36. �e2 @cs 37 .f4

129
Queen's Gambit Declined - Blackburne Variation

tllc 6 38. tllx c6 �xc6 39.�d4 15 .bxc6 i::tb 8 looks promising 'l!t'e2+! and now both 25. ©c3 i::te 3
f6 40.e4 �d6 41.eS+ And the after, for instance, 16.exd4? gxa3 !, and 25. i::td 2 �xd3+ lose on the
players agreed a draw. Not a very but 16. li:Jxd4! exd4 17. gf4 leaves spot. 22. �b1 %ld8 23. J:l.xd8+ 1i'xd8
exciting game, but theoretically White on top) 14.exd4 exd4 24. �e2 24. 'l!t'xc6 'ifdl+ 25. 'l!t'cl
very important as it brought 15. li:Jxf6+ gxf6 is a nice starting .Q.fS+! 26. gd3 gxd3+ 27. ©a2 'l!t'a4#
.

9 ... i::te 8 into the limelight (see also point for your research! 13 ... gxf6 24 ... �fS+ 2S. �a2 J:l.c2?1 25 ... 'l!t'd6!
the notes of Stohl in YB 114) . 14.cxbS would have prevented White from
A) 14. 'l!t'e4 is a cute idea, aiming regrouping with 26. i::td l because
Vesel l n Topalov to meet 14 ... bxc4 with 15.exd4 of 26 ... 'l!t'e6+ followed by 27 ... �c2!.
Vlswa natha n Anand li:Jxd4 16. li:Jxd4 gxd4 17. i::tx d4! and 26. J:l.d 1 1i'b6 26 ... 'l!t'c7 27. 'l!t'e8+
London 2016 (8) 18. 'l!t'xe 8 ! , but 14 ... fS 15. 'l!t'h4 'l!t'xh4 ©g7 28. i::td B (28. 'l!t'e3!) 28 ... �e6+
1.d4 lllf 6 2.c4 e6 3 . tllf3 d S 4. tllc3 16. li:Jxh4 i::td 8 ! is a problem, for 29.©a3 'l!t'c3+! 30. Wa4 'l!t'b3+ 31. WaS
�e 7 S. �f4 0-0 6.e3 cs 7.dxcS instance: 17.cxbS i::tx dS! 18 .bxc6 l::tx e2 32. 'l!t'h8+ ©h6 33. 'ifxf6+ @hS
hes 8.a3 8 .cxdS tll x dS 9. tll x dS ge7 19. tll f3 i::tc S+ 2 0 . Wbl d3! and 34. i::td 4 l::te 4 was a fun line Vishy
exdS is the other approach to since the pawn is untouchable, showed at the press conference,
this position , where White tries Black has a huge advantage; but 2 8 . 'l!t'e3! is a big improvement.
to claim a small plus because B) 14. li:Jd2 ge6 15 . li:Je4 ge7 also 27. �g4 1i'e6+ 28. �a3 1i'eS
of the isolated pawn. The game feels very wrong, which leaves the 29. 1i'b3 �6 30. �f3 J:l.xf2 31.h4?
continuation is more ambitious. game continuation. Just when he has come back into
8 . . . tllc 6 9. W'c2 J:l.e8 Until 14 tlla S The only move, but a
.•. the game, Veselin goes astray.
two years ago, this move was strong one! 1S.exd4 exd4 16. tllb4 Both 31. 'l!t'c3 and 31. i::td S would
virtually non-existent, the main Afterwards 16. li:Je3 was indicated have kept the balance reasonably
continuation being 9 ... 'l!t'aS. The as a more tenacious defence. comfortably. 31... �c2! 32. J:l.d8+
'
game Anand(!) -Carlsen from the Indeed Black would then have to �g7 33. 1i'c3?? Let me throw
World Championship match 2014 find the strong sequence 16 ... ge6 in the old cliche that mistakes
forced white players to have a 17. li:Jc4 i::tc B 18.©bl a6! and White's don't come alone. 33. 'l!t'c4 'l!t'e3+
look at it. It seems that Vishy position falls apart as the line 34.©a2 gfs 35. 'l!t'cS! ge6+ 36.©bl
liked what he was seeing! 10.0-0-0 19.bxa6 'l!t'dS 20. tllfd 2 gxa3! 21.bxa3 l:lfl+ 37.l:ldl would still have given
1 0 . ggs - Anand-Carlsen, Sochi (or 21. 'l!t'a4 gxb2! 22. 'l!t'xaS i::tc S decent fighting chances! 33 ... 1i'bS
2014. 10 . . . e s 11. �gs d4 12. tlld S 23. 'l!t'a4 gd7 24. 'l!t'c2 gc3! with a 34. 1i'c6 J:l.xf3+1 White resigned.
crushing attack) 21... gf5 22. gd3 He is mated after 35. 'l!t'xf3 'l!t'a6#.
li:Jxc4 23. li:Jxc4 i::tx c4! beautifully L'Ami - M/17-1-52
illustrates. 16 ... hb4 17.axb4
�e6 18. tllx d 4 J:l.c8 19. tllc6
Given that it's already time to The c lassical
look for desperate measures, it 9 . �as
. .

makes sense to consider whether


19.li:Jxe6 i::tx c2+ 20.@xc2 'l!t'c8+ Boris Gelfa nd
21.li:Jc5 tllb 7 22. gc4 (22. ©bl tllx cS Peter Heine Nielsen
23.bxcS 'l!t'xcS 24.f3 'l!t'b4 2s. gd3 Tu rin o l 2006 (5)
a6! is an issue) 22 ... lllx cS 23.bxcS 1.d4 tllf 6 2.c4 e6 3. tllf3 d S 4. tllc 3
'l!t'xcS 24. ©b3 is a fortress. It may �e7 S . �f4 0-0 6.e3 cS 7.dxcS
1 2. . . b S I N
It is rare to see novelties just be after 24 ... 'l!t'xf2 25. nhfl hes 8.a3 tllc 6 9. 1i'c2 1i'as
which such impact these days! 'l!t'e3+ 26.Wa2, when White is 10. tlld 2
The previously seen 12 ... ge7 nicely coordinated. Black should
13. tll x e7+ 'l!t'xe7 14.exd4 gives probably play 24 ... i::tb B but again
White chances to fight for an I'm not 100% sure if this wins after
advantage and was undoubtedly 25. i::td 2 a6 26. i::th dl axbS 27. gds .
what Veselin was hoping for. 1 9. . . tllxc 6 20.bxc6 1i'b6 21. 1i'a4
13. hf6?1 And this already 21.bS only temporarily fixes the
seems to be a serious mistake. leak as 21...a6! blasts all files open.
If there is a way to fight for an 21... J:l.xc6+?1 21... gg4!, inducing
advantage, it has to start with 22.f3, in order to drop back and
13.cxbS when 13 . llla S (a recurring
. . make use of the e3-square, would
theme, indirectly defending the have been the cherry on the cake:
cS-bishop. 13 ... 'l!t'xdS 14. gc4 'l!t'd6 22 ... gfs 23. gd3 'l!t'e3+ 24. ©c2
130
Survey QO 2.10

A tricky attempt to make use of the tt:lxg3 17.fxg3 ! ? dxc3 18. gxh7+ 1 1. .i.e2 tt:le4 ll ... dxc4 n. gxc4
awkward position of Black's queen. 'it>h8 may also be playable. But tt:lh5 13.0-0 tt:lxf4 14.exf4 was
10 ... .i.b41 The most precise way to why enter such complications seen in Kramnik-Carlsen,
deal with this tricky move order. without need? 14.0-0 hc3 Dortmund 2009, and has since
A) Alternatively. 10 ... ge7 ll. ge2 1S. tt:lb3 "tlfb6 16. 1fxc3 tt:lxg3 been considered to be slightly
es 12. gg3 d4 13.tt:lb3 'ifb6 14.tt:lds 17.hxg3 J:ld8 Now there is no better for White. 12.cxd S tbxc3
leaves Black regretting the fact stopping ... d5-d4, with total 13 . 1fxc3 13.bxc3 ! ? exdS 14.0-0
that he overextended his centre; equality. 18. tt:lcS 18. l::tfel ge6 gf6 15.c4 ge6 1 6 . ggs!?, as
B) 10 ... 'ifd8 11.tt:lb3 gd6 12. gxd6 19. tt:lcS d4 20 .exd4 tt:lxd4 21. l::ta cl seen in the rapid game Giri­
'ifxd6 13.lldl is unpleasant as l::t a c8 22.b4 1/2-1/2 Jacot-Plomp. Kasimdzhanov, Rosmalen 2 0 14,
well, for instance: 13 ... tt:le7 14.cxdS ICCF 2007. 18 . . . d4 19.exd4 is interesting as well, but I
tt:lexdS 15.tt:lxdS tt:lxdS (15 ... exdS tt:lxd4 20. J:lfe1 .i.e6 Perhaps am not sure White has much
16. ge2 is slightly better for 20 ... gfs ! ? is a tiny bit more after 14 ... 'ifcS . 13 ... 1fxc3+
White) 16. gd3! h6 (16 ... g6 17. ge4!) precise. 21. tbxe6 tbxe6 Since the 14.bxc3 exdS 1 S . J:l.x d S ha3
17. gh7+ 'it>h8 18. ge4 and White bishop is somewhat better than 16. tt:ld4 tbxd4?1 16 ... aS 17. 'it>d2
will exchange his bishop for the the knight, we could say that if a4 18. Wc2! (stopping l 8 ... gb2
dS-knight, achieving a classic anyone is better it must be White. and 19 ... a3) 18 . . . �e7 1 9 . l:l.al is
good knight vs bad bishop type Ivanchuk once won an instructive no fun either. The a-pawn is a
of position. 11.cxdS exd SI Again game against Kramnik (tt:le6 vs liability rather than a strength.
precise. Instead 11 ... tt:lxdS 12. tt:lxdS ge3) in the same structure. Here, White's advantage isn't huge,
exdS 13. gd3 is known to give however, the advantage is merely but it's stable and risk-free.
White some pressure. 12 . .i.d3 of a symbolic nature. 2 2 . J:lac1 Nevertheless, this was a better
A) 12.tt:lb3 gxc3+ 13.bxc3 'ifd8 is J:ld6 23.b4 23. gc4 l::t a d8 24.b3 l::td 2 try than the game continuation.
a position where White's bishop 25. l::te 3 was the best try, I believe. 17.exd4 b6 18. Wd 2 .i.e6 It's
pair doesn't play a huge role But once again, we are talking important to note that 1 8 ... gb7
because of the c3-pawn; about very minimal advantages. 19. l::td 7 gxg2 2 0 . l::ta l! traps the
B) 12. l::tc l gxc3 13. 'ifxc3 'il'xc3 23 . . . J:lad8 24 . .i.e4 tt:igs 2S . .i.b1 bishop. 19. J:lbS .i.d 7 20. J:lb3
14.bxc3 (14. l::tx c3 d4!) 14 ... tt:laS also J:lc6 26. "tlfb2 J:l.xc1 27. 1fxc1 g6 .i.e7 21 . .i.f3 White has a huge
doesn't promise much, leaving 28. 1fc3 "tlfd4 29. 1fxd4
Draw advantage because Black's
the game continuation as the agreed. There is indeed nothing queenside pawns are very
most testing option. left to play for. vulnerable. 2 1 ... .i.a4 2 2 . J:lb2
12 . . . tt:lh SI I am running out of J:lad 8 2 3 . J:la 1 bS 24 . .i.c6 a6
exclamation marks. This was a Magnus Carlsen 2 S . .i.b7 .i.d6 2 6 . .i.e3 A few
novelty at the time, and a good H l karu Nakamura simple moves have illustrated
one! 12 ... d4?! 13.0-0 gxc3 14. tt:lc4 St Louis 2015 (8) the point made on move 21.
'ifhS 15 .bxc3 tt:ldS 16. gg3 dxe3 1.d4 d S 2.c4 e6 3 . tt:lc3 .i.e7 4 . .i.f4 Black's queenside is coll apsing.
17. l::ta el gave White dangerous tt:lf6 S.e3 0-0 6.a3 cs 7.dxcs 2 6 . . . a s 2 7 . .i.c6 J:lb8 28.dS J:lfd8
play, in Topalov- Kramnik, hes 8. tt:lf3 tt:lc6 9. 1fc2 "tlfas 2 9 . Wd 3 Very Carlsenesque;
Monaco blindfold 2001. 13 . .i.g3 10.J:ld1 .i.e7?1 G iving this move the boa constrictor i n action.
A) It is dangerous for White to a dubious mark is harsh, but I 2 9 . . . .i.f8 3 0 . .i.d4 f6 31. �e4 .i.d 6
grab the pawn as his king may get think it's the right thing to do! 32.c4?1 Making the conversion
stranded in the centre: 13. gxh7+ The resulting positions are very a lot harder. The simple 32. ga7
Wh8 14. tt:lb3 (or 14. gd3? tt:lxf4 one-sided. 10 ... l::te 8 - Karjakin­ l::tb c8 33. gb6 decides on the spot.
15.exf4 l::te 8+ 16. Wfl tt:ld4 17.'ifcl Nakamura. 32 ... .i.b4 33 . .i.a7 ts+ 34. wf3
gfs ! 18. gxfS 'ifa6+! 19. Wgl gxc3 J:lbc8 3 5.cxbS b b S 36. bbS
and it's already game over!) .i.c3 3 7 . J:lab1 hb2 3 8 . J:l.xb2
14 ... gxc3+ 15.bxc3 'ifd8 16. gd3
• .i. •• J:l.xd S This is most p robably still
tt:lxf4 17.exf4 lle8+ 18. <;!;>fl 'iff6 i i .i. i i i winning. but not after White's
with active play; � i� next move. 39 . .i.e3?? A llowing
B) 13.0-0 gxc3 14.bxc3 tt:lxf4 'if i an exchange of rooks after which
15.exf4 h6 is harmless, and so is; Black's a-pawn becomes much
C) 13.tt:lb3 gxc3+ 14. 'ifxc3
[:;, � more dangerous. Just enough
'ifxc3+ 15.bxc3 tt:lxf4 16.exf4 ge6 [:;, ttJ [:;, ttJ to secure Nakamura a draw.
with an equal endgame. [:;, � [:;, [:;, [:;, 39 . . . J:lb8 40 . .i.c4 J:l.xb2 41. bdS+
13 ... h6 Simplest, though 13 ... d4 Wh8 42 . .i.d4 J:lb1 43. We2 a4
� @� �
14.0-0! gxc3 15 . tt:lc4 'ifdS 16.bxc3 44.g3 a3 4S.�d2 h S 46.h4 �h7

131
Queen's Gambit Declined - Blackburne Variation

47. �c4 g6 4S. Wc2 :le1 49. �e3 Vlktor Kortchnoi requires more investigation, but
f41 ?Forcing more trades in a Anatoly Ka rpov that will be for another time
fortress position. SO. hf4 a2 Bagu io City Wch m 1978 (21) and another place! 17. hf6
S1. ha2 :le2+ S2. Wb3 lbf2 1.c4 tllf 6 2. tllc 3 e6 3. tllf3 d S 4.d4 'fi'xf6 1S. tllb 3 it.d6 19. lbd5 :es
Carlsen tried to press for a it.e7 5. it.f4 0-0 6.e3 cs 7.dxcS 20. tlld 4 :cs 21. lbes 21. '1Wb3 !?
further 43 moves. but to no avail. hes s. •c2 tllc 6 9 . :ld 1 •as 21 ... •xeS 22. tllxf5 22.f4! '1Wf6
... 112-112 (95) 10.a3 :leS 11. tlld 2 eS 12. it.gS 23.'1We2 is a big improvement over
tlld 4 13 . •b1 The critical reply to the game. 22 ... •xtS 23.0-0?1
Sergey Karjakin Black's opening aggression. 23. lllx e4 bS 24.0-0 nxc4 2S. '1Wd2
H i karu Nakamura was the way to go - with an ugly
road ahead for Black. It is likely
B i l ba o 2016 ( 5 )
• .i. that Kortchnoi too overlooked
1 . c 4 tllf6 2. tllc 3 e6 3. tllf3 d S 4.d4
it.e7 s. it.f4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 l l the resource that Black has on
hes s. •c2 tl\c6 9.a3 •as move 24. 23 ... lbc4 24. :ld1 1i'e5
10. :ld 1 :leS 11. tlld 2 Other moves 24 ... Ae7! is very strong, the reason
are less critical. 11. �e2 allows being that 2SJ:td4 J:[xd4 26.exd4
11...eS 12. �g3 d4, and 11. �g3 wins a pawn, but that is not the
llle 4 12.cxdS exdS 13.l:lxdS lll x c3 end of the story: 26 ... g6 27. '1Wxe4
14.bxc3 gives Black a dangerous (remarkably, 27. lllx e4 'IWdS! 28.g3
lead in development. Now I think '1Wxd4 29. '1Wc8+ �f8 30. '1Wxb7
14 ... '1Wxa3 is fine, but 14 ... �e6 h6 gives White no hopes of an
lS. :tdl?! '1Wxa3 16. lllg S �fS ! 17. Ad3 13 . . . it.f5 14. it.d3 e4?1 White advantage as he can't improve his
�xe3 18. �xfS �xgS+ 19. 'it>fl is ready for this pawn push. position: 31. tllc3 Axa3!) 27 ... '1Wxe4
g6 20. �d7 ne7 21.h4 Af6-+ 14 ... �xd3!, as played 37 years 28. lllx e4 fS ! also holds for Black
Hejazipour-Zumsande, Stockholm later in Tarjan-Zumsande, will after the further 29. lllc S b6 30. llld 3
2016, looked convincing too! be discussed in the next game. 'it>f7 31.f4 'it>e6 32. 'it>f2 'it>dS 33. 'it>e3
1S. l:ld2 is better but also here 15. it.c2 Nothing could be more bS ! 34. llle S Ads 3S.'it>d3 �b6
lS ... '1Wxa3 1 6 . lllgS .1:1ad8!, not natural than this move, but in 3 6 . tllf3 aS and the weakness on d4
fearing any ghosts, gives Black order to refute Black's opening makes it impossible for White to
fine play. 11 . . . e5 12. it.gs play the Steinitzian retreat lS. �fl improve his position. 2S.g3 a6
had to be found. Now after 26 ... b3 bS 27.a4 Even stronger
1S ... tllg 4 16.cxdS llle S 17.exd4 lllf3+ is 27. lldS '1We6 28. 'IWdl �f8 29.J:[dS
• • 18.gxf3 e xf3+ 19. Ae3!? (19. tlld e4 when Black is completely tied up.
l l l �xe4 2 0 . 'IWcl! also suffices) 27 ... :lb4 2S. 'ii' d S 'ii' x dS 29.lbd5
19 ... Axbl 20. lllc4 '1Wc7 21.dxcS it.fS 30.axbS aS 31. :ldS Whether
White has too much material for this offers more winning chances
the queen. 15 . . . tllx c 2+ 16. •xc2 than 31.b6 J:[xb6 32. l:lxaS J:[xb2
•a6?1 A second mistake lands 33. lllx e4 would once again require
Black in serious trouble. a separate investigation. 31 ... lbb2
A) 16 ... d4 was not a good 32.:laS f5 33.lba5 it.b4 34.:laS+
alternative because of 17. Axf6 Wt7 35. tlla 4 :lb1+ 36. Wg2 it.d6
gxf6 18. tllb 3, winning a pawn, but 3 7 . :la 7 + Wf6 3S.b6 it.bS 39.:laS
12 . . . tlld 4
The point of Black's B) after 16 ... dxc4 I have not been it.e5?1 39 ... �d6!, controlling
play, first introduced by Karpov able to p rove a clear advantage. the c5-square, was essential.
back in 1978. 13. •a4 Basically For example: 17. Axf6 gxf6 Now Black's game goes quickly
a draw offer. For 13. 'IWbl see the 18.0-0 (18 . lllx c4 '1Wa6 19. '1Wa4 downhill. 40. tllc 5 it.d6 41. b7
next game. Taking the knight is '1Wxa4 20. tll x a4 Ag4! 21.J:[d2 �f8 We7 42.:lgS it.es 43.f41 exf3+
not advisable because of 13.exd4 22. llld 6 lle6 doesn't look too bad; 44. Wxf3 Wf7 45.:lcS We7 46.h3
exd4+ 14. �e2 dxc3 1S. lllb 3 '1Wa4! Black's bishop pair more or less h S 4 7 . :lgS Wf7 4S. :ldS gs 49.g4
16. �xf6 and here both 16 ... dxc4 compensates for the fractured 49. llld 3!? 49 ... hxg4+ 50.hxg4
and 16 ... �g4 are strong. 13 ..... xa4 structure) 18 .. J:tacS 19. llld S 'it>g7 We7 51. :lgS fxg4+ S2. Wxg4 Wf7
14. tllx a4 tllc 2 + 15. We2 tlld 4 +1 20. lllx c4 '1Wa6 21.a4 Ag4 22. J:[cl S3 . :lcS it.d6 54.e4 :lg1+ S5. WfS
16. We1 The d4-knight is still �e6 23. '1Wxe4 '1Wxa4 24. lllf4 Axc4 g4 S6.eS :lf1+ 57.We4 :le1+
taboo. For instance, 16.exd4 exd4+ 2S. lllh S+ 'it>f8 26. '1Wxc4 '1Wxc4 SS. WdS :ld1+ S9. tlld 3 lbd3+
17.'it>d3 �fS + ! . 16 . . tllc 2 + 11. we2
. 27. l:lxc4 �e7 28. J:[fcl l:lxc4 29. l:lxc4 60. Wc4 Black resigned.
tl\d4+ 1S. We1 tllc 2 + 112-112 aS and Black should hold. This An historic game!

132
Survey QO 2.10

James Tarjan logical move, but other moves 21.l:Hel! promises some advantage)
Martin Zu msa nde have been tried as well: 19 . .Q.h4 gs 20.b4 �f8 21. .fl.g3 .!:tad8
Douglas 2015 (4) A) 16.cxdS lll x c3 17.bxc3 lllb S 18 ... llle 61 19 . .ih4
1.c4 e6 2. lllf3 d S 3.d4 lllf 6 4. ll\c3 1 8 . li:le4 li:ld6 19. lll x d6 �xd6 20.e4
.ie7 5 . .if4 0-0 6.a3 cS 7.dxcS was Lalith-Tarjan, Douglas 2016,
E E •
hes 8.e3 lllc 6 9. 'irc2 'it'aS when 20 ... llec8 21. �d2 'li'xa3 gives
10.lld 1 lies 11. ll\d2 eS 12 . .igS Black good play; ' ' ' ' '
ll\d4 13. °ifb1 .its 14 . .id3 .ixd3 B) 16. li:ldxe4 dxe4 17. 'ii' x e4 'ii' �
�xa3 18.0-0 �xb2 19.li:ldS li:le2+ .t '
20. Whl li:lc3 21. li:lxc3 'ii' x c3
22 . .!:td7 .!:tac8 23 . .!:txb7 should have
� �
led to a quick draw in Babula­ � �
Sebenik, Baku 2016, following � ttJ � � �
23 . . . aS 24. 'ii' d S 'ii' x c4 25. 'i!Vxc4
'ti' :a: <lt> �
.!:txc4 26 . .!:txb2 h6 with an equal
endgame; 19 ... he31 20.fxe3 'ifxe3+
C) Untried so far is 16.li:lxdS but 21. @f1 'it'f4+ 22 . .if2 lla d8 23 .g3
after 16 ... lll x gS 17.b4 'ii' d 8 1 8.bxcS 'ifh6 24. ll\e4 'irh3+ 2S. @g1??
(or 18.exd4 �xd4) 18 ... li:lde6 Black 2 5 . Wel! li:ld4 2 6 . li:lc3! were the
seems to be doing well. two precise defensive moves that
37 years after Kortchnoi- Karpov, 16 ... dxe4 17. 'irxe4 'irb61 White had to find. Black now has
the line experiences a revival Another important point! I nstead nothing better than to repeat
because of this discovery by 17 ... li:lb3 18. 'ii' c 2 leads nowhere. with 26 ... lllf3 + 27. We2 li:ld4+.
Zumsande. The point is revealed 18. 'irb1 18 . .!:tbl h6!? (this is an 2S ... ll\f4 And White resigned.
on the next move. 1S. 'it'xd3 ll\e41 improvement over 18 ... f6 19.0-0 After 26.gxf4 'li'g4+ he loses the
Elegantly sacrificing a pawn for lll e 2+ 20. Whl fxgS as in Riicker­ whole house.
dynamic play. 16. ll\cxe4 The most Zumsande, Stockholm 2016 , when

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

E .t E • K • E
' ' .t i ' ' ' ' ' '
� j. l)i ' l)i
'if if .l i i �
� � � l)i
� ttJ � ttJ � ttJ 'ti' �
� 'ti' � � � £:, ttJ � � �
: <lt> l:[ n@ tr
position after 12. �f1-d3 position after 14. gd3xc4 position after 15. °fV b 1xd3
Black to move. Black to move. Black to move.
(solution on page 251) (solution on page 251) (solution on page 251)

133
Q uee n 's G a m b it Dec l i ned Classica l M a i n Li ne QO 13 . 1 ( 063)

O rthodox QG D n ot yet ex h a usted


by Laza ro Bruzon Batista

1. d4 dS against Mikhail Tal and Boris Spassky,


2. c4 e6 respectively) . In Game 8, enjoying
3. ltJc3 tlif6 a one-point lead, Larsen (as Black)
4. ..tgs ..te7 decided to surprise his opponent with an
5. tlif3 0-0 unorthodox way to treat the Orthodox
6. e3 lllbd 7 QG D. The game went l.c4 e6 2.d4 dS
7. J:r.c1 h6 3 . lt:Jc3 lLJf6 4 . .igS 9..e 7 5.e3 0 - 0 6..lkl
8. ..th4 cs tt:Jbd7 7. tt:Jf3, and now Larsen uncorked
his surprise: 7 .. cS (this is not the first
time this move was played, it's the most
relevant in view of these players' level) .
Geller reacted naturally, and when Larsen
erred on his 17th move, the Ukrainian
GM won a pawn and went on to convert
his material advantage after 70 moves.
Forty-three years later, Bulgarian
grandmaster Julian Radulski decided
to test a very similar idea, but with the
In M arch 1966, Bent Larsen and Efim refinement of inserting the moves 6 ... h6
Geller faced each other in a play-off 7 . .2.h4 (which are sometimes played one
match in Copenhagen to decide the third move earlier or later) . Inserting ... h7-h6
Candidate for the World Championship has two potential benefits for Black: it
match (both had lost their match creates an escape square for the king on
h7 and it prepares for ... g7-g5 if ever the
need arises.
Radulski' s first attempts were successful,
because Black managed to maintain
approximate equality. Then heavyweights
like Vladimir Kramnik, Levon Aronian,
Teimour Radjabov and Michael Adams
also decided to give it a try.
So the line has seen quick development
in the last two or three years, and this
seems a good moment to take stock.
Remarkably enough, Kramnik played
the move on four occasions, with the
Vlad l m l r Kra m n l k fantastic result of two victories and two
134
Survey QO 13.1

draws, although this line is generally 11. �e2 is quieter, and very natural. Black's
used as a quiet route to equality, not as a main alternative in this case is the logical
weapon to generate winning chances. ll ... b6, intending to develop the bishop
to the active b7 post (11 ... cxd4 and even
Ta lking concretely 11... �b6 have also been essayed, as you
The fundamental alternatives for White can see in the Game Section) . Kramnik's
on his 9th move are the pawn captures games are exemplary here.
9.cxdS (the main line by its frequency of 9.dxcS dxc4 leads to the second main
appearance) and 9.dxcS. position ...
After 9.cxdS tlJxdS! 10. �xe7 CiJxe7 we have
a first main position.

• .i. 'if • •
l i � 'A l l
l l

After 10. �xc4 CiJxcS 11.0-0 the main


choice has been ll ... a6. The game
White's next step is to develop his bishop Matlakov-Kramnik is a very remarkable
(Nakamura played the less ambitious example of technique and patience,
11.dxcS in a blitz game vs. Vachier­ which finally yielded the former World
Lagrave at the Paris Grand Chess Tour in Champion the full point.
2016) and he has two main ways to do it: 9.dxcS CiJxcS 10.cxdS gS 11. �g3 CiJxdS has
11. �e2 or 11. �bS (developing the bishop also been played a couple of times, and
to d3, which is the standard option in deserves consideration.
many Orthodox QGD lines, is not the
best option in this particular line; in the
only example, Grandelius- Roiz, Black
equalized comfortably) . l
11. �bS is more forcing, making it l
virtually necessary for Black to exchange
on d4, when White recaptures with either
the queen or the knight. In the games
with ll ... cxd4 12. 'iWxd4 Black has easily
kept the balance after 12 ... CiJf6. More
complex fights have arisen from ll...cxd4 This line is, of course, more committal,
12. tlJxd4 CiJf6. White keeps the queens since it weakens the kingside. Kramnik
on the board, and a pitched positional has also played this line, even before
battle ensues, with the symmetrical pawn he played 9 ... dxc4. After 12. tlJxdS 'iWxdS
structure making it really difficult for 13. �xdS exdS an endgame with an
White to get anything tangible. isolated queen pawn arises. Radek

135
Queen's Gambit Declined - Classical Main Line

Wo j taszek had the white pieces in the The future


two known examples. First he played More and more players are going for this
14. £.eS against Kramnik (the result of line. Black generally does well, so some
the opening was satisfactory for Black) subtle refinements on White's part are
and then he tried to improve with 14. £.e2 to be expected in future games, as white
against Lupulescu, when White managed players will need to put at least some
to keep some edge. pressure on the advocates of the black side.

The fi rst m a i n position Nils G ra ndelius


9.cxd5 tUx d S 10 . ..Le7 tUxe 7 Michael Rolz
Plovdiv Ech 2012 ( 11)
H l karu Nakamura 1.d4 tllf6 2.c4 e6 3. tllf3 d S
Lau rent Fresslnet 4. tllc3 tll b d7 s . .igs h6 6 . .ih4
Paris b l itz 2016 ( 16) .ie 7 7.e3 0-0 8 . l:l.c1 cs 9.cxdS
1.d4 tt:lf6 2.c4 e6 3. tt:lf3 d S 4. tLlc3 lbxd S 10. be7 tt:lxe7 11 . .id3
.ie7 s . .igs h6 6 . .ih4 0-0 7.e3 This deployment of the bishop is
tt:lbd 7 8. l:c1 cs 9.cxdS lbxd S much less frequent than 11. .2.bS
10. be7 tt:lxe 7 or 11. �e2. 11 ... tt:lc6 11...cxd4'7
12.exd4 (12. tllx d4 Wb6 13. We2
(13. Wb3 ttJcS 14. Wxb6 tllx d3+ A mysterious move. White wants
1S . 'it>d2 axb6 16. 'it>xd3 eS 17. tt:ldbS to force the exchange on d4; even
�d7=) 13 ... tllf6 14.0-0 �d7=) 12... so I do not think that in this way
b6 13.0-0 �b7 14. We2 tt:Jds 1s . �b1 White can aspire to get a tangible
tt:l7f6 16. l:tfdl l:te8 17.Wd2 lk8 = advantage. The bishop is much
Barcenilla-Al Harazi, Ach-jr more useful on e2. 11... cxd4
1989. 12 . .ib1 White avoids the 12. 'irxd4 12. tt:lxd4 12 ... tt:lf6 12 ... a6!?
isolani, delaying castling , but 13 .0-0 13. Wa4 b6 (13 ... �d7 14.0-o
still this is not enough to create a6 1S . .Q.xd7 Wxd7 16. llfdl Wxa4
problems for Black. 12.0-0 is the 17. tt:lxa4 llfd8) 14.0-0 .2.b7 lS. llfdl
most natural move. e.g. 12 ... cxd4 Wb8 16. �e2 lld8 17. llxd8+ 'il:Yxd8
11.dxcS tt:lx c S 12. 1i'xd8 :Xd8 13.exd4 tt:lf6 and Black finishes 1 8 . lldl Wf8 19.ttJeS tlle dS 20. tll x dS
13.b4 lbd 7 14 . .id3 tLlc6 14 ... b6!? development and keeps an equal �.xdS 21. �f3 �xf3 1/2- 1/2 H awkins­
1S. We2 (1S . .2.e4 l:lb8 16.tt:ld4 lM6) game. 12 . . . cxd4 13 . lbxd4 lbxd4 Fressinet. England tt 201S/16;
1S ... .2.b7 (lS ... aS!?) ; 14 . . . tt:lf6 1S. We2 14. 'it°xd4 tllf 6= 1S. 'it°b4 IS. Wxd8 13. Wxd8 llxd 8 14. We2 b6 lS.llhdl
.2.d7 1S.a3 tLlceS 16 . .ib1 lbxf3+ l:lxd8 16. We2 b6 1S ... aS 16. 1i'b3 �b7= Sundararajan- Bruzon
17.gxf3 b6 17 ... tt:lf6= 18 . .ie4 l:l.b8 .id 7 17.0-0 .ic6= 18. l:l.fd1 1i'e7 Batista. Gibraltar 2016. 13 ... 'it°xd4
19.f4 tllf6 20 . .if3 .ib7 21.bb7 18 ... Wb8! ? 19.h3 l:l.fd8 20.:Xd8+ The most practical; the endgame
:Xb7 22. we2 �8 23.tt:lbS l:l.bd 7 1i'xd8 21.l:l.d 1 'irc7 22. 'irc4 is completely equal. 13 ... b6!?
23 ... aS 24.bxaS bxaS 2S .a4 gS 26.fxgS l:l.d8 23. l:l.d4 l:l.d 7 24.:Xd7 'it°xd 7 14. llfdl �b7 (14 ... Wxd4 1S. tt:lxd4
hxgS 24.l:l.h d 1 :Xd1 2S.:Xd 1 :Xd1 2S. 1i'd3 .tf8 26.1i'xd7 . . . 112-112 ( 4 1 ) �b7) 1 S . Wb4 (IS. Wes Wb8)
26 . .txd 1 as 26 ... a6! 27. tllc 3 (27. tllc 7 ts ... tt:Jeds 16. Wa3 (16. Wh4 We7
aS 28.bxaS bxaS) 27 ... gS (27 ... We7) 17. tllx dS .axdS) 16... Wb8 17. ttJxdS
27.bxaS bxa S 28.lbd4 We8 28 ... More fo r c ing �xdS 1 8 . tlld 4 Wes 14. lbxd4
a4 29.ttJbS tt:le4 30.f3 29.tt:lb3 lLJe4 11.�bS l:l.d8 1S . .ie2 .id 7 16. l:l.fd1 l:l.ac8
30.f3 tLlc3+ 31. Wc2 tt:lds 32. Wd3 17.f4 17 . .2.f3!? es (17 ... b6) 18. tlld bS
a4 33.tLlcS tt:lb6 34.e4 �e7 3S.h4 Maxlme Vachler-Lagrave (18. tlld e2 b6) 18 ... .2.xbS 19.llxd8+
f6 36. Wd4 gS? 36 ... hS 37.eS g6 Telmour Radja bov llxd8 2 0 . tll x bS lld2 with enough
37. hxgS hxgS 38.fxgS e s + 39. Wc3 Warsaw Ech 2013 ( 7 ) counterplay. 17 ... lLJed S 17 ... ttJfS!?
fxgs 40. Wb4 Wd6 41.lbxa4 lbd 7 1 . d 4 ttJf6 2 . tllf3 d S 3 . c 4 e6 4 . .igs 18. tllxfS (18. @f2 tllx d4 19. Jlxd4
42. tllb 2 � c 6 43. tllc4 � b 7 44. WbS .ie7 S.©c3 h6 6 . .ih4 0-0 7.e3 �c6=) 18 ... exfS 18. lbxdS lbxd 5
g4 4S.fxg4 tllf6 46.lbd6+ Wc7 tt:lbd 71? 8 . l:l.c1 cS 9.cxdS 9.dxcS !? 18 ... exdS 19 . .2.f3 Wf8 20. tlle 2 and
47.gS tllh S 48. tllc 4 lLJg3 49.g6 1-0 9 ... lbxd S 10. be7 tt:lx e 7 1 1. .ibS the endgame is a little more

136
Survey QO 13.1

comfortable for White, although 17 ... gd7 18. l::! fdl 18. l:tfd 1 'it'c7 without problems here. I n this
the natural result would be a draw. 19 . tt:ld S
19. lllb S!? 'i!Yb8 20. llld 6 way he avoids damaging his pawn
19. �f2 @f8 20. :Xc8 ... 112-112 (40) ge6 21. gc4 gxc4 22. tllx c4 ;!; ; structure: 16. l:tfdl l:tc8 17. 'l!Yb3
19.e4!± followed b y tlld S, with tlle d5 (17 ... b6!?) 18. tllx dS ti:JxdS
Anna Rudolf great effect. 19 . . . lLJxd S 20.:XdS 19.g3 16. 1i'xb6 axb6 17.a3 White
Natallja Pogonlna l:te8 21. 'it'c3 21.h3!? gfs 2 2 . l:tdcS ;!; has a small but stable advantage
Mamaia Ech w 2016 ( 2 ) 21 . . . .ig4 22.h3 .ihS 23.b4 l:tad8 due to the structural defect on
1.d4 lLJf6 2.c4 e6 3 . lLlf3 d S 4 . lLlc3 24. l:tcS •e1 2S. ha6? Concrete Black's queenside. 17 ... l:tfd8
lLlbd7 s . .igs h6 6 . .ih4 .ie7 play fails here ... White could have 18. l:tfd1 �8 18 ... tll e dS; 18 ... l::!a c8
7.e3 0-0 8 . l:tc1 cs 9.cxdS lLJxd S kept a stable advantage by simple 19. @11 lLJc6 20. tt:ldbS 20. tllcbS
10. he7 lLJxe7 11 . .ibS cxd4 means: 25 .bS axbS 26.l:lxb5 l:td7 l::!a c8 20 ... :Xd1+ 21.:Xd1 @e7
12. 'it'xd4 a6 12 ... tll f6 has been the 27.a4; 25.a4!? 2S . . . hf3 26.gxf3 22. @e2 I think that Black's
most popular move, when Black tt:ld41 This tactical detail had problem is mainly practical: the
has solved his opening problems surely escaped White's attention. lack of a clear plan, while White's
without difficulty. 2 7 . .if1? � 27.exd4 exd4 28. 'l!Yd3 play is much simpler. 22 ... l:td8 22 ...
bxa6 and in practice it is much gS!?, gaining space on the kingside:
better to play the black side, but 23. ti:Jd6 l::!d 8 24. tllc bS 23.l:tc1
White keeps serious defensive 23. l::!x d8 tllx d8 24.b4 (24. lll a4
options. 27 ... lLJxf3+ 28.@h1 l:td2 ..t>d7) 23 ... l:ta8 24.g3 lbes 24 ... l::!c 8
28 ... 'il!Yh4 29. gg2 tllg S-+ 2 9 . .ig2 25.l:td1 l:td8 26.lLia4 26. l::!x d8
lbf2 30. l:tc2 :Xc2 31. •xc2 lLJe1 tllx d8 27. tlla4 (27.h4) 27 ... \t>d7
32. 'it'e4 lLJxg2 33. @xg2 ... 0-1 (54) 26 ... :Xd1 27.@xd1 lLJeS 28.lLJxb6
lLlg4 29. @e2 lLJxh2 30. lLJc4
M a x l m e Vachier-Lagrave Material is equal and apparently
J u l i a n Radulski Black's position has improved
Ptovd iv Ech 2012 (6) from a structural point of view.
1.d4 d S 2.c4 e6 3. lLJc3 lllf 6 however White's superiority on
13 . .ie2 lLJc6 13 ... lll f6 14.0-0 .Q.d7 4 . .igs .ie7 s.e3 lllb d7 6. lLlf3 h6 the queenside gives him better
(14... 'il!Yxd4 15. lllx d4, followed 7 . .ih4 0-0 8. l:tc1 cs 9.cxd S lLJxd S chances in this endgame , which
by gf3 and l:Hdl, with a more 10. he7 lLJxe7 11 . .i b S cxd4 he eventually won ... 1-0 (50)
pleasant game) 15. l::!fdl gc6 12 . lLJxd4
14. •c4 14. 'il!Yd6!? tll f6 (14 ... tll d e5 Rufi no Camarena Gime nez
15. l::!d l (15 . 'il!Ya3 tllx f3+ 16. gxf3 Alexey Gavri lov
tlle 5 17. ge2 bS !) 15 ... tll x f3+ Otomouc 2016 (4)
16. gxf3 'il!Yxd6 17. l::! x d6 l:ld8 1.d4 lllf6 2.c4 e6 3. lLlf3 dS
18. l::!x d8+ tllx d8 19. tlla 4;!;) 15. 'l!Ya3 4. lLJc3 lllb d7 S . .igS h6 6 . .ih4
b6 16.0-0 gb7 1 4. . . lllb 6 Black .ie7 7.e3 0-0 8. l:tc1 cs 9 .cxdS
should finish his development lLJxd S 10. he7 lLJxe7 11 . .ibS
in a more harmonious way. cxd4 12. lLJxd4 lLJf6 13.0-0 a6
There are several ways to do this: 13 ... gd7! 14. .ie2 .id 7 Finishing
14 ... 'il!Yc7 15.0-0 bS 16. 'il!Yh4 (16. 'l!Yf4 development - the healt hiest
'ilfxf4 17.exf4 gb7 18.a4 (18. tlle 4 option. I think that the advance
l::!a d8) 18 ... b4 (18 ... bxa4 19. tllx a4) in the centre does not help
19. tlle 4 tlla S 20. llld 6 gxf3 21. gxf3 12 ... lllf6 12 ... a6 13. ge2 bS (13 ... Black's cause: 14 ... eS 15. tllb 3±
l::!a d8) 16 ... gb7; 14 ... 'il!Yb6!? 15 .b3 b6) 14.0-0 (14. gf3 l:tb8 15.0-0 1s. 1i'b3 1s. gf3 l:tb8 16. tllb 3
(15. tlla4 'il!YaS + ; 15. l::!c 2 tll f6 16.0-0 'l!Yb6) 14 ... gb7 15.b4 tllb 6 16. lllb 3 1/2- 1/2 Vi.Zakhartsov- Radulski,
eS 17. tlle 4 (17. tlla4 'il!Yc7 18. tllc S tlle dS 13.0-0 .id7 13 ... a6 14. ge2 Cappelle-la-Grande 2009.
gfs) 17 ... gfs ! ? 18. tllx f6+ gxf6<=') �d7 has been seen in practice; 15 ... l:tb8 16. 'it'a3 If 16. l::! fdl 'il!YaS
15 ... tlld eS (15 ... tllc eS) 16. tllx eS 13 ... 'il!YaS!? 14. ge2 (14. tllb 3 'l!Yb6 Black is OK. 16 ... lLJc6 17. lllb3
(16. 'il!Ye4) 16 ... tllx eS 17. 'il!Ye4 tlld 7 1s. ge2 (15. 'l!Yd4 'il!Yxd4 16. tllx d4 17. l:tfdl 'il!Ye7!? (17 ... tllx d4 18. l::!x d4
18.0-0 tllf6 1 9 . 'ilff4 g d 7 1S. 'it'cS l::!d 8 17. l:tfdl jld7) 15 ... gd7) 'il!Yb6) 18. 'il!Yxe7 tll x e7 19. gf3 l::!fc8
tt:ld 7 16. -.a3 lllf 6 17.0-0± 14 ... gd7 15. 'l!Yb3 l:tab8 16. l::!fdl l::!fd8 17 ... .. b6 17 ... 'l!Ye7!? 18. tll c S l::! fd8
White 's play is simple, and she 14. 'it'b3 bbS 15. 'it'xbS 15. lll d xbS 19. l::!fdl (19. tllx d7 'l!Yxd7 2 0 . tlla 4
can put pressure on the dark ti:Jc6 16. l::!fdl 'l!Ye7 15 ... 'it'b6?1 (20. l:tfdl 'l!Yc7) 20 ... 'l!Yd2) 18. 'it'cS
squares on the queenside with 15 ... l:tb8 16. l::!fdl a6 17. 'il!Yb3 'liaS; 18. tllc S l::!fd 8; 18. l::! fd l!? l::!fd8
the tlla 4-c5 manoeuvre. 17 ... eS 15 ... 'il!Yb8!? Black should equalize 19. 'il!YcS 18 ... 1Wxc5 19. lLJxcS l:tfd8

137
Queen's Gambit Declined - Classical Main Line

19 . . . lLle7!? 2 0 . gf3 gc6 21. gxc6 still has to finish his development 20. lLlfS lLJxe4+ 21. lLJxe4 21.fxe4?
lLlxc6 22. lLJ3a4 l:tfc8 23. lLlb6 l:tc7 while Black can easily solve the lLlxfS 22.exfS l::!x c3 23. l::!d 6 l::!c 2+
24.a3 (24. l:tfdl lLlb4 25.a3 lLlbdS main drawback of the Orthodox 21... lLJxfS 22. lLld61 lLlxd6 23. l:lxd6
2 6 . lLlca4 l:txcl 27. l:txcl lLlxb6 Defence, the development of the l:lc2 24.l:lhd1 24. l::!x b6 gds 25.a3
2 8 . lLlxb6 l:td8 ; 24.h3 lLlb4 25.a3 queen's bishop, by ... b7-b6 and l::!a 2 (25 ... gc4 26. l::!e l l::!a 2) 26. l::!e l
lLlbdS 26. lLlca4 lLlxb6 27. lLlxb6 l:txcl gb7. 11. .ie2 This development of l::!x a3 27. l::!d 6 �e6 28. gfl 24 ...
2 8 . l:txcl l:td8) 24 . . . lLleS 20.l:lfd1 the bishop is very interesting, as it e4 2S. l:l1d2 l:lxd2 26. l:lxd2 exf3
.ie8 2 1 . .if3 �8 22. lLJ3e4 ;;,, 22.a3, can go to f3 in the future, putting 27.gxf3 h8 28.l:ld6 l:lb8 29 . .ic4
to follow up with b2-b4, keeping pressure on Black's queenside. �8 30.l:ld 7 l:lc8 31. l:lxf7+ We8
some pressure. 22 ... l:lxd1+ 11... b6 ll ... cxd4!? 12.dxcS 32 . .ie6 l:lc3 33.h4 gs 34.hxgS
2 3 . l:lxd1 lLJxe4 . . . 'h-'h ( 3 2 ) 12.0-0 gb7 12 ... lLJxcS 13.b4 A hxgs 3S.a4 l:la3 36. wg3 l:le3
consistent move. White follows 3 7. h2 l:la3 38 . .ie6 ... 'h-'h (42)
the path of maintaining some
Q u iet a n d n at ur al dynamism in the position and AR Saleh Salem
11. ..lit.e2 trying not to allow Black to fully Vla d i m i r Kra m n i k
equalize quickly. 13.0-0 gb7 14.b4 D o h a 2014 ( 8 )
Vasily lva n c h u k lLle4 with good play for Black. 1.d4 tt:lf6 2.c4 e6 3. lLlf3 d S
Vlad i m i r Kra m n i k 13 ... 'ifxd1+ 13 ... lLld7!? 14. l:lxd1 4. lLlc3 lLlbd 7 S . .igS h6 6 . .ih4
Novi S a d t t 2016 ( 5 ) tt::id 7 1S. tt::id 4 1? Convinced that .ie7 7 .e3 0-0 8.l:lc1 cs 9.cxdS
1.c4 e6 2 . lLlc3 lLlf6 3 . tt:lf3 d S full equality is very near, White lLJxd S 10. be7 lLJxe7 11 . .ie2 b6
4 . d 4 .i e 7 s . .igs h6 6 . .i h 4 o-o tries to confuse matters a little by 12.0-0 .ib7 13.dxcS White can
7 . l:lc1 tt:lbd 7 8.e3 cSI? Black delaying castling. In case of 15.0-0 play in different ways to fight
has employed this move quite Black plays 15 ... lLlf6 followed by for a small advantage, but I do
successfully recently; although 16 ... gb7. 1S ... aS Kramnik always not think that objectively he
the second player has other deals with strategic positions in can achieve anything, as Black
methods, I think this idea a creative way. That said, I do not has good development and a
produces simple play with see any problem in continuing in healthy pawn structure: 13. �a4
excellent possibilities to equalize. the standard way: 15 ... lLlf6 16. �f3 ti:lfS 14. l:tfdl cxd4 15. ti:lxd4 ti:lcS
8 ... c6 is the most played; 8 ... b6; l::!b 8 17. lLldbS (17.0-0 gb7=) 17 ... 16. �c2 (16. lLlxfS ? l2lxa4 17. l::!x d8
8 . . . a6; 8 . . . l::!e 8 ; 8 . . . dxc4 9.cxdS aS (17... a6 18.lLld6 gd7) 18.bxaS l::!fxd 8 -+) 16 ... l2lxd4 17. l::!x d4 (17.
9 .dxcS is the other main option to bxaS 19.0-0 �b7= 16.bS lLlcS exd4 'ii' g S 18.g3 ti:ld7=) 17 ... �gs
fight for the advantage. 9 ... lLJxd S 17.f3 17. lLlc6!? lLlxc6 18.bxc6 ga6 18.g3 l::! fd8 (18 ... l::!a c8) ; 13. �d2
9 . . . cxd4 10. 'ii' x d4 lLlxdS 11. lLlxdS 19. l:tbl (19 . gxa6 lLlxa6 (19 ... l::!x a6 lLldS (13... �b8!? 14. l::!fdl l::!d 8)
gxh4 12. �xh4 (12. lLlxh4 exdS 20.c7 l::!a a8 21. lLlbS+-) 20. lLlbS 14. l::! fdl �e7 13 . . . lLJxcS 14. tt:ld4
13. gdJ ;!;) 12 . . . �xh4 13. lLlxh4 rues 21.l:td6 lLlb4 22.c7 lLla6 23. l::! c 6 For some mysterious reason,
exdS 14. lLlfH (14. lLlfS) ; 9 ... exdS?! l2lxc7!) 19 ... lLld3+ 20. \t>d2 l::!fd8 White evades the exchange of
is not advisable: 10.dxcS± and 21. gxd3 l::!x d3+ 22. \t>c2 17 .. . .ib7 queens. 14. �xd8 l::!fxd8 15. l::!fdl
Black does not have a simple way 18.e4 18. lLlb3!? is the healthiest was a d irect road to equality. Here
to restore the material balance. move, eliminating the strong I do not see how Black could
10. be7 lLJxe7 10 ... �xe7 11.lLlxdS black knight: 18 ... lLlxb3 19.axb3 create an imbalance to fight for
exdS 12.dxcS lLlxcS 13. �xdS ± ti:ldS (19 ... l:tac8 20.ti:la4 ti:ldS 21.\t>d2 victory. 14.b4 14 ... tt:lfSI? 14 ... ti:ldS
l::!fd8 22. gc4 lLlf4+ 23.\t>cl lLlxg2 is equally possible - in any case
24.e4 l::!x dl+ 25. l::!x dl lLle3 26.lLlxb6 the assessment is full equality.
lLlxdl 27. lLlxc8 gxc8 28.\t>xdl \t>f8 14 ... l::!c 8 1S. lLJxfS exfS
29.b4 axb4 30.\t>c2 \t>e7 31.\t>b3
@d6 32. \t>xb4 gS=) 20.@d2 lLlxc3
21. \t>xc3 l::!fd8 22.e4 @f8= 18 ... l:lac8
19. �2 eS The start of some
concrete play that leads practically
to a forced draw. 19 ... l::!c 7!? keeps
the tension without simplifying.
In this case Black's position may
be a little easier to play, but a
The main position of the system. draw with the black pieces vs.
White must play very accurately to Ivanchuk in this team tournament
achieve a tangible advantage, as he is, undoubtedly, not a bad result.

138
Survey QO 13.l

16. �f3?! White damages his 49. l:tcS +) 4S . l:tcS l:txcS 46.bxcS ti:JxcS 18.l:tccl (18 . l:txd8+ l:txd8
pawn structure without any need g3 47.fxg3 fxg3 48. lll x g3 @xg3 19. '1Wxa7? '1Wd6-+) 18 ... aS and
to do so. Again the exchange 49.c6 llld 2+ S O . @e2 lllx e4 S l.c7 Black is fine. 1S .bdS 16. lbd2
..•

was healthier: 16. '1Wxd8 l:tfxd8 llld 6 S2.aS hS S3.a6 lllc 8-+ 44 ... White aims to fight for a minimal
17. l:tfdl= E. Levin-Goganov, St h S 4S. lllg3 h4 4S ... fxg3? 46. l:txhS+ advantage through the advance
Petersburg 2016. 16 ... 1i'xd1 lll h 4 47. l:txh4# 46. lbe2 g3 47.fxg3 e3-e4. 16.ti:Jel; or 16 . .2.bS l:tfd8
17. l:tfxd1 .bf3 18.gxf3 l:tfd8 47. lllxf4 g2+ 48. lUxg2 l:txg2-+ 17 . .2.xd7 �xf3 18.gxf3 l:txd7 and
19. �f1 Centralizing the white 47 .. .fxg3 48.bS l:tf6 49. l:tts :Xts Black is OK. 16 . . . cxd4 Simplest.
king is quite natural. 19.l:txd8+ SO.exfS g2+ S1. �f2 lbd4 S2. lllg 1 16 ... l:tfd8 17.e4 �b7 18.b4!? - the
l:txd8 20.l:tdl l:txdl+ 21. lllx dl 1 9. . . lbxbS S3.a4 lbc3 S4. tt:'lf3+ S4.aS scheme is similar to the Lasker
g 6 20. �e2 �g7 21. ltJbS �6 llle 4+-+ S4 . . . �h1 SS.as h3 S6.a6 Variation of the Orthodox QG D.
22. :Xd8 :Xd8 23.b4 23. lllx a7 l:ta8 h2-+ 0·1 This advance is typical, increasing
24. lllc 8!? l:txa2 (24 ... l:txc8 2S .b4 l:ta8 the pressure on cS . Tactically it is
(2S ... @eS 26.bxcS bxcS 27.a4 @ds Zden ko Kozul justified by the penetration of the
28. @d3 l:ta8 29.l:tal l:taS 3 0 . @c3 hS Ante Saric rook to c7. 16 ... l:tfc8 17. �a6 �c6
31.h4=) 26 .bxcS l:txa2+ 27. @fl bxcS Croatia tt 2015 (5) 18. '1Wa3 l:tc7 19. ti:Jb3 �dS 2 0 .dxcS
28. l:txcS=) 2S.l:tc2 l:ta6 (2S ... lll a 4 1.d4 ltJf6 2.c4 e6 3. tt:'lf3 d S 4. �gs �xb3 21.axb3 lllx cS 17. 1i'xd4 17.e4
26. @d2 l:tal 27.b3 lllc S 28.b4 llld 7 �e7 S.e3 h6 6. �h4 0-0 7 . ltJc3 lllc S 18. l:lxcS (18 . '1Wxd4 �b7=) 18 ...
29.f4 l:thl 30. l:tcn) 26. lllx b6 l:txb6 ltJbd 7 8 . l:tc1 cs 9.cxdS lbxd S bxcS 19.exdS exdS 20 . .2.f3 l:tfd8
27. l:txcS = 23 ... lbe6 24.l:tc6 24. lllc 7 10 . .b e 7 lbxe7 11. �e2 b6 12.0-0 21. 'IW a3 l:tac8 22. lllb 3 l:tc7 and Black
l:td7 (24 ... l:tc8 2S. llld S++-) 2S. lllx e6 �b7 13 . 1i'a4 is not worse. 17 ... l:tfd8 17 ... lllf6
fxe6= 24 ... �e7 2S.a3 l:td 7 26.l:tc8 18.e4 eS (18 ... �b7 19.eS llld S
a6 2 7 . lbc3 bS 28.l:ta8 l:td6 29. l:th8 20. llle 4 (20. lllc4) 20 ... lllf4 21. �f3;

29.tt:lb1 @f6 30.tt:ld2 @gs 31.f4 + 21. �fl; 18 ... �xa2? 19. '1Wa4+-)
@h4 3 2 . lllf3+ @h3 3 3 . llle S 29 . . •
l .t 19. '1Wd3 .2.b7 20.f3 l:tfd8 18.e4
gS! 29 ... hS; 29 ... l:tc6!? 3 0 . >t>d3 lllg S l �b7 19.f3 19. l:tc7 may have been
31.f4 lllh 3 32.f3 lllf2 + 33. @d2 l:td6+ l the last opportunity to fight for
34.@e2 ltJd3t 30.l:ta8 3 0 . lhh6? an advantage: 19 ... lllc S 20. '1Wxg7+
lllf4+-+ 30 ... �f61 31. l:ta 7 �g6
£!:, @xg7 21.l:txe7 l:tac8 (simplest; the
32. lba2 lbd8 33. �e1? �hS ttJ £!:, ttJ threat is to trap the rook with 22 ...
34. lbc1 �h4 3S. lbb3 �h3 36. lbd4 £!:, £!:, � £!:, £!:, £!:, @f8) 22. �hS l:td7 23. l:txd7 lllx d7
36. lllc S @xh2 37. l:txa6 l:txa6 and Black will soon re-establish
� :S w
38. lllx a6 @g2-+ 36 ... f4 3 7 . l:ta8 the material balance with accurate
37. lllfS l:tf6 38.e4 (38. llld 4 @xh2) 13 ... lbd SI? 13 ... tt:ifs 14. l:tfdl cxd4 play. 19 ... ltJf6= 19 ... lllf8!? 20. 1i'e3
38 ... @g2 39.l:ta8 lllc 6 40. l:txa6 1S.tt:'lxd4 tt:Jxd4 (Black can try l:tac8 21.a3 :Xc1 ... V2-'h ( 4 1 )
l:te6 41.a4 (41. @e2 llld 4+-+) 41 ... lS ... tt:'lcS but I think the text
bxa4 42. l:txa4 (42.bS llle S 43.l:txe6 move is much healthier: 16. '1Wa3 Michal Krasen kow
fxe6 44. llld 4 a3 4S. @e2 a2 46. lllc 2 (16. '1Wc2 tt:'lxd4 17. l:txd4 'IWgS) Ernesto lna rklev
(46. lllb 3 lllxf3 47.b6 llld 4+ -+) 16 ... lllx d4 17. l:txd4 'IWgS 18 . .2.fl Baku 2014 ( 7 )
46 ... lllx f3-+) 42 ... llle S 43. @e2 l:tfd8 19.l:tcdl aS 20 .b4 tt:'le4!) 1. tt:'lf3 dS 2 . d 4 lllf6 3 . c 4 e 6
lUxf3-+ 37 ... �xh2 38.ltJfS l:tf6 16. '1Wxd4 (16. lhd4 'IWgS) 16 ... ti:Jf6 4.lbc3 �e7 S. �gS tt:\bd 7 6.e3 h 6
39.e4 39. lllx h6 l:txh6 40. l:txd8 17.f3 and White plays for a small 7. �h4 0-0 8.l:tc1 cS 9.cxdS lbxdS
@g2 41.@e2? (41. l:tg8! @xf3 but not very relevant endgame 10 . .be7 lbxe7 11. �e2 cxd4
42. l:txgS fxe3 43. l:tfS + @e4 44. l:txf7 advantage: 17 ... '1Wxd4 1 8 . l:txd4 In a similar way this position
exf2+ 4S . @xf2 l:th3 46. @e2 l:txa3 l:tfd8 19.l:tcdl l:txd4 20. l:txd4 @f8 is reached in the variation with
47. @d2=) 41...g4! 42.fxg4 f3+-+ 21.e4 @e7 22. @f2 (Zhou- Naiditsch, 11.�bS, the only difference being
39 ... lbc6 40.:Xa6 l:tg6 41. �f1 Danzhou 20 14) 22 ... l:tc8 23. @e3 that here the black pawn is on a7
lbes 42.l:taS 42. l:txg6 fxg6 llld 7= A more ambitious method instead of a6. Still, I do not think
43. llld 4 hS 44. lUxbS g4 4S.fxg4 of play is 17. '1Wb4 '1Wb8 1 8 . ti:Jbs that this is a big difference, and
hxg4-+ and ... g3-g2-gl is coming. 'IWeS (18 ... l:td8!? 19.l:txd8+ (19. Black keeps excellent chances to
42 ... lbxf3 43. :XbS g4 43 ... hS h3) 19 ... '1Wxd8 2 0 . l:tdl '1Wf8) 19.a3 equalize. 12. lbxd4 12. '1Wxd4 lllf6
44.a4 h4 4S.aS h3 46.l:tb6 llld 2+ .2.a6 20 . .2.fl .2.xbS 21. 'IWxbS 'IWxbS 12 ... lllf6 13.0·0 �d 7 14. 1i'b3
47. @e2 @g2-+; 43 ... llld 2+ 44. @e2 22. �xbS l:tfd 8 14. l:tfd1 14. lllx dS 14. �f3 l:tb8 14 ... li'aS The queen
lllx e4 4S. l:teS 44.l:tdS 44.a4 l:tc6! �xdS lS. l:tfdl '1We7 transposes is very well placed on aS as it
(44 ... g3 4S . lllx g3! llld 2+ 46. @e2 to the game. 14 ... 1i'e7 1S. lbxdS controls important squares and
fxg3 47.fxg3 lllx e4 48. @f3 lUxg 3 lS. '1Wa3 ti:Jxc3 16. l:txc3 l:tfd8 17.dxcS additionally allows the connection

139
Queen's Gambit Declined - Classical Main Line

of the rooks. 1S. J:lfd 1 1 S . �xb7 Although this annotator prefers further, but he does not do this in
only leads to an equal game: finishing development by 11... the most accurate way. 20.ti:le2!?;
1S .. Jbb8 1 6 . ti:lb3 (16.b4 �a3 b6, this queen move also has its 20. Ae2! (with the same objective)
(16 ... �xb4 17. �xa7 l:ta8) 17. �a6 merits and seems quite playable. 20 ... bs (20 ... as 21.e4) 21. Af3 20 ... as
�xa6 18 . .Q.xa6 l:txb4) 16 .. Jhb7 12.b3 12.0-0 �xb2 13.dxcS Allowing an opportunity to slip:
17. tiJxaS l:txb2 18. ti:lc4 l:tbb8 tiJxcS 14. �d6 tiJdS lS. tiJxdS exdS 20 ... .Q.c8 21. ti:lxc8 l:lxdl+ 22.ti:lxdl
1S ... J:lfd8 16 . .if3 J:lab8 17.h3 A 16. �xcS (16. ti:ld4 ti:le6 17. l:tc2 �b6) l:lxb7 21 . .ia6 21. Af3 keeps a
useful move. White has his pieces 16 ... �xe2 and Black is OK; 12.l:tc2 comfortable advantage. The knight
ideally placed but it is not easy ti:lf6 (12 ... cxd4 13. �xd4 �xd4 on d6 exerts strong pressure on
to improve the position or to 14. ti:lxd4 ti:lf6) 13.dxcS (13.0-0) Black's position: 2i. . . gc6 22. Axc6
undertake something active. 17.a3 13 ... �xcS 14.0-0 �aS; 12. �d2 cxd4 ti:lxc6 23.ti:lcbS f 21 ... @fS 21. . . .Q.c6
a6 (a prophylactic move - Black 13. ti:lxd4 ti:lcS 14.0-0 .Q.d7 (14 ... l:td8) 22.e4 gs 23 .f3 ti:lg6 24. @f2 24. ti:lc4
controls bS , avoiding a possible lS. l:lfdl l:tfd8; 12.dxcS �xb2 13.0-0 24 ... �c6 2S . .ibS hbS 26. ti:lcxbS
knight jump. If 17 ... eS!? 1 8 . ti:lde2 bS; transposes to 12.0-0. 12 ... ti:lf6 llle S 2 7.g3 J:ld7 28.f4 ti:lg6 29. �f3
17 ... ti:lg6) 18. �a2 (to win space on Black could take immediately: 12 ... gxf4 30.gxf4 tiJhS 31. ti:lc4 J:lbd8
the queenside by b2-b4) cxd4. This may be more exact, 32.J:lxd7 J:lxd7 33.fS J:ld3+ 34. @f2
A) 18 ... tt'b6!? 19.b4 aS; limiting White's options: 13. �xd4 exfS 3S.exfS ti:lh4 36.ti:lxb6 J:lf3+
B) 18 ... eS is another possibility (13. ti:lxd4) 13 ... �xd4 14. ti:lxd4 ti:lf6 37. @e2 ti:lf4+ 38. @d2 tiJxfS
to take into account, even more 1S. �f3 l:tb8 16.0-0 l:ld8 17. l:tfdl 39.J:lel J:lf2+ 40. '1tc3 J:lxa2 41. J:lfl
so now that White's queen has .Q.d7 13.0-0 13.dxcS !? �xcS 14.0-0 J:lc2+ 42. '1txc2 ti:le3+ . . . 'h-'h (51)
left the centre: 19.b4 (19. ti:lb3 ti:lc6 (14 . . . 'll!f a S) lS. tiJbS 1? (1S . ti:le4
�b6 2 0 . ti:ld 2 .Q.c6 (20 ... .Q.e6 �e7 16.ti:lxf6+ (16. �c2 l:td8 17. l:tfdl
21. �bl) 21. ti:lc4 tt'c7 with balanced �d7 18. ti:ld6 (18. tiJcS .Q.e8) 18 ... .Q.e8 M o re comm itt a l
chances) 19 ... �b6 20.ti:lb3 .Q.c6; 19. ti:lxe8 l:lxdl+ 20. l:lxdl l:lxe8) 9 . d x c S dxc4
C) 18 ... �gs 19. ti:le4 ti:lxe4 16 ... �xf6 17.l:tcS l:td8 18. �cl �d7;
20 . .Q.xe4 �es (20 ... es 21. ti:lf3 1S. �c2 �e7) 1S ... �b6 (1S ... �e7 Le Quang Liem
�f6 22.h3 .Q.c6 23 . .Q.xc6 ti:lxc6 16. �d6;t) 16. �d6 l:td8 17. �g3 �d7 M ichael Adams
24. �b3) 21. �bl .Q.c6 22. ti:lxc6 bxc6 13 ... cxd4 14. 'tlfxd4 14. ti:la4 'ifd8 Baku o l 2016 (5)
23. l:txd8+ J:l:xd8 24. �c2 l:tb8 2S.l:tbl 1S.ti:lxd4 (1S . �xd4 b6) lS ... tiJedS 1.d4 ti:lf6 2.c4 e6 3 . ti:lf3 d S 4 . ti:lc3
aS 1/i-1/2 (41) Gajewski- Radulski, (1S ... b6!? 16 . .Q.f3 �a6) 16. �c2 .ie7 s . .igs h6 6 . .ih4 0-0 7.e3
Cappelle-la-Grande 2010. 17 ... bS �d7 17. ti:lcS l:lc8 18. �b2 �b6 ti:lbd 7 8. J:lc1 cs 9.dxcSI? 9 .cxdS
18. llle 4 tbxe4 19 . .be4 b4 20.ti:lf3 19.ti:lxd7 ti:lxd7 14 'tl'xd4 1S. ti:lxd4
•.. 9 ... dxc4 The healthiest treatment.
ti:lds 21.�c2 J:lbcS 22. 'tlfd3 ti:lf6 .id 7 Once again this typical 9 ... ti:lxcS 10.cxdS gS is another
23 . .ib3 .ibS 24. 'tlfb1 J:lxd1+ structure appears, where White possibility. Maybe the discovery
2S.J:lxd1 'tlfb6 26.J:lc1 J:lcs has developed in a slightly more of this more dynamic alternative
2 7 . J:lxcS . . . 'h- 'h (48) harmonious way. Even so, Black's was one of the important reasons
healthy pawn structure gives him for reviving Black's system.
Fra ncesco Rambaldl excellent possibilities to keep the
Noel Studer balance. 16 . .if3 16. l:lfdl; 16.ti:lcbS !?
Biel j r m 2016 (5) .Q.xbS (16 ... eS 17. ti:lf3 .Q.xbS 18. gxbS
1.d4 e6 2.c4 ti:lf6 3. ti:lf3 dS 4. ti:lc3 a6 19 . .Q.e2 e4 20. llle S) 17. lllxbS
ti:lbd 7 s . .igs h6 6 . .ih4 .ie7 l:lfd8 18.l:l:c7 (18. �f3 a6 19.ti:ld4
7.e3 0-0 8 . J:lc1 cs 9.cxdS ltJxd S ti:ledS; 18. l:lfdl) 18 ... l:lab8! (18 ...
1 0 . .b e 7 tbxe7 1 1. .ie2 'tlfb61? a6 19. llld 4 l:ld7 20. l:lxd7 ti:lxd7
21. �f3) 19. ti:lxa7 l:td2 20.l:lxe7 l:lxa2
21. .Q.f3 l:txa7 22.h3 l:ta3= 16 ... J:labS
17. ti:ldbS a6 18. ti:ld6 b6?1 From a
strategic point of view this move
is suspicious as it weakens the 10 . .bc4 The natural 10.c6!?,
queenside structure. 18 ... .Q.c6! is with the aim of damaging Black's
simplest, immediately exchanging queenside pawn structure and
the powerful bishop on f3: 19 . .Q.xc6 fighting for a small advantage, has
ti:lxc6 20. l:tfdl (20. ti:la4 ti:lb4 21.a3 not yet been tested in practice:
lllb dS) 20 ... l:lfd8 19. J:lfdl J:lfd8 A) 10 ... lllb 6 11. 'ifxd8 .Q.xd8
20 . .ib7 Conceptually White tries 12. ti:leS! (12.cxb7 gxb7 13. Ae2
to weaken Black's queenside ti:lfdS 14 . .Q.xd8 l:tfxd8) 12 . . . tiJfdS
140
Survey QO 13.l

(12 ... i.c7 13. ti:lxc4; 13.cxb7 i.xb7 i.d7; 16. 0.eS i.b7 17. tllc 6 i.xc6 13. llfdl;!;; ll ... Q.d7 12. tlle S i.e8;
14. i.xf6 (14. ti:lxc4 ti:lxc4 IS . i.xc4 1 8 . llxc6 llfd8 16 ... .i.d 7 17.l:l.c7 ll... 1!fb6 (to develop the bishop to
gS 1 6 . i.g3 i.xg2 17. llgl i.xg3 Being consistent. White could d7) 12. °*e2 i.d7 13.e4;!; and Black's
1 8 . llxg2 i.h4) 14 ... gxf6 IS. 0.xc4; also t ry to fight for a minimal position lacks harmony.
12 ... bxc6 13. 0.xc6 i.b7 (13 ... i.c7 advantage with the advance 17.e4
14. 0.bS) 14. 0.xdS llaxd 8 IS.f3±) i.bS 1 8 . l:lfel (18 . llc7 '*b4 1 9 . llel
13. i.xdS llxd8 14. 0.xc4 0.xc3 llfc8) 18 ... llfd S ; Black is O K .
IS. llxc3 bxc6 16.0.aS;!;; 1 7 . . . l:l.fc8 18. l:l.d1 1 8 . llfcl llxc7
B) 10 ...bxc6 ll. i.xc4 Now Black 19. llxc7 '*dB 18 ... lbc7 Although
has several paths: Black can equalize in this way,
Bl) 11 ... 0.dS 12. i.xe7 (12. i.g3 this path is quite complex.
0.xc3 13.bxc3 0.b6) 12... '*xe7 18 ... 'iWe8! is much simpler, moving
13.0-0 i.b7 (13 ... llbS!? 14.b3 i.b7) out of the pin and preparing
14. i.e2 (14. °*e2) 14 . . . llfdS IS . .. c2; ... .Q.. c 6: 19.h3 (19 . llxc8 l::l.x c8
IS. '*a4; 2 0 . 0.eS i.c6 21. tllx c6 't!fxc6;
B2) 11 ... i.b7 12.0-0 cS 13. °*eH; 19.lldcl llxc7 2 0 . llxc7 llc8 21.h3 12. ti:ld4 12. Ae2 bS (12 ... b6)
B3) n ... 0.b6 n . .ad3 (12. '*xd 8 aS) 19 ... i.c6 19. 'ifx c 7 'iVdB The 13. tlld4 (13. Axf6 i.xf6 14. tllx bS
llxd8 13. i.e2 i.b7 14.0-0 play has a forced character now, axbS lS. llxcS °*xdl 1 6 . l:txdl
(14. 0.eS) 14 ... cS; 12. i.e2) 12 ... 0.fdS and Black has to defend with llxa2=; 13.b4 tllc d7 14. °*b3
(12 ... i.b7!? 13.0-0 cS - structurally several only moves. 20. 'iVxdB+ �b7 15. llfdl tlld S=) 13 ... i.b7
White is better, but Black has a 20. 'ilt'd6 °*f8 20 ... lbdB 21. ti:leS 14 . .Q.xf6 �xf6 lS. tllc xbS axbS
harmonious piece arrangement lt>fB 22 . .i.a4 lt>eB 23 . .ic6 a 5 16. llxcS llxa2 17. llxbS '*as
which gives him good chances 24. lt>f1 bc6 25. lbdB+ lt>xdB and Black has excellent play.
of counterplay) 13. i.xe7 '*xe7 2 6 . tbxc6+ �c7 26 ... @d7 also 12 ... ti:lfe4 Black frees his
14.0-0 lld8 (14 ... 0.xc3 IS. llxc3 0.dS works, e.g. 27. tlle S+ @e7 2 8 . tll c4 position by this simplifying
16.llcl llb8) IS. 0.xdS cxdS with a tlld 7 29.@e2 @d8 3 0 . @d3 @c7 manoeuvre. 13. be7 'ifxe7
balanced game. 10 . . . 0.xcS 11.0-0 3 1 . @d4 tllb 8=. 2 7 . ti:leS ti:ld S 14. 'ifc2 14. tllx e4!? tll x e4 lS. °*c2
li:lfe4 11 ... a6 12. li:ld4 0.ce4 13. li:lxe4 Black's defence is justified (1s. Ae2; lS. 't!fd3 l!Jf6 16 . .l:tfdl Ad7
(13. °*c2 0.xc3 14. '*xc3 i.d7) tactically as in case White takes 17. tllf3 i.a4 1 8 . i.b3 Sargissian­
13 ... 0.xe4 14. i.xe7 '*xe7 IS. '*c2 on f7, the pawn is immediately Sethuraman,Tsaghkadzor 201S)
12. tbxe4 12. '*xd8 i.xd8 13. i.xdS recovered and the assessment 1S ... tlld 6 (15 ... tllf6 16. i.e2 lld 8
(13. 0.xe4 0.xe4 14. i.d3 i.xh4 remains equal. 28.lt>e2 28. li:Jxf7 (16 ... i.d7 17. °*c7 llab8) 17. llfdl
(14 ... 0.d2 I S . 0.xd2 i.xh4 16. i.e4 tllb 4 29.a3 (29 . @e2 tllx a2 30.e4 es 18. tllb 3 (18. tllf3 Ag4) 18 ... Ae6
lld8 17. llfdl llb8 18. 0.f3 llxdl+ tllb 4) 29 ... tlld 3 30.b3 bS 31. @e2 14 ... li:lxc3 15. 'iVxc3 l!Ja41 The
19.llxdl Q.f6) IS. i.xe4 i.f6 16.b3) tllc l+ 32.@d2 tllx b3+ 33. @c3 tllc S= most exact. This was surely still
13 .. J lxdS 14. llfdl i.d7 12 . . . 0.xe4 28 . . . f6 2 9 . ti:lf3 �d6 ... 'h-'h (70) part of Kramnik's preparation.
13. be7 1he7 14. 1i'd4 Most 15 ... Ad7 16. °*a3 and the pin is
natural. White centralizes his Maxim Matlakov uncomfortable for Black; I do
queen with tempo. 14. 0.eS! ? b6 Vladi m i r Kra m n l k not think Black gets full equality
(14... lldS IS. °*c2 0.d6 16. i.e2 Q.d7 Doha 2015 (5) after 15 ... b6 16. 'ilt'b4 'ilt'a7 17. llfdl
17.°*'c7 llac8 18. °*'aS a6 19. llxc8 1.d4 li:lf6 2.c4 e6 3 . li:lf3 d 5 Ab7 18. °*a3 and White's play is
llxc8 2 0 . 0.xd7 '*xd7 21. l:ldl) 4 . lLJc3 .i e 7 s . .igs h 6 6 . .i h 4 o-o much easier, while the queen
Although the weakening of c6 7.e3 ti:lbd 7 8 . l:l.c1 8.cxdS; 8 . 't!fc2 on a7 remains passive. 16. 'ifc2
seems quite dangerous to the 8 . . . c5 9.dxc5 dxc4 10. bc4 .id7 17.b3 l!Jb6 17 ... .l:tfc8!? is a
human eye, a concrete way to take 0.xc5 11.0-0 a6 Black takes the suggestion by the chess engine.
advantage of it is not in sight: bS-square under control and After delving deeper into the
1S . 0.c6 (15 . i.bS i.b7 1 6 . i.c6 llfc8 at the same time prepares the analysis of the position, I think
17. °*g4 tllf6 18. °*f3 tlld S) 15 ... 'ilt'e8 development of the bishop to Black equalizes completely:
16. i.bS i.d7; 16 ... a6 17. i.e2 i.b7 b7. 11 ... tllfe4; 11 . . . b6 12. �c2 (12. 18.bxa4 (18 . °*e4 tllc S 19. 'ti°eS °*gS
14. . . ti:lf6 15 . .i.b3 White tries b4 tllc e4 13. tllx e4 tllx e4 14. 1!fxd8 20. °*xgS hxgS 21. tllf3 bS 22 . .Q..e 2
to create threats through the i.xd8 15. �xdS llxd8; 12.°*e2 a6 0.e4 23. tlle S llxcl 24. llxcl llc8
penetration of the rook to c7, (necessary; 12 ... i.b7 13. llfdl and 2S.llxc8+ i.xc8=) 18 ... bS 19. '*b3
however it seems that Black can Black is in trouble as he does not (19.axbS axbS 20. 't!fb3 bxc4 21. llxc4
effectively parry the threats. have a healthy position for the llxc4 22. 't!fxc4 't!fa3 23. 't!fc7
lS. llfdl i.d7 (15 ... b6) 16. tlle S queen) 13. llfdl 'ilt'e8 14. �xf6!? i.e8=) 19 ... bxc4 20. llxc4 llxc4
llfd8= 15. . . b6 16. 'iVf4 16. °*eS �xf6 1S.b4 tlld 7 16. tlle4) 12 . . . i.b7 21. °*xc4 °*a3= (21 ... 't!fd6) 18 . .i.e2

141
Queen's Gambit Declined - Classical Main Line

18 . ..Q.d3!? ti:lc 8!? (Black improves ..Q.d7 13 ... tbxe4 14. he7 'ifxe7 10 ... ti:lxdS 11. ti:lxdS ..Q.xh4 12. llxcS
the position of the knight and 1S. 'iVc2 tt:lf6 16. �b3 Once again exdS 13. llxdS �e7 14. ti:Jxh4
prepares the advance ... e6-eS in a structure that is typical for �xh4 1S . ..Q.e2 Ae6 1 6 . lld4 �gs
some cases. 18 ... llfc8 19. �d2 llxcl this variation is reached, where 17. 0 - 0 ± 11. �g3 tbxd S 12. tbxdS
20. llxcl llc8 21. ..Q.e4;!;; 18 ... llac8 White is somewhat ahead in 'it'xd S 12 ... exdS has been played
19. �d2 llfd8 20. �as (20 . ..Q.e4 eS) development and the only way on some occasions, but I do not
20 . . . ti:JdS 21. ..Q.e4 b6 22. �xa6 ti:lc3 he can achieve some advantage think Black can fight for equality
and Black has good options ... is by fighting to prevent Black in this way. To me exchanging
but I do not think it is necessary from finishing his development queens seems more correct from a
to play this way, sacrificing in a harmonious way; however, as strategic point of view. 13. 'iVxd S
material) 19. llfdl (19. �b2 ti:Jd6 practice shows, with correct play exd S
20. �a3 llac8) 19 ... ti:Jd6 20. �b2 Black solves his opening problems.
llfc8 1S ... :acs 19. 'iVe4 The most 16 . ..Q.e2!? is another possibility with
energetic. 19. �d2 llxcl 2 0 . llxcl the same strategic idea already
I .i. ••
llc8 21. ..Q.f3 llxcl+ 22. �xcl es seen in this scheme: the bishop is i i .t i
and Black equalizes. 19 ... ti:Jd S placed on f3 and an invasion on i
20. �d3 fSI Concrete play prevails. c7 is threatened: 16 ... ..Q.d7 17. � c7 �i i
Although this move is dubious (17 . ..Q.f3 eS 18. ti:JfS �e6 19.ti:Jg3 llac8
from a positional point of view and Black is OK) 17 ... llab8 18 . ..Q.f3
(as it weakens the dark squares) , (18. llfdl llfc8 19. �aS llxcl 2 0 J lxcl � Cjj §l.
it is tactically justified. Although llc8) 18 ... eS 19. ti:JfS �e6 and again � � � � �
there is no direct refutation, 20 ... Black arrives in time with his
� � ii l:t
g6 is more passive than the move defence. 16 ... tlbS Prophylaxis!
in the game. 21. Wes 21. 'fif3 ti:lb4 No doubt this move is more exact A typical isolated queen's pawn
21 ... ti:lc3 1 22.ti:lc6 22.ti:lxfS? llxfS than 16 ... ..Q.d7 as Black can play the position has been reached, where
23 . ..Q.xfS ti:le2+ 24. @hl ti:lxcl; 22. 'fiaS advance ... e6-eS in some cases and Black has excellent development
'fid8 23. �xd8 llfxd8 24. Ac4 ti:lxa2 the bishop can go directly to g4 that offers fair equalizing
2S . llc2 bS 26. Axe6+ Axe6 27. llxa2 or fS , depending on the situation. possibilities; although his
lld6= 22 .. . lbc6 23 . .l:l.xc3 .l:l.xc3 There is no direct refutation of kingside structure is somewhat
23 ... 'fid6!? 24. �xd6 llxd6 24. 1i'xc3 16 ... ..Q.d7, but the move employed weakened, the absence of queens
:lcS From this equal position, by the Armenian GM looks better does not allow White to derive
Kramnik managed to outplay his to me. 17.e4 17. �c7 �xc7 1 8 . llxc7 much of an advantage from those
opponent, and he won in 73 moves. ..Q.d7 followed by 19 ... llfc8; 17. llfdl weaknesses. 14. �eS 14 . ..Q.e2
..Q.d7 17 ... J:idS 17 ... eS!? 18. ti:JfS ..Q.xfS Ad7 (14 . . . ti:le4; 14 ... ..Q.e6) lS.0-0
Ding Liren 19.exfS llbd8 1S. J:ifd1 eS 19. ttJfS llfc8 16. llfdl 1 4... �fS 1S. �e2
Levon Aron ian hfS 20.exfS .l:l.xd1+ I think that 1S . ti:Jd4 ..Q.e4 16.f3 llfc8! 17. @f2
St Louis 2016 (1) the exchange of rooks facilitates ti:Jd7 1 8 . llxc8+ llxc8 19 . ..Q.g3
1.d4 ttJf6 2.c4 e6 3 . ttJf3 d S 4. ttJc3 Black's defensive task. 21. .l:l.xd1 ..Q.g6 1s ... :acS 16.0-0 �d3
tLlbd7 s. �gs h6 6. �h4 �e7 e4= ... '12-'h ( 3 1 ) 16 ... ti:Jd3!? 17. llxc8 llxc8 18 . ..Q.c3
7.e3 0-0 S . tlc1 cs 9.dxcS dxc4 ti:lcS 1 7 . J:ice1 �e4 1S. J:id 1 a6
10. hc4 tbxcS 11.0-0 a6 12. tbd4 19. �d4 tbe6 20. �c3 bS 21. J:ic1
More comm itta l b4 21... llfe8 22.ti:Jd2 ..Q.g6 2 3 . ti:Jb3
9.dxc5 t2Jxc5 ..Q.f8 22. �es f6 23. �g3 23. ti:ld4!
llxcl (23 . . . ti:lxd4 24 . ..Q.xd4±;
Radoslaw Wojtaszek 23 . . . ti:JcS 24 . ..Q.g3 ti:Jd3 2S. llc6)
Vladimir Kra m n i k 24. llxcl fxeS 2S. ti:lxe6 llf6 26.f3
Russia tt 2015 (5) (26. ti:lc7) 23 ... as 24. �bS @f7
1.d4 ttJf6 2.c4 e6 3 . ttJf3 dS 4. ti:lc3 2 S . ti:Jd 4 ti:lcs 2S ... ti:lxd4 26.exd4
tLlbd 7 s. �gs h6 6. �h4 �e7 ..Q.fs 2 7 . ..Q.a6 llxcl 2 8 . llxcl ..Q.d8
7.e3 0-0 S . J:ic1 cS 9.dxcS tbxcS 26.f3 �g6 2 7 . :lfd1 h S 2 S . ti:lc6
The other method employed by h4 29. �f2 tbe6 30 . .1:1.xdS J:ic7
Kramnik . 9 . . . dxc4 has been seen 31.e4 :as 32.J:ic4 @gs 33. �b6
more often recently. 10.cxdS J:ib7 34.has �ts 3 S . ti:Jd S
12 ... ti:lce41? 12 ... tbfe4 was the gs Forced: 10 . . . exdS 11. Axf6 .l:l.xbS 3 6 . .l:l.xbS tbxdS 37. hb4
move employed by Kramnik. (11. ti:JxdS ti:JxdS 12 . ..Q.xe7 �xe7 �f7 3 S . J:ic1 tbe6 39.J:id 1 hb4
13. tbxe4 13. �c2 ti:lxc3 14. �xc3 13. �xdS±) ll... ..Q.xf6 12.ti:JxdS; 40 . .l:l.xb4 .l:l.xa2 . . 112-112 ( 5 5 )
.

142
Survey QO 13.l

Radoslaw Wojtaszek (17 . .lle s f6 18 . .ll d 4) 17 ... ge6 18. llbS as the pawn on e3 would be under
Consta ntin Lupulescu b6; attack. 17.�bS 17. tLlbS ! ? l:td8
Germany Bu ndesl iga 2015/16 (8) C) 16. llfdl lLie4 17 . ..Q.es (17. llxc8+ (17 . . . .lla S 1 8 . tt:lc7 gxc7 19.llxc7
1.d4 lLif6 2.c4 e6 3 . lLif3 d S 4. lLic3 lhc8 1 8 . .ll e S; 1 8 . lhdS ..Q.e6 1 9 . lldl d4 20.exd4 ..Q.e6) 18.f3 tt:lxg3
�e7 S. �gS lLibd 7 6.e3 h6 7 . ..ll h 4 .ll f6; 19 ... lLixg3 20.hxg3 llc2) 19.hxg3 @g7 2 0 . tt:ld4 gd6 21.f4
O·O 8 . J:lc1 cs 9.dxcS lLixcS 9 ... 17 .. J:!xcl 1 8 . llxcl llc8 19.llxc8+ ..Q.d7 17 ... J:le7 18. �e2 lLixg3 +?1
dxc4 10.cxdS g S 11. �g3 lLlxd S ..Q.xc8 1S. lLld41? White delays 18 ... .lle 6; With 18 ... @g7!? Black
12 . lLlxdS 'if x d S 13 . Wt'xd S exd S castling and prepares f2-f3 . 15.0-0 could delay the capture on g3 a
14. �e2 14 . .ll e s lLixg3 (15 . . . .ll f6 16. tt:ld4 lle8 17. llfdl little longer: 19.f3 (19. ga4!? to
tt:lxg3 18.hxg3 �e6) 16.hxg3 ..Q.d8! take the bishop to b3, attacking
(the bishop will be very well dS; 19 . .llc 7 a6 2 0 . gd3 .Iles
I .t Ie posted on b6, preventing the 21 . .ll x e4; 21.tLlb3 l:txc7 22 . ..Q.xe4
l i .t i entry of the rook to c7) 17. tt:ld4 dxe4 23 . .IIx cS .llg 4+ 24.f3 l:txcS
1 gb6 18 . .ll f3 .ll e 6 1S . . . �b4+ 25. tt:lxcS exf3 + 26.gxf3 l:tc8 27. l:tcl
�· 1 A) With 15 .. ..Q.d7!? Black wants
. ..Q.d7=) 19 ... tt:lxg3+ 20.hxg3 ..Q.e6
to quickly finish his development 21.g4 .lld 6 and Black's position
by ... llc8. Evidently this leads is quite solid, though somewhat
� {fj � to concrete play, and without passive. 19.hxg3 �g7 20.a3
� � �� � � preparation it is not easy to This move, followed by the
take this decision: 16.llc7 (16.f3 capture on c8, throws away all of
l:t @ 1l
tt:lxg3 17.hxg3 llac8 1 8 . llxc8 llxc8 White's chances to fight for an
14 . . . lLie4 14 ... �d7!? 15.0-0 llfc8 19. llxh6 llcl+ 20.@d2 llbl 21. Wc3 advantage. 20 . ..Q.d3! .ll e 6 21. .ll fS
The exchange of rooks also works llcl+) 16 ... ..Q.b4+ 17.@dl .lla 4+ 18.b3 .ll a S 22 . .llx e6 fxe6 23.f4 and
in favour of Black's defence. .llc 6 19.tt:lxc6 (19 . .lld 3 .lla S 2 0 . lle7 White has pressure on Black's
A) 16. ges White can install a �d8 21. tt:lxc6 bxc6 22.lleS f6 23. llfS kingside structure. 20 . . . �aS
piece on d4, blocking the isolani, lle8) 19 ... bxc6 20. @c2 (20. 1l.f3 21. J:lxcS This simplification only
but he should do more than block llfc8 21.llxc8+ llxc8 22 . ..Q.xe4 leads to equality. 21.b4 ..Q.g4+ !
it - he should attack it! And Black dxe4 23. lt>c2 l:ld8=; 20.l:lxc6 tt:lc3+ (21 . . . ..Q.b6 22.l:lxc8 l:lxc8 23. tt:lfS+
has enough resources for the 21. 'i!td2 llfc8) 20 ... gas; 'i!tf6 24. t2Jxe7 'i!txe7 2 5 . l:txh6 l:tc2+
defence. An ideal deployment of B) 15 ... 'i!tg7!? Black will capture 26. 'i!tfl d4) 22.f3 .llb 6 2 1 ... J:lxcS
forces would be taking the bishop on g3 sooner or later, and it is 22.lL!fS+ �f6 23. �d3 J:lh8
to f3 and the knight to c3, but I useful to have h6 defended. 16.f3 24. lLixe7 �xe7 2S. �fS �c7
do not see a way to achieve this; (16.0-0 tt:lxg3 17.hxg3 �f6 1 8 . l:lfdl) 26. J:lc1 �es 2 7 . J:lc2 d4 28.exd4
B) 16.llcdl lLie4 (16 . . . ..Q.e6 17 . ..Q.es ; 16 ... tt:lxg3 17.hxg3 16.�d1 J:le8 bd4 29. �e4 b6 30.b4 J:ld8
17. lLid4 ..Q.f6 18.f3 .ll d 7) 17.l:txdS Black hinders the advance f2-f3 31.g4 �es 32. J:ld 2 112.112

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

position after 19 . °iVf4xc7 positio n after 21 . . . tlJd 5-c3 position after 18. l::rf 1-d 1

Which is Black's best defence, Can White take advantage of What is the best way for Black
19 �d8 or 19 ... 'iYe8 ?
... the pin on the e6-pawn by to continue: 18 ... �d7, 18 ... tlJg4
(solution on page 2 5 1) capturing on f5 , either with the (to centralize the knight on e5)
knight or with the bishop ? or 18 . . . e5 ?
(solution on page 2 5 1) (solution on page 252)
143
Q u ee n 's G a m b it Dec l i n ed Ea rly Dive rge n ces Q O 16 . 9 ( 037 )

A s i del i ne i n crisis?
by Viacheslav l kon n i kov

1. d4 dS line with 8 .. �e7 Black has the obvious


.

2. c4 e6 intention to prevent quick development


3. tl:if3 tl:if6 by White with ll.leS and fVg4 (-hS). In
4. tl:ic3 dxc4 2016, several interesting games were
5. e4 i.b4 played with this line, combining new ideas
6. i.xc4 tl:ixe4 and improvements. I suppose several
7. 0-0 tl:ixc3 top players have studied it in detail, e.g.
8. bxc3 i.d6 Nakamura, Topalov and Caruana. This
article was written around the time the
- � .t 'ii' • • games Nakamura-Caruana and Topalov­
.l .l .l i .l .l Caruana were played in the Saint Louis
i. .l Champions Showdown.

�� The new trend


� Analysis of the games from 2016 reveals
that White's best approach is connected
with the move �el. This move looks quite
logical and contains many ideas:
This article focuses on the so-called A) Supporting ll.leS
'Arbakov Attack' with the retreat of the B) Putting pressure on e6, supporting a
bishop to d6. Compared to the main sacrifice there, and
C) Transferring the rook to the kingside
by way of e4.
The simplest way was demonstrated by
Nakamura in his game against Caruana.
After 9 . i.g5 i.e7 10. he7 'ifxe7 11. l:lel

Fa bio Caruana

144
Survey QO 16.9

the threat of d4-d5 leaves Black cxd6 13. 'tWg3, with the double threat
without much choice, and after ll ... tbd7 of 14. 1l.xh6 and 14. 1l.a3, regaining the
12. tbeS Caruana had problems with his material. However, the direct recapture
development. In Topalov-Caruana, White of the pawn doesn't give White an
tried an unclear bishop sacrifice with advantage, as shown in the early game
9.l:el 0-0 10. °*'d3 tbd7 11. lLJeS!?. Sargissian-Khairullin from 2012. The best
continuation for White was demonstrated
by Cheparinov against Sanikidze: after
ll ... tbc6 White played 12. l:el!, and it is
difficult for Black to establish good piece
coordination.
A similar scenario develops in case of
another possible continuation for Black,
ll ... tbd7. Now, In the game Bacrot-Maze,
instead of regaining the pawn White
preferred to continue his attack with
A brief analysis shows that Black 15. ld.e4!, which was another confirmation
looks like having sufficient chances of of the usefulness of the move ld.el. It
counterplay, but for those interested should be noted that this novelty was
in this line there is plenty space for known from the older line with 11. 'tWhS.
investigation. An improvement was introduced by Zhao
Xue against Batsiashvili in the sharp line
The classical option with the bishop sacrifice 11. °*'hS tbd7
9.tbg5 is the main continuation. This 12. Ah6 gxh6 13. 'ifxh6 l:e8
logical move was played in the early days
of this line. If White's knight cannot go
to eS , why not move it to gS ? The only
question is where the knight will be
better placed: on eS, as in the main line
with the 9 ... 1l.e7 retreat, or on e4?
After the logical 9 ... h6 10. tbe4 0-0

14. '*'h5!?. It is not clear whether 14. 'tWhS


is any better than Mamedyarov's 14 . .l:!.ael.
After my analysis it looks as if Black has
sufficient chances to equalize in both
cases.

Conclusion
there is another popular trend nowadays: Nakamura's play with 1l.g5 and ld.el looks
11. '*'f3 instead of the older 11. �h5. very attractive for White. Without any
The idea of 11. 'tWf3 is to play 12. tbxd6 great risk, White obtains a slight but

145
Queen's Gambit Declined - Early Divergences

lasting advantage. Topalov's idea of the to solid positional play in which White
bishop sacrifice, on the other hand, is has good compensation for the sacrificed
very risky and needs detailed analysis. pawn. Just like Topalov's concept, the older
The assessment may change very quickly, plan with 'tWhS involves a lot of forced
depending on future information. variations and can be recommended to
What about the classical continuation players who like to analyse a lot. Summing
9.tt:lgS ? I think the plan with �el and up, I would say that the bishop retreat to
'tWf3 looks quite promising, since it leads d6 in the Arbakov Attack is in crisis now.

The new trend move. Caruana defends the pawn on lose a tempo, as other moves like
8 . . . �d6 g6 in case of 19 . .igS f6. According 9 ... 'fYd7 don't look normal. 9 ... .te7
to the computer Black is fine after 10. Le7 'ii'xe7 11. :e11N The new
Vesel i n Topalov 18 ... gc6! ? 19.ggs '*Yes , but it's move from Nakamura. The older
Fa biano Caruana very scary. 19. .tgs f6!? Again the 'fYe2·e4, kd3 is too slow: 11. 'fYe2
St Lou i s 60 m i n utes 2016 (1) machine proposes 19 ... 'fYcS. Caruana 0-0 12. gd3 li:ld7 13. 'fYe4 (IHt fel!?)
1.c4 ll:lf6 2 . ll:lc3 e6 3. ll:lf3 d 5 4.d4 decides to open the position, and it 13 ... li:lf6 14. '*Yh4 h6 IS. Illes l::te 8
dxc4 5.e4 �b4 6. hc4 ll:lxe4 is difficult to blame him for such a (1S ... c5 16. l::la el l::td 800) 16.f4 kd7
7.0-0 ll:lxc3 8. bxc3 �d6 9 . l:ie1 0-0 move. 19 ... 'fYcS !? 20. 'fYh4 (20 . .if6? 17. l:lf3 (17.g4'? li:ld5 18.gS00) 17 . . . li:ldS
10. 1i'd3!? li:ldS 21. l::t xdS 'fYxdS 22. 'fYe3 .ic6 18. 'iWel?! (18. 'fYhS li:lf6 19. °fYh4=)
23.f3 l::lfd 8 24. 'fYh6 'fYcS+ -+) 20 ... 18 ... kc6 (18 ... cS'F) 19. 'fYd2 li:lf6
f6 21.exf6 eS! 22. l::lde4 li:ld7 23 . .ih6 20. l::te 3g/ Gunina· Dzagnidze,
gf7 24. 'fYgS l::lfd8 2S . .ig7 'fYc6+ Internet blitz 201S. 11...0·0 Black
20.exf6 °ifcS 21. :Xe6 1!ff5 22. :es has to move his king from the
'ii' b1+ 23. �h2 gxhS? The decisive centre, because the threat of
mistake. 23 ... l:lf7? 24. gh4+- ; but d4-dS is always in the air: ll ... li:ld7
with 23 ... .if7 Black could still keep 12.dS l!JcS (12 . . . eS 13. li:lxeS li:lxe5
the balance: 24 . .ih6 l::lfe8 2S.hxg6 14.f4±) 13. kbS+ kd7 14. kxd7+
hxg6 26. l::t e7 l::lxe7 27.fxe7 'fYfS li:lxd7 1S. li:ld4t 12. lLleS tt:ld7 How
28. l::ld S+ ke8=; RR 24.hxg6 seems else should Black develop his
winning! 24 . .th&+ .tg& 25. LfS pieces? After 12... li:lc6 13. li:lxc6 bxc6
:Xts 26. "ifgs 1i'xa2 21.:e1 'ii'xf2 14. l:leS the position doesn't look
A quite unusual way to play in such 2s.:g1+ �hS 29. :Xg& 1·0 very promising for him. 13 . ll:lxf7!
positions. Logical after 9. l::le l is A quite spectacular sacrifice,
IO. Illes followed by 'fYhs. Or 10. li:lgS. Hikaru Nakamura which can't be accepted . 13 ... tt:lb6
10... ll:ld 7 11.lLleS This move leads Fa biano Caruana 13 ... l::lxf7 14. l::lx e6! (14 . .ixe6 'fYf8
to a forced variation, which had St Lou is rapid 2016 (5) IS. 'fYb3 liJf600) 14 ... 'fYd8 (14 . . . 'iWf8?
possibly been prepared by Topalov. 1.d4 lLlf6 2.c4 e6 3. ll:lf3 d 5 4. ll:lc3 IS. 'fYe2 li:lf6 16.l:te7+-) IS. l::te3 li:lf6
Otherwise the neutral lU:ibl!? keeps dxc4 5.e4 .tb4 6. Lc4 ll:lxe4 16. 'fYb3+- 14. lLleS ll:lxc4 15. ll:lxc4;t
the tension. 11 ... LeS 12.dxeS 7.0-0 ll:lxc3 8. bxc3 .td6 9 . .tgs b& 16. "ifg4 .tb7 11.tt:ies :ts
tt:lb6 13. 'ii'g3 Sacrificing the bishop. 18. "ife2 l:iafS 19.f3 Underlining
Also possible is 13. 'fYe4 li:lxc4 White's advantage. The strong
14. '*Yxc4 'fYdS (14 ... b6 Alejandro knight disturbs the communication
Ramirez, M/16·8·S2) IS. '*Yg4 between the rooks, and the pawn
with compensation for the pawn. on f3 limits the range of the gb7.
13 ... ll:lxc4 14 . .th6 g6 15. l:iad1 .td7 19 ... cS 20.l:iad1 :t4?1 This small
Caruana has to decide where to put mistake loses the weak pawn on
his queen: on cS or on f7. Probably e6, but anyway White's position
here it was better to play IS . . . 'fYe7 is clearly better: 20 ... cxd4 21. l::txd4
16 . .igS f6 17.exf6 'fYf7+ with the l::td 8 22. l::lx dS+ 'fYxd8 23.l:tdl 'fYc8
idea ... e6-eS, but like in the game 24. 'fYe3i 21. tt:ld3 .ta& 21... l::t4f6
White can continue 16.h4!? li:lb6 22.dxcS bxcS 23. tt:leS± 22. •xe6+
17.hS .id7 18. l::td 4. 16.h4 tt:lb6 17.h5 A very logical answer to the 1!fxe6 23.:Xe6 bd3 24. :Xd3 cxd4
1!fe7 1S. :d4 .tea A very human bishop retreat to d6. Black has to 25.cxd4 :ds 2&. :e4 l:ifS 2 1 . :e1

146
Survey QO 16.9

:n 2s. :es :c1 29.dS @f7 30. @t2 then 13. lllx d6 and '*fg3. 1z.. . ge7
:c2+ 31. :e2 :cs 31... l::lx e 2+ 13. '*VhS00 13. :b1 This is one of
32. ltt xe2 ltt e7 33Jla3± 32.d6 :d 7 the advantages of '*ff3 compared
33.:d4 :ts 34. :de4 as 3S.g4 :ts to '*fhS - flexibility. White
36.:e7+ :Xe7 37.:Xe7+ 37.dxe7?! has a choice between starting
ltt e 8� 37 ... WtS 3S. :d7 Clearing a sharp attack on the kingside
the path for his king to es, with and exerting positional pressure
a winning position. 3S ... bS 38 ... over the entire board. 13 ... tllt5
h6 39.h4 gS 40.l:ld8+ @f7 41.h5+- 14. lLJxd6 cxd6 14 ... lllx d6 1s. gd3
39. We3 b4 40. We4 a4 41.f4 :h& �d7 16.c4f 15. �d3 1i'a5 16. �t4
42.h4 b3 42 ... l::!xh4 43. l::!x g7+- l:ldS 17.1i'h3 'iti>fS 17 ... '*Vxa2
43.axb3 axb3 44. WeS :Xh4 4S.:b7 18.g4 eS 19.dxeS dxeS 20. �xeS 1 2 ... �e7 An interesting decision.
wes 46. :Xg7 b2 47. :b7 :Xg4 llle 7 21. �xg7 @xg7 22.l:!xe7 '*VdS In earlier games Black allowed
4S. :Xb2 :g1 49. :bs+ 1-0 23. l:!e3± 1S.a4 Cheparinov slowly the exchange of the bishop
increases the pressure, and Black on d6, which gives White the
has no clear way to liberate opportunity to transfer the rook
The classical option himself. This provides excellent from el via e4 to h4. How can
9. tllg S compensation for just a pawn. White now develop his attack?
18.g4! was even stronger: 18 . . . 12 ... l:!e8 13. lllx d6 (13 . l:!bI!? lllf6
Ivan Cheparlnov eS ( 1 8... llle 7 19. gxh6±) 19.dxeS (13 . . . gfg 14. °*Yg3 Wh8 IS. gf4±)
Tornika Sanl kldze dxeS 20 . ..Q.xeS l:!dS 21. gf4± 1S ... 14. lllx d6 cxd6 lS. £bS l:!f8 16.a4�)
Gjakova 2016 ( 1 1) a6 19. �d2 tlle 7 20. 1i'h4 20. gc2!? 13 ... cxd6 14. '*Vg3 Wh8 1S. l:!e4!?
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3. tllt3 tllt6 4. tbc3 20 ... 1i'xa4 21.c4 l:lbS?I 21... (lS. '*Vxd6 lllb 6 16. '*Vxd8 l:!xd8
dxc4 5.e4 �b4 6 . .hc4 tllx e4 bS 22. '*Ve4 bxc4 23 . ..Q.c2 '*Vc6 17. £b3 ..Q.d7�) 1S ... tllf6 16. l:!h4
7.0·0 lLJxc3 S. bxc3 �d6 9. tllg 5 h6 24. °*Yh7� 22.l:lb& Wa3 22 ... ..Q.d7 tllg 8 17 . ..Q.b3 (17 . ..Q.d2 £d7 18.l:!el
10. tlle 4 0-0 11. 1i't3 tbc6 12. :e1N 23, gb4 ..Q.e8 24. l:!bl± 23.�e4 as l:!c8 19. Ad3�) 17 ... aS 18. £g5 '*Vc7
12. tllx d 6 cxd6 (12... '*fxd6 13.a4;!;) 24.h3?1 24. gxh6! gxh6 2S. '*fxh6+ 19.l:!el a4 (19 ... eS!?) 20 . ..Q.c2 l:!aS
13. °*Yg3 °*Yf6! (13 ... @h8 14. £a3;!;) @es 26.cS!+- 24 ... @es 25. WhS 2I.£d2 °*Yc4 22. £bl eS (22 ...fS
14. °*Yxd6 (14. �a3 eS�) 14 ... l:!dS :as 26. @h2? Several of White's 23. Wg6 l:!e7 24 . ..Q.gS±) 23. dxeS '*Ve6
15. '*Vg3 (15. °*Yf4 '*fxf4 16. �xf4 previous moves were too slow and 24. °*Yd3 fS 2S. '*Vxd6 l:!xeS 26. '*VxeS
b6�; I6 ... tllxd 4 17. ID'dI�) 15 ... es too cautious, relinquishing most of '*VxeS 27. l:!xeS l:!xeS 28. l:!xa4±
16.dS tlla S I7. gb3 lllxb 3 (17 ... gfs=F) his advantage. Here it was already Bacrot· Maze, St- Quentin 2015.
18.axb3 l:!xdS 19.c4 l:!d8 20.gb2 necessary to take a pawn with 13. Wh3 Straight forward! The idea
°*Yf4 2UheS '*fxg3 22.hxg3= 26 . ..Q.xb7 l:!a7 27. ge4 ;!;. 26 ... Wa2 is ..Q.xh6, '*fxh6 and l:!el-e3-g3(+) .
Sargissian-Khairullin, Plovdiv 2012. 27. We2 d S 2S. �d3 tbc6 29. We3 13 ... tllt6 14 . .hh6
dxc4 30. �b1 1i'a4 31.dS :XdS
32.�e4 l:ldS?I 32 ... llle 7!+ 33. 1i'c3
tlle 7 ?1 33 ... llld 4 34 . ..Q.e3 '*Vd7
3S. '*Vxc4 l:!a6'F 34. �t4 @tS? 34 ... f6
3S. '*Vg3 wf7 36 . ..Q.d6 l:!xd6 37. '*fxd6
l:!a6+ 35. �e5 t6? One move
earlier, 34 .. .f6 with the exchange
sacrifice could have helped Black
to stabilize his position, but now
it loses. 3S ... °*Yd7 36. �xg7+ We8
37. '*Vxc4� 36 . .ht6 gxt6 37. Wxt6+
@es 3S. �g6+ lLJxg6 39. Wxg6+
A strong novelty. This is a @e7 40. Wg7+ 1-0 14 ... eS? It looks as if B lack gets
waiting move which is at the counterplay, but in real i ty he is
same time useful. as it underlines Ma rkus Ragger only creating more weaknesses
the unfortunate position of the Hagen Potsch for himself. Now Black has to
lllc 6. Besides, White may want Austria Bu ndesl iga 2015/ 16 ( 1 1 ) reckon with '*Vg6, because he
to make a switch with the rook 1 . d 4 tllt6 2.c4 e6 3. tllt3 d S 4. tbc3 has opened the a2-g8 d i agonal
for an attack on the kingside. dxc4 S.e4 �b4 6 . .hc4 lLJxe4 for the white bishop. 14 ... gxh6
12 ... tlle 7 For Black it is difficult 7.0·0 lLJxc3 S. bxc3 �d6 9. lLJg5 h6 l S . °*Yxh6 lllg 4 1 6 . °*Yf4 fS 17.f3
to develop his pieces. If 12 ... �d7 10. tlle 4 o-o 11. :e1 tlld 7 12. Wt3 l:!f7 (17 . . . tll x h2? 1 8 . '*fxh2 fxe4

147
Queen's Gambit Declined - Early Divergences

1 9 . lhe4 gf6 2 0 . l:tael l:tf7 2 1 . l:tg4+ Now White has no choice. 12 ... tt:lf6 force . The only move was 14 . . .
l:tg7 22. 'l!t' h 6 +- ; 17 ... '0t>g7 1 8 . fxg4 is threatened, to exchange the Wg7! when t h e position remains
fxe4 19. 'l!t' e S + gf6 20. 'l!t'xe4 l:th8 knights. unclear: 15. 'l!t'g4+ @f8 16. 'l!t'h3
2 1 . l:tabl 'l!t'd6 22.gH) 1 8 . fxg4 'Ot>g7 17.f4 (17. 'l!t'g4+=) 17 ... J:th8
fxe4 19. 'l!t'xe4 gd6 2 0 . l:tfl (17 ... tt:lf6 18. 'l!t'g3+ 'it>f8 1 9 . tt:lgS 'Ot>e7
'l!t'e700 15. "tt" h4 gxh6 16. "tt" x h6 20. l:taelg?) 18. 'l!t'g3+ @f8 19. tt:lxd6
tt:lxe4 1 7 . lbe4 1i'd6 The other cxd6 20.f500; 14 ... gf8 ?? 15 . tt:lg5+-
continuation was 17 ... ..Q.gS , which 15.f4 tt:\g6 16.fS 1i'h4 The only
leads to a position where White move. Now Black gets a knight
has two pawns for the bishop and bishop for the rook, but
and a continuing attack on the all his pieces are disconnected
black king: 17 ... ggs 1 8 . 'l!t'g6+ 17. 1i'xh4 tt:lxh4 18. tt:lf6+ Wf8
'Ot>h8 1 9 . 'l!t' h S + @g7 2 0 . d xeS fS 19. tt:\xe8 Wxe8 20.l:tae1 �e7
2 1 . l:td4 'l!t' e 7 2 2 . f4 gh6 2 3 . l:tadlg? 21.fxe6 fxe6
18. 1i' h 5 exd4? The decisive
mistake. After 1 8 ... @g7! the 12. b h 6 gxh6 13. 1i'xh6 J:te8
position remains unclear: 1 9 . l:te3! 14. 1i'h51? This is a novelty from
.i .! •
(19 . l:tael 'l!t' f6 2 0 . l:t4e3 l:th8+) Zhao Xue. I am not sure that it's .t. .t. .t. .l
19 . . . 'l!t'h6 2 0 . 'l!t'xeS+ (20 . l:tg3+ an improvement on Shakhriyar .t.
@h7 2 1 . g d J + fS 22. 'l!t'e2 l:tg8 Mamedyarov's 14. l:tael. It is clear
23. 'l!t'xeS J:txg3 24.hxg3 gd6 that after 14. l:tael White has good
2 5 . gxfS + gxfS 2 6 . 'l!t'xfS + 'l!t'g6=F) compensation, but the position Ji £::, I)
2 0 ... gf6 2 1 . 'l!t'xc7g? 19 . J:tae1 �f6 remains unclear. In the present £::,
2 0 . �d3 �f5 21. l:tg4+ �xg4 game, Zhao Xue's opponent made £::, £::, £::,
2 2 . "tt" h 7 # 1-0 an early mistake, which helped
tt tt @
White to attain a quick victory.
Zhao Xue 14. l:tael gf8 15. 'l!t'h3 (15. 'l!t'f4!? 22.dS?I Encircling the tt:lh4. The
N i n o Batslashvl l l �g7 1 6 . l:te3 tt:lf8 17. l:tgJg?) 15 ... tt:lf6 simple 22. �xe6 was also winning,
Teheran W 2 0 16 ( 3 ) 16.tt:lgS gg7 17.f4 bS!? (17 . . . l:le7 e.g.: 22... gxe6 23. J:txe6 @d7
1 . d 4 tt:lf6 2 .c4 e6 3 . tt:lf3 d 5 4. tt:lc3 18.fS bS 19. gbJ exfS 20.l:lxe7 'i!!Y x e7 24. l:le4 tt:lg 6 25. l:lf7+- 22 . . . exdS?I
dxc4 5.e4 �b4 6. hc4 tt:lxe4 21. tt:lxf7 cS 22.dxcS 'l!t'xcS + 23. @hl 22 ... tt:lfS 23. gbs+ @d8 24.dxe6
7.0-0 tt:lxc3 8. bxc3 �d6 9 . tt:\g5 Wf800) 1 8 . gxbS (18. gbJ!?) 18 ... J:te7 tt:ld6 2 s . gd3 cs± 23. �d3 �d 7
h6 10. 1i'h5 This active move was 19. �c4 'i!!Y d 6?! (19 ... gb7 2 0 . l:leS 24.l:tf4 Wd8 2 5.g3 The final part
popular in the past. The negative �ds 21. gbJ aS 22. J:tfelg?) 20.J:teS is clear. 2 5 ... �h3 26.gxh4 Wd7
side to it is that there is no (20.fS !) 20 ... �a600 M amedyarov­ 2 7 . J:tf7 J:te8 28.hS �e6 2 9 . l:tg7
flexibility; White plays only for Morozevich, Moscow blitz 2009. l:tf8 30.h6 Wd6 31.h7 �f6 32.l:tg6
the attack. 10 ... 0-0 11. tt:le4 tt:ld 7 1 4... tt:lf8? Leading to a loss by �es 33. �fS l:txf5 34. l:txe6+ 1-0

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3

.i .! 'if .i • .i .l 'iV .i •
.t. .t I) .t. .t. .t. .\ .\ .t. .\
.t. .\ .t. I) .! .\ .t.

positio n after 12 tll b 8-d 7


. . . position after 14 . . . 'lt>g8-h8 position after 11 . . tll b 8-c6
.

What tactic does White have Which move is better: 15. "iYxd6 What is the best move for
here? or 15. l:le4 ? White here?
(solution on page 252) (solution on page 252) (solution on page 252)
148
Slav Defe n ce Krause Va riation SL 4.5 (017)

Morozevich's 'mix-up'
by Pavel Skatch kov a n d Dmitry Frolya n ov

1. d4 dS Alexa nder Morozevich


2. c4 c6 Usually the ...g7-g5 pawn thrust occurs
3. tlJc3 tbf6 one move earlier - instead of ll.. .f6. It is
4. tlJf3 dxc4 customary to regard grandmaster Alexander
s. a4 i.fS Morozevich as the author of the early
6. tlJeS lbbd 7 ... g7-g5 . The resulting wild complications
7. tlJxc4 1i'c7 demand of the players not only a good
8. g3 es memory, but also a fantastic feeling for the
9. dxeS tlJxeS piece dynamics for both sides.
10. i.f4 tbfd 7
11.�g2 f6 Unpredictable and surprising
12. 0-0 gs The move 12 ... gS suggested in the present
article constitutes a synthesis of modern
.i. •-*- .i. ideas and the classical heritage. In recent
' .t. 'if ll ' times 12 ... gS has been employed by 2700+
.t. ' grandmasters such as Fressinet, Akopian,
� .ti Vitiugov, and twice by the 2016 European
� ltJ � champion Inarkiev.
ltJ £!:i The unpredictable complications and the
£!:i £!:i £!:i � £!:i surprise factor of the idea have drawn
1:1 � � <iit> the attention of talented young players,
educated at the Chess Centre in the
In modern opening theory, insufficient Samara State Technical University.
attention is paid to Black's interesting
possibility of sharpening the play with
12 ... gS. This move looks as though the
black player has mixed up the variations
in his memory.

Alternatives for 12 ...gs


12 ... l:tad8 , 12 ... 0-0-0 or 12 ... ll:lcS are
far more popular. These moves have
occurred many times in practice and
have a deep historical origin: one
can recall the matches for the world
championship between Euwe and
Alekhine in 1935 and 1937. Alexander Morozevlch

149
Slav Defence - Krause Variation

After 12 ... gS White has four possible checking, is 13.e4. The resulting
continuations: complications are unpredictable.
A) The least popular move, and possibly C) After 13. �xeS tLixeS (13 .. .fxeS is worse
an inaccuracy, is 13.llle 3. The most natural for Black) both White's moves 14.llle 3 and
is the capture on eS with the knight or 14. lLixeS promise approximate equality.
bishop. The new move 13.e4 promises D) After 13.lllx eS gxf4 14.lllxd7 Black
sharp play. The chief drawback to 13.llle 3 should play 14 ... �xd7. If he plays
is that it allows Black the additional 14 ... �xd7, then White begins a dangerous
possibility 13 ... �e6 14. �xeS �xeS. With attack after the strong move 1S.e3!.
the capture on eS by the queen Black
retains control over the important Conclusion
strategic squares cS and fS. After this The move 12 ... gS has the right to exist.
move order practice demonstrates that White has not demonstrated any clear
White does not achieve any advantage. refutation, and in all variations Black has
B) A move which has not occurred in sufficient resources for the strengthening
practice, but which definitely deserves of his position.

Variation A (18.J:lfdl 0-0 19.tt:lc4 'ii'f6'F) Variation B


13.llle 3 18... 'ii'bS 19.b3 0-0'F Black's 13.e4
two bishops and active pieces
Ana lysis compensate for the exposed Analysis
Skatch kov & Frolya nov position of his king: 16.tllc2!? 1.d4 d S 2.c4 c6 3.tLlf3 lLlf6 4. lllc3
hS! (16... 0-0-0 17.e3 (17.tlld4 tt:lcS dxc4 S.a4 .i.fS 6 . lLleS lLlbd 7
1.d4 dS 2.c4 c6 3. lLlf3 lLlf6 4. lLlc3 18.e3 tt:lb3 19.l::ta4 .Q.cS'F) 17... .Q.c4 7 . lLlxc4 1rc7 8.g3 es 9.dxeS
dxc4 S.a4 .�.fS 6.tLleS lLlbd 7 (17... tt:lcS 18. 'ii'e2 tt:lb3 19.l::tadl tLixes 10 . .i.f4 lLlfd 7 11 . .i.g2 f6
7. lLlxc4 1rc7 8.g3 es 9.dxeS 'ii'xaS 20.l::txd8+ 'ii'xd8 2i.gxc6 12.0-0 gs 13.e4
tLixes 10 . .i.f4 tLlfd 7 11 . .i.g2 f6 bxc6 22. 'ii' xa6+ Wb8 23. 'ii'xc6-)
12.0-0 gs 13. lLle3 18.tt:ld4! hS (18... gxfl? 19. 'ii'xfl
tt:lcS 20.gxc6! bxc6 21.tllxc6 'ii'e6
E • .t E
22.tllxd8 @xd8 23.tlldS!-) 19.l::tcl i .l 'if 6 .l
E • .t E i
'ii'xaS 20 . .Q.xc6 tt:leS) 17.e3 h4+=' .l
i ••• i 16 ... 0-0-0 16...fS 17. 'ii'c2 0-0-0 •.t i
.l i 18.tllcdS @b8 (18... .Q.xdS?! 19.tt:lxdS
!'::, t2J !'::, i.
• .t i @b8 20.tllb4 tt:lcS? (20... l::tc8 21.l::tdl
!'::,
tt:lcS 22.l::ta3t) 21.tllxc6+! bxc6 t2J
!'::, i. !'::, i. !'::,
22.l::tb4+ wa7 23.l::tb6 l::tb8 24.b4+­ !'::,
t2J t2J !'::, Sieciechowicz-Sadzikowski,
n � .: <it>
!'::, !'::, !'::, i. !'::, Polanica Zdroj 2011) 19.tllc4
A new move - an old idea. The
ll � �@ 'ii'g7 20.tt:lb4 tllcS 21.tt:lxc6+ bxc6
22.l::tb4+ @a7 23.l::tb6\!? 17. l:le4 drawback to 13.e4 is that it blocks
13 ... .i.eG 14. beS 1rxeSI For 17.tllc4 'ii' c7 18. 'ii'cl @b8 19. 'ii'e3 the diagonal of the bishop on g2.
Black it is important to gain .Q.xc4 20.l::txc4 'ii'xaS 21. 'ii'e6 In return White begins an attack in
control over the central squares. .Q.cS'F; 17. 'ii'c2 tt:lcS 18.l::tb4 fS'F the centre, by advancing his pawns.
14... tt:lxeS transposes into the 11 ... lllc s 1s. :Xes l:lxd1 19. l:lxd1 13 ... �eG 13...gxf4 14.tllxeS 'i!'xeS
variation 13 . .Q.xeS tt:lxeS 14.tlle3 fxeS In this position, Black's (14... .Q.g6 15.tllxd7 'i!'xd7 16. 'i!'f3;l;)
ge6. 1S.aS 15. 'ii'c2 .Q.cs 16.tt:lcdl chances are not worse, thanks to 15.exfS 0-0-0 16.aS a6 17. 'i!'d3
0-0-0 17.tllc4 .axc4!? 18. 'ii'xc4 his two bishops and the weakness fxg3 18.hxg3 .Q.c5!7+=' 14.tLlxeS
hS+=' 1S ... a6 16.J:ia4 In the event on aS. 14. .Q.xeS is an interesting decision,
of 16. 'l:!Yc2 fS 17.tlla4 J;..e7 18.tllc4 leading to complicated play: 14...

150
Survey SL 4.5

fxeS 1S.ti:ie3 (lS.'i!l'hS+ gf7 16.'i!l'e2 20."ii'x cS J:lxa4 21.b4 21.llfdl!? 16. 'ii'b3 lld7 17.l:tfdl .ae6 (17...'i!l'e6
0-0-0 l?Jhbl (17.aS ti:icS 18.llfdl llf8 22.lld6 '1We7 23. 'iWxeS± 18. '1Wxe6+ (18.tLld5! cxd5 19 . .axdS
.ae7 19.llxd8+ l:Ixd8 20.l:tdl l:tdH; 21... tt:ld7 22. 'ifc3 'it'b6 23.J:lbl llxdS 20. .llxdS @17 21.l:td7+ Wg6
17 . .ah3 hs:i=) 17... .ab4 18.ti:ia2 .acs 'ifd4 24.'ifc2 l:la2 2S."ii' c 1 0-0? 22.'i!l'xe6 .axe6 23. .llxb7;!;) 18... .axe6
19.b4 .adH) lS...hs 16.llcl 'i!l'aS+:! 25...'1Wd2 26.bS 'iWxcl 27. .llfxcl;!; 19.tl:le4 .aen Cebalo-Svane, Biel
14...lbxeS 1S. heS lS. .ae3 hS:f 26.l:ldl 'ifb6 2 7. J:lxd7 J:lxe2 201S) 18. '1Wc2 llxdl+ 19.llxdl .ab4=
1S...'ifxeS 16.f4 gxf4 17.gxf4 28.J:ld6 28.Whl!? .llxe3 (28... .axd7 1S... a616'if . a416.'1Wb3 .llb8
'it'd6 18. 'ifhS+ .if7 19.'ifh3 .ie6 29.'1Wc4++-) 29 . .lle7 l:txf2 (16...'i!l'e7 17.'i!l'b6!? (17. .llfcl 'i!l'b4=
19...'i!l'e6!? 20.'i!l'e3 (20.'i!l'h4 llg8!? 30. .llxe6+- 28 ... .ta2 28... .llfxf2 Hovenga-Skatchkov, Groningen
21.Whl 'i!l'gH) 20...'i!l'e7!? 21.llfdl 29. 'iWcS+- 29.J:lal 29.tl:lg4! 2007) 17...lld8 (17...'i!l'b4?
(21.Whl 'i!l'cS 22.'i!l'h3 'i!l'hS=) .axbl 30.'i!l'c4+ @h8 31.'1Wxe2+- 18. .axc6++-) 18.lladlt) 17.lla4
21...'i!l'cS 22.lld4 lld8 23.lladl l:txd4 29 ... 'ifxb4 30.J:ld 7 l:lexf2 3 1.tLlc2 .ae6 18.'i!l'c2 fS (18...@17? 19.f4
24.l:lxd4 '1Wb6!? 2S.eS fS 26.aS 'i!l'xaS 3L.ah3! llb2 32.tLlc4!?+- 31... 'ifg4 'i!l'cS+ 20.Whl± Sachdev-Bindu,
27.e6� 20.'ifhS+ 20.'i!l'h4?! 0-0-0t 32 . .th3 'ifhS 33.J:lxa2 h6?T India tt 2012) 19.e3 (19.Whl .ah6!?
20... .tf7= 33. . @h834.tt:le3 "ii'x h3 3 5. J:lxf2?T
. 20.e3 0-0=) 19 ... .ag7 20.tl:le2 0-0
35.'1Wc4+ ll217 (3S...Wh8 36. .llxf2 (20...'i!l'xb2 21.'1Wxb2 .axb2 22.f4
.llxf2 37.l:td8++-) 36. .llxb7+- (22.l:tbl .ae5 23.tl:ld4 .ac81?=)
Variation C 3S ..."ii'x d7 36.'ifc4+ �g7 37.J:lxf8 22... .af6 23.tl:ld4 .ad7 24.tl:lxf5 .bf5
13. ..\i.xes 'it>xf8 38. 'ifcS+ 'ife7 39. 'ifxa7 2S.fxgS .ac2 26.lla2 Axg5=) 21.tLld4
'it'b4 40. 'it'b8+ �f7 41. 'ifc7+ .ad7= Shrneliov-Charbonneau, ICC
Marat Ma karov 'it>g6 42. 'ifd 7 'ifel+ 43.lllfl 'ife4 INT 201S; 16.e3 .ad6 17.'i!l'a4 0-0=
Pavel Skatch kov 44.'ifxb7? 44.'1We6+ Wg7 4S.@f2± Bucsa-Weilguni, corr 2011 16... .tcS
Togliatti 2002 44... 'ifd4+ 45.�g2 'ife4+ 46.�f2 16...0-0-0 17.llfdl llxdl+ 18.llxdl
1.d4 dS 2.c4 c6 3.tt:lf3 tt:lf6 4.tt:lc3 "ii'c 2+ 47.�gl 'ifcS+ 48.�g2 Wc7 19.'i!l'b3 ft.cs 20.tLldS+ Wb8
dxc4 S.a4 .its 6.tt:leS tt:lbd7 "ii'd S+ 49.�gl 'ifcS+ SO.�g2 21.tLlb4 Axb4 (21...Wa7 22.ti:lxc6+!?
7.lbxc4 'ifc7 8.g3 eS 9.dxeS V2-V2 (22.'i!l'c4) 22...bxc6 23. .axc6 'i!l'c7
lbxeS 10. .tf4 tt:lfd 7 11. .tg2 f6 (23...llb8 24.lld8! '1Wc7 25.llxb8
12.0-0 gS 13. heS fxeS?I Alexa nder Rlaza ntsev 'i!l'xc6 26.llh8 .Q.d6 27. 'i!l'e3+ .Q.cs
Pavel S katch kov 28.'i!l'b3=) 24.'i!l'dS 'i!l'e5 2S.'i!l'b3=)
Ca ppelle-la·Grande 2006 (3) 22.'i!l'xb4 llc8 23.e3;!; Fabian­
K •.t. K 1.d4 dS 2.c4 c6 3.tt:lf3 tt:lf6 4.tt:lc3 Alonso, Buenos Aires 2010 17.'ifb3
' .t. ... � ' dxc4 s.a4 .tts 6.tt:leS tt:lbd7 17. .llfdl 0-0 18.'i!l'b3+ .llf7 19.e3 .ag4
' 7.lbxc4 'ifc7 8.g3 eS 9.dxeS lbxeS 20.lld2 Ae6 21.'1Wc2 lle8= 17 ...'ife7
i.i.i 10. .tt4 tt:ltd 7 11. .tg2 t6 12.0-0 gs 17...0-0-0!? 18.tl:la4 (18. .llacl?! lld2;
13. heS lbxeS 14.lbxeS 14. 'l!!Yd4 18.tl:ld5 .ae6 19.e4 @b8:f) 18... .ae6
/'::, ttJ .ae6 1S.tl:le3 (lS.tLlxeS 'iWxeS=) 19.'i!l'c2 .aa7 20.tl:lb6+ Wb8 21.e3
ttJ /'::, 15...'1Wb6 16.'i!l'e4 aS!? 17.f4 gxf4 hS+:! 18tt:la. 41 ? 18.llfdl .ae6 19.'i!l'a4
/'::, /'::, /'::,Ji./':. :, 18.gxf4 0-0-0! 19.fxeS fS 20.lhfS 0-0= 18... .id6 18... Q.e61? 19.'i!l'c2
.axfS 21.'i!l'xf5+ @b8 22.tl:lcdl .ab4:f 19.lbc1 �8 20.e4 .ie6
l:t 'ii' : <it>
.ac5!? 14... 'ifxeS 21.'ife3 �g7 22.tLlcS lbd8 23.f4
14.l:lc1 l:ld8 15. 'ifd2 .ie6 gxf4 24.gxf4 .tc8 24... l:l.hg8!?=
16.tt:le4± tt:lb6 16....axc4 17..!:l.xc4 2S.b41h-1h
K •.t. K 25.eS! .axes (25...fxe5? 26.tl:lxb7!!
tt:lb6 18.'i!l'aS .ae7 19.llccl 0-0
20.tLlcS± 17. 'ifaS 17.'i!l'xgS! ' .t. ' .axb7 (26...'i!l'xb7 27.'1Wg3++-; 26...
.axc4 (17...tt:lxc4 18.'i!l'f6 'i!l'f7 ' ' exf4 27.'i!l'xe7+ .axe7 28.ti:lxd8+-)
19.'i!l'xh8 We7 20.llfdl+-) 'if.ii 27.'i!l'g3+ Wh6 28.'1Wh3+ lt.>g7
18.'i!l'hS+ g17 (18... '1!1'17 19.'i!l'xeS+ 29.'i!l'g4+ Wh6 30.llc3+-) 26. .llxcS
.ae6 20.'i!l'xh8+-) 19.tt:lf6+
/'::, fSoo
We7 20.'1Wh4! lld4 21.tLld5+ ttJ /'::,
lt.>d7 22..ah3+ .ae6 23.'i!l'f6 /'::, /'::, /'::,Ji../'::, Maxim Rodshtei n
'i!l'd6 (23...tLlxdS 24. .axe6+ We8
n 'ii' .a: <it> Ernesto lnarkiev
2S.'i!l'xh8+-) 24.tl:lxb6+ axb6 Plovdiv Ech 2012 (6)
2S.'i!l'xh8 gxh3 26.'i!l'xh7++- 1S.aS 15.'i!l'b3 0-0-0!? 16. .llfdl (16. 1.d4 dS 2.c4 c6 3.tllf 3 tt:lf6 4.tLlc3
17 ... .ie7 18.lll e 3 18.'i!l'xeS as .ae6 17.'i!l'a4 .lld4 18. 'i!l'c2 a6:f) dxc4 s.a4 .its 6.tt:les lll b d7
'i!l'xeS 19.tLlxeS tl:lxa4 20.llal .ab3 16...llxdl+ 17.llxdl 'i!l'e6! 18.tl:ld5 7.lbxc4 'ifc7 8.g3 eS 9.dxeS
21.tLlc3± 18... l:ld4 19.tLlcS hes Wb8:f; 15.l:tcl lld8 (15...hS!?) lbxeS 10. .tf4 tt:lfd 7 11. .ig2 f6

151
Slav Defence - Krause Variation

12.0-0 gs 13. hes lLJxeS 14. tlle 3 .I • .t .I 20.l:!abl 'ifd2 21. 'ifcs 'ifd6
.ie6 14...kg6 15.tlle4 (15.a5!? a6
.\ .\ 'if .\ 21....Q.cS? 22.£xc6 tt:lxc6 23.'*Yxc6±
16.llleH) 15...£e7 16.:i:!cl 0-0 Gupta-Bakre, Durban 2014. 22.f41
17.'*Yb3+ kf7 18. '*¥ cH De Ruiter· I. .\ .! .\ 22.'i¥c3 l:ld7 23.as :i:!g8!? 22 ...
Timmermans, Amsterdam 2015 � .\ gxf4 23.gxf4 'ifxcS 24. :Xcs
� tllg4 2S. hc6 b6 26. lLJxg4 hg4
27.aS 27.@f2!? 27 ... l:!dl+ 27... J:td2
.I • .t .I ttJ ttJ � 28.axb6 a6! 28. :Xdl bxcS 29.�2
.\ .\'ii .\ �� � ��� 29.:i:!d6i 29 ... '0tc7 30 . .if3 hf3
.\ .t .\ : :a: w 31.'0txf3 �c6 32.e4 �bS 33.l:!d7
� .\ a6 34.l:!c7 hS 3S.eS fxes 36.fxeS
lS ... 0-0-0 1S...£e7 16.tllcdSi; 'OtxaS 3 7 . :XcS+ 'Otb4 38.l:!c7 aS
� 1S.. Jtd8 16.b4! '*Yf7 (16...£d6 39. We4 a4 40.l:!b7+ Wc3 41.l:!a7
ttJ ttJ � 17.l!abl (17.bS!?i) 17...0-0 18.£eH) Wb3 42.e6 a3 43.h4 a2 44. WeS
� � ��� 17.llle4 .Q.xb4 18.f4 gxf4 19.:i:!xf4 Wb2 4SJ:lb7+ �c1 46.l:!a7 Wb1
47.l:!b7+ 112-112
n � :@ £e7 20.l:lafl 0-0 21.tllgS fxgS
22.:i:!xf7 :i:!xf7 23.:i:!xf7 kxf7
lS.aS 15.l:kl h5!? (15...'i¥f7?! 24.£e4± Li Chao-Hammer, Wijk
16.tlle4i; 15 ...:i:!dS 16.'*Yc2 'i¥b6 aan Zee 2011. 16.l:!fcl 16.aS a6 Variation D
17.llle4 ke7 18.b4! 0-0 19.tllc5i) 17.llle4 .Q.e7 18.tllcS (18.b4 fS! (18... 13.tlJxeS
16.tlle4 .Q.e717.b4 h4;:t Kleiser· hS 19.l:lfcl h4 20.bS! axbS 21.a6t
Straka, corr 2012; 1S.tlle4 Sil.e7 Post!· Kreis!. Austria Bundesliga M i kael Agopov
16.'i¥d4 0-0 17.f4 (17.tllcS .Q.xcS 2012/13) 19.tllcS .Q.xcS 20.'*YxcS f4 Ari lssa kainen
(17...£f7!?) 18.'*YxcS 'i¥b6=) 17... 21.tllc2 .Q.c4=i=) 18...£xcS 19.'iYxc5 Fin land tt 2013/14 (9)
gxf4 18.gxf4 tllg4 19.£h3 :i:!ad8 @b8=; 16.tlle4 £e7 17.tllcS .Q.xcS 1.d4 d S 2.c4 c6 3. tllf3 tllf 6 4.tlic3
20.'*Yc3 '*Yb6 21. .Q.xg4 kxg4 22.aS 18.'*YxcS Wb8= Schenk-Lentrodt, dxc4 s.a4 .its 6.tlies tllb d7
'*Yd4 23.�xd4 :i:!xd4 24.tllg3 .Q.h3 Munich 2003 16 ... @b8 16...aS! 7 . lLJxc4 'ifc7 8.g3 eS 9.dxeS lLJxeS
2S.tliefS i.cS 26.tlixd4 £xd4+ is an important novelty. Black 10 . .it4 tlitd 7 11 . .ig2 ts 12.0-0 gs
27.'it>hl £xfl 28.:i:!xfl :i:!d8=i= prepares against the advance 13.lLJxeS gxf4 13...tllxeS?! 14.Ae3
Petersen·Frijling. corr 2014. b2-b4. 17.tlicdS (17.tlle4 llld7=) hS 1S.tlle4 (lS.'i¥d4!? il.g7 16.f4)
1S ... a6 16. tlle 4 16.'i¥a4 0-0-0 17...'i¥f7 18.b4 Sil.xdS 19.tllxdS l:lxdS 1S... .Q.e7 16.'i¥b3 tllg4 17.£d4±
17.:i:!fcl '*Yf7 18.'i¥e4 £cs (18...'it>b8 20.£xdS 'iYxdS 21.bxaS Sil.b4 22.a6 Sheldon-Crouch, Newport
19.b4 '*Yg6!=i=) 19.llla4 l:ld4 20.'*Yc2 bxa6 23.aS 'it>c7 24.:i:!abl 'i¥d6!?;:t 1999. 14. lLJxd7 14.tlld3; 14.e4!?
.Q.b4 21.tllcS :i:!hd8 22.tllxe6 '*Yxe6=i= 17.b41 hb4 17...fS 18.bS f4 19.bxc6 WxeS lS.exfS 0-0-0 14 ... hd7?1
Tikkanen-Hector, Orebro ch·SWE tt:lxc6 (19 ...fxe3? 20.tllbS+-) 14...0-0-0?! lS.'*Yd4 (lS.tllbS
2013 16 ... .ie7 17. b4?1 17.f4 tlld7!? 20.tllbS Wf7 (Ererdem-Gundogan. '*Yxd716.'*Ycl '*Ye6 17.'i¥xf4 Wes
(17...gxf4 18.:i:!xf4 tlld7 19.lllfS £xfS Turkey u 2012) 21. .Q.xc6 fxe3 18.lllxa7+ 'it>b8 (18...'it>c7 19.'i¥f3-+)
20.l:!xfS 0-0-0 21. °iYcl hS=) 18.fxgS 22.fxe3 .Q.b3 (22...:i:!c8 23.'*Ye4 19.tllxc6+ bxc6 20.'i¥f3-+)
0-0-0 19.gxf6 tt:lxf6 20.'*Yc2 tlldS� bxc6 24.:i:!abl-+) 23.'i¥e4 bxc6 15... il.xd7 16.'i¥xa7 fxg3 17.hxg3
17 . . . fSl 18.tlic:S hcS 19.bxcS 24.'*Yes+ 'it>b7 2S.:i:!abl-+ 18.tlicdS '*Yes ( Izzat·Zuhao Li, Melbourne
f4 20. tllc 2 l:!d8 21. 'ifcl 0-0 'ifaS 18... £xdS 19.lllxdS l:lxdS! 2016) 18.tlldS! cxdS 19.l::iacl+ (19.
22.l:!dl .ic41? 22...l:lxdl+ 23.'*Yxdl (19 ...'i¥d6 20.lllxb4 '*Yxb4 21.:i:!abl aS!?) 19 ... .Q.c6 20.:i:!xc6+ bxc6
lllcH 23.tlld 4 'ife7 24. 'ifc3 'iff6 'i¥d6 22.f41 gxf4 23.gxf4 '*Yd4+ 21.:i:!cl l:ld6 22.:i:!c3 l:le6 23.l:!b3 Ad6
2S.e3 l:!d7 26.exf4 gxf4 27.gxf4? 24.'it>hl '*Yxf4 (24...tllg4?? 25.:i:!xb7+ 24.'*Ya8+ 'it>d7 2S.'*Yxh8+-
27.l:ld2! :i:!fd8=i= 27 ... 'ifxf4 28. 'ife3 'it>a8 26.£xc6 tllf2+ 27.'it>g2 l:lhg8+
l:!g7-+ 0-1 28.'it>f3+-) 2S.:i:!xb7+! 'it>xb7
.I • .t .I
26.Axc6+ Wc7 (26...'it>b8 27.Sil.e4
Larry Kaufm a n '*Yxcl+ 28. '*Yxcl±) 27.Ae4+ 'it>d7 .\ .\'if .t .\
Aleksa ndr Ostrovskiy 28.'i¥c7+ 'it>e6 (28...'it>e8 29.Sil.c6+ .\ .\
Rockvil le 2014 (8) :i:td7 30. .Q.xd7+ 'it>f8 3t.Ah3±)
1.d4 d S 2.c4 c6 3. tllf3 tllf6 4.tlic3 29.l:lc6+ tllxc6 30.'*Yxf4±) 20.AxdS
dxc4 S.a4 �ts 6.tlies tllb d7 aS 21. .Q.g2 (21. °iYfS 'i¥e7 22.fil.b3!?
� .\
7 . lLJxc4 'ifc7 8.g3 eS 9.dxeS hS 23.'i¥e6i) 21...g4 22.'iYfS '*Ye7 ttJ �
lLJxeS 10 . .if4 tllf d7 11 . .ig2 f6 23.:i:ldl hS 24.h4 gxh3 2S . .Q.xh3 h4 � � ���
12.0-0 gs 13. hes lLJxes 14.tlie3 26.g4 :i:!g8� Kiilaots·Moiseenko,
l::r � n@
.ie6 1S.'ifc2 Jyvaskyla 2014. 19. lLJxb4 'ifxb4

152
Survey SL 4.5

1S.e31 15.aS a6 ( :;,, 15...fxg3 16.hxg3 Rivas Maceda-Valak, corr 21.b3 0-0 (21...fxg3!? 22.hxg3 h5)
a6) 16.gxf4 (16.e3!) 16...0-0-0 2013. 16... 1t'c7 17. tlle 4 he4 22.gxf4 'it>h8+ Hilverda-Yevseev,
17.'li'a4 l:tg8 18.'it>hl 'it>b8 (18...�e6, 18. he4 0-0-0 19. .l:td3 a S 19... Schwarzach 2015) 20...0-0 21.e3
c4<) 19.'li'c4 �d6 20.e3 'li'c8!? fxg3 20.hxg3 hS 21.'li'c4 (21.'li'd2 fxg3 22.hxg3 'li'b4 23.'li'c3 'li'xc3
21.l:tgl �e6 22.'li'e2 'li'c7 (22... h4 22.l:tdl �e7=) 21...h4 22. .l:tadl 24.l:txc3 l:tf7 25.l:tfcl hS 26.gf3
fS!?) 23.tlle4 �e7 Gubaidullin­ 'it>b8 23.'li'e6 l:tde8 24.'li'xd6 l:th7 27.l:tdl l:txdl+ 28.�xdl h4'F
Skatchkov, Saratov 2007. 1S... 'li'xd6 25. .l:txd6 l:txe4= 20. 1fc4 Brynell-Hector, Copenhagen
fxg3 15...fxe3? 16.'li'hS+ 'it>d8 Wb8 2 1. .l:tad 1 fxg3 22.hxg3 2014. 17 .fxg3 17...0-0 18.tlle4 fxg3
.•

(16...'it>e7 17.l:tfel+-) 17.l:tadl �d6 hS 23. �f3;t �es 24. .l:txdS+ 19.hxg3 ges 20.tllcS 'li'e7 21.�e4±
(17...'it>c8 18.l:txd7+-) 18.tlle4 .l:txd 8 2 S. .l:txd8 + 1t'xd8 26.b3 A.Smith-Hector, Copenhagen
�b4 19.�h3+-; 15...h5 16.exf4 <i>c7 2 7.'i>g2 'fi'd6 28.e3 'i>b6 2014. 18.fxg3 0-0-0 19. lLld S 1t'e6
0-0-0 17.'li'd4 'it>b8 18. 'li'xf6±; 2 9.1t'c2 29.�xhS 'li'dS+ 29 "it'cS ..• 20.tlle 3 20.tllxf6 'li'e5!? 21.tlle4
15...0-0-0 16.exf4 �fs 17.'li'b3 3 0. "it'd1 "it'd6 3 1. b h S 1t'd5+ ge7g?; 20.l:tc4 �es (20...'it>b8
gcs 18.aS a6 19.tlla4± 16. "it'hS+ The resulting complex endgame 21.l:txc6!?) 21.tlle3 �h3 (21...gg6!?
<i>e7 17.fxg3 1fes 1s."ifh4 as is a case study of strong defence.