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Issue #767 Harrisburg, PA March 11, 2019

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Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability Of
DCNR Funding Choices

On March 4, Senators on the Appropriations Committee from both


parties expressed concerns about the proposed transfer of monies used to
fund local projects from the Environmental Stewardship (Growing
Greener) and Keystone Recreation, Parks and Conservation funds to pay
operating expenses for the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources and DEP.
Gov. Wolf proposed transferring a total of $95.7 million from
special funds to be used for agency operating costs or not deposited in
the special funds for their original intended purpose.
For the first time, Environmental Stewardship Fund monies
would be used for DEP operating costs and other expenses taking $15.4
million away from the Fund and the income to the Fund would be further
reduced by $19.3 million because money would not be transferred there
from the Marcellus Legacy Fund. DCNR projects are also financed through this Fund.
$30 million would be transferred out of the Keystone Fund and $69.6 million would be
transferred out of the Oil and Gas Lease Fund to pay DCNR operating costs.
Wolf also proposed taking $10 million from the Recycling Fund to pay for DEP
operations.
And it gets more complicated from there. Click Here for a summary of all the transfers.
Some Senators said what the Governor’s budget tried to do was not transparent and hide
increases in DCNR operating funds.
Others said they would oppose using project money from the funds to pay agency
operating expenses.
Sen. Pat Browne (R-Lehigh), Majority Chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee,
again said he was worried about the sustainability of transferring monies from these and other
funds to meet DCNR’s financial obligations going into the future.
He said there were so many accounting moves it was a “budgeteer’s dream.” He said
there is no certainty in how these moves are presented and if they are sustainable.
He noted DCNR’s is charged with preserving critical assess that the people of
Pennsylvania covet.

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Sen. Browne also raised the issue of how sustainable the current model was for funding
environmental protection programs at last week’s hearing on DEP’s budget.
DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said she is committed to funding projects at the
same level as other years, even with the proposed transfers, adding the Keystone Fund, which
relies on a portion of the Realty Transfer Fund, had healthier than usual revenues this past year to
support the Fund and its obligations.
She also said each year’s budget will need to be reevaluated to make sure DCNR can
meets its obligations.
Here’s a quick summary of some of the issues raised at the hearing--
-- More Drilling On State Lands: Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming), Majority Chair of the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, said there has been a lot of concern expressed
about the transfer of funds from the Environmental Stewardship and Keystone funds, but at the
same time he did not believe DCNR was doing enough to use its own assets to help fund the
agency. He said allowing more drilling on just 3 percent of DCNR’s land could generate about
$100 million for the agency. Dunn said only a little more than 35 percent of the existing leases
on State Forest land have been developed and in some areas there has been little activity. She
said DCNR’s lands have recreation and other values the public uses that bring significant
economic returns to the communities around them and briefly mentioned Gov. Wolf’s drilling
moratorium.
In a follow-up, Sen. Yaw said he would rather see the land used to generate revenue
DCNR could use like the Game Commission does with its no surface impact leases for drilling
than to take money out of special funds used for dedicated purposes.
-- Restore Pennsylvania: Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), Minority Chair of the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, asked how the Restore Pennsylvania proposal
could help with the infrastructure maintenance backlog at DCNR. Dunn said the agency has
about a $1 billion maintenance backlog in State Parks and Forests and Restore Pennsylvania
could help bring them back to their “former glory.” The funds could also be used for a variety of
local recreational infrastructure projects, like filling gaps in local and regional trail systems. She
again pointed to the economic return these kinds of projects yield for the communities in which
they are located.
Sen. Judith Schwank (D-Berks), Minority Chair of the Senate Agriculture and Rural
Affairs Committee, said we don’t need another study to know how important the return on
investments are from our State Parks and Forests and said the Restore Pennsylvania initiative
would provide much-needed help to DCNR and communities.
-- Fund Transfers To Pay Operating Expenses: Here are just some of the comments made
about the proposed transfers of monies used to support local projects from the Environmental
Stewardship (Growing Greener) and Keystone funds to pay agency operating expenses--
-- Sen. Tom Killion (R-Delaware) said he’s getting a lot of emails opposing the transfers
saying he would rather see those funds go into projects and not pay operating expenses.
-- Sen. Mario Scavello (R-Monroe) said he was also getting “tons” of emails expressing
opposition to the transfers and was concerned about the impact of the transfers on funding
projects.
-- Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver), Majority Chair of the Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs
Committee, also said he was getting a lot of constituents contacting his office opposing the
transfers and expressed his concern.
-- Sen. Kristin Phillips-Hill (R-York) said she was concerned about the confusion around the

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transfers and the lack of transparency. She also noted when she was in the House and a similar
proposal was made by Republicans, the Governor opposed it. She said the Governor must have
had a change of heart.
-- Sen. Vincent Hughes (D-Philadelphia), Minority Chair of the Senate Appropriations
Committee, said for the record it was not unusual for Governors to propose fund transfers to
balance a state budget.
-- Stormwater Pollution Reduction: Sen. Yudichak asked what DCNR can do to help
communities meet their stormwater pollution reduction obligations. Dunn said water quality was
always a key part of what DCNR did, recalling the name of the initial forest agency was the
Department of Forests and Waters which acquired land for its water quality benefits. She said
DCNR has taken the lead on forested riparian buffers to reduce agricultural and stormwater
pollution in part to meet Pennsylvania’s obligations to reduce water pollution going to the
Chesapeake Bay. DCNR is also looking at how local parks can be enhanced to reduce flooding
and contribute to stormwater pollution reduction. She again pointed to the need for the Restore
Pennsylvania proposal to support these kinds of projects.
-- Climate Initiatives: Sen. Sharif Street (D-Philadelphia) asked what DCNR is doing to
mitigate against climate change and how the Restore Pennsylvania initiative would help. Dunn
said DCNR released a Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Plan in 2018 with 124 recommended
actions DCNR should take. Through the Governor’s Executive Order, DCNR is also working
with other agencies on climate issue. She said DCNR hopes to exceed the goals laid out in the
Governor’s Order. She added, it was not only important for DCNR to reduce its carbon
footprint, but her agency has the opportunity to educate the over 40 million annual visitors to its
facilities about climate issues and what they can do to help.
Sen. Vincent Hughes (D-Philadelphia) followed up by asking for some specific examples
of DCNR actions. DCNR Deputy Secretary for Administration Michael Walsh said DCNR
hopes to cut its energy use by 24 percent by 2025, replace 25 percent of its fleet with hybrid and
electric vehicles by 2025, complete the installation of 15 solar arrays by the end of year, and get
50 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2022 saving $500,000 a year.
-- Increasing ATV/Snowmobile Trails: Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming) expressed a concern
Pennsylvania is losing out to West Virginia in developing new destination ATV use areas. Dunn
pointed to Whiskey Springs ATV Riding Area as an example of the kind of project DCNR has
supported. She said there is a proposal to expand the area with a price tag of about $20 million
they would need Restore Pennsylvania to fund. DCNR Deputy Secretary for Conservation and
Technical Services Lauren Imgrund also mentioned the Mines and Meadows ATV area in
Lawrence County that wants to add land in Armstrong County.
Sen. Mario Scavella (R-Monroe) said constituents have told him they have taken their
snowmobiles to Canada because they have thousands of miles of snowmobile trails there and
asked about the status of snowmobile trails. Dunn said DCNR has had a long partnership with
the snowmobile owners and dealers on developing opportunities in Pennsylvania. Sometimes,
she said, what Pennsylvania doesn’t have is snow. She again pointed to the need for the Restore
Pennsylvania proposal and the funding it would bring to these kinds of projects.
-- Timber Sales Decline: Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) expressed a concern about the decline in
timber sales and wondered if the tariff fight with China has had an impact. Dunn said China’s
growing middle class has been a good market for hardwood-- cherry-- furniture. She added
DCNR’s Green Ribbon Task Force has developed recommendations and is advising her agency
on additional steps to take to expand the forest products industry. DCNR Deputy Secretary for

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Parks and Forestry John Norbeck added DCNR expects prices will be soft this year in part
because of the tariff discussions around the world along with a reduced demand from China. He
said the invasive Emerald Ash Borer has also had some impact on the availability of ash trees.
Norbec said DCNR’s forest pest management staff is also working with the other agencies on the
impact of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly on hardwoods.
-- Invasive Species: Sen. Daniel Laughlin (R-Erie) asked if anyone has ever won a fight with an
invasive insect species like the Spotted Lanternfly or “are we just wasting our money.” Dunn
said fighting invasive species has become a constant battle, but what is at stake is the damage
they can do to our forests and our forest industries. Norbec said Pennsylvania has been fighting
the gypsy moth battle since the 1970s and it hasn’t been won, but it is being managed.
-- Presque Isle State Park: Sen. Daniel Laughlin (R-Erie) said he is proud to have Presque Isle
State Park in his district and asked how can we do more to improve park because it is a major
economic contributor to the region. He noted Gull Point at the end of the peninsula is ready to
separate from the main peninsula. Dunn said Presque Isle is a globally important birding area
and Pennsylvania’s most visited park with 4 million visitors a year. But it’s also a poster child
for the need for Restore Pennsylvania because of the many infrastructure projects that need to be
done in the park.
Click Here to watch a video of the hearing. Click Here for DCNR’s written testimony.
NewsClips:
Meyer: Lawmakers Keep Questioning Wolf’s Intricate Web Of Environmental Funding
Op-Ed: PA Budget Proposal Hurts Local Environmental Projects, Bipartisan Consensus - Rep.
Bernstine (R)
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
Editorial: Lawmakers Should Recognize Need For Infrastructure Program And A Fair Severance
Tax
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Related Budget Stories This Week:
House DEP Budget Hearing 2: Only 0.30% Of DEP Final Actions Were Appealed In 2018; 25
Fewer Attorney Positions
Department Of Agriculture Budget Testimony Highlights Conservation, Organic & Urban
Farming, Invasive Species Issues
House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks & Forests
Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
Related Stories:
DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address State’s
Infrastructure Needs In House Hearing
Republican Chair Of Appropriations Committee: The Way We Fund Our Environmental
Protection Programs Is Not Sustainable
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
All Major PA Hunting, Angler, Wildlife Groups Oppose Using Environmental Fund Project
Money To Pay Agency Operating Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed

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Budget
Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation Opposes Transfer Of Environmental
Stewardship, Keystone Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation
Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses; Issues Call To Action
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf To Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Pennsylvanians Urged To Help Preserve The Legacy Of PA's State Parks & Forests
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Agency
Operating Expenses Instead Of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

House DEP Budget Hearing 2: Only 0.30% Of DEP Final Actions Were Appealed In 2018;
25 Fewer Attorney Positions

On March 4 DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell returned before the


House Appropriations Committee to review the answers DEP
provided to questions asked, but not answered, during the first
House budget hearing on February 14.
A number of legislators asked questions about how many
times appeals are taken from DEP’s final actions to the
Environmental Hearing Board, how much has the agency paid in
attorneys fees, whether DEP hires outside legal counsel for its
cases, legislation DEP supports to regulated pipelines, additional
details on the agency’s response to PFAS contamination, a list of
federal agencies that notified DEP it did not have the resources to
meet minimum standards for administering their programs and
other issues.
Here are some of the highlights from DEP’s response--
Appeals
DEP reported of the 42,689 final actions it took on permits and other approvals in 2018,
128 appeals were filed with the Environmental Hearing Board or on 0.30 percent of the cases.
“Over the last 10 years, the EHB appeal numbers have not varied much - between ll7 and
224 appeals per year - though 2008 was a high appeal outlier with 351 appeals filed. The 10-year
annual average for appeals is 191.
“Assuming, conservatively, DEP took 30,000 final (appealable) actions each of these
years prior (12,000 fewer than 2018), the appeal rate would still be less than one percent (0.64
percent).
“The EHB had a particularly busy docket between 1985 and 1992 - when the DEP
complement was one-third larger than it is today - where appeals filed per year ranged between
538 and 621.”
Paid Legal Fees

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“Over the past 11 years, the Department has paid a total of $1.3 million pursuant to the
Pennsylvania Clean Streams Law Section 309. This amount is the combination of court awarded
fees and some fees paid in settlement, all pursuant to the statutory provision.
“Please note: The vast majority of these cases where fees were awarded are situations
where DEP defended permits issued alongside the permittee and their counsel/experts.
“The total amount includes payments to both environmental groups and to other
Appellants.
“What is the source of the money used to reimburse legal fees?
-- 61 percent Clean Water Fund
-- 16 percent General Operations
-- 14 percent Air & Energy Title V Management
-- 6 percent Safe Drinking Water
-- 3 percent Misc. Funds (mostly Dams & Encroachments/Solid Waste Abatement Fund)”
Outside Counsel
“It is extremely rare for DEP to hire outside counsel for an environmental case.2
DEP has hired outside counsel for environmental cases in two cases that we are aware of--
-- Robinson Township RE: the environmental rights amendment. This decision was made
under a prior administration, so we are not able to answer the reasons for this decision; however,
the case did represent an important, unique, and significant constitutional issue.
-- EOT - Declaratory Judgement (PA Supreme Court argument only) RE: The Clean
Streams Law civil penalty provision. This is the only case under the Wolf Administration and
under DEP's current Chief Counsel where outside counsel has been engaged. There were a
number of legal and strategic reasons for hiring specialized statutory construction counsel in this
case.
“Moreover, EQT, which has experienced in-house environmental counsel and regular
outside environmental counsel, also chose to hire an appellate specialist in this case, perhaps for
similar strategic reasons. This outside counsel engagement in EQT was for the Supreme Court
argument only.
“The DEP Office of Chief Counsel litigated the case in the lower coufi and prevailed in
the civil penalty case and that appeal.
“Again, it is remarkably rare to errcountel a case that DEP counsel cannot handle, as we
have sorne of the most experienced state environmental compliance and enforcement attorneys in
both the Commonwealth and the United States.”
Attorney Positions
“While DEP is down 25 attomey positions from 14 years ago and faces competition for
hiring from the private sector and budgetary pressures, we have worked to be more efficient and
our attorneys are highly competent to handle lawsuits.
Pipeline Legislation
“We support legislation to provide the Public Utility Commission with the authority to
regulate siting and routing of intrastate pipelines; legislation requiring pipeline operators to
provide more information to schools located within 1,000 feet of a pipeline, including how to
respond to leaks; legislation requiring public utility facilities transporting natural gas or natural
gas liquids to work with county emergency coordinators on response to releases and emergency
response; and legislation mandating the installation and use of automatic or remote shutoff
valves in high consequence areas.” (Borrows from the list Gov. Wolf announced February 8.)
Click Here for a copy of DEP’s responses to questions asked, but not answered, during

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the first House budget hearing. Click Here for videos of DEP’s House budget hearings.
Click Here for DEP’s written budget testimony. Click Here to watch a video of DEP’s
Senate budget hearing.
NewsClips:
Meyer: Lawmakers Keep Questioning Wolf’s Intricate Web Of Environmental Funding
Op-Ed: PA Budget Proposal Hurts Local Environmental Projects, Bipartisan Consensus - Rep.
Bernstine (R)
Editorial: Lawmakers Should Recognize Need For Infrastructure Program And A Fair Severance
Tax
Wolf Returns To Schuylkill County With Plan For Flood Prevention And Recovery
Officials Tout Severance Tax To Fund Infrastructure Projects
Officials Detail How Wolf Plan Would Help West Pittston Flood Survivors
York Twp. Official Hangs Hopes On Wolf’s Severance Tax Plan
Work Underway To Retrofit Flood Gate In Wilkes-Barre
Wolf Highlight Need For Restore PA Proposal To Deal With Flooding In Allegheny County
Wolf: Tremont Flooding Helped Inspire Aggressive Restore PA Plan
Wolf Highlights Restore Pennsylvania Plan To Help Columbia County With Flood Protection
PEMA, Local Leaders Highlight Past Projects As Models For Restore PA Success
DEP, Local Officials Tour Flood-Damaged Sites In York County To Promote Restore PA
Proposal
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Related Budget Stories This Week:
Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability Of
DCNR Funding Choices
House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks & Forests
Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
Department Of Agriculture Budget Testimony Highlights Conservation, Organic & Urban
Farming, Invasive Species Issues
Related Stories:
Republican Chair Of Appropriations Committee: The Way We Fund Our Environmental
Protection Programs Is Not Sustainable
DEP Secretary Promotes Restore PA Bond Proposal To Get More Funding For Environmental
Improvement Projects
DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address State’s
Infrastructure Needs In House Hearing
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
All Major PA Hunting, Angler, Wildlife Groups Oppose Using Environmental Fund Project
Money To Pay Agency Operating Expenses
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation Opposes Transfer Of Environmental
Stewardship, Keystone Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs
PA Recreation & Park Society Opposes Diversion Of Millions Dedicated To Local Recreation

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Project Funding To Pay Agency Expenses; Issues Call To Action
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf To Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Pennsylvanians Urged To Help Preserve The Legacy Of PA's State Parks & Forests
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Agency
Operating Expenses Instead Of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Department Of Agriculture Budget Testimony Highlights Conservation, Organic & Urban


Farming, Invasive Species Issues

Department of Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding appeared


before the House and Senate Appropriations Committee this week
and submitted this written testimony as part of his budget
presentation.
His testimony highlighted Gov. Wolf’s new PA Farm Bill
proposal and Agriculture’s role in water quality improvement,
Chesapeake Bay Watershed cleanup, organic and urban farming,
controlling invasive species like Spotted Lanternfly and more.
Here is the text of his testimony--

I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak to you today, to share


the story of Pennsylvania agriculture, the people and products
behind it, and the work that our Department does each day to
support it.
As you’ve undoubtedly heard me say many times before, agriculture is essential to the
long-term health and vitality of our Commonwealth—from a preserved farm in Bucks County to
an urban agriculture plot in Pittsburgh, and everything in between.
It is critical that we continue to make strategic, targeted investments in an industry that is
so far-reaching and important to the lives and livelihoods of all Pennsylvanians.
Certainly, we know that agriculture is unique in its ability to provide a healthy return on
those investments.
This industry—with its $135.7 billion economic impact and 580,000 jobs—is not simply
driven by results, but also by the passion of those for whom this is their business and way of life.
Each sector contributes, and each year provides a new opportunity for growth. Farmers create
new wealth with the dawning of each production season.
That wealth is built upon as value is added through a robust food and beverage
processing sector. The investments we make today are down payments on a stronger, more
dynamic economy tomorrow.
I have been in and around the Department of Agriculture for much of my career – indeed,
most of my life. I have never been so excited about a governor’s budget and what it means for
Pennsylvania’s farmers, processors, and consumers.

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This budget addresses several of the recommendations in the economic impact
assessment we released with Team PA last year, and it builds on investments previously
proposed by Governor Wolf and made by the General Assembly.
It honors the achievements of our past by funding the Penn State College of Agricultural
Sciences and PennVet, restoring several popular and successful programs, and protects our future
by creating new responses to complex challenges.
This proposal signals a clear commitment to growing Pennsylvania agriculture’s
prominence in the region, our reputation in the nation, and our presence in world markets.
PA Farm Bill Proposal
We are calling this bipartisan, bicameral legislative effort the Pennsylvania Farm Bill,
and I am proud to say publicly that this budget and the accompanying legislative proposal looks
like Pennsylvania.
Both rural and urban, young and old, plant and animal, conventional and organic, farmer
and consumer, this PA Farm Bill is for all Pennsylvanians.
In total, this budget proposes more than $24 million in investments in the people and
infrastructure of agriculture, including farm land.
That begins with a renewed commitment to the entrepreneurial spirit of farmers by
providing them with easy access to planning services – advice on getting into business for new
and beginning farmers, pursuing new opportunities for economic and environmental
sustainability, and transitioning ownership of the business to the next generation.
With so many independent business owners in agriculture reaching retirement age, it is
critical that the path to succession be as smooth as possible and that outreach to new and
beginning farmers happens early and often.
This is especially true for the more than 5,400 farms that have committed to preserving
their land in agriculture in perpetuity through the Farmland Preservation program, now in its
30th year.
The program’s dual goals are to protect prime farm land from development pressure and
improve land access for beginning farmers by allowing the land to be sold at its farm value.
The first objective has been realized with more than 550,000 acres in the program, but the
second objective has proven more challenging in recent years.
Land prices in some parts of Pennsylvania have increased to the point that there is little
benefit to a beginning farmer to look for a preserved farm when he or she is ready to buy land.
To improve our ability to meet this second objective, Governor Wolf has proposed
extending the waiver of realty transfer taxes for the sale of a preserved farm to a qualified
beginning farmer.
Last year, much of our conversations focused on the dairy industry. Farmers’ milk prices
are projected to be slightly higher this year than last, but dairy remains an area of concern and
focus for the governor and for the Departments of Agriculture and Community and Economic
Development (DCED).
The first round of Dairy Investment Program funds are scheduled to be awarded this
month, totaling about $3.4 million. More applications have been submitted to DCED since, and
we are impressed by the quality of the applications and the entrepreneurship shown by our dairy
industry.
Applications have been submitted from farms and businesses across the commonwealth,
showing ingenuity, perseverance, and faith in the future.
This year’s budget proposes an additional $5 million in grants for value-added

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processing, research and development, organic transition assistance, and marketing and
promotion.
The budget also includes an increase in funding for the Center for Dairy Excellence,
which has been working with individual farm families to improve profitability. The work of the
Center has been critical to supporting dairy farm families through the real challenges and
uncertainty they have faced over the past three years.
In recognition of the importance of animal agriculture in Pennsylvania, the budget
proposes the creation of a new center of excellence to support both established and emerging
sectors such as swine, poultry, sheep, and goats.
Using the successful models for dairy and beef, the Center for Animal Agriculture
Excellence will address contemporary issues such as expanding processing capacity throughout
the state, providing technical assistance and resources for food safety compliance, growing
domestic supplies of organic grains, and assisting the industry with establishing hemp as an
approved animal feed.
This year, in addition to dairy, our areas of focus include organic production and
processing and realizing the market potential of some new “old” crops that offer farmers a
chance to diversify their operations and improve profitability.
Organic Farming
Pennsylvania farmers have been transitioning to organic production without state
government incentives. In fact, we are ranked second only to California in the value of farmers’
organic sales.
However, increases in our supply have not kept pace with increases in demand for
organic foods by consumers.
A study conducted by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service released in
September 2017 counted 803 Pennsylvania farms with organic certification.
Today, more than 1,500 Pennsylvania entities are listed in USDA’s database of certified
organic operations, which includes both farms and processing facilities.
We believe there are approximately 1,000 farms with organic certification today, and
more that follow organic production requirements but stop short of pursuing the independent
third-party audit required for USDA certification.
The governor is committed to our encouraging this growth through voluntary transition,
with an eye toward an eventual Pennsylvania organic program that leverages our PA Preferred
brand and further differentiates our products in a global marketplace.
Organic certification is just one way that farms can distinguish themselves in the
marketplace, and the governor believes in fostering opportunity and growth across all production
methods.
Hemp & Hops
Other options include diversifying into new or re-emerging areas, including hemp and
hops. Both crops were prevalent across Pennsylvania in the past, but past generations’ expertise
is long gone.
After two years of research in hemp production, Pennsylvania has redeveloped some
capacity to work with farmers interested in trying to grow hemp.
Through creation of an Agricultural Business Development Center as proposed in this
budget, the Department would be able to help interested farmers find the guidance they need
through planning grants for private sector consultants.
Similarly, as Pennsylvania’s craft brewery industry continues to escalate following the

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liquor code modernization in Act 93 of 2016, the potential for Pennsylvania-grown hops to affect
the flavors of local brews is great, and can unleash even more variety for consumers to enjoy.
These grants could be used to secure business planning services, succession planning,
marketing planning, help with forming cooperatives, public and private sector financing options,
and more, with the flexibility to choose from a variety of providers.
Conservation & Stewardship
Conservation and stewardship remain hallmarks of Pennsylvania agriculture. Our farmers
are important stewards of the land, air, and water that they both rely on for their livelihoods and
protect for our collective future.
The budget proposes resources in the form of loans, grants, and tax credits to assist
farmers to fund and install conservation practices.
The proposal re-funds the Agriculture Linked Investment Program, a low-interest
financing option allowing farmers to borrow funds needed for implementing their conservation
plans.
The PA Farm Bill would also increase the lending limit from $75,000 to $250,000 in
recognition of the reality farmers face in helping Pennsylvania meet its goals under the federal
Phase 3 [Chesapeake Bay] Watershed Implementation Plan for improving the health of
Pennsylvania’s waterways and the Chesapeake Bay.
The governor also proposed increasing the popular Resource Enhancement And
Conservation (REAP) tax credit program by $3 million, as well as offering new Conservation
Excellence grants for financial and technical assistance.
Career Opportunities
Ensuring that future generations of farmers and educated consumers learn of career
opportunities in agriculture, the governor’s budget also proposes restoring funds to the
Agriculture and Rural Youth grants program.
This popular program was used in the past to help high school FFA chapters and 4-H
clubs build greenhouses and other facilities to further their studies.
The budget also creates the Pennsylvania Farm to School Grant Program to help younger
students learn about food and agriculture. These grant programs can help students learn about
career opportunities while also teaching future consumers about Pennsylvania’s abundant and
diverse supply of safe, healthy foods.
Urban Agriculture
Another way that the budget cultivates agriculture in every corner of the Commonwealth
is through brand-new funding for urban agriculture.
Last year, Governor Wolf declared the firstever Pennsylvania Urban Agriculture Week. I
visited urban farms in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Altoona and was reminded again of the
power of agriculture to heal, connect, and bring communities together.
This proposed investment will support agriculture infrastructure in urban areas, making
resources available to support the community and economic development already happening.
Pathogens/Invasive Species
Over the past four years, I’ve provided regular updates about looming threats, whether
Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) or the Spotted Lanternfly.
The administration, legislature, private sector, and the federal government have worked
together to prepare for the threat of HPAI by working with industry on farm biosecurity plans,
disease diagnostics through the Pennsylvania Animal Diagnostic Laboratory System, setting
aside response funds, hosting drills and response exercises, and remaining vigilant.

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The same collaborative approach has been activated for the Spotted Lanternfly.
Last year’s state appropriation of $3 million helped to secure over $17.5 million in
federal funds toward controlling this devastating insect that threatens agricultural products, the
environment, and the quality of life in affected communities.
Progress has been made, but continued investment will be critical to stopping further
spread and fighting back against this invasive insect.
We have learned a lot about the value of initial investments to detect and stop threats
when they are found at a single source versus the challenge and cost of controlling a threat that
has spread to 13 counties or the entire state.
The Governor has proposed, under the PA Farm Bill, to dedicate “just in case” funding
that can be flexible enough to respond to the next regulatory emergency, whether in animal
health, plant health, or human health from foodborne illness.
The proposal includes funding to continue the fight against the Spotted Lanternfly, with
additional resources available to help neutralize the next threat.
In addition, the governor’s budget proposes readiness funding that we anticipate using
each year in training and exercises for our staff, the state and county animal response teams, and
for other necessary materials like Personal Protective Equipment, which has a limited shelf life.
The Rapid Response Disaster Readiness appropriation is an essential investment to
protect and secure our food supply, as well as our ability to conduct inter-state and international
trade.
With of all the good news in this year’s budget, I must still return to an important
budgetary theme I have emphasized in the past.
Dog Licensing
Last year, I discussed the need to raise the fees for a dog license, which are used to fund
the Bureau of Dog Law Enforcement and have not been increased in over 20 years.
I appreciated the willingness of the General Assembly to engage and learn more about
this issue, however the problem has not yet been resolved. We have talked at length about the
projections for the Dog Law Restricted Account to go negative.
It has only been due to carrying ever-increasing numbers of vacancies that the fund has
held out this long. This means that our ability to meet our statutory obligations of licensing dogs,
returning lost dogs, inspecting kennels, and protecting the public from dangerous dogs is
compromised.
Discussions about raising fees responsibly is an important part of the legislative process.
A modest increase in both annual and lifetime dog licenses is the necessary next step.
Thanks to feedback from the legislature, the Dog Law Advisory Board, and passionate
stakeholders, we are working on new ways to meet our statutory obligations through
modernization and reform to better protect all Pennsylvanians – human and canine.
We look forward to sharing our ideas with you and working together on this issue in the
coming months.
Finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t close by applauding the accomplishments of the
department’s team of dedicated public servants.
We continue to do more with less, and I know that is due to the enthusiasm, commitment,
and skill of our employees. For many of them, agriculture is not just a job, but an important part
of their lives.
Thank you to the members of this body for the faith you have shown in the Department
of Agriculture over the years. Now more than ever, we need the General Assembly’s help to

12
enact our strategic mission and reach our goals.
We hope we can soon begin administering the Pennsylvania Farm Bill upon passage by
this legislature.
I would be happy to address any questions you and other members of the committee
might have at this time.
Thank you.
Click Here for a copy of the written testimony. Click Here to watch a video of the House
hearing. Click Here to watch a video of the Senate hearing (when posted).
Related Budget Stories This Week:
House DEP Budget Hearing 2: Only 0.30% Of DEP Final Actions Were Appealed In 2018; 25
Fewer Attorney Positions
Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability Of
DCNR Funding Choices
House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks & Forests
Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
Related Story:
New PA Farm Bill Proposal Includes $6 Million For Farm Conservation Practices, Aims To
Make PA Leading Organic State
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Senate’s Next Job: Consider Confirmation Of DEP, DCNR, Agriculture Secretaries

With budget hearings now out of the


way, one of the Senate’s next tasks is
to consider Gov. Wolf’s nominations
of Patrick McDonnell as DEP
Secretary, Cindy Adams Dunn as
DCNR Secretary and Russell Redding
as Agriculture Secretary.
Gov. Wolf renominated them
to lead their agencies on January 16,
2019.
Although each has served in their cabinet positions in Gov. Wolf ‘s first Administration,
agency Secretaries must go through the nomination and confirmation process in the Senate in his
second term.
Patrick McDonnell
McDonnell has led DEP since he was named Acting Secretary on May 20, 2016, formally
nominated by the Governor on January 3, 2017 and confirmed by the Senate on May 22, 2017.
Prior to his appointment in 2016, McDonnell served as Director of DEP’s Policy Office.
Before returning to DEP’s Policy Office, McDonnell was executive policy manager for
former Commissioner Pamela A. Witmer of the Public Utility Commission, focusing on electric,
natural gas and water issues as well as cybersecurity and the impact of environmental regulation
on energy markets.
McDonnell spent 13 years with DEP in a variety of roles. As deputy secretary for
administration, he managed the budget, human resources, information technology and oversaw
the facilities management functions of the agency. He also previously served as policy director

13
and as an assistant to the special deputy secretary.
McDonnell is the 8th Secretary of DEP.
Cindy Adams Dunn
Dunn had lead DCNR since she was nominated as Acting Secretary in January 2015 and
was later confirmed by the Senate. She returned to the agency where she worked under three
governors in multiple positions over the last two decades.
Since November 2013, Dunn had served as the president and chief executive officer of
PennFuture, a statewide environmental advocacy organization.
Prior to her time at PennFuture, Dunn served as DCNR’s Deputy Secretary of
Conservation and Technical Services from 2007-2013, where she led DCNR's conservation
landscape program and oversaw the community conservation partnerships grant program, which
provides $30-$60 million annually for conservation and recreation throughout the
Commonwealth.
She is the 6th Secretary of DCNR.
Russell Redding
Redding has lead the Department of Agriculture since being named Acting Secretary in
January 2015 and was later confirmed by the Senate.
Redding is the former dean of the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at
Delaware Valley College.
Redding has extensive experience as a public servant, having spent more than 20 years
serving Pennsylvania in Harrisburg and Washington D.C. He worked on Capitol Hill as
Agriculture Policy Advisor to U.S. Senator Harris Wofford and served for 16 years in the
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, serving as secretary from 2009-2011 under Governor
Rendell.
The DEP and DCNR nominations will be considered by the Senate Environmental
Resources and Energy Committee
Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming) serves as Majority Chair of the Senate Environmental
Committee and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3280 or sending email to:
gyaw@pasen.gov. Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7105 or sending email to: yudichak@pasenate.com.
The Agriculture nomination will be considered by the Senate Agriculture and Rural
Affairs Committee.
Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) serves as Majority Chair of the Senate Agriculture
Committee, and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3076 or sending email to:
evogel@pasen.gov. Sen. Judy Schwank (D-Berks) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-8925 or sending email to: SenatorSchwank@pasenate.com.
No committee meetings have yet been scheduled to consider the nominations.
Related Stories:
House DEP Budget Hearing 2: Only 0.30% Of DEP Final Actions Were Appealed In 2018; 25
Fewer Attorney Positions
Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability Of
DCNR Funding Choices
Department Of Agriculture Budget Testimony Highlights Conservation, Organic & Urban
Farming, Invasive Species Issues
House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks & Forests
Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report

14
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Winners Of The Women In Conservation Awards Announced By PennFuture

On March 7, PennFuture announced the


winners of the Celebrating Women In
Conservation Awards who will be
recognized at a special awards dinner in April
25. The winners include--
-- Woman Of Lifetime Achievement In
Conservation: Margaret Brittingham, Ph.D.,
Professor of Wildlife Resources, Extension
Wildlife Specialist, Pennsylvania State
University; and Kelly Gutshall, President of
LandStudies, Inc.
This award celebrates a remarkable woman who has devoted at least 25 years of her life
to protecting and enhancing Central Pennsylvania's natural greatness and for her tireless
dedication to environmental advocacy.
-- Woman Of Environmental Education: Lauren Ferreri, Biologist and Middle Creek
Wildlife Management Area Manager, Game Commission; and Lydia Martin, Director of
Education, Lancaster Conservancy.
This award honors an individual who has dedicated herself to educating her community
about sustainability and environmental policy. She is admired in her Central Pennsylvania
community for her passionate commitment to environmental awareness and to educating
students and the public.
-- Woman Of Environmental Arts: Stacy Levy, Artist, SERE Ltd.
This award honors an individual who has creatively used the arts to bring greater
awareness to, or to actively address, environmental issues. Her work may include, but is not
limited to, visual arts, music, poetry, fiction, theatre, dance, as well as the curation or promotion
of such arts in Pennsylvania.
-- Woman of Environmental Media, Marketing & Communications: Leah Zerbe, Journalist,
Senior Editor at Ancient Nutrition.
This award honors an individual who has established herself as a credible source for
presenting the public with information about climate, water issues, environmental stories, and
conservation-related current events.
-- Woman of the Susquehanna River Watershed: Carol Parenzan, Middle Susquehanna
Riverkeeper.
This award honors an individual who has made a positive impact on water quality in a
Central Pennsylvania watershed. Her water quality work may include, but is not limited to,
wildlife impacts, macroinvertebrates, land protection, stream buffers, bank rehabilitation,
agriculture, water quality studies, and environmental policy.
-- Woman of Renewable Energy and Climate: Susan Stewart, Ph.D, Associate Teaching
Professor Aerospace Engineering, Pennsylvania State University
This award honors an individual who is dedicated to addressing climate impacts or
championing renewable energy efforts. This woman can be active in communities, business,
government, and science fields. With her skills, this woman has blazed a new trail toward a

15
cleaner, more sustainable energy future for Pennsylvania.
The Celebrating Women In Conservation Awards Dinner will be held at the Susquehanna
Club in New Cumberland, Cumberland County from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. Click Here to purchase
tickets or for more information.
NewsClip:
Crable: The Woman Who Made Environmental History By Wading In The Polluted Conestoga
River
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Trunk Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County

On March 4, Department of Environmental Protection assessed a $1.5 million penalty against


Rice Midstream Holdings, LLC for violations that occurred on Rice’s Beta Trunk Pipeline
located in Aleppo and Richhill townships, Greene County.
The violations are for sediment discharges into local waterways, unstable construction,
and the failure to maintain pollution controls.
“Protection of resources like streams and wetlands cannot be the concern of DEP alone.
Environmental protection and compliance must also be an operator’s top priority,” said DEP
Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “DEP will continue to hold operators accountable when they fail
to meet the protective conditions of their permits.”
Rice is required to use erosion and sedimentation control (E&S) best management
practices (BMPs) in its pipeline construction to prevent sediment pollution into waters of the
Commonwealth.
On October 11, 2017, Rice reported—and a same-day DEP inspection confirmed—that
sediment-laden water overtopped numerous E&S BMPs into unnamed tributaries to Mudlick
Fork and Harts Run. E&S BMPs were not properly maintained or not installed at all.
Subsequent inspections revealed similar violations on January 21, 22, and 23, 2018;
February 12 and 15, 2018; and March 6 and 30, 2018.
Rice voluntarily shut down construction of new sections of the pipeline, redirected
resources to the remediation of unstable areas, and resolved the violations as of April 30, 2018.
However, on May 25, 2018, Rice reported three significant slope failures within and
outside the Beta Trunk Pipeline’s permitted limit of earth disturbance. In addition, there were
E&S BMP failures along a different section of the pipeline, and soil was stockpiled in a wetland.
Rice corrected these violations as of July 5, 2018.
The Beta Trunk Pipeline is an approximately 7.5-mile gathering line, within a larger
“Beta System,” that takes natural gas from several well pads to transmission facilities. The line
was permitted by DEP in July 2017, and portions of the line are in service. DEP continues to
inspect the pipeline as it remains under construction.
In December 2018, DEP approved a permit modification to repair the slope failures. As
part of DEP’s review, it required the permittee to submit a geotechnical design report with
detailed plans for each location to repair and install BMPs, avoid future slides, and to address
stability.
This pipeline is now owned by Equitrans Midstream Corp. but the violations began prior
to the acquisition of Rice.
Click Here for a copy of the Consent and Civil Penalty document.

16
NewsClips:
Sisk: DEP Issues $1.5M Fine For Pipeline Construction Site In Greene County
Operator Of Natural Gas Gathering Pipeline Fined In Greene County
Litvak: Greene County Gas Line Garners $1.5 Million Fine
Phillips: Chester County Investigation Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Now Includes Grand Jury
Op-Ed: Pipeline Alert Systems: Energy Obstructionism
FERC Plans Environmental Assessment Of Leidy South, FM100 Pipeline Projects In PA
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider Stripper Well
Impact Fee Decision
Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten, Groups Hold Pipeline Safety Rally March 19 In Harrisburg;
Pipeline Safety Caucus Formed
IFO: Natural Gas Production Increased 14.2% In 2018, Largest Increase Since 2014
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider


Stripper Well Impact Fee Decision

On March 7, the PA Supreme Court issued an order turning down the request of the PA
Independent Oil and Gas Association to reconsider its December 28 decision in favor of the
Public Utility Commission in a case involving the definition of a stripper well for the purposes of
paying the Act 13 unconventional well impact fee.
At stake in this case was about $22.3 million in Act 13 fee revenue, or about 10 percent
of the revenue collected by the PUC.
The Court, however, granted the reconsideration motion of the drilling company
involved-- Snyder Brothers, Inc.-- and remanded that portion of the case to Commonwealth
Court to reconsider issues that specifically apply to that one company, most likely the interest
and penalties imposed by the PUC when the company did not pay its Act 13 fees.
Under Act 13, so-called stripper wells were provided an exemption from the impact fee.
Snyder Brothers, Inc. said a number of their wells were stripper wells and not subject to the fee.
The PA Supreme Court’s decision in December said otherwise.
The dispute was over whether an impact fee would be assessed whenever a vertical well’s
production exceeds an average of 90,000 cubic feet of natural gas per day for even one month of
the year, or whether the well must exceed this production threshold in every month of the year
for the fee to be imposed, as the Snyder Brothers contend.
The PUC consistently held that a well is not a stripper well and is subject to the impact
fee if it exceeds the minimum production levels in one calendar month in a year, but
Commonwealth Court held otherwise saying wells had to pay the impact fee only if a well
exceeds the minimum production levels in every month in a year.
The PA Supreme Court agreed with the PUC’s interpretation.
Click Here for a copy of the Court’s order.
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Overturns Decision Allowing Drillers To Avoid Act 13 Impact Fees
Related Stories This Week:
DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Truck Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County

17
Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten, Groups Hold Pipeline Safety Rally March 19 In Harrisburg;
Pipeline Safety Caucus Formed
IFO: Natural Gas Production Increased 14.2% In 2018, Largest Increase Since 2014
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants
Would Cost Ratepayers $500 Million A Year

Christina Simone, Director Of Policy and External


Affairs at the University Of Pennsylvania Kleinman
Center For Energy Policy updated her estimate of
the cost of a bill to support nuclear power plant
operations in the Commonwealth, putting the cost at
an estimated $500 million a year to ratepayers.
The option she based her estimate on was
creating a new Tier III requirement in the state
Alternative Energy Portfolio Act for nuclear power
and other zero-carbon sources of electric
generation.
The proposal would require electric distribution companies to purchase Tier III credits to
cover 50 percent of the total power sold in their service territory, regardless if sold by the
distribution company’s default supply or by a competitive retail supplier.
Click Here to read Simone’s analysis.
The actual bills creating the nuclear power plant support program are expected to be
introduced shortly.
PPL Utilities has estimated this option for supporting nuclear power plants would cost its
customers $130 million a year.
Electricity costs in Pennsylvania for electric service default customers decreased 15
percent between 1996, when competitive electric generation was started, and 2016.
“Residential customers taking restructured default generation and transmission service
from their local utility have the potential to save over $818 million in 2016, compared to
inflation-adjusted 1996 regulated generation and transmission costs.”
As a point of comparison, when the Public Utility Commission required utilities to pass
along their savings from federal tax laws changes in 2018, PPL returned $72 million to its
customers in a refund. The total refunds to electric utilities were about $277.4 million resulting
in an average distribution rate decrease of 4.74 percent.
(Photo: Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant, Dauphin County.)
NewsClips:
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors

18
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Robert Swift: Three Mile Island Accident - March 28, 1979
WITF: Watch MetEd Press Conference From The Day After The 1979 Three Mile Island
Accident
Activists Challenge License Extension For Peach Bottom Nuke Plant
Op-Ed: Pennsylvania Needs Cap-And-Trade To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Joe Minott
Related Stories:
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 9, 2019]

PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy
Alternatives

On March 7, Andrew Place, a Commissioner on the Public


Utility Commission, circulated a paper address policy
alternatives for Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants.
The paper-- Analysis Of Pennsylvania Nuclear Plants
and Available Policy Alternatives-- represents his view of the
issue and not the Commission's.
“Experts agree that single unit reactors such as TMI
[Three Mile Island] are uneconomic, and industry and plant
specific data validate this conclusion. However, the
conclusions around the economics of Beaver Valley are less
straightforward.
“Some studies indicate that Beaver Valley is economic,
and that the closure of TMI may not necessarily be followed by
additional nuclear power plant closures.
“Nevertheless, through the extent of closures is debated, there is a substantive risk of the
loss of some carbon free generation in Pennsylvania.
“This paper outlines the reasons for the energy transformation in Pennsylvania and offers
market analysis and impacts of potential solutions.”
Some of the conclusions outlined in the report include--

19
-- “Pennsylvania nuclear generation plants provide 39% of PA’s electricity generation. TMI and
Beaver Valley account for 26% of its nuclear generation.
-- “Single-unit reactors, such as TMI, are at an economic disadvantage and will continue to be in
the future.
-- “If TMI were to retire prematurely no new network transmission upgrades would be required.
However, Beaver Valley, should it retire in 2021, will require an acceleration in an estimated
$182 million in incremental transmission investments.
-- “PJM’s recent analysis indicated that even with the announced retirements the PJM system is
reliable today and will remain reliable into the future.
-- “If energy efficiency goals were increased by 1% of statewide usage per year, the lost
emissions reductions for each plant could be replaced in 5 and 11 years, respectively.
-- “At the current annual rate of increase in Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS) Act
Tier I resources, it would take Pennsylvania 12.6 years to replace the lost carbon free electricity
from TMI, and an additional 28.4 years to replace Beaver Valley.”
The paper analyzes 10 policy options--
-- Option 1- No State Intervention: “Absent further cost support for further out-of-market
payments for Beaver Valley, it appears that the loss of zero-emissions generation may be limited
to TMI under this scenario.” “In conclusion, if the policy choice is to prevent backsliding on
carbon emissions this is not a very viable option.”
-- Option 2- Replace Nuclear Retirements With Renewables & Energy Efficiency:
“...Existing Tier 1 (AEPS) resources currently offer a lower cost solution to replacing emissions-
free generation from TMI.” “Energy efficiency also presents a “net benefits” solution to
replacing emissions free generation, but also will take a number of years to replace both nuclear
units.”
-- Option 3a- Expand AEPS Act To Include A Nuclear Generation Tier: If the goal is to
retain all Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, “total market costs would range from $700 million
to over $1.1 billion per year.”
-- Option 3b - New Tier (AEPS) Wherein Other Resources Qualify: The approach would
create a new zero-emissions category “Tier Y” open to all zero-emissions resource and would set
the value of carbon at the market cost of marginal emissions-free resource. “Market prices for
Tier Y resources would be very volatile, as the supply/demand balance could shift substantially
if even one nuclear power plant retires. It could take a number of years for market prices to
stabilize-- absent some type of additional market intervention (i.e. administrative price caps or
Tier Y quantity adjustment.”
-- Option 4- Zero Emission Credit Program: A targeted nuclear support program could be
targeted to those plants that can demonstrate a long-term financial need to compensate the
nuclear unit for its environmental and health benefits. The paper said estimated payments to TMI
under this option would be between $60-$90 million per year.
-- Option 5- Establish a Carbon Market: The paper notes there are no recognition of the cost
of carbon emissions in the PJM markets. Looking at an Illinois Social Cost Of Carbon model
estimated the cost of carbon would be $16.50 per MWh. Also mentioned were the existing
carbon markets like the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.
-- Option 5a- Establish a Carbon Market for Pennsylvania: The paper notes Pennsylvania
could establish its on carbon market like California has done. “Such a market would have most
of the same advantages and disadvantages of RGGI. It would provide more state control of all
design elements of the carbon market.” “Using California’s carbon allowance market price,

20
currently valued at $17.15 per metric ton of CO2. This translates into an electricity market price
of $6.3 to $7.4 per MWh based on the 2017 average generator emissions rate in Pennsylvania
and PJM, respectively.”
-- Option 5b- Link with the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative: “Linking with RGGI would
provide several benefits including providing an additional boost to Pennsylvania’s four dual-unit
nuclear power plants-- likely sufficient enough to keep these units profitable. However, it would
be insufficient to keep TMI from being retired at current carbon market prices.”
-- Option 5c- Establish a PJM-wide Carbon Market: “An extensive state compact that
established a carbon price for all PJM states would provide a more cost-efficient solution to
carbon emissions abatement.” “Such a mechanism could address a meaningful level of
competitive inequities across electricity markets, and commercial and industrial businesses
relative to other options, such as a state-level carbon, price, or RGGI membership.”
-- Option 5d- Participate in a National Carbon Market: “Of course, a national carbon market
would be the most efficient solution for achieving carbon emission goals. It would also resolve
most competitive industry industry inequities, other than imported goods, which would otherwise
need to be addressed by tariffs or similar adjustment mechanisms. However, while most
competitive market inequities are resolved by a national carbon market such legislation is
unlikely to render TMI economic.”
Click Here for a copy of the paper.
NewsClips:
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Robert Swift: Three Mile Island Accident - March 28, 1979
WITF: Watch MetEd Press Conference From The Day After The 1979 Three Mile Island
Accident
Activists Challenge License Extension For Peach Bottom Nuke Plant
Op-Ed: Pennsylvania Needs Cap-And-Trade To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Joe Minott
Related Stories:
Nuclear Energy Caucus Releases Report On The Impact Of Closing Nuclear Power Plants,
Possible Solutions
Cap-And-Trade Climate Petitioners Resubmit Entire Petition To EQB With Updated List Of
Petitioners
State Govt. Already Achieved 40% Renewables Goal; Climate Impact Assessment Report To

21
Focus On Farm, Water Issues
Gov. Wolf Sets Goal Of Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions By 80% By 2050 From 2005
Levels
Related Stories This Week:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To


County Planning Process

On March 8, the PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed


Implementation Plan Steering Committee
adopted a phased approach to implement the
county-level clean water planning process to
develop plans to meet Pennsylvania Bay
pollution reduction goals.
The remainder of the 7 counties in DEP’s
Tier 1 responsible for 50 percent of the state’s
Chesapeake Bay water pollution reduction goal
would start the planning process in July and
complete planning by February.
The planning process for the remaining
36 counties in Tiers 2, 3 and 4 responsible for the
other half of the reductions would start in
October and be due in late 2020.
The Committee also heard presentations from Adams and Franklin counties on the plans
they developed to meet their nutrient pollution reduction targets.
Adams, Franklin, Lancaster and York counties were selected to pilot the county clean
water planning process.
Adams County
Representatives of Adams County gave a presentation on their planning process,
recommendations for program changes and best management practices needed to be put on the
ground to achieve needed reductions.
The County developed a plan that would achieve a reduction of 56 percent of the nitrogen
goal and 99 percent of the phosphorus goal. These handouts describe their plan--
-- Handout A1 – Adams County Narrative (PDF)
-- Handout A2 – Adams County Snapshot (PDF)

22
-- Handout A3– Adams County Programmatic Recommendations Template (PDF)
-- Handout A4 – Adams County Planning and Progress Template (PDF)
-- Handout A5 – Adams County Technical Appendix (PDF)
-- Handout A6 – Adams County Presentation (PDF)
Franklin County
Representatives of Franklin County said the plan they developed would achieve a
reduction of 46 percent of the nitrogen goal and 70 percent of the phosphorus goal. These
handouts describe their plan--
-- Handout F1 – Franklin County Narrative (PDF)
-- Handout F2 – Franklin County Snapshot (PDF)
-- Handout F3 – Franklin County Programmatic Recommendations (PDF)
-- Handout F4 – Franklin County WIP Template (PDF)
-- Handout F5 – Franklin County Template 2 Detailed BMPS (PDF)
The plans presented by Lancaster and York counties at the last meeting were said to
achieve these reductions--
-- Lancaster County: Plan would achieve a reduction of 80 percent of the nitrogen goal and 100
percent of phosphorus goal.
-- York County: Plan would achieve a reduction of 80 percent of the nitrogen goal and 100
percent of phosphorus goal.
Local Area Workgroup
The Local Area Goals Workgroup made recommendations on changing the County
Planning Process. One of the biggest changes recommended is a phased approach to beginning
the local county planning process based on 4 tiers of counties DEP developed earlier. Each tier
is responsible for achieving 25 percent of Pennsylvania’s pollution reduction goals.
The tiers include--
-- Tier 1: Lancaster*, York*
-- Tier 2: Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin*, Lackawanna, Lebanon
-- Tier 3: Adams*, Bedford, Centre, Columbia, Huntingdon, Lycoming, Mifflin,
Northumberland, Perry, Snyder
-- Tier 4: Berks, Blair, Bradford, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Chester, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk,
Fulton, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Luzerne, McKean, Montour, Potter, Schuylkill, Somerset,
Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Wayne, Wyoming.
*Already part of the pilot program.
The proposed schedule for the phased approach would have Tier 2, begin their planning
efforts in July and end in February. Tiers 3 and 4 would begin in October and end in late 2020.
Here are the handouts available from the Local Area Goals Workgroup--
-- Handout LAG1 – Local Area Goals Workgroup Powerpoint presentation (PDF)
-- Handout LAG2 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Recommendations and Planning Templates
(PDF)
-- Handout LAG3 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Planning and Progress Template: Watershed
Wide Approach(PDF)
-- Handout LAG4 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup Planning and Progress Template: Staged
Approach (PDF)
-- Handout LAG5 -- Local Area Goals Workgroup County Planning Process and Community
Clean Water Toolbox Updates and Recommendations (PDF)
-- Handout LAG6 – Revised Pennsylvania's Community Clean Water Planning Guide (PDF)

23
-- Handout LAG7 – Revised Pennsylvania's Community Clean Water Technical Toolbox (PDF)
The next meeting of the Steering Committee is on March 22.
For more information and copies of available handouts, visit the PA Chesapeake Bay
Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee webpage.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County

By: Felicia Dell, Pam Shellenberger, and John Seitz, York County Planning Commission;
Mark Flaharty, York County Conservation District

"We'll only improve our water quality in


York County when we work as a team. Anything
less will short-change future generations of clean
water."

Residents across Pennsylvania’s part of the


Chesapeake Bay watershed—all or part of 43
counties—are working hard to make the streams
and rivers in their counties healthier by reducing
nitrogen and sediment levels.

24
A key component of their effort: Coming together to hammer out a plan called a “WIP3,”
or Phase 3 Watershed Implementation Plan.
In their WIP3 plans, counties identify what pollution-reducing projects are needed for
specific locations.
Projects may be planting trees on streambanks, planting rain gardens in parks, replacing
asphalt with porous material, putting in a wetland, reducing fertilizer use on farms and lawns,
improving manure management on farms, or others.
Then they submit the plan to DEP.
These Pennsylvanians are helping their communities in a big way. They’re also helping
the state meet federal requirements for water quality in the Bay.
We think “planning” is an inadequate word to describe their endeavor, which takes a
combination of teamwork, vision, and passion for community as well as case-making, numbers-
crunching, and logistics-nailing.
So we want to share an inside look at some of the work these awesome Pennsylvanians
are doing in developing their WIP3s, as they strive for healthy local waters and communities.
-- Taking the lead in county WIP3 plan development: York County Planning Commission,
York County Conservation District, and York County Coalition 4 Clean Waters (YCC4CW).
-- Healthier streams and rivers mean: Clean drinking water in the county, recreational
opportunities, the protection of animal and plant life in streams, plus the overall improved quality
of life for people that a healthy environment brings.
-- One thing we're especially proud of: Our teamwork. The county and YCC4CW developed a
Phase 2 WIP in 2013 with strategies and actions to clean up impaired waters, including voluntary
opportunities that anyone could take. This laid the groundwork for our current WIP3 work.
Also, we've pulled together municipalities, farmers, the Watershed Alliance of York,
watershed stewards and associations, sanitary treatment plant operators, the Lower Susquehanna
Riverkeeper, and other partners through the YCC4CW.
Of particular note is the Penn State Extension York County Master Watershed Steward
Program. They've trained 55 county residents to be water stewards in the last three years and will
be helpful in communicating the benefits of the WIP and getting projects implemented.
We'll only improve our water quality in York County when we work as a team. Anything
less will short-change future generations of clean water.
-- Main areas we're focusing our planning on: To reduce stormwater runoff pollution, many
types of actions are needed, such as restoring streams; planting trees; managing fertilizer;
planting cover crops; writing agricultural erosion/sediment control, conservation, and manure
management plans; and providing technical assistance on projects.
We're proposing changes in county and state programs to streamline tracking and
reporting progress, so that the multitude of needed projects can be carried out more efficiently.
-- Our big pluses: Having the YCC4CW on board is a big plus. Also, we have a Regional
Pollutant Reduction Plan that spans 46 municipalities in the county and is managed and funded
through the York County Stormwater Consortium. Having the help of dedicated staff from the
county, conservation district, DEP, and technical support agencies, such as the Susquehanna
River Basin Commission and Penn State Cooperative Extension, is another
-- Our top challenges: How can we educate and engage more residents? How can we enable
changes in programs that we believe are essential to accomplishing the plan? Where to find
landowners to host projects? And, of course, where can we get funding to design and carry out
projects?

25
-- We're thinking outside the box on: We're taking a partnership approach, as opposed to each
municipality going it alone. Similarly, we're bridging sectors: urban stormwater, agriculture,
sanitary treatment plants, etc. We're also promoting creation of a stormwater authority, revisions
to the state municipal stormwater permitting process, enhanced water quality monitoring, and
watershed permits for multiple projects that achieve improved water quality.
-- The key to our success will be: We're working hard with federal, state, and local
governments to try to get our proposed program and policy changes in place. In addition,
success hinges on finding funding, enlisting landowners, and educating and engaging more
residents.
-- How people can help: In many ways! Call your borough, township, or city secretary,
manager, or zoning officer, and let them know they need to be part of the solution.
They need to enforce their stormwater management and land use ordinances, maintain
their infrastructure, regularly clean storm drains, incorporate green infrastructure provisions into
land use ordinances, and educate residents on how to be better stewards.
Volunteer your time to committees, attend meetings, and assist with projects such as
community cleanups or planting buffers.
If you're a farmer, make sure you have required erosion, nutrient, and manure
management plans and are putting them in place.
Consider joining the Penn State Extension York County Master Watershed Steward
Program or other watershed/environmental groups in the county that are doing hands-on projects
to improve stream health.
Take action on your own property. Plant trees and raingardens, reduce or eliminate your
use of lawn fertilizer, pick up pet waste, and wash your car on the lawn instead of your driveway.
These are just a few things you can do at home that will have a real impact in your watershed.
Find our plan here.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
Related Stories This Week:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County

26
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your


Event, Volunteer For A Cleanup

The Great American Cleanup of PA is now officially


underway and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful is
encouraging anyone who is planning a local event, large
or small, to register with the Great American Cleanup of
PA.
“Cleaning up your neighborhood is one of the
best investments you can make. Whether it’s cleaning up
a vacant lot, roadway or common area, planting flowers
or mulching a playground, all neighborhoods can be
improved with a little effort and camaraderie,” said
Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania
Beautiful.
The 15th annual Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Great American Cleanup of PA kicked off
on March 1 and will run through May 31.
The program brings together thousands of Pennsylvania families, friends and
communities who will pick up litter, clean illegal dumpsites, plant flowers or trees, join recycling
efforts and education programs all geared towards the vision of a cleaner and more beautiful
Pennsylvania.
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful partners with PennDOT, the Department of Environmental
Protection and Keep America Beautiful to provide free trash bags, gloves and safety vests to
registered participants, as supplies last.
During Let’s Pick It Up PA – Everyday from April 13th through May 6th, cleanups
registered with the Great American Cleanup of PA are eligible to take their trash to participating
landfills free of charge or for a reduced rate.
“It’s always amazing to see the amount of energy that is created when neighbors join
together to work on a project that benefits the whole community. The improvement is instant and
the volunteers can see immediate results,” said Reiter.
During the 2018 Great American Cleanup 108,638 volunteers were instrumental in
cleaning up over 6.6 million pounds of trash.
To register an event go to gacofpa.org. Questions can be answered by Michelle Dunn,
Great American Cleanup of PA Program Coordinator, at 1-877-772-3673 ext. 113 or send email
to: mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org.
Video Contest
Anyone participating in Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful’s Great American Cleanup of PA

27
can earn cash for their nonprofit or charity of choice by entering the Great American Cleanup of
PA Video Contest.
To participate, send Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful a 60-second video of your Great
American Cleanup of PA event showing how YOU keep Pennsylvania beautiful.
Current 2019 supporters of the Great American Cleanup of PA include: Pennsylvania
Waste Industries Association, Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Food Merchants
Association, Giant, Wawa, Wegmans, Mahantango Enterprises, Inc., Lancaster County Solid
Waste Management Authority and Republic Services.
If you are interested in becoming a supporter of the 2019 Great American Cleanup of PA
contact Shannon Reiter at 724-836-4121 or send email to: sreiter@keeppabeautiful.org.
Volunteers
If you are interesting in volunteering to be part of a cleanup event you, just check out the
schedule of cleanup events already listed in your county by going to the Great American Cleanup
of PA website.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful website. Click Here to become a member. Click Here to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter, Discover them on
Pinterest and visit their YouTube Channel.
Also visit the Illegal Dump Free PA website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s Electronics Waste website.
Sign up now for the 2019 Great American Cleanup of PA and volunteer or set up your
own cleanup and beautification event runs through May 31.
NewsClips:
Great American Cleanup Event Planned In West Leechburg
Allegheny County Launches Adopt-A-Roadway Anti-Litter Program
Keep Plair Beautiful Plans Litter Survey In County
Related Stories:
Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In Illegally
Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To Increase By
20%
DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

Joint Conservation Committee Celebrates 50th Anniversary With Special Report


Reviewing Its History

The Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution


Control and Conservation Committee recently
celebrated its 50th anniversary by putting out a
special report highlighting its history, the issues
it was involved with and accomplishments.
Current Chair Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-

28
Venango) said in the introduction--
“The Committee was established with a unique mission: to monitor abandoned mine
reclamation efforts, to assess water quality projects, and, most importantly, to identify further
practical options for change.
“It has earned a solid reputation for crafting important environmental legislation,
conducting major inquiries into conservation initiatives, and by monitoring key developments
that influence the way environmental policies are determined in the future.
“The value of the Committee’s work lies in its ability to select the environmental issues
of importance, along with those stakeholders having the greatest impact on those issues, and
report its findings in the most objective way possible.
“It is my sincere belief that the work of this Committee has brought genuine benefit to
overseeing the state’s natural resources.
“In countless ways – many of which are described in this report – Pennsylvania has been
well served by having an agency like the Committee serving the General Assembly.
“I hope that you will take the opportunity to read through this retrospective and examine
the events and individuals which have moved the environmental agenda forward during the past
50 years.”
Tony Guerrieri, current Executive Director, also provided some introductory remarks--
“The Committee was established by an act of the legislature and signed into law by
Governor Raymond P. Shafer (1967-1971) in 1968, but its conception was the culmination of
developments reaching back the beginning of the 20th century.
“Its creation was hastened by the existence of rampant and highly visible pollution. The
poster child for the state’s major water quality issues was the legacy of lifeless streams, open pits
and mountains of waste from our coal-mining past – rivers and streams that literally turned
bright orange because of acid mine drainage from a hundred years of unrestrained coal mining in
Pennsylvania.
“In the 1960s there was no U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and no Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Resources (a predecessor of today’s DEP and DCNR).
“But in 1967, Representative Orville E. Snare (R-Huntingdon) introduced legislation that
would establish an independent legislative oversight agency charged with tracking the
performance of water quality projects that were being funded by a $500 million bond approved
by voters in 1967.
“Along with other like-minded legislators, Snare saw his efforts realized when Governor
Shafer signed Act 448 establishing the Committee in order to strengthen legislative oversight of
the programs and activities funded by the conservation bond referendum.
“We were very fortunate to have visionary leaders in the General Assembly during those
years and a governor who chose to address the issues of pollution, water quality and conservation
and who believed that it was time to work together in a bipartisan effort to manage our shared
natural resources.
“The Committee’s reputation for independence, for objective research, and for
constructive criticism has made possible an open flow of communications and increasingly broad
oversight activity – from the highest levels of government and business to local grassroots
environmental efforts.
“As a result, the Committee has witnessed the significant influence that its activities have
had in shaping public policies, government programs, environmental actions, and new
initiatives.”

29
Click Here for a copy of the report. It’s a good way to step through Pennsylvania’s
environmental history over the last 50 years.
For more information, visit the Joint Conservation Committee website, Like them on
Facebook or Follow them on Twitter. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
To learn more about Pennsylvania’s environmental heritage, visit the Pennsylvania
Conservation Heritage website.
(Photo: Just one example of a mine drainage breakout problem faced by Pennsylvanians in the
1960s and today. Click Here for an overview of abandoned mine lands hazards from DEP.)
NewsClip:
Crable: The Woman Who Made Environmental History By Wading In The Polluted Conestoga
River
Related Story:
March Newsletter Now Available From Joint Conservation Committee
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (March 11): House Bill 60 (Cox-R-Berks) to prohibit new employees of the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission from being part of the PA State Employees Retirement
System (sponsor summary); House Bill 374 (Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing the Keystone
Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources (sponsor summary); Senate Bill 9 (Yaw-R-Lycoming) designating the Eastern
Hellbender as the state amphibian and clean water ambassador (sponsor summary). <> Click
Here for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (March 19): Senate Bill 147 (Laughlin-R-Erie) authorizing the Game Commission to
allow Sunday hunting. Click Here for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meetings This Week

House: The Environmental Resources and Energy Committee holds an information meeting
on the PJM Interconnection; the Consumer Affairs Committee holds an information meeting
on PJM Interconnection. <> Click Here for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate: <> Click Here for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

30
Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Repeal Of Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards: House Bill 767 (Ortitay-R-Allegheny)


repeal the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards and restore truly competitive energy markets
(sponsor summary).

House and Senate Co-Sponsorship Memos

House: Click Here for all new co-sponsorship memos

Senate: Click Here for all new co-sponsorship memos

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House
March 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. Click Here to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission

Sen. Scott Martin (R-Lancaster) has been appointed to serve on


Pennsylvania’s delegation to the Chesapeake Bay Commission for the
2019-20 Legislative Session.
The Chesapeake Bay Commission is a tri-state legislative panel
created in 1980 to advise members of Congress and the General

31
Assemblies of Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania on issues concerning the Chesapeake Bay
and its watershed.
“Reducing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay watershed requires a strong partnership
between state, local and federal governments, and I appreciate the chance to play a leading role
in finding new ways to approach this challenge,” Sen. Martin said. “Meeting the federal
government’s pollution reduction mandates is going to be difficult and expensive. We need to
work together to find ways to reduce pollution without asking state taxpayers to commit billions
of new dollars in taxes and spending.”
Sen. Martin noted that protecting water quality locally will help improve downstream
water quality as well.
“Our area has an important role to play in promoting a cleaner and healthier Chesapeake
Bay, and that starts with safeguarding and improving the water quality in Lancaster County
first,” Sen. Martin said. “As a new member of this panel, I will encourage the Committee to
explore mutually beneficial water quality solutions in the years ahead.”
For more information on the Commission, visit the Chesapeake Bay Commission
website.
More information is available on Pennsylvania’s efforts to meet its Chesapeake Bay
water pollution cleanup obligations by visiting DEP’s Chesapeake Bay Watershed Plan webpage.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

32
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March
11 On PJM Interconnection

The House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and the House Consumer Affairs
Committee will hold information meetings on March 11 to hear from the PJM Interconnection,
the multi-state electricity grid operator.
The Environmental Committee will hear from a representative of PJM who will provide
an overview of the organization’s responsibilities in the wholesale energy markets.
The Committee will meet in Room G-50 of the Irvis Building starting at 11:00.
The Consumer Affairs Committee will hear from Stu Bressler, Senior Vice President of
Operations and Markets at PJM, who will provide an overview of the role of PJM in the
interstate energy market.
The Committee will meet in Room 140 of the Main Capitol starting at Noon.
Committee meetings are typically webcast through the House Republican Caucus
website.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the House Environmental
Committee and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: gvitali@pahouse.net.
Rep. Brad Roae (R-Crawford) serves as Majority Chair of the House Consumer Affairs
Committee and can be contacted by calling 717-787-2353 or sending email to:
broae@pahousegop.com. Rep. Robert Matzie (D-Beaver) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-4444 or sending email to: rmatzie@pahouse.net.
NewsClips:
Shale Gas Boom Slows Progress On Renewables In PJM Grid Territory
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Related Stories:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County

33
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To


Zero-Carbon Energy Production In PA

On March 11, Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware), Minority Chair of the


House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, will hold a
briefing on legislative proposals to recognize the contributions nuclear
energy makes to Pennsylvania's zero-carbon energy production.
"Legislation will soon be introduced to provide financial
support for Pennsylvania’s nuclear power plants," said Rep. Vitali.
"The legislative proposal includes updating Pennsylvania’s
Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards (AEPS) Act to recognize
nuclear energy for its contribution to Pennsylvania’s zero-carbon
energy production."
The briefing is intended to help legislators and other
understand this complex issue.
A panel of speakers will provide a variety of perspectives on
this important issue and there will be ample time for questions and discussion.
The panel will include the following presenters:
-- Stu Bresler, Senior Vice President, Operations and Markets, PJM
-- John Hanger, Former PUC Commissioner, Former DEP Secretary
-- Tanya McCloskey, Acting Consumer Advocate
-- John Quigley, Director for the Center for Environment, Energy & Economy, Harrisburg
University, Former DEP/ DCNR Secretary
-- Christina Simeone, Director of Policy and External Affairs, Kleinman Center for Energy and
Policy
-- Mark Szybist, Senior Attorney, Climate and Clean Energy Program, Natural Resources
Defense Council
-- Andrew Williams, Director of Regulatory and Legislative Affairs, U.S. Climate and Energy,
Environmental Defense Fund
The briefing will be held in Room 8E-B of the East Wing Capitol Building from 11:00 to
12:30. The briefing will be carried live by the PA Cable Network.
NewsClips:
Shale Gas Boom Slows Progress On Renewables In PJM Grid Territory
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change

34
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Related Stories:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks &
Forests Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report

The House Tourism and Recreational Development Committee is


scheduled to hold an informational meeting on March 19 to hear a
presentation from the PA Parks and Forests Foundation on their 2018
infrastructure repair needs report.
On January 28, the Parks and Forests Foundation released the
“The Legacy of Pennsylvania Parks and Forests: The Future is in Our
Hands” report documenting the need for hundreds of millions of
dollars in maintenance and replacement work to keep state parks and
forests safe and accessible to the public.
In her House and Senate budget hearings, DCNR Secretary
Cindy Adams Dunn has said there is a $1 billion backlog of
maintenance projects in parks and forests.
The meeting will be held in Room 205 of the Ryan Office
Building starting at 9:00. Committee meetings are typically webcast through the House
Republican Caucus website.
Rep. David Millard (R-Columbia) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by calling 717-783-1102 or send email to: dmillard@pahousegop.com. Rep. Mark
Longietti (D-Mercer) serves as Minority Chair of the Committee and can be contacted by calling
717-772-4035 or send email to: mlongiet@pahouse.net.
NewsClips:
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
Related Stories:
Pennsylvanians Urged To Help Preserve The Legacy Of PA’s State Parks & Forests
Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability Of
DCNR Funding Choices

35
DCNR Touts Restore PA Bond Proposal As The Only Plan That Can Truly Address State’s
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten, Groups Hold Pipeline Safety Rally March 19 In
Harrisburg; Pipeline Safety Caucus Formed

Sen. Andy Dinniman (D-Chester) and Rep.


Danielle Friel Otten (D-Chester), other
lawmakers, community groups, residents, and
families from across Pennsylvania will hold a
Rally for Pipeline Safety and Environmental
Protection on March 19 at 10:00 a.m. in the
Main Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg.
“Mariner East may have brought area
residents together and opened our eyes to the
lack of strong pipeline public safety and
environmental protection regulations in
Pennsylvania, but this is a statewide issue and
one that demands real, immediate and lasting
reform,” said Sen. Dinniman. “Residents are coming to Harrisburg by the busload on March 19
to demand immediate relief and real action from the legislature so that no one in Pennsylvania
will have to have their home and their safety held hostage by a pipeline project again.”
At the rally, residents will lobby for the passage of a package of comprehensive pipeline
safety bills introduced by Sen. Dinniman, Sen. Tom Killion (R-Delaware) and others in the wake
of various environmental violations, public safety concerns, geologic problems, threats to private
property and water rights, and other wide-ranging quality-of-life issues brought on by
Sunoco/ETP’s controversial Mariner East project.
Pipeline Safety Caucus
Sen. Dinniman also will announce the formation of a bipartisan, Senate-House Pipeline
Safety Caucus that he is forming in conjunction with Rep. Friel Otten.
Following the rally, members of the caucus will hold a news conference expressing their
commitment to the passage of pipeline public safety legislation.
“Energy Transfer Partners’ Mariner East project has triggered sinkholes, exploded a
Pennsylvania family’s home, and destroyed personal water sources. We are negligent if we fail
to act,” said Rep. Friel Otten said. “The time has come for public safety, private property rights,
and environmental protection to guide economic development in Pennsylvania. I am grateful for
the support of our colleagues as we take the fight to protect our communities to the next level.”
Sen. Dinniman said the movement he helped launch several years ago has now grown
into a full-fledged, statewide grassroots initiative. With rising support from both parties within
the legislature and that of a number of new representatives, like Rep. Friel Otten, who were
elected on the pipeline issue, he said Pennsylvania is moving closer to legislation that will
provide a regulatory safeguard for our residents.
He pointed to mounting pressure on the Public Utility Commission to take action on
Mariner East, including a number of school districts, municipalities and counties filing as

36
intervenors in a public safety complaint on Mariner East.
And most recently, the Department of Environmental Protection barred all future ETP
pipeline permits, and the governor publicly expressed support for 4 of Sen. Dinniman’s pipeline
safety bills.
“Change can take time. And now is the time,” Sen. Dinniman said. “We’ve worked hard
and we’re gaining the numbers we need to make this happen. However, highly volatile natural
gas liquids continue to flow in our area through a hodge-podge of antiquated pipelines, and
Sunoco still has the power of eminent domain.”
He said that’s why he has introduced legislation calling for a two-year moratorium to
give the legislature time to develop a stronger regulatory process regarding the safety of
pipelines carrying highly volatile liquids, as well as a better approach to the use of corporate
eminent domain by companies like Sunoco/ETP.
Click Here for the full announcement. Click Here to contact Sen. Dinniman. Click Here
to contact Rep. Friel Otten.
NewsClips:
Phillips: Chester County Investigation Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Now Includes Grand Jury
Sisk: DEP Issues $1.5M Fine For Pipeline Construction Site In Greene County
Operator Of Natural Gas Gathering Pipeline Fined In Greene County
Litvak: Greene County Gas Line Garners $1.5 Million Fine
Op-Ed: Pipeline Alert Systems: Energy Obstructionism
FERC Plans Environmental Assessment Of Leidy South, FM100 Pipeline Projects In PA
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider Stripper Well
Impact Fee Decision
DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Truck Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County
IFO: Natural Gas Production Increased 14.2% In 2018, Largest Increase Since 2014
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

March Newsletter Now Available From Joint Conservation Committee

The March newsletter is now available from the Joint


Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and
Conservation Committee featuring articles on--
-- Reading Terminal Farmers Market In Philadelphia
-- The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident To
New Nuclear Technology
-- Wood Waste And Recycling In The U.S.
-- Federal Action Plan To Reduce childhood Lead Exposure
-- Lack Of Crop Diversity Could Lead To Instability
-- EPA Watchdog Questions Safety Of Biosolids Used As
Fertilizer
-- Growing PA’s Agriculture And Food Industry
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Conservation
Committee.
For more information, visit the Joint Conservation Committee website, Like them on

37
Facebook or Follow them on Twitter. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
Related Story:
Joint Conservation Committee Celebrates 50th Anniversary With Special Report Reviewing Its
History
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

News From Around The State

CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA is urging


Pennsylvanians to show their support for restoring
waterways across the state by calling your House
and Senate member and telling them to support
House Bill 374 (Everett-R-Lycoming) and Senate
Bill 108 (Yaw-R-Lycoming) establishing the
Keystone Tree Fund.
Trees filter and absorb polluted runoff, keep
streams cool and clean, provide wildlife habitat, and
stabilize streambanks, among many other benefits.
No other practice does so much for so little.
The bills authorize a voluntary $3 checkoff on drivers and vehicle license applications to
support a new Keystone Tree Fund to provide funding to DCNR’s TreeVitalize Program (40
percent) and for Riparian Forest Buffer Grants (60 percent).
The new Fund is intended to supplement the existing capacity of these programs (sponsor
summary).
House Bill 374 is now on the House Calendar for action. The House returns to voting
session on March 11.
Senate Bill 108 is in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee. The
Senate returns to voting session on March 18.
Click Here to make your voice heard and send a message to your House and Senate
member.
More information on the initiative to plant 10 million trees in Pennsylvania is available at
the Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership webpage.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA webpage. Click Here to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). Click Here to support their work.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay

38
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA Needs 2 Summer Interns For Keystone
10 Million Trees Initiative

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA seeks 2 Keystone 10 Million Trees Restoration [paid]
Interns to be based at its Harrisburg Office. The interns will be coordinating tree plantings,
collecting data from planting sites, restoration research, and literature reviews. Click Here for all
the details. Deadline for applications March 22.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County

39
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County

Penn State Extension will hold a Livestaking For Minor


Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 at the
Southeast Agricultural Research & Extension Center,
1446 Auction Road in Manheim, Lancaster County from
9:00 to 11:30 a.m.
Do you have a small stream on your property
that is slowly (or maybe quickly) getting deeper? Are
you losing property as it caves in or slumps off into the
water during heavy rain events?
In some cases you need a professionally
designed stream restoration plan to fix these issues, but
you may also be able to repair minor stream bank erosion problems at home with a simple and
affordable technique known as livestaking.
At this workshop, Extension educators will teach you about the process of cutting and
planting livestakes, branch segments of trees and shrubs that are planted during their winter
dormancy.
Educators will spend about 30 minutes discussing how the process works and then the
remainder of the time we will spend practicing the techniques directly in a stream at the
workshop site.
You will gain the skills you need to repeat this experience at your stream while also
helping to repair a stream in need.
Click Here to register or for more information.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County

40
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs

Sign up now with the Western PA Conservancy


to help plant trees along streets and trails and in
parks and restoration areas throughout Western
Pennsylvania or to become a Community
Garden Steward.
Tree Plantings
Every spring and fall, WPC needs help
from volunteers to plant hundreds of trees around the region. When you plant trees, you are
helping create a green and healthy region. You’ll also learn about different types of native trees
and tree care.
Click Here to learn more and to sign up.
Garden Stewards
Have you ever seen a WPC garden and wondered how it stays looking colorful, strong
and healthy? A loyal crew of volunteers known as Garden Stewards cares for the Conservancy’s
many gardens. After spring planting, Garden Stewards help water, weed and clean up the areas.
Stewards work from spring to fall.
Click Here to learn more and to sign up (scroll down).
The Western PA Conservancy has other ways you can volunteer to make the environment
better. Click Here to find out about more opportunities.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events at the Western
PA Conservancy website. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy, Like
them on Facebook, Follow them on Twitter, join them on Instagram, visit the Conservancy’s
YouTube Channel or add them to your network on Linkedin. Click Here to support their work.
NewsClips:
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?

41
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Schneck: Family Taps Their Maple Trees To Make Syrup In Dauphin County
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard
Ross Twp Commissioners Eye Ways To Protect Trees, Environment
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County

The Conodoguinet Creek


Watershed Association updated its
members this week on upcoming
volunteer events, including an
April 27 riparian buffer tree
planting and the 2019 schedule of
creek cleanups in Cumberland
County.
Tree Planting - April 27
In celebration of Earth Day and Arbor Day, CCWA and East Pennsboro Townships, are

42
teaming up with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA’s Keystone 10 Million Tree Partnership,
and local volunteers to enhance the riparian buffer along the Conodoguinet Creek.
All volunteers to bring their own hand tools and shovels. Sunscreen is suggested.
Children must be accompanied by adults.
Volunteers should meet at the East Pennsboro Township's Ridley Park, 1625 Matthew
Drive, Camp Hill starting at 9:00 a.m. RSVP to volunteer by sending email to:
ccwadocs@gmail.com.
Tree Wrapping - April 16-18
The annual Ironstone Ridge Nature Center Tree Wrapping will be held April 16-18. Help
wrap 7,000 trees starting each day 9:00 a.m. to Noon. Trees and growing instructions are given
to local school students in Cumberland County. Location Shillelagh Farm, 6623 Carlisle Pike,
Mechanicsburg (Across from DaVinci Restaurant).
Creek Cleanups
Save these dates for creek cleanups: May 18, June 15, July 20, August 17 and September
21. PA Cleanways and Keep PA Beautiful provided a $500 grant to purchase a new boat and
supplies for 2019.
2018 Creek Cleanups Recap
The Association had a very rainy year so June and July were only the 2 months we could
safely conduct our Creek Clean-Ups. It was a beautiful June day for the first in East Pennsboro
Township.
17 eager volunteers, including 2 awesome youth, walked the 0.9 miles on a wide stretch
from Acri Meadow Park to Brentwater Rd. We worked together to take about 700 pounds of
trash out of the creek, along with 7 tires and a big steel I-beam. Even with waders on, some of
the volunteers got wetter than others, but all had a great time!
The July Creek Clean Up went well and the rain held off just a light shower in time for
Hampden Twp, to pick up the trash. 33 Volunteers, ages from about 10 years walked for about 1
mile and picked up 920 pounds. Some interesting finds of a terracotta pipe, lawn chair, an alum
downspout.
Thank you to East Pennsboro and Hampden Township Maintenance staff.
Click Here for more details from the Association.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Association website or like them on Facebook.
NewsClips:
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Schneck: Family Taps Their Maple Trees To Make Syrup In Dauphin County
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard

43
Ross Twp Commissioners Eye Ways To Protect Trees, Environment
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Related Stories:
Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your Event,
Volunteer For A Cleanup
Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In Illegally
Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To Increase By
20%
DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other


Underserved Farmers April 9 In Berks County

The Capital Resource Conservation and Development


Area Council and the Natural Resource Conservation
Service-PA are hosting a Farming & Conservation
Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other
Underserved Farmers Workshop on April 9 in Berks
County.
Farmers are invited to come and start a fresh
growing season with new tools, ideas, and support
from your production and conservation team.
Learn about opportunities for farmers from
farmers, financial assistance programs, grants, land
access, and that your voice matters.
Meet your partners in production and conservation that are willing to give you a hand.
The Workshop will be held at the Pine Forge Academy, 361 Pine Forge Road in Pine
Forge, Berks County from 9:00 a.m.to 3:00 p.m.
All farmers are welcome to attend, and registration is just $10 and includes lunch. If cost
is a barrier to your participation, contact Abigail at 570-415-6463 or send email to:
abigail.appleman@usda.gov for scholarship options. Seating is limited.
Click Here to register or for more information.
For more information on educational, technical and financial assistance programs for
farmers, visit the Capital Resource Conservation and Development Area Council and the Natural
Resource Conservation Service-PA websites.
NewsClips:
Clearfield Conservation District Offers Manure Plan Writing Workshops March 16, April 13
Meyer: Hemp Looks Like A Bright Spot For PA Farming Advocates
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission

44
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake
Workshops

To help residents keep local lakes and ponds clean,


Pike County Conservation District is hosting a free
three-part workshop series titled “How your
Backyard Activities Affect your Lake.”
The first workshop in the series is “Ways to
Help Your Lake Stay Healthy,” is scheduled for
March 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., at the
Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern
Road in Milford. Complimentary coffee and donuts
will be provided, and the event will include a
raffle.
The free workshop will begin with an
interactive activity, led by Watershed Specialist Rachel Posavetz, to illustrate how our individual
actions contribute to the quality of our local waterways. Senior Resource Conservationist Ellen
Enslin will then discuss the Conservation District’s services, which help to protect water quality.
Jeanne Calabrese and David Altemier of Conashaugh Lakes Community Association will
also present some of the successful water quality practices implemented in their community.
Remaining workshops in the “How your Backyard Activities Affect your Lake” series
include “Homeowner Tips to Protect Clean Water” on June 20; and “Properly Maintaining Your
On-Lot Septic System” on September 19.
All workshops will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Dingman Township Fire
Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road in Milford.
Visit the Events webpage at the Pike County Conservation District website to register.
Reservations for “Ways to Help Your Lake Stay Healthy” are requested by March 25. For more
information, please contact kgromalski@pikepa.org or 570-226-8220.
For more information on programs, initiatives, technical and financial assistance, visit the
Pike County Conservation District website.
(Photo: Pike County Conservation District Watershed Specialist Rachel Posavetz, left, and
Senior Resource Conservationist Ellen Enslin will lead the free “Ways to Help Your Lake Stay

45
Healthy” workshop.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Southwest PA Water Resource Center Hosts Workshops On Grant Writing, Stormwater


Pollution Control Implementation, Reporting

The Southwestern PA Commission's Water Resource


Center is hosting 2 workshops on grant writing in March
and 2 workshops on Stormwater Pollution Control
Measures Implementation and Reporting in May.
The grant writing workshops will be held from
9:00 a.m. to Noon--
-- March 13: Allegheny Twp. Community Building,
Leechburg, Armstrong County. Click Here to register.
-- March 14: Cranberry Twp. Municipal Center,
Cranberry Township, Butler County. Click Here to
register.
The stormwater workshops will be held from 9:00 a.m. to Noon--
-- May 7: Moon Twp. Municipal Building, Moon Township, Allegheny County. Click Here to
register.
-- May 8: Peters Twp. Municipal Building, McMurray, Washington County. Click Here to
register.
For more information on these and other educational opportunities, visit the Southwestern
PA Commission's Water Resource Center website.
NewsClips:
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter

46
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
New Plan For Turnpike Stormwater Runoff Will Better Protect Valley Forge Historical Park
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
Greencastle Council Works Toward Stormwater Fee
Related Stories:
March 12 Penn State Water Insights Seminar Highlights Green Infrastructure To Reduce
Stormwater Pollution
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

March 12 Penn State Water Insights Seminar Highlights Green Infrastructure To Reduce
Stormwater Pollution

The Penn State Environment and Natural Resources Institute will


host a Water Insights Seminar on March 12 on Implementation
and Function of Green Infrastructure: Insight From The Site To
The City.
Dr. Lauren McPhillips, Assistant Professor of Civil and
Environmental Engineering and Agricultural & Biological
Engineering, will discuss work in upstate New York at the site
level investigating function of different stormwater management
strategies including detention basins and roadside ditches.
More specifically, how design elements like hydrologic
regime and soil media composition can impact nutrient cycling
and water quality benefits.
Moving up in scale, she will describe efforts to understand
implementation of stormwater management strategies over time and in space across several U.S.
cities.
She will also cover some initial efforts related to planning for and monitoring of
stormwater management strategies locally here in Pennsylvania.
Dr. McPhillips presented at a Water Insights Seminar last November on the topic of
Resilient Management of Stormwater in Urban Landscapes.
The Seminar will held from Noon to 1:00 in Room 312 of the Ag and Bio Engineering
Building on Penn State’s main campus in State College and is available online via Zoom.
For more information on past Seminars, visit the Water Insights Seminars webpage.
NewsClips:
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
New Plan For Turnpike Stormwater Runoff Will Better Protect Valley Forge Historical Park
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
Greencastle Council Works Toward Stormwater Fee
Related Story:
Southwest PA Water Resource Center Hosts Workshops On Grant Writing, Stormwater
Pollution Control Implementation, Reporting

47
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film

On March 5, Pennsylvania American Water announced an


exclusive partnership with the soon-to-be-released iMax film,
“Expedition Chesapeake, A Journey of Discovery.”
The film, hosted by biologist, wildlife conservationist
and TV personality Jeff Corwin, takes its audience on an epic
journey into the region’s vast and diverse watershed,
exploring the connections between the millions of people,
plants and animals that call it home.
The goal of “Expedition Chesapeake” is to create
awareness of the threats facing watersheds and estuaries
around the globe and to educate audiences about the roles they
can play to protect and preserve vital water resources.
According to Pennsylvania American Water president,
Jeffrey McIntyre, this partnership fits perfectly with
Pennsylvania American Water’s commitment to being a leader
in environmental sustainability by leading and encouraging the protection of our environment
and the sources of our drinking water.
“We are deeply protective about keeping our watersheds healthy and clean because
millions of people depend on us every day for safe, clean drinking water and sanitation,”
McIntyre said. “Clean water is at the very core of who we are and what we do, and we see this
film as a powerful educational tool for the next generation of environmental stewards.
“The health of our rivers and streams influences how Pennsylvania American Water
treats water to meet safe drinking water standards for our customers,” McIntyre continued.
“When our sources of drinking water have low concentrations of contaminants, we use less
chemicals, energy and equipment in our treatment process, which means less cost for our
customers and a healthier community overall.”
The film premieres March 20 at Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts in Harrisburg,
Pa.
As part of this partnership, Pennsylvania American Water customers can see “Expedition
Chesapeake” at Whitaker Center at a discounted rate.
From March 21 through the remainder of 2019, customers can show a copy of their
Pennsylvania American Water bill (print or mobile) at the Whitaker Center box office and
receive $2 off all documentaries and second run films for up to four admissions.
“All of us who worked on the production of this immersive film appreciate that
Pennsylvania American Water has joined with us to build awareness of the need for informed
water resource management,” said Dr. Michael Hanes, president of Whitaker Center
Productions. “Our film focuses on the captivating Chesapeake Bay and its 64,000 square mile
watershed as a case study of the need to protect and preserve watersheds and estuaries across the
country and around the world.”
In addition to this new partnership, Pennsylvania American Water demonstrates its
commitment to environmental sustainability across the Commonwealth through environmental
and educational initiatives related to water.

48
The company helps with local watershed clean-up efforts and offers educational
programs focused on protecting sources of drinking water.
Its annual Environmental Grant Program offers funding for innovative, community-based
environmental projects that improve, restore or protect watersheds, surface water and
groundwater supplies in local communities.
Also, Pennsylvania American Water’s industry-leading source water protection program
incorporates risk assessment, source water monitoring and community outreach in a continuous
effort to understand and address risks to drinking water supplies.
“Expedition Chesapeake’s” producer, Whitaker Center Productions, worked with
experienced educators to help develop instructional materials to provide classroom-tested
innovative learning experiences for children of all ages and their families in conjunction with this
film.
These resources can be found at the Expedition Chesapeake website.
For more information, visit the Pennsylvania American Water website.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA American Water Now Accepting Entries In Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
Stream Of Learning College Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted By PA American
Water
Applications Now Being Accepted For PA American Water Environmental Grant Program
Related Stories This Week:
Showing Added: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker
Center For Science & The Arts In Harrisburg
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops

49
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Showing Added: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker
Center For Science & The Arts In Harrisburg

On March 20 the Expedition Chesapeake iMax film will


premiere at the Whitaker Center For Science & The Arts in
Harrisburg. The original 5:30 show was sold out, so an 8:00
p.m. show has been added.
This is the first giant screen film to feature the
Chesapeake Bay and its 64,000 square mile watershed.
Biologist and wildlife conservationist Jeff Corwin takes
us on a journey from the headwaters of the Susquehanna River
in New York through the rugged Allegheny Mountains, and
down to the sandy shores of uninhabited islands at the southern
end of the Chesapeake Bay.
Along the way we meet dedicated scientists who have
devoted their careers to studying, nurturing and sustaining
beloved animal species in the region.
The survival and resilience of iconic and intriguing animal species, including river otters,
blue crab, osprey and hellbenders, illustrate the important role that each of us plays in the
reclamation, conservation and future health of watersheds and estuaries wherever we live.
This is Whitaker Center Production's first world premiere event and the first public
screening of the film. To remember this special occasion, each child and adult in attendance will
receive a film poster suitable for framing.
Click Here for tickets or more information. The film will be playing at the Whitaker
Center from March 21 to 29.
For more information on the film, visit the Expedition Chesapeake website. Click Here
to explore the education modules for teachers that accompany the film.
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund

50
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation 2019 Save The


Bay Photo Contest will be accepting entries from
March 11 to April 5.
Open to both amateur and professional
photographers, CBF's annual Photo Contest
highlights the beauty and character of the
Chesapeake Bay and its watershed rivers and
streams through the eyes of those who enjoy
them.
CBF is seeking photographs that illustrate
the positive aspects of the Bay and the rivers and streams throughout the its watershed.
Images depicting people, wildlife, recreation, and farms within the watershed will all be
considered, however all photos must include water from the Chesapeake Bay or a river, stream,
creek, or other body of water inside the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
Winners will receive awards for: First Prize: $500; Second Prize: $250; Third Prize:
$150; and Viewers' Choice: $100.
In addition, the first-prize photograph will appear in CBF's 2020 calendar. And that's not
all: All winners will also receive a one-year membership to CBF and will have their photos
displayed on CBF's website, in a CBF e-newsletter, and in CBF's Save the Bay magazine.
Click Here to enter or for more information.
[Note: Pennsylvania hasn’t had a winner in the top 4 in the last 3 years and we make up
most of the watershed! We can do better!]
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA webpage. Click Here to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). Click Here to support their work.
(Photo: Kayaking Past The Capitol by Tara Leo Auchey, 5th Place.)
NewsClips:
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap

51
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach To
County Planning Process
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree Fund
Bills
Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10 Million
Trees Initiative
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved
Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake Workshops
PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29

The Schuylkill Action Network and the Partnership


for the Delaware Estuary are now accepting entries
for the Schuylkill Student Street Art Contest through
March 29. (Extension Notice)
Any students in grades 6-12 who attends
public, private, or homeschool within Berks, Chester,
Montgomery, or Schuylkill Counties are invited to
enter the contest.
There will be a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winner
for each of the four counties: Berks, Chester,
Montgomery and Schuylkill County--
-- 1st Place Winners: Artwork transformed into street
art and a $100 gift card
-- 2nd Place Winners: $75 gift card
-- 3rd Place Winners: $50 gift card
Click Here for all the details and to look at past winners. Questions should be directed to
Virginia Vassalotti, SAN Coordinator, by calling 302-655-4990, ext. 121 or by sending email to:

52
vvassalotti@DelawareEstuary.org.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Schuylkill Action Network website. Click Here to sign up for regular updates. Like them on
Facebook. Follow them on Twitter. Click Here to support their work.
For more information on the programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Partnership for the Delaware Estuary. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the
Partnership, Like the Partnership on Facebook, Follow them on Twitter, Join them on Instagram
or Subscribe to their YouTube Channel. Click Here to support the Partnership’s work.
(Photo: 2018 1st place - Berks County - Abigail M. Ryan, 6th grade Conrad Weiser Middle
School.)
NewsClips:
Schuylkill River Trail Mural Meeting March 20 In Pottstown
Delaware RiverKeeper March 8 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Stories:
DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest Begins
March 20
EPA Exhibit At 2019 Philadelphia Flower Show Highlights Ecological Power Of Flowers Now
Through March 10
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest
Begins March 20

On March 5, the Delaware River Basin Commission


announced that Bridget Davis’ photograph, titled Polar
Vortex Beauty, was chosen as the winner of the
Commission’s Winter 2018-2019 Photo Contest. Forty
photographs were submitted by 14 individuals for the
contest.
“I always have my camera with me and enjoy
photographing the amazing wildlife and beautiful
scenery of this area along the West Branch Delaware
River,” said Bridget Davis of Deposit, N.Y. “The
recent polar vortex made for some fantastic photographs; I felt sorry for the geese, but they
didn’t appear to mind the cold.”
For this season’s contest, DRBC invited Carl LaVO, author, journalist, and former Bucks
County Courier Times Editor, to join our internal judging team as a guest judge.
“Bridget’s photo has great composition and balance, as well as a haunting quality,” said
LaVO. “I love the wintery landscape encrusted in ice and an impenetrable mist; it's also great to
showcase the far upper reaches of the river basin.”
The photo will also be published in the Commission’s 2019 annual report, and the winner
will receive a certificate of recognition.
Staff Photo Contest
In addition to holding the public seasonal photo contests, DRBC also holds an internal
contest for staff. The judging team chose Water Resource Scientist Evan Kwityn’s photo Frozen
Stemware on the Flat Brook as the winner.

53
“Talk about being at the right place at the right time with camera in hand,” said LaVO.
“Evan caught a unique ice drip from a branch, seemingly stemware hung to dry over the stream;
eye catching perfection.”
The Commission thanks everyone who submitted photos this season. The contest’s
purpose is to highlight amateur and professional photography representing the beauty, diversity,
function, and significance of the water resources of the Delaware River Basin, a 13,539-square
mile watershed.
Spring Photo Contest
The Spring Photo Contest will begin on March 20 and has a deadline of May 15. Click
Here for complete contest details, including instructions on how to submit photographs.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Delaware
River Basin Commission website. Click Here to sign up for regulator updates. Follow DRBC
on Twitter. Visit them on YouTube.
(Photo: Winner of the staff photo contest - Water Resource Scientist Evan Kwityn’s photo Frozen
Stemware.)
NewsClips:
Schuylkill River Trail Mural Meeting March 20 In Pottstown
Delaware RiverKeeper March 8 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Stories:
Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March 29
EPA Exhibit At 2019 Philadelphia Flower Show Highlights Ecological Power Of Flowers Now
Through March 10
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

EPA Exhibit At 2019 Philadelphia Flower Show Highlights Ecological Power Of Flowers
Now Through March 10

This year’s Philadelphia Flower Show, which


runs through March 10, showcases the Power of
Flowers, and the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency’s exhibit “E=mc2: Eco-Power” hits the
mark.
The exhibit shows how elements of a
formal garden such as using native plants and
on-site water management techniques can help
power an ecosystem while enhancing the
landscape.
“There is an intrinsic connection
between diverse flora and fauna and healthy
ecosystems,” said EPA Regional Administrator
Cosmo Servidio. “Through our exhibit, EPA is demonstrating that in addition to instilling
beauty, gardens can promote clean and healthy water by incorporating sustainable landscaping
practices.”
EPA’s exhibit begins with a formal garden adorned with beautiful native trees and shrubs
such as flowering dogwood and sweetly fragrant azaleas.
The exhibit also includes a water garden teeming with wild and unique botanical beauties

54
such as the carnivorous pitcher plant and exquisite swamp pinks, all receiving water from a
gutter system and rain barrel.
The exhibit shows how native plants grow in a formal setting and demonstrates how to
incorporate them in home landscapes.
The environmental benefits of these native plants include providing buffers for aquatic
resources that help to naturally manage stormwater, which can improve water quality.
EPA’s volunteers will engage with visitors on the connection between healthy aquatic
resources and drinking water, as well as provide visitors with information on the benefits of
using native plants, sustainable landscaping, and stormwater management practices for
protecting our water.
EPA websites provide additional information on promoting healthy water through
sustainable landscaping, and how to get started. Photographs of sustainable landscaping practices
used in residential settings are featured at EPA’s Green Infrastructure and Soak Up The Rain
webpages.
The Philadelphia Flower Show runs through March 10.
(Photo: Planted rain garden and rain barrel.)
NewsClips:
Schuylkill River Trail Mural Meeting March 20 In Pottstown
Delaware RiverKeeper March 8 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Stories:
Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March 29
DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest Begins
March 20
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition Meeting March 12

The West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration


Coalition will hold its next meeting on March 12 at the
Clinton County Conservation District Environmental
Learning Center, 45 Cooperation Lane in Mill Hall
starting at 6:30.
The meeting agenda includes updates on grant
opportunities, acid mine drainage policy and legislative
happenings, and an opportunity to plan the tour the brand
new Cresson AMD Treatment Facility in June.

For more information on programs, initiatives


and other upcoming events, visit the West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition
website.
NewsClips:
Luzerne Artist Wins National Award For Mining Artwork
EPCAMR: Profile Of Nescopeck Creek Watershed Mine Drainage Problems In Luzerne County
Related Stories:
March Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29

55
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

March Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

The March issue of The Catalyst newsletter is now


available from the Butler County-based Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition featuring articles on--
-- History Comes Alive At Annual Cherry Pie Hike
(photo)
-- Slippery Rock Creek Watershed Received $1
Million In Growing Greener Funding
-- The KIDS Catalyst - Animal Groups Word
Unscramble
-- March 6 Butler Outdoor Club - SRWC’s Shaun
Busler To Present On Jennings’ Prairie
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy.
The Catalyst newsletter is distributed to over 1,200 individuals in over a dozen countries
including: Brazil, Peru, South Korea, Mexico, England, Wales, Venezuela, South Africa, New
Zealand, Australia and Germany.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition website.
NewsClips:
Luzerne Artist Wins National Award For Mining Artwork
EPCAMR: Profile Of Nescopeck Creek Watershed Mine Drainage Problems In Luzerne County
Related Stories:
West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition Meeting March 12
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment - Lake Erie Water Diversions

The latest issue of Connect With Your


Environment in the Erie Times-News is now
available. This edition focuses on Great Lakes
water diversions and how they are evaluated by
the Great Lakes Compact.
A related teacher’s lesson plan is also
available.
Click Here for dozens of past issues and
their related curriculum guides.
Connection With Your Environment is supported
by the Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program and
DEP’s Coastal Resources Management Program.
For more information on programs,
initiatives and other educational opportunities,
visit the Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program website.

56
Related Story:
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29

The Keystone Elk Country Alliance will host


an Environmental Career Day & Job Fair on
March 29 at the Elk Country Visitor Center,
134 Homestead Drive in Benezette from 10:00
a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
This career day and job fair is intended
for high school and college students interested
in pursuing a career in an environmental field.
Conservation agencies and businesses
will be available to ask about jobs and
internships.
Among the groups scheduled to be a this special event is the Elk County Conservation
District, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Game Commission, U.S. Forest
Service, Penn State Extension, Penn State University, Cessna’s Taxidermy, Shadow Calls,
Keystone Elk Country Alliance and Shadow Calls.
To RSVP or more information, contact Ben Porkolab or Victoria Challingsworth,
Conservation Education Department, Keystone Elk Country Alliance call 814-787-5173 or send
email to: KECAConEd@windstream.net.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming visitor and other
events, visit the Keystone Elk Country Alliance website.
NewsClips:
Burgettstown Students Get Hands-On Look At Natural Gas Industry
AP-Scolforo: Dinosaur Tracks Make Fresh Impression At Valley Forge National Park
Related Stories:
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10
Million Trees Initiative
PaEN: Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment - Lake Erie Water Diversions
PaEN: Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In
Illegally Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23

The Jacobs Creek Watershed Association’s


Tired Of Tires campaign is now underway
to pay a reward for collecting illegally
dumped tires in Westmoreland County and
dropping them at a special collection event
on March 23.

57
Are you tired of looking at Illegal Tire Dump Sites in our region? Want to earn a few
extra dollars for yourself, your club, or organization?
Collect tires from an illegal dump site (with selfie-proof). Bring those tires that have been
sitting in your garage for months. We will cover the cost of disposal and reward your effort.
The Association will pay 50 cents for every tire brought to a special collection event on
March 23 at Scottdale Borough, 10 Mount Pleasant Road in Scottdale from 9:00 a.m. to Noon.
The top tire collecting organization will win the brand new Golden Rim Trophy and $100
in cash. A total of $1,000 will be given out at this first come, first served event.
Click Here for all the rules and more information (Facebook).
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Jacobs Creek Watershed Association website or like them on Facebook.
NewsClip:
Tired Of Tires? Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Will Pay For Them In Westmoreland
Related Stories:
Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your Event,
Volunteer For A Cleanup
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To Increase By
20%
DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To Increase
By 20%

The Department of Environmental Protection is


now accepting applications for the calendar year
2018 Recycling Performance Grants. The
deadline for applications is September 30. (formal
notice)
Due to funding available for the Recycling
Performance Grant program for calendar year
2018, the funding formula has been amended from
previous years which will increase individual
grants by an extra 20 percent.
Funds will be awarded to municipalities
based upon the weight of source-separated recyclable materials
For residential tonnage, municipalities that market some or all of their own material are
not subject to the 20 percent residue deduction for those materials. Marketed means that the
materials were sold to a manufacturer for the purposes of converting the recyclables into new
product. Compensation/rebates from a collector or processor do not count as the marketing of
materials.
Materials that go to a second-hand processor are subject to the 20 percent residue

58
deduction—weight receipts from that entity cannot be considered as market receipts for the
municipality (the processor cannot prorate marketed materials to one or more municipalities).
For commercial tonnage, materials that go directly from the generator to a market can be
exempt from the 20 percent rate. Documentation must include a statement from the commercial
entity or home office of the commercial entity that the materials are directly marketed without
further processing. Any commercial materials that are sorted/processed after leaving the
generator are subject to the 20 percent residue rate.
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for additional details.
For more information, visit DEP’s Recycling Performance Grants webpage. Questions
should be directed to Mark Vottero by sending email to: mvottero@pa.gov.
NewsClips:
Recycle Your Electronics Saturday In Erie County
China Cutback On Taking Recyclables Means More To Burn In Chester City
Campaign Encourages Lancaster County To Pass On Plastic
DEP Says Benefits Of Chrin Landfill Expansion Outweigh Possible Harms
Residents Sue Grand Central Landfill Citing Excessive Odors
Friends Of Lackawanna Online Petition Opposing Landfill Expansion Approaches Goal
Allentown Company Uses Old Mack Plant To Divert Construction Debris From Landfills
Neighbors Urge DEP To Deny Permits For Bucks County Hazardous Waste Facility
Bagenstose: Crowd Speaks Out Against Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Proposal
Coal Waste At Power Plants Linked To Groundwater Pollution; Montour Plant Included
Report: Little Blue Run Scrubber Waste Impoundment Still Contaminating Local Groundwater
Related Stories:
Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your Event,
Volunteer For A Cleanup
Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In Illegally
Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted

On March 5, the Department of Environmental Protection issued its environmental assessment


review letter to Chrin Landfill regarding the facility’s permit application for expansion in
Williams Township, Northampton County.
DEP has determined that Chrin has shown that the identified benefits of the project
clearly outweigh the remaining known and potential harms of the project.
DEP issued the review as part of Chrin’s July 2015 application to expand its existing
landfill by approximately 32 acres.
Some of the benefits to the local community recognized by DEP are in the form of host
fees to the township, which could cover roadway maintenance, with additional benefits arising
from local employment and free waste and recycling services.

59
The review also noted mitigation the landfill has proposed to limit some potential harms
associated with traffic, air quality, water quality, and litter. Capping and landscaping plans will
mitigate the known visual impacts of the project.
“DEP diligently reviewed the application to make sure the benefits to the community
regarding this expansion are evident and carried out,” said DEP Northeast Regional Office
Director Mike Bedrin. “A project of this size has to show that resident will see minimal
impacts.”
The proposed expansion area would be located within the current landfill permit
boundary and consists of an overlay on the existing disposal area and a new disposal area to the
east of the existing landfill. The total height would increase between 30 and 40 feet.
The project does not propose to increase the daily maximum and quarterly average waste
acceptance rates for the landfill. Chrin has indicated that the expanded landfill will allow the
landfill to continue operating for approximately eight (8) additional years.
A public meeting was held on March 21, 2016, to discuss the project and a public hearing
on the permit application was held on January 20, 2017, at the Wilson Area High School to take
testimony from residents. A 30-day comment period followed where DEP accepted written
comments.
The review of the permit application now moves on to the technical review phase.
Technical Review Comments
Those wishing to comment on the technical review can do so by mailing written
comments to Roger Bellas, Waste Management Program Manager, DEP Northeast Regional
Office, 2 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, 18701 or by emailing him at rbellas@pa.gov. Public
comments will be accepted until April 29, 2019.
A copy of the environmental assessment letter is available for review at DEP’s Northeast
Regional Office between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. or the Bethlehem District Office at 4530
Bath Pike, 18017. Appointments for reviewing the application materials may be made by calling
(570) 826-2511.
Additional copies of the letter are also available for review at the Easton Public Library,
515 Church Street and the Easton Area Neighborhood Center, 902 Philadelphia Road. The
public does not need an appointment to view documents at either location.
Click Here for a copy of DEP’s review letter. Click Here to visit DEP’s Chrin Landfill
webpage.
Questions should be directed to Colleen Connolly, DEP Northeast Regional Office, 570-
826-2035 or send email to: coconnolly@pa.gov.
NewsClips:
DEP Says Benefits Of Chrin Landfill Expansion Outweigh Possible Harms
Residents Sue Grand Central Landfill Citing Excessive Odors
Friends Of Lackawanna Online Petition Opposing Landfill Expansion Approaches Goal
Allentown Company Uses Old Mack Plant To Divert Construction Debris From Landfills
Neighbors Urge DEP To Deny Permits For Bucks County Hazardous Waste Facility
Bagenstose: Crowd Speaks Out Against Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Proposal
Recycle Your Electronics Saturday In Erie County
China Cutback On Taking Recyclables Means More To Burn In Chester City
Campaign Encourages Lancaster County To Pass On Plastic
Coal Waste At Power Plants Linked To Groundwater Pollution; Montour Plant Included
Report: Little Blue Run Scrubber Waste Impoundment Still Contaminating Local Groundwater

60
Related Stories:
Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your Event,
Volunteer For A Cleanup
Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In Illegally
Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To Increase By
20%
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

IFO: Natural Gas Production Increased 14.2% In 2018, Largest Increase Since 2014

On March 5, the Independent Fiscal Office released its latest update on natural gas production in
Pennsylvania reporting a 14.2 percent increase in 2018 over 2017, the largest year-over-year
increase in production since 2014.
Pennsylvania produced 6,115.1 billion cubic feet of natural gas in 2018. In 2017,
production was 5,354.3 billion cubic feet.
Four counties-- Susquehanna, Washington, Greene and Bradford--comprised two-thirds
of statewide production.
In the fourth quarter of 2018 there were 8,606 producing horizontal wells, a 10.6 percent
increase over the year prior, and total producing wells increased by 9.9 percent in 2018 over
2017.
Click Here for a copy of the report.
[Note: The Act 13 drilling impact fee that supports a variety of local and state program is a per
well fee, it is not based on natural gas production like a severance tax.]
NewsClips:
Do PA Landowners Retain Mineral Rights When Selling Land To State?
PA Marcellus Gas To Power Electric Plant In Puerto Rico
Related Stories:
DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Truck Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County
PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider Stripper Well
Impact Fee Decision
Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten, Groups Hold Pipeline Safety Rally March 19 In Harrisburg;
Pipeline Safety Caucus Formed
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For


March 31 In Monroe County

What’s the difference between weather and climate? And if the


planet is warming, why is it so cold? Get the answers to these and
many more questions during “Reflections on a Changing Climate,”
a free event rescheduled for March 31, hosted by Brodhead
Watershed Association in Monroe County.

61
Starting at 1 p.m. at Brodhead Creek Heritage Center, 1539 Cherry Lane Road,
Analomink, BWA member Mark Lichty will facilitate the conversation. Lichty is an executive
producer of the documentary “Groundswell Rising.”
Participants will discuss the science of climate change; its impacts on weather patterns,
the environment, economy, and human health; and actions citizens can take to lessen their
carbon footprint.
This is “a talk on how climate change affects us, and how we can affect climate change,”
Lichty said. “Climate change is something you can impact. Come and connect with your true
power.”
The event is free, but registration is required and limited. To register, send an email to:
info@brodheadwatershed.org or call 570-839-1120.
Click Here for more information on this event and other activities by the BWA’s Climate
Change Committee.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Brodhead Watershed Association website.
NewsClips:
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Editorial: Modernize State Policies To Encourage Electric Vehicles
Letter: Trivializing Science Is Not The Answer To Dealing With Climate Crisis - Dr. Richard
Kaplan
NJ Coastal Towns Face Nearly $1.6B In Annual Damage Sea Rise
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Study: Trump Climate Deregulation Could Boost CO2 Emissions 200 Million Tons A Year
Related Stories:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

62
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry

By Ed Perry, National Wildlife Federation Global Warming Campaign

[Note: The following op-ed appeared in the March 3 Scranton Times-Tribune.]

It’s hard to believe anyone would propose actions that


would release more mercury into the environment. But
nothing the Trump administration does surprises me
anymore, especially when it comes to polluting our air
and water.
On Dec. 28, President Trump’s Environmental
Protection Agency announced its first step toward
sabotaging the Mercury and Air Toxic Standards rule. The
rule aims to reduce dangerous levels of mercury, heavy
metals, arsenic and other toxic air pollutants released from
coal- and oil-burning power plants.
Coal-burning power plants are the largest source of mercury pollution. Burning coal to
produce power releases mercury into the air, where it falls to earth locally or downwind into
neighboring regions. Bacteria then convert it into methylmercury, a highly toxic form of
mercury, which is readily taken into the food chain by insects, fish and other wildlife.
Because mercury bioaccumulates, large predator fish such as walleye and trout can have
mercury levels more than 1 million times that of the surrounding water.
Mercury is a potent neurotoxin that has a wide range of health effects on both humans
and wildlife. Humans are exposed primarily through consuming fish — either commercial fish
such as tuna and swordfish, or sport fish caught in polluted lakes and streams.
Over time, mercury can reach dangerously high levels in our bodies. For example, the
EPA estimates that one in six women of childbearing age has enough mercury in her body to put
her developing fetus at risk of developmental problems.
Both the EPA and the Food and Drug Administration recommend that children and
women of childbearing age avoid eating any shark, swordfish, king mackerel or tilefish.
Because mercury had been unregulated for so long, nearly every body of water in our
country is contaminated with it, causing 46 states to issue fish consumption advisories.
Pennsylvania is no exception. In addition to a general, statewide health advisory for
recreationally caught sport fish, Pennsylvania lists an additional 92 lakes and streams so
contaminated with mercury that they recommend eating only one or two meals of fish per month,
depending on the water body.
These ninety-two streams and lakes encompass thousands of stream miles and thousands
of acres of lakes.
Ironically, the very industry that the rule would benefit opposes the rollback in
protection.
In a letter dated June 10, 2018, Edison Electric Institute, the American Public Power
Association, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and others, wrote to EPA
stating that: “It is important to note that all covered plants have implemented the regulation and
that pollution controls — where needed — are installed and operating.” Their letter ends by

63
saying that “we urge EPA to move forward to leave the . . . rule in place and effective.”
Exelon, one of the largest producers of electricity, has informed the EPA that the mercury
standards rule has had substantial health and environmental benefits and it has cost a fraction of
what industry had originally claimed.
Exelon has argued that weakening the mercury rule would potentially kill jobs across the
south and waste billions the industry has spent cleaning up pollution.
So, if mercury is so toxic, and the industry doesn’t want it, why does the Trump
administration propose this rollback?
The answer lays in Trump’s ongoing commitment to prop up the coal industry and
benefitting one company in particular.
Murray Energy Co., one of the largest U.S. coal companies, was a major contributor to
the president’s inauguration and CEO Robert Murray reportedly urged the administration to
change the mercury rule.
The company now has a special friend in the administration in the form of ex-coal
lobbyist and the new EPA administrator, Andrew Wheeler, who once worked for the law firm
that represented Murray.
If you’re like me, you must be tired of the dishonest argument that we must sacrifice our
environment in order to allow polluting industries to continue poisoning our streams and lakes.
Although industry has already spent more than $18 billion to implement the rule Trump
proposes to roll back, the real cost of not having mercury regulations has been borne by the
public for a long time in terms of polluted air and water that puts our citizens and wildlife at risk.
The Trump administration that wants us to return to the bad old days.
It’s time our elected representatives worked to protect our health, safety and environment
instead of trying to prop up an industry that is on its way out.

Ed Perry is the Pennsylvania Outreach Coordinator for the National Wildlife Federation Global
Warming Campaign. He can be contacted by sending email to:
paglobalwarmingoutreach@gmail.com.
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry - Ed Perry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change And Act - 15 Lehigh Professors
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Editorial: Modernize State Policies To Encourage Electric Vehicles
Letter: Trivializing Science Is Not The Answer To Dealing With Climate Crisis - Dr. Richard

64
Kaplan
NJ Coastal Towns Face Nearly $1.6B In Annual Damage Sea Rise
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Study: Trump Climate Deregulation Could Boost CO2 Emissions 200 Million Tons A Year
Related Stories:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change - And Act

By: Lehigh University's Dept. Of Earth And Environmental Sciences Staff

[Note: The following op-ed appeared in the March 3 Allentown Morning Call.]

Climate has been in the news, thanks to the release


of several concerning reports, plus reactions to the
proposed Green New Deal.
Our Lehigh colleague in Economics, Tony
O’Brien, recently published an opinion piece in
these pages (Feb. 17) in which he claimed that
climate-change impacts won’t be very bad, so
there’s no need to go all-in on the Green New Deal,
and that a nonideological view suggests a carbon
tax is the far better approach.
We’d actually agree that a carbon tax would
be one important part of an effective climate policy, but what motivates us to write is concern
over widespread misunderstandings of the earth system and how it pertains to people and
society, misunderstandings that happen to be well illustrated in O’Brien’s column.
First, it’s our judgment that there’s plenty to be really worried about, as reported in the
fourth National Climate Assessment and related analyses. We’re not talking “hysteria,” just deep
concern for our grandchildren and then theirs.
Solid science shows that by the end of the century the direct impacts on the economy
could easily exceed several trillions of dollars per year.
Although not economists, we think it’s naive to depend on uninterrupted growth, future
wealth and projections from the past in a nation that faces the costs of entitlements and
infrastructure replacement, with energy costs unlikely to be nearly as cheap as those that enabled
post-World War II prosperity.

65
The stark reality is that despite all the talk, global-emissions trends have closely followed
the highest “business as usual” pathways. There’s been no sign of an invisible hand steering us to
another course.
Our next concern is that economic and impact projections often err on the cautious side,
either to avoid sounding alarmist or to stick to sectors that it’s easier to hang numbers on (such as
Figure 29.2 of the NCA).
Such projections ignore anything like full valuation of fundamental ecosystem and
natural-resources services, especially when those services are as hard to put a dollar on as they
are essential, and they omit consideration of the human and economic costs of human hardships
and migrations driven by climate change.
Beyond that, there are elements of the earth system and the natural world that are beyond
valuation, either because of their fundamental nature or their spiritual significance, and these are
omitted from impact projections.
Another problem in trying to cope with climate change is our human tendency towards
overly simple short-term thinking. Too often debate about climate impacts focuses on brief
extrapolations from past to future.
While OK in the short term, this ignores one of the great recent advances in physics, the
understanding that systems with feedbacks can exhibit very complex and unexpected behavior
that includes tipping points.
With respect to climate, we might hope for the best, but if we’re wise we’d better prepare
for the chance of some surprises, something natural ecosystems and financial ones both very
much dislike, things like significant accelerations of sea-level rise, or changes in the behavior of
clouds that would greatly enhance warming.
The bottom line is that human-induced climate change presents an unparalleled challenge
to humanity. Why? Climate change shares a simple cause in the energy use that is essential for
our civilization, but fossil fuels are used by a complex blend of peoples, cultures, governments
and industries.
Climate change is slow by human standards, a slow-rolling catastrophe that transcends
quarterly reports, election cycles, careers and even generations, and we humans are very poorly
equipped to manage that.
Climate change is pervasive across the world, unlike problems that can be tackled at one
spot, and it will be around for a very long time. Due to the large residence times of carbon
dioxide in the atmosphere, significant impacts will continue for centuries — the world will not
end in 2090.
Finally, climate response will be complex due to the nonlinear feedbacks in earth-system
components like the oceans, atmosphere and biosphere.
Is it time for panic? Not panic, but some bipartisan feeling of collective urgency would be
nice. Across the world, the environmental changes we see rolling out are a shared responsibility
connected to both past and present emissions.
Solutions are going to require compromise and all hands on deck, whether it’s in policy,
technology or economics: No one will like everything that’s required.
On the positive side, leadership on the issue can result in major and sustainable economic
gains in energy sources that will have to change anyway at some point.
We all purchase insurance for disasters we don’t expect to happen: why wouldn’t we act
now and insure our children and grandchildren against serious harm to their only home?
In our view, the motivations to act could not be stronger, the rewards more clear and the

66
damage related to inaction more dire. To the poor lobster in a pot, things might look pretty good
at first. But we all know how that story ends.

This op-ed is the joint collaboration of 15 professors in Lehigh University’s Department of Earth
and Environmental Sciences: Peter Zeitler, Frank Pazzaglia, Anne Meltzer, Dork Sahagian,
David Anastasio, Gray Bebout, Robert Booth, Edward Evenson, Benjamin Felzer, Ken Kodama,
Donald Morris, Steve Peters, Joan Ramage, Zicheng Yu and Jill McDermott.
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change And Act - 15 Lehigh Professors
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry - Ed Perry
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Editorial: Modernize State Policies To Encourage Electric Vehicles
Letter: Trivializing Science Is Not The Answer To Dealing With Climate Crisis - Dr. Richard
Kaplan
NJ Coastal Towns Face Nearly $1.6B In Annual Damage Sea Rise
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Study: Trump Climate Deregulation Could Boost CO2 Emissions 200 Million Tons A Year
Related Stories:
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants Would Cost
Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy Alternatives
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings March 11 On
PJM Interconnection
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program For
March 31 In Monroe County
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Penn State Extension: Everybody Walk Across PA And Tour The Natural Wonders Of
Pennsylvania

Join Penn State Extension’s Everybody Walk Across PA in a virtual walking program and

67
virtually tour of some of Pennsylvania’s Most
Spectacular Natural Wonders! Each week we will
feature an exciting location to virtually explore.
Everybody Walk Across PA is a great program
for worksites, schools, community groups, and any
other group. Gather your family, friends, or co-workers
to form a team of up to five. Even your dog can be a
member of your team!
Each team member will try to average walking
or exercising 15 miles per week, for a total of eight
weeks. Walk with your team or on your own, at a time
and place convenient for you – we will virtually visit a different Spectacular Natural Wonder
each week. Individuals with all levels of physical ability are encouraged to participate.
Weekly emails to your team will include the area we “virtually” visited that week,
motivators to keep walking, and strategies for eating healthy. Each week, team captains will be
required to report the total number of miles walked.
The program will run April 1st through May 26. It’s free but registration is required by
April 1..
Click Here to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Karen
Bracey at 570-836-3196 or by sending email to: kbracey@psu.edu.
Related Story:
PA Wilds Cooperative To Bring Traveling Public Art Show To Capitol In Harrisburg March 8-
28
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

PA Wilds Cooperative Traveling Public Art Show To Be At Capitol In Harrisburg Thru


March 28

On March 5, the PA Wilds Center for


Entrepreneurship, Inc. and Wilds
Cooperative of Pennsylvania announced the
Creative Makers of the Pennsylvania Wilds
– A Traveling Public Art Show will be at the
the Capitol Building East Wing Gallery in
Harrisburg through March 28.
Details about the Creative Makers of
the PA Wilds Exhibit and registration for the
closing reception can be found online.
The Creative Makers of the PA
Wilds Exhibit celebrates the artisans and
producers of rural Pennsylvania by bringing processes that are often completed behind the
scenes, in the rolling hills of the Pennsylvania Wilds, to public spaces.
"The Pennsylvania Wilds region covers about 25 percent of the Commonwealth, but only
about 4 percent of the population calls it home. A while back, it became a mission of the PA
Wilds Center and the WCO to help share the stories of the artisans and makers, as well as how
they create their products," said Abbi Peters, PA Wilds Center managing director. "This is what

68
led to the Creative Makers of the PA Wilds - A Traveling Public Art Show."
Artisans featured in the exhibit are juried artisan members of the Wilds Cooperative of
PA, a value chain network managed by the PA Wilds Center.
The exhibit features nearly 200 images of 49 artisans, including painters, photographers,
jewelry and fiber artisans, as well as woodworkers and glass artisans, from each of the 13
counties encompassed in the Pennsylvania Wilds region, including: Warren, Forest, Elk, Potter,
McKean, Tioga, Clinton, Lycoming, Clearfield, Jefferson, Cameron, Clarion and Northern
Centre.
A closing reception for the exhibit will be held on March 27, from 1 to 4 p.m. The public
is welcome to attend; however, registration is requested.
The Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts has supported this project for the past two years,
helping the PA Wilds Center contract with four photographers from the region to document
creative makers.
So far, the show has been exhibited in five public spaces across the PA Wilds. The
Capitol exhibit will be the first time it has been shown outside of the region.
For more information, visit the Creative Makers of the PA Wilds Exhibit webpage.
More information on the PA Wilds Region and related programs is available at the PA
Wilds Center website.
Related Story:
Penn State Extension: Everybody Walk Across PA And Tour The Natural Wonders Of
Pennsylvania
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires

On March 4, the Department of Conservation


and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams
Dunn called upon Pennsylvania residents to
exercise wildfire prevention vigilance
throughout a three-month period when major
fires are most likely across the state’s forests
and brush lands.
“Because of seemingly endless rainy
periods, Pennsylvania’s 2018 wildfire season
was relatively short-lived in the spring, but
conditions can change almost overnight,”
cautioned Dunn. “Lack of foliage, strong sun
and drying winds all cause fire danger in our woodlands to spike rapidly.”
Although the weather this week is winter-like, March marks the start of a “sometimes
very dangerous three months,” Dunn said. “That’s why Governor Tom Wolf this year has
proclaimed March 3-9 as Wildfire Prevention Week.”
Human carelessness continued to lead the list of causes as wildfires across the state in
2018.
A total of 690 wildfires, ranging from less than one acre in size to almost 690 acres, were
reported last year. They consumed 1,843 acres, well below the 10-year average of 4,000 acres.
“When visitors are careless with burning trash, campfires, and smoking, volunteer

69
firefighters often pay the price, answering call after call in spring woodlands that are ripe for
damaging, life-threatening wildfires,” said Dunn.
DCNR statistics show nearly 85 percent of Pennsylvania’s wildfires occur in March,
April, and May, before the greening of state woodlands and brushy areas. Named for rapid
spread through dormant, dry vegetation, under windy conditions, wildfires often scorch 7,000 or
more acres of state and private woodlands.
Anglers, campers, and other state forest visitors are reminded open fires are prohibited on
state forestland from March 1 to May 25, and when the fire danger is listed as high, very high, or
extreme, unless authorized by district foresters.
Communities in heavily wooded areas are urged to follow wildfire prevention and
suppression methods of the Pennsylvania Firewise Community Program to safeguard life and
property.
DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry is responsible for prevention and suppression of wildfires on
the 17 million acres of state and private woodlands and brush lands. The bureau maintains a fire-
detection system, and works with fire wardens and volunteer fire departments to ensure they are
trained in the latest advances in fire prevention and suppression.
For more on wildfires, visit DCNR’s Wildfire webpage or call the Bureau of Forestry at
717-787-2925. Click Here for tips on how homeowners can reduce the risk of wildfires.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website, Click Here to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the Good Natured
DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click Here to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Schneck: Family Taps Their Maple Trees To Make Syrup In Dauphin County
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard
Ross Twp Commissioners Eye Ways To Protect Trees, Environment
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Forests - Wildfires
Re-Imagining Paradise, CA: Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire
Related Story:
DCNR: Wildfires Increase In 2018 Over 2017, But Nowhere Near 2016
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named Chesapeake
Bay Forest Champion
Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop In Mercer County
Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet April 20 At
3 Locations
Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending Upcoming
Workshops
South Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

70
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named
Chesapeake Bay Forest Champion

Matt Keefer, an Assistant State Forester for DCNR’s Bureau of


Forestry, who oversees community and private forest
stewardship, recently was named a Chesapeake Forest Champion
for 2018 by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and the U.S.
Forest Service for his outstanding efforts to conserve and restore
forests within the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
Matt received the “Greatest on the Ground Impact” award
for his work in the development of DCNR’s new state-funded
riparian buffer grant program, which supports partners’ efforts to
reach landowners seeking alternatives to USDA funding
programs.
Riparian forest buffers are the trees, shrubs, and grasses
planted along streams that play an important role in maintaining
the health of our waterways. They act as filters for the sediments and pollutants from farm fields,
residential lawns, and roadways to help keep them from reaching the water.
Forested buffers can be quite challenging to implement in Pennsylvania, where plain-sect
and other farmers often shun federal programs, and small farms make every acre valuable for
production.
Matt always keeps in mind the human component of buffer implementation, never
forgetting that each landowner who adopts buffers as a practice may have different motives,
needs, and desires.
Matt is leading the exploration of new incentives for buffer adoption, including the multi-
functional buffer concept, incentivizing landowners to grow products within their buffers for sale
or personal use -- helping overcome the idea that buffers usurp productive ground.
Matt also is leading the development of the innovative “Prime Prospects” project, which
analyzes publicly available social data-mined information to identify landowners who are more
likely to implement riparian forest buffers.
Through partnerships with Penn State and the University of Montana, this work will lead
to focused landowner outreach -- which has already resulted in a dramatic increase of PA service
foresters and other technical assistance providers reaching new landowners, helping find the
right-fit buffer program for their properties.
This innovative approach to targeting landowners is expected to continue to streamline
and increase outreach effectiveness over the next several years.
Matt also developed the Riparian Forest Buffer Advisory Committee, which includes
individuals representing more than 40 organizations, businesses, and agencies who bring their
diverse opinions, experiences, and ideas to the table for consideration to further Pennsylvania’s
buffer work.
Under Matt’s leadership, we are seeing continued innovation that goes well beyond what
has been historically possible for Pennsylvania.
Click Here to learn more about DNCR’s riparian buffer work.
Know of a good natured Pennsylvanian who is passionate about outdoor recreation and/or
conservation that we should feature? Contact DCNR by sending email to: ra-resource@pa.gov to

71
nominate someone.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website, Visit the Good Natured DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click
Here to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Schneck: Family Taps Their Maple Trees To Make Syrup In Dauphin County
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard
Ross Twp Commissioners Eye Ways To Protect Trees, Environment
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Related Story:
DCNR’s Matt Keefer Honored As Chesapeake Bay Forest Champion
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet April 20 At
3 Locations
Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop In Mercer County
Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending Upcoming
Workshops
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29

(Reprinted from the March 6 DCNR Resource newsletter. Click Here to sign up for your own
copy.)
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending


Upcoming Workshops

You can become a certified Pennsylvania Master


Naturalist volunteer in Westmoreland County
and join the growing team of volunteers working
locally for nature conservation by attending
upcoming training workshops.
This course is perfect for educators,
volunteers, and nature-lovers who want to
discover and protect the natural habitats of the
Laurel Highlands. Volunteer service and life-
long learning are at the heart of this program.
The training will be held Tuesday in
August, September and October at the Penguin
Court Preserve, 104 California Avenue in
Laughlintown. There will also be Saturday field
trips,

72
Only 15 applications will be considered. A discounted rate is offered until May 1.
The training is presented by Pennsylvania Master Naturalist and Penguin Court Preserve,
Brandywine Conservancy.
Click Here to register or for more information.
Other Upcoming Training
Pennsylvania Master Naturalist is also holding training sessions this Spring in Allegheny,
Chester, Delaware and Montgomery County.
Training Sessions will also be held in the Fall in Berks, Chester, Philadelphia and other
locations yet to be scheduled.
Click Here to register or for more information on each of these training sessions.
For more information on the program, visit the Pennsylvania Master Naturalist website.
Related Stories:
DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named Chesapeake
Bay Forest Champion
Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop In Mercer County
Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet April 20 At
3 Locations
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet April
20 At 3 Locations

The Audubon Society of Western


Pennsylvania will hold an Earth Day Of
Service To The Planet at 3 locations on
April 20 from 9:00 a.m. to Noon.
The 3 locations are the
Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve
(Allegheny County), Succop Nature Park
(Butler County), and Todd Nature
Reserve (Butler County).
Pitch in with friends and neighbors
to improve our little corner of the planet by removing invasive species, plant native trees, shrubs,
and perennials with high wildlife value, and much more! Families and groups are welcome.
Click Here to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Sarah at
412-963-6100.
Can’t make it on April 20 but want to help out? Audubon Of Western PA has habitat
restoration volunteer opportunities available from March through November – visit our Calendar
Of Events.
For more information on programs, initiatives, camp opportunities for students and other
upcoming events, visit the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania website.
NewsClips:
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly

73
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Related Stories:
DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named Chesapeake
Bay Forest Champion
Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop In Mercer County
Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending Upcoming
Workshops
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
[Posted: March 8, 2019]

Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management


Workshop In Mercer County

Penn State Extension will host a Rights-Of-Way


And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop on March 22 at the Extension Office in
Mercer County at 463 N. Perry Highway in Mercer
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Workshop will provide insight and
beneficial information for vegetation managers in
roadside, public utility, DOT's, municipalities,
native species land reclamation and non-
agriculture industrial sites.
Among the topics to be covered are--
-- How to control those hard to manage invasive weeds. Participants will practice identifying the
plants, including desired vegetation systems, including: Mile-a-Minute, Japanese Stiltgrass,
Ailanthus, Japanese Knotweed, Barberry and Exotic Bush Honeysuckle
-- Proper application methods that conserve pollinators and ecological integrity while achieving
management objectives.
Click Here to register or for more information.
NewsClips:
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Related Stories:
DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named Chesapeake
Bay Forest Champion
Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending Upcoming
Workshops
Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet April 20 At
3 Locations
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

74
March 6 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

The March 6 issue of the Resource newsletter


is now available from the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources featuring
articles on--
-- DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To
Restore Pennsylvania
-- How Restore PA Could Benefit Flood-
Plagued Shikellamy State Park; Related Video
-- Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
-- Parks - Managing Water For Multiple Community Benefits Workshop April 2
-- Volunteer Opportunity: Tree Planting At Moshannon State Forest In Clearfield County
-- Volunteer Opportunity: Live Stake Collecting In Centre, Snyder, Union Counties
-- Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named Champion
-- DCNR Good Natured Blog: Invasive Species And Climate Change
-- DCNR Good Natured Blog: Be On The Lookout! Emerging Invasive Plants In PA
-- Upcoming Maple Sugar Events Across The State
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website, Visit the Good Natured DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click
Here to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New


South Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit

The South Mountain Partnership, the Center for Land Use


and Sustainability at Shippensburg University, and the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources are
launching new South Mountain Research Corps initiative
that supports student research on land management projects
within the South Mountain Landscape in portions of
Adams, Franklin, Cumberland, and York counties.
As part of the launch, landowners, land managers
and researchers are encouraged to take an online survey and
attend the April 11 South Mountain Science Summit.
What’s The Research Corps?
Many landowners in the South Mountain region
(consisting of portions of Adams, Franklin, Cumberland, and York counties) want to leave their
land better than when they first gained ownership.
Through time and dedication to managing their land, they have undoubtedly formed a
strong attachment to it.
But at times these landowners may have questions about how to manage their land, and
they don’t know who to turn to.

75
At the same time, college students are looking for opportunities to gain tangible
experience and insight from work in real communities so they can build skills that are
immediately applicable when interviewing for and starting their careers.
It is with those landowners and students in mind that the South Mountain Research Corps
was launched in 2019 through collaboration among the South Mountain Partnership, the Center
for Land Use and Sustainability of Shippensburg University, and the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources.
Through the SMRC, the South Mountain landscape will become a place-based and
experiential research “facility” for local universities’ faculty and students while also meeting the
land management needs of local landowners.
The SMRC will:
-- Develop and sustain a responsive, applied research program that empowers the natural and
cultural resource conservation efforts happening throughout the South Mountain landscape
-- Build collaborative relationships among property owners, land managers, researchers, and
students throughout the South Mountain region
-- Build collaborative relationships amongst institutions of higher education throughout the
South Mountain region
-- Provide authentic, high impact, and experiential learning opportunities to college students
throughout the region
To date, 14 landowners and land managers in the region have expressed an interest in
participating in the SMRC, but more are encouraged to participate through one or more
upcoming calls to action.
Science Summit
The SMRC will launch officially during an inaugural South Mountain Science Summit
on April 11; those interested will receive details by participating in the survey mentioned below.
The Science Summit will connect the needs of local landowners and land managers with
the research capacity of regional research institutions while generating practical learning
opportunities for college students that will have a collective impact on regional land management
and stewardship.
If you would like to stay informed on Summit details, send an email to: clus@ship.edu.
Survey
And, if you are a land manager in the South Mountain region with resource issues or
questions about the land you manage, or are interested in encouraging relevant student research
on your land that may need funding support, then please consider completing a short online
survey.
Survey responses will provide the catalyst for developing project initiatives and outreach
during the April Science Summit.
The deadline to take the survey is March 14.
For more information, visit the South Mountain Research Corps webpage.
More information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events on the South Mountain
Landscape are available by visiting the South Mountain Partnership website.
If you want to learn more about landscape initiatives around the state, visit DCNR’s
Conservation Landscapes webpage.
NewsClip:
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories:

76
Manada Conservancy Protects 44 Acres On Blue Mountain In Dauphin County
Brandywine Conservancy Hosts April 3 Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable In Chester County
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Manada Conservancy Protects 44 Acres On Blue Mountain In Dauphin County

Manada Conservancy has protected a 44-acre, fully wooded


property along Blue Mountain in Lower Paxton Township in
Dauphin County that will be open to the public for hiking and
passive enjoyment.
Located near Hocker Park, the property includes a
portion of the Darlington Trail and is part of the Kittatinny
Ridge, an important corridor for raptor and songbird migration,
wildlife diversity, and improving air and water quality to the
region.
This acquisition adds another piece to the growing
tapestry of unfragmented forested ridge that numerous
organizations are attempting to conserve.
The purchase was made possible by a Keystone
Recreation, Parks and Conservation Fund grant from the Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources, the generosity of the Champagne Family, and the assistance of The Nature
Conservancy-PA.
Manada Conservancy has protected more than 1,800 acres in the region, primarily in
Dauphin County, since it was established in 1997.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events and educational
opportunities, visit the Manada Conservancy website. Click Here for the Conservancy’s latest
newsletter.
NewsClip:
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New South
Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
Brandywine Conservancy Hosts April 3 Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable In Chester County
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Brandywine Conservancy Hosts April 3 Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable In Chester
County

Join land trust staff, board members, and


volunteers on April 3 at the Brandywine
Conservancy for a roundtable discussion about
farmland preservation and other farm-related
work by land trusts in Chester County.
Discussion topics include--
-- PA Land Trust Association report findings:
Pathways Toward Increased Land Trust

77
Involvement in Agricultural Conservation Planning and Implementation (please review in
advance and come prepared with feedback)
-- State funding for land trusts engaged in farmland-related work-- including recently introduced
House Bill 574 and the impact of proposed budget cuts to the Environmental Stewardship Fund)
-- Pennsylvania Farm Bill and proposed changes to the ACEP program
-- Rural enterprise endeavors (e.g., weddings, agritourism, etc.) on preserved farms
-- Working with conservation districts and NRCS
-- Considerations when placing easements on working lands
-- Understanding the economic and infrastructure needs of farm operations
-- Other topics raised by participants
The Roundtable will be held at the Brandywine Conservancy Offices, 1 Hoffman’s Mill
road, Chadds Ford in Chester County from 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Click Here to register or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the PA Land
Trust Association website, Click Here to sign up for regular updates from PLTA, Like them on
Facebook, and Follow them on Twitter. Click Here to support their work.
The 2019 PA Land Conservation Conference will be held May 16-18 at Skytop Lodge in
Monroe County.
NewsClip:
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New South
Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
Manada Conservancy Protects 44 Acres On Blue Mountain In Dauphin County
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

PA Environmental Council In Case You Missed It In February Now Available

The In Case You Missed It In February is


now available from the PA Environmental
Council is now available featuring articles on-
-
-- Reaching Common Ground On The Federal
Land & Water Conservation Fund
-- 100 Local Governments Endorse The
Circuit Trails In Philadelphia Area
-- Podcast: Power To The People In
Watersheds
-- Podcast: PA And National Work Of Trout
Unlimited
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the PA
Environmental Council website, visit the PEC Blog, PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker, follow PEC
on Twitter or Like PEC on Facebook. Visit PEC’s Audio Room for the latest podcasts. Click
Here to receive regular updates from PEC.
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

78
Love Is In The Air As The Peregrine Falcon Egg Watch Begins In Harrisburg

The Egg Watch is on for the Peregrine


Falcons nesting on the Rachel Carson
Building in Harrisburg and you can watch
everything happen live online.
Last year, the falcons laid their
first egg on March 13 followed by the
second on March 16, so the first egg
should arrive soon.
To keep up-to-date, you can
follow them on Falcon Wire News or at
Falcon Chatter on Twitter.
Pairs of peregrine Falcons have
been on the 15th floor ledge of the Rachel Carson Building since 1996 when the Game
Commission placed a nest tray there to see if would attract them. It did, and the rest, as they say
is history.
If everything goes well, watch for the announcement of the falcon banding event which
will also be made available online.
Click Here for all things Peregrine Falcon in Harrisburg.
Other Online Animal Cams
-- Black-Bear Den in Monroe County
-- Snow Goose Migration at Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area, Lancaster County
-- Bald Eagle Nest in Hanover, York County
(Photo: From the 2018 falcon breeding season on the ledge.)
NewsClips:
Bald Eagle Mom In Hanover Protects Eggs From Snow - Video/Photos
Hanover Bald Eagle Nest Welcome 2nd Egg Of 2019
Middle Creek Snow Geese Migration Not Quite At Peak, But Close
Schneck: Pittsburgh’s National Aviary Now Home To Cock-Of-The-Rock
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Related Story:
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Spring Hawk Watch Launches April 1
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Spring Hawk Watch Launches April 1

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Berks County


invites visitors to look for returning raptors and
other migrants during its annual Spring Hawk
Watch, held daily April 1 through May 15 from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sanctuary’s famous North
Lookout.
Trail fees apply for non-members and cost
$10 for adults, $7 for seniors, and $5 for children
ages 6 to 12. Members are admitted free, year-

79
round, and memberships can be purchased online or at the Visitor Center.
In conjunction with the count, international trainee-run spring weekend programs also
begin on the first and are held every Saturday and Sunday throughout the count. The Sanctuary’s
signature live raptor program, “Raptors Up Close!” is sponsored by M&T Bank and continues
through Memorial Day.
A full schedule of weekend programs and other details can be found online.
During the count, staff, trainees, and volunteers will be stationed at the Lookout to help
visitors spot and identify raptors, including broad-winged hawks, redtails, ospreys, and bald
eagles.
Migration typically peaks in mid to late April, especially on days with southerly winds
and cloud cover, when counts of more than 100 birds may be seen. For raptor enthusiasts and
those who cannot make it to Hawk Mountain, daily counts are posted online throughout the
season.
The Sanctuary has monitored the spring raptor migration since the 1960s and reports an
average 1,063 raptors each season. Numbers are just a fraction of Hawk Mountain’s autumn
migration, but spring is a great time of year to get outdoors and visit the Mountain.
Since 2000, International Conservation Science trainees have regulated the daily count at
the North Lookout during the second half of the spring migration, using the training of
experienced volunteers and staff to learn migration count techniques.
Those who wish to hike to the North Lookout and join in the fun should wear sturdy
shoes and be prepared for a walk over rocky terrain.
The nearby South Lookout may be preferable to those with small children or with limited
mobility and can be reached using a 900-foot-long ADA accessible Silhouette Trail with bench
seating.
RaptorThon! March 30
On March 30, Educator Rachel Spagnola will kick off Hawk Mountain's spring migration
season by participating in the annual HMANA RaptorThon event.
Team "Ridgetop Rachel and the Wing Watchers" will make several stops via road survey
between Little Gap and Lehigh Gap, ending with an afternoon count at North Lookout.
Supporters can sponsor Rachel's team or join in the fun.
The 2,500-acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is the world’s first refuge for birds of prey and
is open to the public year-round by trail-fee or membership, which in turn supports the
organization’s raptor conservation mission and local-to-global research, training, and education
programs.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary website or call 610-756-6961. Click Here to sign up for regular updates
from the Sanctuary, Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter, visit them on Flickr and visit
their YouTube Channel. Click Here to support Hawk Mountain.
NewsClips:
Bald Eagle Mom In Hanover Protects Eggs From Snow - Video/Photos
Hanover Bald Eagle Nest Welcome 2nd Egg Of 2019
Middle Creek Snow Geese Migration Not Quite At Peak, But Close
Schneck: Pittsburgh’s National Aviary Now Home To Cock-Of-The-Rock
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Related Story:
Love Is In The Air As The Peregrine Falcon Egg Watch Begins In Harrisburg

80
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Ice Anglers Urged To Use Caution As Season Comes To Close

As the ice fishing season winds down across


many parts of the Commonwealth, the Fish and
Boat Commission reminds anglers to use caution
when venturing out onto frozen lakes and ponds.
"While temperatures may remain cold
enough in many places to produce new ice, these
late season conditions can be among the most
dangerous," said Ryan Walt, PFBC's Boating
and Watercraft Safety Manager. "The freeze-
thaw cycle that we will be experiencing over the
next few weeks can result in many different
layers of ice forming on top of each other and various ice thicknesses that can be deceiving."
In early March, the angle of the sun and its impact on ice has changed dramatically since
December, when ice began forming on many water bodies. Extended days of sun exposure and
more frequent variations in temperature can lead to accelerated deterioration of ice.
Should someone fall through the ice, even brief exposure to cold water can result in
hypothermia or even death.
Cold water shock can occur when water temperatures are less than 70 degrees F, often
resulting in an involuntary gasp and the swallowing of water. Associated hyperventilation,
breathlessness and a reduced ability to control breathing will limit the ability for a person to
swim and can lead to unconsciousness.
Anglers and anyone else walking out onto the ice are reminded that ice conditions are not
officially monitored by any authority and there is no such thing as "safe ice."
The PFBC urges anglers and anyone venturing out on to the ice to follow these safety
steps:
-- Always wear a lifejacket or float coat while on the ice. Avoid inflatable lifejackets, which do
not perform well in freezing temperatures.
-- When arriving at the water's edge, visually survey the ice. Look for open water areas and signs
of recent changes in water levels. Ice sloping down from the bank can indicate a recent drop in
water level, while wet areas on the ice can indicate a rise in water level.
-- Listen for loud cracks or booms coming from the ice. This can be an indicator of deteriorating
ice.
-- Look for new ice, which is clear or has a blue tint. New ice is stronger than old ice, which can
appear white or gray.
-- Remember that ice thickness is not consistent across the surface of the lake or pond.
-- Beware of ice around partially submerged objects such as trees, brush, embankments or
structures. Ice will not form as quickly where water is shallow or where objects may absorb heat
from sunlight.
-- Anglers should use an ice staff to probe ahead as they walk. If the ice staff punches through,
retreat to shore slowly.
-- Always carry a pair of ice awls, which are handheld spikes. Ice awls can assist in performing a
self-rescue, in which the spikes are driven into the ice to help someone pull themselves out of the

81
water.
-- Never walk on ice that has formed over moving water such as a river or stream.
-- Never go out on ice alone.
-- Always let someone know your plans and when you expect to return.
Those who are new to ice fishing can get started by visiting the PFBC's Ice/Winter
Fishing webpage. A list of PA's Best Fishing Waters and maps of submerged habitat structures
are also available.
(Photo: York County Fire Departments, Fish & Boat Commission practice ice rescues, York
Daily Record.)
NewsClips:
Frye: Fish & Boat Commission Answers Angler Questions On Voluntary Permits
Tierney: Trout Season In PA By The Numbers
Related Stories:
Annual Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing To Be Held March 15 In Luzerne County
Game Commission Launches 3rd Online Livestream - Black Bear Den
Learn How To Resolve Deer Problems In Your Backyard, Neighborhood At March 25 Seminar
In Harrisburg
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Game Commission Launches 3rd Online Livestream - Black Bear Den

On March 5, the Game Commission


launched its third livestream of the season –
video and audio captured at a Monroe
County black-bear den and streamed in real
time to viewers.
There’s much to be learned about the
bears in the den.
The adult female has ear tags that
indicate she previously was handled by
Game Commission staff. While video from
the den has not clearly shown the numbers
on those tags, as the days pass, and especially as the bears move more, the tag numbers seem
certain to provide some details about the bear’s past.
It’s also not yet known how many cubs are present in the den because they’re nestled so
closely to their mother. With time, however, the answer will become obvious. Pennsylvania’s
black bears usually are born in January and begin walking in about eight weeks. They leave the
den when 3 months old.
The snow-goose migration livestream, which provides a 24-hour-a-day look at waterfowl
off Willow Point at Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area, launched February 26.
The Game Commission has a third livestream available-- the Hanover bald eagles
For viewers, the livestreams provide round-the-clock, behind-the-scenes looks at wildlife,
said Game Commission Bureau of Information and Education Director Steve Smith.
“These livestreams provide an incredible educational opportunity, allowing us to witness
wildlife intimately in a manner that’s simply not possible in the wild with our own two eyes,”
Smith said. “That’s one of the reasons they’ve proven so popular, and we’re proud to offer these

82
two for viewers to enjoy in the coming months.”
Click Here to watch the black-bear den online.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Go Inside A Black Bear Den Through Latest Game Commission Webcam
Live Bear Cam Debuts In Pennsylvania
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Related Stories:
Ice Anglers Urged To Use Caution As Season Comes To Close
Annual Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing To Be Held March 15 In Luzerne County
Learn How To Resolve Deer Problems In Your Backyard, Neighborhood At March 25 Seminar
In Harrisburg
[Posted: March 5, 2019]

Annual Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing To Be Held March 15 In Luzerne County

Representatives of waterfowl organizations,


interested hunters and the public are invited by
the Game Commission to attend a briefing on
March 15 on the status of Atlantic Flyway
waterfowl populations and proposed federal
frameworks for the 2019-20 waterfowl hunting
seasons.
The briefing will begin at 1:00 p.m., at
the Game Commission Northeast Region Office,
3917 Memorial Highway, Dallas, PA 18612-
0220.
“Although the annual waterfowl meeting has typically rotated between locations in
northwestern and southeastern Pennsylvania, waterfowl hunters in northeastern Pennsylvania
long have expressed interest in holding the briefing in this portion of the Commonwealth,” said
Jeremy Stempka, Game Commission waterfowl biologist. “With the Northeast Region’s new
headquarters facility now available for use, the time seemed right to respond to this request. We
hope to see both regular attendees and new participants at this year’s meeting.”
In addition to reviewing frameworks established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
for upcoming waterfowl and migratory bird seasons, Game Commission staff will provide
updates on current and planned research and management programs, as well as past hunting
results.
Public comments will be accepted at the meeting; by sending a letter to: Pennsylvania
Game Commission, Bureau of Wildlife Management, 2001 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg, PA
17110-9797; or via email through WaterfowlComments@pa.gov.
Based on public comments and results of previous hunter surveys, Game Commission
staff will prepare and present recommended waterfowl and migratory bird seasons, bag limits
and related criteria to the USFWS for final approval.
All migratory bird-hunting seasons and bag limits must conform to frameworks set by the
USFWS. States select their hunting seasons within these established frameworks.
There no longer are separately timed selections and announcements for “early” and “late”
seasons. All selections will be made and announced at the same time, and will appear in the

83
2019-20 Pennsylvania Hunting & Trapping Digest.
For more information on waterfowl hunting and conservation, visit the Game
Commission’s Waterfowl Hunting Regulations webpage. Click Here for an update on
Waterfowl Migration in Pennsylvania, including live video and sound of over 100,000 snow
geese from the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area.
NewsClips:
Middle Creek Snow Geese Migration Not Quite At Peak, But Close
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Related Stories:
Ice Anglers Urged To Use Caution As Season Comes To Close
Game Commission Launches 3rd Online Livestream - Black Bear Den
Learn How To Resolve Deer Problems In Your Backyard, Neighborhood At March 25 Seminar
In Harrisburg
[Posted: March 6, 2019]

Learn How To Resolve Deer Problems In Your Backyard, Neighborhood At March 25


Seminar In Harrisburg

The Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control will


host the Pennsylvania Deer Conflict Management
Seminar on March 25 at the Dixon University Center in
Harrisburg
This free Seminar will educate the public about
how to resolve deer problems in their backyards and
neighborhoods while helping municipalities learn
effective and sustainable ways to co-exist and mitigate
conflicts with deer and other wildlife.
Speakers John Griffin, Director of Urban
Wildlife Programs at The Humane Society of the United
States (HSUS), and Laura Simon, an Urban Wildlife Consultant, will present participants with:
-- A model deer conflict management plan which provides municipal, community, and political
leaders with a framework to build stakeholder engagement, identify root causes of conflict, and
comprehensively address problems using a science-based and sustainable approach.
-- Strategies for protecting gardens and plants, reducing the incidence of Lyme disease and
decreasing deer-vehicle collision risks.
“We get a lot of inquiries about human-deer conflict from people in Pennsylvania,”
explained Stephanie Boyles Griffin, The Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control Science
and Policy Director. “We want people to be able to co-exist with urban wildlife. We hope to
help them better understand these conflicts and how to put together a sustainable plan for their
communities.”
Subsequent seminars are planned for other areas in Pennsylvania later in the year. This
series aims to educate the public about deer conflict mitigation in urban and suburban areas.
The seminars will provide the knowledge, tools, and resources to encourage communities
to solve management issues while co-existing with deer and other wildlife.
The Seminar will be held at the Dixon University Center, Administration Building,
Conference Room B/C, 2986 North Second Street in Harrisburg from 5:30 to 8:00.

84
For more information, visit the Pennsylvania Deer Conflict Management Seminar
webpage. Seating is limited, please RSVP by sending email to: BIWFC@BOTSTIBER.org.
NewsClips:
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Related Stories:
Ice Anglers Urged To Use Caution As Season Comes To Close
Annual Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing To Be Held March 15 In Luzerne County
Game Commission Launches 3rd Online Livestream - Black Bear Den
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

DEP Deputy Secretary George Hartenstein To Retire After 37 Years Of Public Service

DEP Deputy Secretary for Waste, Air, Radiation and Remediation


George Hartenstein will retire at the end of March after 37 years of
public service at the Department of Environmental Protection.
Prior to his appointment as Deputy Secretary, Hartenstein
served as the Director of the Bureau of Environmental Cleanup
and Brownfields from 2012 to 2016
In that position, he was responsible for the implementation
of the award-winning Land Recycling Cleanup Program,
brownfield redevelopment, state and federal superfund response,
federal facilities restoration, natural resource damage assessment,
and aboveground and underground storage tank regulation.
He spent a total of 27 years working in Pennsylvania’s remediation programs and 7 years
in the mining program.
“George has served the people of Pennsylvania with dedication and distinction for nearly
4 decades,” said former DEP Secretary David Hess. “His expertise and thoughtfulness will be
missed, but our environment is better off because of the restoration work he did.”
A native of Pittsburgh, George graduated from Penn State with a Bachelor of Science in
Biology.
[Posted: March 7, 2019]

Help Wanted: PennFuture Director Of Communications

PennFuture is seeking qualified candidates to fill the position of Director of Communications to


oversee and manage all public communications, media relations, and communication campaigns.
Click Here for all the details.
[Posted: March 4, 2019]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

85
The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog and Twitter Feed.

PaEN: Senate’s Next Job: Consider Confirmation Of DEP, DCNR, Agriculture Secretaries
Sunday NewsClips
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
Bailout Bill Proposed For Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation - PPL President
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation - PPL President
WITF: Airing Of Three Mile Island Accident Documentary 40 Years Later March 26
Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten Form Pipeline Safety Caucus
Some Peoples Gas Customers In Moon Might Not Get Service Back Until Monday
Sen. Yaw Tours Muncy Company Turns Out Drainage Pipes Made From Recycled Plastic
Editorial: Pop-Up Recycling, PA Resources Council Helps Us Do The Right Thing
Pittsburgh Recognized As Starting Point For Lewis And Clark Expedition
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Local Leaders Tour Bucks State Parks, Assess Needs
A Park That Makes Money? Dilworth Park In Philadelphia Generated $2.5 Million In 2018
Crable: Extreme Adventurer: When Winter Weather Gets Rough, Ben Weaver Gets Going
Crable: Rumors Swirl Around Sale Of Girl Scout Camp In Lancaster County
Hunters Gather In Jefferson County To Protest Deer Removal Plans
Hunters Protest Chronic Wasting Disease Deer Elimination Plan
Hunters Gather To Hear Speaker Opposed To Deer Removal In Blair County To Deal With
CWD
Letter: End Sunday Hunting Ban
Allegheny Front: Birders Make The Best Friends
Bay Journal: Look For Signs Of Spring Around The Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Sunday - National/International
Over 40 Ice Fishermen Rescued After Ice Floe Breaks Off In Lake Erie
Film On Arctic Refuge Battle Set For Pittsburgh Screening
Politics
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
Hopey: U.S. Steel Says Clairton Coke Works Repairs Ahead Of Schedule
Erie (Coal) Coke Appeals DEP Air Quality Order
Hopey: Air Pollution Frustration Spills Out At Allegheny Health Board Meeting
Alternative Fuels
Editorial: Modernize State Policies To Encourage Electric Vehicles
Awards & Recognition
PaEN: Winners Of The Women In Conservation Awards Announced By PennFuture
Crable: The Woman Who Made Environmental History By Wading In The Polluted Conestoga
River
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named
Chesapeake Bay Forest Champion

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PaEN: DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest
Begins March 20
PaEN: Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29
PaEN: CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
Pittsburgh Rises To No. 8 On Livability.com 2019 List Of Best Places To Live
Luzerne Artist Wins National Award For Mining Artwork
PaEN: Penn State Climate Scientist Michael Mann Awarded 2019 Tyler Prize For
Environmental Achievement
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
PaEN: Penn State Extension March 22 Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation Management
Workshop In Mercer County
PaEN: Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet
April 20 At 3 Locations
Budget
Meyer: Lawmakers Keep Questioning Wolf’s Intricate Web Of Environmental Funding
Op-Ed: PA Budget Proposal Hurts Local Environmental Projects, Bipartisan Consensus - Rep.
Bernstine (R)
Editorial: Lawmakers Should Recognize Need For Infrastructure Program And A Fair Severance
Tax
PaEN: House DEP Budget Hearing 2: Only 0.30% Of DEP Final Actions Were Appealed In
2018; 25 Fewer Attorney Positions
PaEN: Senators Question Use Of Project Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs, Sustainability
Of DCNR Funding Choices
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
PaEN: House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks &
Forests Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
PaEN: Department Of Agriculture Budget Testimony Highlights Conservation, Organic & Urban
Farming, Invasive Species Issues
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach
To County Planning Process
PaEN: DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider Stripper Well
Impact Fee Decision
Wolf Returns To Schuylkill County With Plan For Flood Prevention And Recovery
Officials Tout Severance Tax To Fund Infrastructure Projects
Officials Detail How Wolf Plan Would Help West Pittston Flood Survivors
York Twp. Official Hangs Hopes On Wolf’s Severance Tax Plan
Work Underway To Retrofit Flood Gate In Wilkes-Barre
Wolf Highlight Need For Restore PA Proposal To Deal With Flooding In Allegheny County

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Wolf: Tremont Flooding Helped Inspire Aggressive Restore PA Plan
Wolf Highlights Restore Pennsylvania Plan To Help Columbia County With Flood Protection
PEMA, Local Leaders Highlight Past Projects As Models For Restore PA Success
DEP, Local Officials Tour Flood-Damaged Sites In York County To Promote Restore PA
Proposal
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
Frye: Fish & Boat Commission Answers Angler Questions On Voluntary Permits
State Treasurer Authorizes $800 Million Line Of Credit For State General Fund; Warns About
Low Fund Levels
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Chesapeake Bay
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach
To County Planning Process
PaEN: DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
PaEN: Sen. Scott Martin Appointed To Chesapeake Bay Commission
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named
Chesapeake Bay Forest Champion
PaEN: Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10
Million Trees Initiative
PaEN: CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
PaEN: Showing Added: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The
Whitaker Center For Science & The Arts In Harrisburg
PaEN: PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Citizen Action
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake
Workshops
PaEN: Become A PA Master Naturalist Volunteer In Westmoreland County By Attending

88
Upcoming Workshops
PaEN: Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
PaEN: Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In
Illegally Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
PaEN: Volunteers Needed For Western PA Audubon's Earth Day Of Service To The Planet
April 20 At 3 Locations
PaEN: Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
PaEN: CBF Save The Bay Photo Contest Accepting Entries Starting March 11
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard
Campaign Encourages Lancaster County To Pass On Plastic
Allegheny County Launches Adopt-A-Roadway Anti-Litter Program
Climate
PaEN: Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants
Would Cost Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PaEN: PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy
Alternatives
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry - Ed Perry
Op-Ed: We Really Do Need To Worry About Climate Change And Act - 15 Lehigh Professors
Editorial: Modernize State Policies To Encourage Electric Vehicles
PaEN: Brodhead Watershed Assn. Reschedules Reflections On A Changing Climate Program
For March 31 In Monroe County
PaEN: Penn State Climate Scientist Michael Mann Awarded 2019 Tyler Prize For
Environmental Achievement
Letter: Trivializing Science Is Not The Answer To Dealing With Climate Crisis - Dr. Richard
Kaplan
NJ Coastal Towns Face Nearly $1.6B In Annual Damage Sea Rise
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Study: Trump Climate Deregulation Could Boost CO2 Emissions 200 Million Tons A Year
Coal Mining

89
Op-Ed: Public Health Imperiled To Aid Dying Coal Industry - Ed Perry
For The Few Who Heat Homes With Coal, It’s Still King
Luzerne Artist Wins National Award For Mining Artwork
Coal Waste At Power Plants Linked To Groundwater Pollution; Montour Plant Included
Frazier: Report: Coal Ash Contamination Widespread In U.S., PA
Most U.S. Coal Power Plants Are Contaminating Groundwater With Toxins, Analysis Finds
Report: Little Blue Run Scrubber Waste Impoundment Still Contaminating Local Groundwater
Compliance Action
PaEN: DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Trunk Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County
Sisk: DEP Issues $1.5M Fine For Pipeline Construction Site In Greene County
Operator Of Natural Gas Gathering Pipeline Fined In Greene County
Litvak: Greene County Gas Line Garners $1.5 Million Fine
Hopey: U.S. Steel Says Clairton Coke Works Repairs Ahead Of Schedule
Erie (Coal) Coke Appeals DEP Air Quality Order
Attorney General’s Case Against Pittsburgh Water Authority Goes To Allegheny County Court
DCNR
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
PaEN: House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks &
Forests Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
PaEN: March 6 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Delaware River
PaEN: DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest
Begins March 20
Delaware RiverKeeper March 8 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
McKelvey: Pittsburgh Embarks On $49M Lead Line Replacement Project As Criminal Charges
Move Forward
Attorney General’s Case Against Pittsburgh Water Authority Goes To Allegheny County Court
PaEN: PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
Cong. Fitzpatrick Wants EPA To Get Tough In Efforts To Cleanup PFAS In Drinking Water
Bagenstose: Warminster Native At Center Of Congressional PFAS Contamination Hearing
Economic Development
PaEN: PA Wilds Cooperative To Bring Traveling Public Art Show To Capitol In Harrisburg
March 8-28
Efficiency Leads 2019 Energy Job Growth Prospects
Education
PaEN: Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair Elk Country Visitor Center March 29
PaEN: Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New
South Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
Burgettstown Students Get Hands-On Look At Natural Gas Industry
PaEN: Interns Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA 2 Summer Interns For Keystone 10
Million Trees Initiative

90
PaEN: Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment - Lake Erie Water Diversions
PaEN: Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29
AP-Scolforo: Dinosaur Tracks Make Fresh Impression At Valley Forge National Park
Emergency Response
NPR: How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich
AP: Tornado Forecasting Improves, But Still Deaths Keep Coming
Energy
EcoWURD Wants To Connect Black Philadelphians To Green Economy
PaEN: Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants
Would Cost Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PaEN: PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy
Alternatives
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Robert Swift: Three Mile Island Accident - March 28, 1979
WITF: Watch MetEd Press Conference From The Day After The 1979 Three Mile Island
Accident
Activists Challenge License Extension For Peach Bottom Nuke Plant
Op-Ed: Pennsylvania Needs Cap-And-Trade To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Joe Minott
Letter: Invest Tax Dollars In Renewable Energy
PaEN: House Environmental, Consumer Affairs Committees Hold Separate Info Meetings
March 11 On PJM Interconnection
Shale Gas Boom Slows Progress On Renewables In PJM Grid Territory
Scenic Groups Say Too Many Power Lines Blocking View Of Pittsburgh
PA Marcellus Gas To Power Electric Plant In Puerto Rico
U.S. EIA: New U.S. Power Plants Expected To Be Mostly Natural Gas, Solar PV
Energy Conservation
Efficiency Leads 2019 Energy Job Growth Prospects
Environmental Policy
PaEN: PA Environmental Council In Case You Missed It In February Now Available
Farming
PaEN: Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic, African American, Other

91
Underserved Farmers April 9 In Berks County
Clearfield Conservation District Offers Manure Plan Writing Workshops March 16, April 13
Meyer: Hemp Looks Like A Bright Spot For PA Farming Advocates
PaEN: March Newsletter Now Available From Joint Conservation Committee
Flooding/Storms
Wolf Highlight Need For Restore PA Proposal To Deal With Flooding In Allegheny County
Wolf Returns To Schuylkill County With Plan For Flood Prevention And Recovery
Officials Tout Severance Tax To Fund Infrastructure Projects
Officials Detail How Wolf Plan Would Help West Pittston Flood Survivors
York Twp. Official Hangs Hopes On Wolf’s Severance Tax Plan
Work Underway To Retrofit Flood Gate In Wilkes-Barre
Wolf: Tremont Flooding Helped Inspire Aggressive Restore PA Plan
Wolf Highlights Restore Pennsylvania Plan To Help Columbia County With Flood Protection
PEMA, Local Leaders Highlight Past Projects As Models For Restore PA Success
DEP, Local Officials Tour Flood-Damaged Sites In York County To Promote Restore PA
Proposal
North East Boro Considers Options For Flooding Along Baker Creek
Penn Hills Road To Close As Crews Prep For $4 Million Landslide Repair
Evacuations Lifted For Flooded California Wine Country Towns
AP: Searches Resume After Tornado Kills 23 In Alabama
AP: Tornado Forecasting Improves, But Still Deaths Keep Coming
NJ Coastal Towns Face Nearly $1.6B In Annual Damage Sea Rise
NPR: How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich
Forests
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks &
Forests Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Matt Keefer, Assistant State Forester, Named
Chesapeake Bay Forest Champion
PaEN: Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New
South Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
PaEN: Sign Up Now To Volunteer For Western PA Conservancy Tree Planting, Garden Steward
Programs
PaEN: Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
PaEN: Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Penn State Extension Hosts Meetings In Lehigh Valley On Spotted Lanternfly
PA Looking For New Ways To Fight Spotted Lanternfly

92
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
PaEN: DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Schneck: Family Taps Their Maple Trees To Make Syrup In Dauphin County
Schneck: Making Maple Syrup From The Trees In Your Backyard
PaEN: PA Wilds Cooperative To Bring Traveling Public Art Show To Capitol In Harrisburg
March 8-28
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
Ross Twp Commissioners Eye Ways To Protect Trees, Environment
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Forests - Wildfires
Re-Imagining Paradise, CA: Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire
Geologic Hazards
Penn Hills Road To Close As Crews Prep For $4 Million Landslide Repair
PennDOT To Repair Landslide Along Route 422 In Pittsburgh
Green Infrastructure
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach
To County Planning Process
PaEN: DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
PaEN: Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
PaEN: EPA Exhibit At 2019 Philadelphia Flower Show Highlights Ecological Power Of Flowers
Now Through March 10
PaEN: Southwest PA Water Resource Center Hosts Workshops On Grant Writing, Stormwater
Pollution Control Implementation, Reporting
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
New Plan For Turnpike Stormwater Runoff Will Better Protect Valley Forge Historical Park
Greencastle Council Works Toward Stormwater Fee
PaEN: Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake
Workshops
PaEN: March 12 Penn State Water Insights Seminar Highlights Green Infrastructure To Reduce
Stormwater Pollution
Hazardous Substances
McKelvey: Pittsburgh Embarks On $49M Lead Line Replacement Project As Criminal Charges
Move Forward
Cong. Fitzpatrick Wants EPA To Get Tough In Efforts To Cleanup PFAS In Drinking Water
Bagenstose: Warminster Native At Center Of Congressional PFAS Contamination Hearing
Hurricanes
Nearly 5 Months After Hurricane Michael, Many Still Hurting In Florida
Lake Erie
PaEN: Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment - Lake Erie Water Diversions

93
Land Conservation
PaEN: Manada Conservancy Protects 44 Acres On Blue Mountain In Dauphin County
PaEN: Brandywine Conservancy Hosts April 3 Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable In Chester
County
PaEN: Landowners, Land Managers, Researchers, Students Encouraged To Participate In New
South Mountain Research Corps Survey, April Science Summit
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Litter/Illegal Dumping
PaEN: Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA Now Underway, Register Your
Event, Volunteer For A Cleanup
PaEN: Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn. Tired Of Tires Campaign Paying Rewards To Bring In
Illegally Dumped Tires In Westmoreland March 23
Great American Cleanup Event Planned In West Leechburg
PaEN: Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Allegheny County Launches Adopt-A-Roadway Anti-Litter Program
Keep Plair Beautiful Plans Litter Survey In County
Mine Reclamation
Luzerne Artist Wins National Award For Mining Artwork
PaEN: West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition Meeting March 12
PaEN: March Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
EPCAMR: Profile Of Nescopeck Creek Watershed Mine Drainage Problems In Luzerne County
Noncoal Mining
Bagenstose: Federal Court Ruling Mostly Favors Rockhill Quarry
Oil & Gas
PA Supreme Court Turns Down Conventional Gas Drillers’ Motion To Reconsider Stripper Well
Impact Fee Decision
Residents Want Gas Drilling To Stop At Beaver Run Reservoir In Westmoreland
Hopey: Buffer Zones Debates For Drilling Near State Dams After Westmoreland Shale Gas Well
Problem
Editorial: Lawmakers Should Recognize Need For Infrastructure Program And A Fair Severance
Tax
PaEN: IFO: Natural Gas Production Increased 14.2% In 2018, Largest Increase Since 2014
Letter: Natural Gas A Winner For Pennsylvania
Do PA Landowners Retain Mineral Rights When Selling Land To State?
PA Marcellus Gas To Power Electric Plant In Puerto Rico
Burgettstown Students Get Hands-On Look At Natural Gas Industry
3 Firms Seek To Buy Worley & Obetz Fuelling Stations, Other Assets
Litvak: EQT Names COO In Effort To Cut Costs Amid Proxy Challenge
Editorial: Where To Drill For Oil In U.S. Still Requires Discretion
U.S. EIA: New U.S. Power Plants Expected To Be Mostly Natural Gas, Solar PV
Permitting
PaEN: DEP Posts 41 Pages Of Permit Notices In March 9 PA Bulletin
Personnel
PaEN: DEP Deputy Secretary George Hartenstein To Retire After 37 Years Of Public Service
Pipelines

94
Phillips: Chester County Investigation Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Now Includes Grand Jury
PaEN: DEP Assesses $1.5 Million Penalty Against Beta Trunk Pipeline For Unstable Slope,
Construction Violations In Greene County
Sisk: DEP Issues $1.5M Fine For Pipeline Construction Site In Greene County
Operator Of Natural Gas Gathering Pipeline Fined In Greene County
Litvak: Greene County Gas Line Garners $1.5 Million Fine
Op-Ed: Pipeline Alert Systems: Energy Obstructionism
FERC Plans Environmental Assessment Of Leidy South, FM100 Pipeline Projects In PA
Radiation Protection
PaEN: Kleinman Center For Energy Policy Estimates Bill Supporting Nuclear Power Plants
Would Cost Ratepayers $500 Million A Year
PaEN: PUC Commissioner Andrew Place Circulates Paper On Nuclear Power Plant Policy
Alternatives
Cusick: Unsolicited, PUC Commissioner Sends Legislators A Breakdown Of Nuclear Bailout
Options
Maykuth: Customers Would Pay Millions To Rescue PA Nuclear Reactors, Including Some
Already Profitable
AP-Levy: Rescuing PA’s Nuclear Power Plants Could Come With Conditions
Industrial Customers Oppose Evolving PA Nuclear Subsidy Proposal
A Pizza Shop Owner Worried About Three Mile Island Closing, Others Don’t See Major Impact
Climate Concerns Rise As Clock Ticks For Aging Reactors
There Really, Really Isn’t A Silver Bullet For Climate Change
Rep. Vitali To Hold Informational Meeting March 11 On Nuclear Power's Contribution To Zero-
Carbon Energy Production In PA
Letter: Reject Bailouts Of The Nuclear Industry - Rep. Ortitay
Op-Ed: Why Should Electric Customers Subsidize Nuclear Generation? - President Of PPL
Op-Ed: PA Should Not Be Propping Up The Nuclear Power Industry
Editorial: Pennsylvania Shouldn’t Save Nuclear Power Plants
Robert Swift: Three Mile Island Accident - March 28, 1979
WITF: Watch MetEd Press Conference From The Day After The 1979 Three Mile Island
Accident
Activists Challenge License Extension For Peach Bottom Nuke Plant
Op-Ed: Pennsylvania Needs Cap-And-Trade To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Joe Minott
Recreation
PaEN: House Tourism & Recreation Committee Holds March 19 Info Meeting On PA Parks &
Forests Foundation Infrastructure Needs Report
DCNR Good Natured Blog: A Plan To Restore Pennsylvania
DCNR Promotes Restore Pennsylvania At Delaware, Washington Crossing Parks
Study: Presque Isle State Park Needs $50 Million In Improvements
PaEN: Penn State Extension: Everybody Walk Across PA And Tour The Natural Wonders Of
Pennsylvania
Penn State Extension Urges Everybody Walk Across PA To See Natural Wonders Of PA
Sisk: Lewis & Clark Expedition’s Pittsburgh Roots Get Federal Recognition
Letter: Remove All Mountain Bikes From All Non-Motorized Trails In Allegheny National
Forest
Snow Boosts Conditions, Extends Season At Seven Springs In Somerset

95
PaEN: March 8 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
WITF Smart Talk: Recreation Gets Funding Commitment, Carbon Credits For Woodlands?
Ashley Officials Plan To Sell Centennial Park, Build New Park Nearby
Susquehanna Warrior Trail Faces More Delays
Schuylkill River Trail Mural Meeting March 20 In Pottstown
Rebuild Philadelphia Starts 6 Playground And Park Construction Projects
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
Pittsburgh’s Kolb Brothers Brought The World To The Grand Canyon
PaEN: PA Wilds Cooperative To Bring Traveling Public Art Show To Capitol In Harrisburg
March 8-28
Letter: Remove All Mountain Bikes From All Non-Motorized Trails In Allegheny National
Forest
AP-Scolforo: Dinosaur Tracks Make Fresh Impression At Valley Forge National Park
Congress Reauthorizes Land And Water Conservation Fund
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Recycling/Waste
PaEN: DEP Accepting Applications For 2018 Recycling Performance Grants; Grants To
Increase By 20%
Recycle Your Electronics Saturday In Erie County
China Cutback On Taking Recyclables Means More To Burn In Chester City
Campaign Encourages Lancaster County To Pass On Plastic
PaEN: DEP: Benefits Outweigh Harms From Chrin Landfill Expansion In Northampton County;
Technical Review Comments Being Accepted
DEP Says Benefits Of Chrin Landfill Expansion Outweigh Possible Harms
Residents Sue Grand Central Landfill Citing Excessive Odors
Friends Of Lackawanna Online Petition Opposing Landfill Expansion Approaches Goal
Allentown Company Uses Old Mack Plant To Divert Construction Debris From Landfills
Neighbors Urge DEP To Deny Permits For Bucks County Hazardous Waste Facility
Bagenstose: Crowd Speaks Out Against Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Proposal
Coal Waste At Power Plants Linked To Groundwater Pollution; Montour Plant Included
Report: Little Blue Run Scrubber Waste Impoundment Still Contaminating Local Groundwater
Renewable Energy
Bill Opens Door To Community Solar Projects
EcoWURD Wants To Connect Black Philadelphians To Green Economy
Letter: Invest Tax Dollars In Renewable Energy
Shale Gas Boom Slows Progress On Renewables In PJM Grid Territory
U.S. EIA: New U.S. Power Plants Expected To Be Mostly Natural Gas, Solar PV
Schuylkill River
PaEN: Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29
Schuylkill River Trail Mural Meeting March 20 In Pottstown
Stormwater
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach
To County Planning Process

96
PaEN: DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
PaEN: Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
PaEN: Southwest PA Water Resource Center Hosts Workshops On Grant Writing, Stormwater
Pollution Control Implementation, Reporting
New Plan For Turnpike Stormwater Runoff Will Better Protect Valley Forge Historical Park
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
Greencastle Council Works Toward Stormwater Fee
PaEN: March 12 Penn State Water Insights Seminar Highlights Green Infrastructure To Reduce
Stormwater Pollution
Susquehanna River
PaEN: West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition Meeting March 12
Sustainability
New Position Will Drive Environmental, Corporate Sustainability At Harsco
Wastewater Facilities
Letter: Requiring Sewer Inspections On Sale Of Property Unfair To Reduce Groundwater
Infiltration
Watershed Protection
PaEN: CBF-PA: Pennsylvanians-- Call Your House, Senate Member To Support Keystone Tree
Fund Bills
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Adopts Phased Approach
To County Planning Process
PaEN: DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: York County
State, Federal Efforts Take Aim At Conowingo Dam
Choose Clean Water Coalition Seeks More Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay
PaEN: Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
Livestaking: A Trusty Technique For Planting Trees And Shrubs On The Cheap
Tree Talk - Livestaking Video By Alliance For Chesapeake Bay
Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter
PaEN: Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Assn. Sets April 27 Riparian Buffer Planting, 2019 Creek
Cleanup Events In Cumberland County
Clearfield Conservation District Offers Manure Plan Writing Workshops March 16, April 13
Bay Journal: Get Pollution-Reduction Credits For Planting Trees In Your Community
PaEN: Pike Conservation District: 3-Part How Your Backyard Activities Affect Your Lake
Workshops
PaEN: PA American Water Announces Sponsorship Of Expedition Chesapeake Film
PaEN: March 12 Penn State Water Insights Seminar Highlights Green Infrastructure To Reduce
Stormwater Pollution
Scranton Says Annual Stormwater Fee Of $32 Per Home
Declining Water Quality, Litter In Buffalo Creek Watershed Among Concerns In Upcoming
Report
EPCAMR: Profile Of Nescopeck Creek Watershed Mine Drainage Problems In Luzerne County
PaEN: DRBC Announces Delaware Watershed Winter Photo Contest Winner; Spring Contest

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Begins March 20
PaEN: Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest Now Accepting Entries Thru March
29
Delaware RiverKeeper March 8 RiverWatch Video Report
Letter: Requiring Sewer Inspections On Sale Of Property Unfair To Reduce Groundwater
Infiltration
PaEN: Erie Times-News Connect With Your Environment - Lake Erie Water Diversions
Op-Ed: Why We Support EPA Waters Of The U.S. Rule Change - PA Farm Bureau
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal On Facebook
Wildlife
Frye: Fish & Boat Commission Answers Angler Questions On Voluntary Permits
Tierney: Trout Season In PA By The Numbers
Hayes: Game Commission Struggles With Expenses As State Audit Continues
Game Commission Waterfowl Meeting To Be Held In Luzerne County
PaEn: Annual Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing To Be Held March 15 In Luzerne County
Preconstruction Efforts Will Limit Access At Minsi Lake In Northampton County
Bald Eagle Mom In Hanover Protects Eggs From Snow - Video/Photos
PaEN: Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Spring Hawk Watch Launches April 1
Hanover Bald Eagle Nest Welcome 2nd Egg Of 2019
Middle Creek Snow Geese Migration Not Quite At Peak, But Close
Schneck: Pittsburgh’s National Aviary Now Home To Cock-Of-The-Rock
Editorial: Of Deer, Driving And Responsibility
PaEN: Learn How To Resolve Deer Problems In Your Backyard, Neighborhood At March 25
Seminar In Harrisburg
PaEN: Game Commission Launches 3rd Online Livestream - Black Bear Den
Schneck: Go Inside A Black Bear Den Through Latest Game Commission Webcam
Live Bear Cam Debuts In Pennsylvania
PaEN: Ice Anglers Urged To Use Caution As Season Comes To Close
PEC Podcast: Pennsylvania’s Living Cities - Wildlife
Tierney: Cicadas Will Swarm Southwestern PA This Spring
West Nile/Zika Virus
Winter Chill Won’t Affect Mosquitoes, Ticks, Penn State Extension
PA Scientists Look For Most Wanted Insects On Behalf Of The Federal Govt.
Kummer: NJ Has At Least 11 Tick Species, And Some Are Making Us Sick
Federal Policy
EPA Union In Philadelphia Calls 2020 Budget Proposal Devastating Blow To Health,
Environment

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and

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meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW means new from last week. Go to the online Calendar webpage for updates.

Note: DEP published the 2019 schedules of its advisory committees, councils and board
meetings in the Dec. 10 PA Bulletin, page 7708.

March 9-- 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River. Montgomery County
Community College campus in Pottstown.

March 9-- Penn State Extension York County Master Gardeners GardenWise Native Plants,
Ecosystems Gardening Workshop Central York Middle School, 1950 N. Hills Road, York. 7:30
to 4:00.

March 9-- Dauphin County Woodland Owners Annual Conference. Dauphin, Dauphin County.
8:30 to 3:15.

March 9-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Bethel Park, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

March 11-- NEW. House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee information meeting
on the PJM Interconnection. Room G-50 Irvis Building. 11:00. Click Here for more on the
agenda.

March 11-- NEW. House Consumer Affairs Committee information meeting with Stu Bressler,
Vice President of Operations and Markets for PJM Interconnection. Room 140. Noon. Click
Here for more on the agenda.

March 11-- NEW. Rep. Vitali Holds Information Meeting On Nuclear Power’s Contribution To
Zero-Carbon Energy Production In PA. Room 8E-B East Wing. 11:00 to 12:30. Click Here for
more on the agenda.

March 11-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Clearfield County.

March 12-- DEP Drive Electric Pennsylvania Coalition meeting. Duquesne Light Company, 411
7th Avenue, Pittsburgh. 10:00 to 2:00. DEP Contact: Mark Hand, mhand@pa.gov.

March 12-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Tioga County.

March 12-- NEW. PUC PA 1 Call Damage Prevention Committee meeting. Hearing Room 1,
Keystone Building. 9:00. Webcast available.

March 12-- NEW. Penn State Environment & Natural Resources Institute Water Insights
Seminar - Green Infrastructure To Reducing Stormwater Pollution. Room 312 of the Ag and Bio
Engineering Building, State College. Noon to 1:00. Webcast available.

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March 12-- NEW. West Branch Susquehanna River Restoration Coalition meeting. Clinton
County Conservation District Environmental Learning Center, 45 Cooperation Lane, Mill Hall.
6:30.

March 13-- Agenda Posted. DEP Sewage Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, jvollero@pa.gov.

March 13-- Delaware River Basin Commission meeting. Washington Crossing Historic Park
Visitor Center, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, Bucks County. 10:30. (formal notice)

March 13 -- DEP Weathering The Storm Workshop On Understanding Stormwater Runoff. Jane
Schultz Room 1st Floor of the Wertz Student Center at Lycoming College, Williamsport. 8:30 to
3:00.

March 13-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Chester County.

March 13-- PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture Soil Health: Real Farms, Real Problems,
Real Solutions Workshop. Lancaster Farm and Home Center, 1382 Arcadia Road, Lancaster.
11:00 to 3:00.

March 13-- NEW. Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Grant Writing
Workshop. Allegheny Twp. Community Building, Leechburg, Armstrong County. 9:00 to
Noon. Click Here to register.

March 14-- CANCELED. DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, lahenry@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 14-- Penn State Extension Webinar - Methane Migration & Changes In Aquifer
Properties. 1:00.

March 14-- NEW. Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Grant Writing
Workshop. Cranberry Twp. Municipal Center, Cranberry Township, Butler County. 9:00 to
Noon. Click Here to register.

March 15-- Susquehanna River Basin Commission meeting. Crowne Plaza Annapolis, 173
Jennifer Road, Annapolis. 9:00. Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423 Ext. 1302. (formal notice)
Click Here for more on the agenda.

March 15-- Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series: Legal Pathways To Zero Greenhouse Gas
Emissions. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30
to 1:00.

March 15-- NEW. Game Commission Waterfowl Briefing. Game Commission Northeast

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Region Office, 3917 Memorial Highway, Dallas, Luzerne County. 1:00.

March 16-- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Creating The Appalachian Trail In
The South. Pine Grove Furnace Ironmasters House, Gardners, Adams County. Noon.

March 16-- South Mountain Partnership, Capital Resource Conservation & Development Area
Council Watershed Groups Working With Municipalities For Greater Impact Workshop. Adams
County Conservation District Office, 670 Old Harrisburg Road, Gettysburg. 9:00 a.m. to Noon.

March 16-- DCNR Bureau Of Forestry. Making The Most Of Your Piece Of Nature: A
Sustainable Backyard Workshop. Franklin Regional Senior High School, 3200 School Road in
Murrysville, Westmoreland County. 8:30 to 12:30.

March 16-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Fox Chapel, Allegheny
County. 10:30 to Noon.

March 16-- Brodhead Watershed Association Get Outdoors Poconos Hike at the new Bluestone
Preserve In Paradise Township, Monroe County. 10:00.

March 18-- Penn State Extension 2 Home Water And Septic System Workshops. Gracedale
Nursing Home Conference Room, 2 Gracedale Ave., Nazareth, Northampton County. 1:30 and
6:00.

March 18-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Quakertown, Bucks
County.

March 18-19-- PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators. 2019 Cityscapes & Greenscapes


Conference. Philadelphia.

March 18-19-- Green Building Alliance Certified Passive House Tradesperson Training -
Module I. Pittsburgh.

March 19-- Joint Conservation Committee informational meeting on promoting PA Route 6 for
biking and local tourism. Room 108 Irvis Building. 10:00.

March 19-- NEW. House Tourism and Recreational Development Committee holds an
informational meeting with a presentation by the PA Parks & Forests Foundation on
infrastructure needs report. Room 205 Ryan Building. 9:00. Click Here for more on the agenda.

March 19-- CANCELED. Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ledinger@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 19-- CANCELED. DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. The next scheduled meeting
is April 16. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to:
ksalador@pa.gov. (formal notice)

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March 19-- DCNR, Penn State Extension Forest Health, Insect & Disease Briefing. Penn Stater
Hotel and Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:30.

March 19-- NEW. Dept. Of Labor & Industry Uniform Construction Code Review And
Advisory Council meeting. L&I Building, 651 Boas Street, Room E-100 in Harrisburg. 10:00.
Contact: Nathan Clark, 717-772-9162. (formal notice)

March 19-- NEW. Pipeline Safety Rally - Sen. Dinniman, Rep. Friel Otten. Capitol Rotunda,
Harrisburg. 10:00.

March 20-- Joint Senate & House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees hold joint hearing
on Gov. Wolf’s proposed PA Farm Bill. Hearing Room 1 North Office Building. 9:00. Click
Here for more on PA Farm Bill

March 20-- Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series. Options For Meeting MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction Requirements Without Breaking The Budget. Noon to 1:15.

March 20-- Whitaker Center for Science & The Arts Premiere Of Expedition Chesapeake iMax
Film. Whitaker Center, Harrisburg. 5:30.

March 20-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Point Breeze, Allegheny
County. 6:30 to 8:00.

March 20-21-- Registration Open. Northeast Recycling Council Spring Conference.


Wilmington, DE.

March 21-- DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, twallace@pa.gov. (formal
notice)

March 21-- Stroud Water Research Center World Water Day Celebration. At the Center,
Avondale, Chester County. 6:00.

March 21-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Nazareth, Northampton
County.

March 21-- NEW. Dept. Of Agriculture’s Controlled Plant And Noxious Weed Committee
meeting to consider adding hemp to the Controlled Plant List. Room 309 Agriculture Building,
2301 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg. 1:00. Questions should be directed to Trilby Libhart,
717-787-4843, or send email to: RA-plant@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 22-- Tree Pittsburgh Tree Ordinance Workshop. Tree Pittsburgh, 32 62nd Street in
Pittsburgh. 8:30 to Noon.

March 22-- NEW. Penn State Extension Rights-Of-Way And Integrated Vegetation
Management Workshop. Extension Office in Mercer County at 463 N. Perry Highway, Mercer.

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8:30 to 4:00.

March 22-23-- Registration Open. Penn State Center For Private Forests 4th Biennial Forest
Landowners Conference. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

March 23-- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Adams County Barn Survey Volunteer
Training. Apple Museum in Biglerville. 8:30.

March 23-- NEW. Jacobs Creek Watershed Association Tired Of Tires Collection Campaign,
Westmoreland County. Scottdale Borough, 10 Mount Pleasant Road, Scottdale. 9:00 to Noon.

March 23-- Pocono Environmental Ed Center Angling & Hunting For Conservation Program.
At the Center, 538 Emery Road in Dingmans Ferry, Pike County.10:00 to 2:15.

March 25-- NEW. Botstiber Institute For Wildlife Fertility Control Pennsylvania Deer Conflict
Management Seminar. Dixon University Center, Administration Building, Conference Room
B/C, 2986 North Second Street, Harrisburg. 5:30 to 8:00

March 25-26-- Green Building Alliance Certified Passive House Tradesperson Training -
Module II. Pittsburgh.

March 25-29-- Carnegie Mellon University Energy Week 2019. Pittsburgh.

March 26-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Lewisburg, Union County.

March 27-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Macungie, Lehigh County.

March 27-28-- Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators. Jennings
Environmental Education Center, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County. Click
Here to register.

March 28-- DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, diawilson@pa.gov.

March 28-- DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board Reclamation Committee meeting.
14th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden,
717-783-8846 or send email to: dsnowden@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 28-- NEW. Pike County Conservation District. Ways To Help Your Lake Stay Healthy.
Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

March 29-- Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series: Natural Gas In PA: Energy, Innovation And The
Environment. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg.
11:30 to 1:00.

March 29-- NEW. Keystone Elk Country Alliance Student Environmental Career Day & Job

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Fair. Elk Country Visitor Center, 134 Homestead Drive, Benezette, Elk County. 10:00 to 2:00

March 30-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Edgeworth Borough,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

March 30-- NEW. Penn State Extension Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop.
Southeast Agricultural Research & Extension Center, 1446 Auction Road, Manheim, Lancaster
County. 9:00 to 11:30.

March 31-- NEW. Brodhead Watershed Association Reflections On A Changing Climate


Program. Brodhead Creek Heritage Center, 1539 Cherry Lane Road, Analomink, Monroe
County. 1:00.

April 1-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Phoenixville, Chester
County.

April 2-- Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop. Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 2-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Cambria County.

April 2-- Registration Open. PRPS Parks & Green Infrastructure - Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits Workshop. Penn Stater Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:00.

April 3-- NEW. Brandywine Conservancy Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable. Brandywine
Conservancy Offices, 1 Hoffman’s Mill Road, Chadds Ford, Chester County. 10:00 to 2:30.

April 4-6-- Registration Open. Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit. Philadelphia.

April 5-- Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala. Nittany Lion Inn,
State College.

April 5-- Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate Disruption
& Sustainable Development Series: Towards A Public Web-Platform For Limiting Methane
Emissions From The Oil & Gas Sector. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326
Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 6-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. South Fayette Twp., Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 6-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Point Breeze, Allegheny
County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 7-9-- CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh.

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April 8-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Westmoreland County.

April 9-- DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board meeting. Delaware Room, Rachel Carson
Building. 8:30. DEP Contact: Allison Acevedo, 484-250-5942. (formal notice)

April 9-- Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop. Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 9-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Crawford County.

April 9-- NEW. Capital RC&D, NRCS-PA Farming & Conservation Opportunities For
Hispanic, African American, Other Underserved Farmers. Pine Forge Academy, 361 Pine Forge
Road in Pine Forge, Berks County. 9:00 to 3:00.

April 10-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Point Breeze,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

April 11- DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to: kdalal@pa.gov.

April 11-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Lehigh County.

April 11-- NEW. South Mountain Partnership Science Summit.

April 13-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Dormont Borough, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 13-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. O’Hara Township,


Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 13-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Springfield, Delaware
County.

April 16-- Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ledinger@pa.gov.

April 16-- DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to: ksalador@pa.gov.

April 16- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Charcoal Hearths, Collier Huts And
Haul Roads. Dickinson College in the Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, Carlisle, Cumberland
County. 7:00.

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April 16-- PA Environmental Council Dinner Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For
Environmental Excellence. Hilton Harrisburg. 5:00. PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor
of this special event.

April 16-18-- PA American Water Works Association Annual Conference. Hershey Lodge and
Convention Center.

April 16-18-- NEW. Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Association Tree Wrapping. Shillelagh
Farm, 6623 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 9:00 to Noon.

April 17-- Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series. Making The Most Of Historical And
Heritage Assets. Noon to 1:15.

April 17-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Phipps Garden
Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 18-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Benefits Of Energy Management
Systems Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

April 19-- Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series: Using The Latest Digital Innovations To Address
Energy Poverty In Developing Counties. Harrisburg University, Room 1151, 326 Market Street,
Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 20-- Clean Air Council Run For Clean Air. Philadelphia.

April 20-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Construction


Junction, Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 20-- PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting Weiser State Forest, Columbia
County. 9:00 to 1:00.

April 20-- NEW. Audubon Society of Western PA Earth Day Of Service To The Planet At 3
Locations. Butler, Allegheny counties.

April 22-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Dauphin County.

April 24-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Sewickley


Public Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 25-- DEP Agricultural Advisory Board meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund 717-772-5636 or jbraund@pa.gov.
(formal notice)

April 25-- NEW. PennFuture Celebrating Women In Conservation Awards Celebration.

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Susquehanna Club, New Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:30 to 8:00.

April 26-- Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase. Berks County 4-H
Center, 1206 County Welfare Road, Leesport. Noon.

April 26-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Lords Valley, Pike County.

April 26-27-- Bucknell University 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium. Bucknell University,
Lewisburg, Union County.

April 27-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Avalon & Bellevue Boroughs,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 27-- NEW. Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Association Riparian Buffer Planting. East
Pennsboro Township's Ridley Park, 1625 Matthew Drive, Camp Hill, Cumberland County. 9:00

April 29-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Lackawanna County.

April 29 to May 2-- Registration Open. Center for Watershed Protection. 2019 National
Watershed and Stormwater Conference. South Carolina.

April 30-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Bedford County.

May 1-- Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium. State College.

May 1-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Green Tree
Municipal Building, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 4-- PA Environmental Council, DCNR Moshannon State Forest Tree Planting, Clearfield
County.

May 4-- Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale. Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and
Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.

May 4-- PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting at Moshannon State Forest, Clearfield
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

May 7-- NEW. Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Stormwater Workshop.
Moon Twp. Municipal Building, Moon Township, Allegheny County. 9:00 to Noon. Click
Here to register.

May 8-- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Pollinators And Their Habitat. Messiah
College, Boyer Hall Room 131, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00.

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May 8-- PA Parks & Forests Foundation Annual Awards Celebration. Susquehanna Club, New
Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:00. Click Here for sponsor information. PA Environment
Digest is a proud sponsor of this special event.

May 8-- NEW. Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Stormwater Workshop.
Peters Twp. Municipal Building, McMurray, Washington County. 9:00 to Noon. Click Here to
register.

May 8-10-- PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals. 2019 Annual Conference - Growth


Through Collaboration. State College.

May 10-- PA Environmental Council, DCNR 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit. Raystown Lake
Visitors Center, Huntingdon County. 10:00 to 4:00.

May 11-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Upper St. Clair Twp,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

May 11-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. O’Hara


Township, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

May 15-- Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series. The Benefits And Challenges of
Ridesharing On The Transportation System. Noon to 1:15.

May 16-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Basics Of Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

May 16-- PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs. Luzerne County.

May 16-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Mt. Lebanon
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 16-18-- Registration Open. PA Land Trust Association. Land Conservation Conference.
Monroe County.

May 18-- Registration Open. Environmental Advisory Council Network Conference. Held in
conjunction with the PA Land Conservation Conference in Monroe County.

May 18-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Ross Township, Allegheny
County. 4:00 to 5:30.

May 21-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Mt. Lebanon Library,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 22-- PA Resources Council Healthy Body & Healthy Home Workshop. Sewickley Public
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

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June 1-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Kilbuck Township, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 3-7-- Registration Open. American Society of Mining & Reclamation Annual Meeting.
Montana.

June 4-- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. North Park Rose
Barn, Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 6-- DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, lahenry@pa.gov. (formal notice)

June 6- PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop. Phipps Garden


Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 8-- PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event. Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 11-- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Appreciating The PA Local Craft Brew
Industry. Appalachian Brewing Company in Shippensburg. 6:30.

June 11-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. North Park Rose Barn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 13-- PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop. Phipps Garden Center,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 13-- Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting. Exton, Chester County.

June 16-21-- Cumberland Valley TU Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp. Messiah
College, Grantham, Cumberland County.

June 17-21-- Registration Open. Group Against Smog And Pollution Air Adventures Summer
Youth Camp. Pittsburgh.

June 23-29-- Registration Open. Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp. Keystone College,
Lackawanna County.

July 8-12-- Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp. Hawk Mountain
Sanctuary, Berks County.

July 18-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Funding & Incentives To Implement
Energy Efficiency Projects Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

June 20-- NEW. Pike County Conservation District. Homeowner Tips To Protect Clean Water.

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Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

July 24-26-- Registration Open. Professional Recyclers Of PA Annual Recycling & Organics
Conference. Harrisburg.

August 12-16-- Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp. Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary, Berks County.

August 15-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning For Energy
Efficiency In Downtown Buildings Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

August 22-25-- PA Association Of Hazardous Materials Technicians Annual Hazmat Training


and Education Conference. Seven Springs, Somerset County.

September 4-5-- PA Waste Industries Assn/Solid Waste Assn-Keystone Chapter Joint


Conference. Harrisburg Hilton.

September 8-11-- Registration Open. 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation and National
Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference. Pittsburgh. PA Environment Digest is a proud
sponsor of this event.

September 11-- DEP Sewage Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, jvollero@pa.gov. (formal notice)

September 12-- South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Methods Of Combating Illegal
Dumping And Vandalism In A Forest Setting. Caledonia State Park in Fayetteville, Franklin
County. 6:30.

September 19-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Alternative Energy Projects For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

September 19-- NEW. Pike County Conservation District. Properly Maintaining Your On-Lot
Septic System. Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

September 22-24-- Pennsylvania Greenways And Trails Summit. Shippensburg University


Conference Center.

October 3-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Economy, Energy And Environment
For Food-Related Industries Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

October 8-10-- Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference. Pittsburgh.

October 16-17-- 7th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum. Allentown.

November 21-- Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Entrepreneurship Ecosystem At


Penn State Webinar. Noon to 1:00.

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Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities.


Click Here for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit DEP Connects for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page DEP Twitter Feed DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events DCNR Calendar of Events
Click Here to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule House Committee Schedule
You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. NEW means new from last week.

March 11-- Pennsylvania Sea Grant Research Grants


March 15-- WPC TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree Planting Grants
March 21-- Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp
March 20-- EPA Conowingo Dam Watershed Implementation Plan Grants
March 22-- PA American Water Stream Of Learning College Scholarship
March 22-- DEP Section 902 Recycling Implementation Grants
March 22-- CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
March 22-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
March 22-- CFA Solar Energy Funding
March 22-- CFA High Performance Building Funding
March 29-- PA Environmental Professionals Karl Mason, Walter Lyon Awards
March 29-- PA American Water Environmental Grants
March 29-- NEW. Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest
March 31-- DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates (First-Come)
March 31-- DEP Municipal, Hazardous Waste Host Municipality Inspector Grants
April 1-- DEP Farm Conservation Planning Reimbursement In 43 Counties
April 5-- NEW. Chesapeake Bay Foundation Save The Bay Photo Contest
April 10-- DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Recreation, Buffer Grants
April 10-- Appalachian Regional Commission Coal Regions Workforce Grants
April 12-- PA American Water Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
April 18-- Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
April 20-- PPL Future Environmental Leaders Scholarship
May 3-- Pike Conservation District Environmental Ed Grant
May 10-- DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
May 15-- NEW. Delaware River Basin Commission Spring Photo Contest
May 17-- CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 17-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding

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May 17-- CFA Solar Energy Funding
May 17-- CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement and Treatment Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grants
July 1-- PA Wilds Center Champion Of PA Wilds Awards
July 15-- DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
July 19-- CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 19-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
July 19-- CFA Solar Energy Funding
July 19-- CFA High Performance Building Funding
September 30-- NEW. DEP Recycling Performance Grants
December 16-- DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1-- Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22-- DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1-- Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1-- Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 4-- PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
September 23-- DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1-- Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR Apply for Grants webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

No new regulations were published this week. Pennsylvania Bulletin - March 9, 2019

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance was published this week.

Permits ------------

The Fish and Boat Commission published notice in the March 9 PA Bulletin on proposed

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additions, revisions and removals from the Classification Of Wild Trout Streams and proposed
changes to the list of Class A Wild Trout Waters for public comment.

Note: The Department of Environmental Protection published 41 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the March 9 PA Bulletin -
pages 1034 to 1075.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. Click Here to sign up.

Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)- DEP webpage

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Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or

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programs for publication in the PA Environment Digest to: PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com.

PA Environment Digest is a publication of PA Environment News LLC and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
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PA Environment Digest Proudly Helps Sponsor These Award, Educational


Programs

PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor of these award and educational programs--

Sponsor: PEC Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence Dinner

PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor of the PA Environmental Council Dinner


Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence on April 16 in
Harrisburg.

Sponsor: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Awards Celebration

PA Environment Digest is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 PA Parks & Forests Foundation

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Annual Awards Celebration on May 8 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County.

Sponsor: PA/National Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference

PA Environment Digest is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation


and National Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference to be held in Pittsburgh on September
8-11.

Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited

PA Environment Digest is a supporting member of the Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers


Association, Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited and the Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout
Unlimited.

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