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Mark Julien

NLP Anchoring

Authors: Mark Julien (mark.julien@julienco.com) Date: Monday, 24 April 2006
Authors:
Mark Julien (mark.julien@julienco.com)
Date:
Monday, 24 April 2006

NLP Anchoring

Contents

1 Introduction

3

1.1 Definition

3

1.2 So What Is It Really?

3

1.3 What Can Anchoring Be Used For?

3

1.4 The Science of Anchoring – The Brain and Neurotransmitters

4

1.5 Studies on Anchoring

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2 Anchoring Exercises

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2.1 Basic Theory

6

2.2 State Elicitation Script

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2.3 States For Stacking Anchors

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2.4 Collapse Anchors

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2.5 Chaining Anchors

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3 Reference

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3.1 The Presuppositions Of NLP

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3.2 NLP Training

10

3.3 NLP Websites

10

3.4 NLP Bibliography

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Credits:

In the production of this pack, I have used a number of sources, including:

Advanced Neuro Dynamics (http://www.nlp.com/) Pegasus NLP (http://www.nlp-now.co.uk/ ; http://www.pe2000.com) NLP Institute (http://sidjacobson.com/institute/) NLP Schedule (http://www.nlpschedule.com/) ‘Blink’ by Malcolm Gladwell ‘What The Bleep Do We Know?’, a film produced by Will Arntz ‘Brain Story’, a BBC documentary programme about the brain with Prof. Susan Greenfield

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1

Introduction

1.1 Definition

NLP Anchoring

In NLP, “Anchoring” refers to the process of associating an emotional or physical response with a separate environmental / physical or mental trigger.

1.2 So What Is It Really?

Anchoring is the study and application of a simple concept ‘memory’ and how, through neuro- associative connections, an environmental, physical or mental trigger can stimulate a separate emotional or physical response.

Everything has memory – even your pillow will ‘remember’ the shape of your head. All memories work on the same principle – the strength and depth of the memory is determined by the intensity of the experience through a range of forms, including length of time, significance of time, excitement, size, weight, colour, brightness, etc. depending on the type of memory.

Think of your strongest memories – your first day at school, sitting for exams, your first kiss, Christmases with your family – what makes those memories stay with you so clearly and vividly? In every case, the experience will have intensity on some level so that it almost literally ‘etches’ itself into your mind.

And do you notice ‘associations’ between certain senses – pictures, sounds, smells or even tastes – and your strongest memories? Have you ever heard a song, detected a smell or seen a photograph that then triggers a flood of feelings and emotions that you experienced many years ago? Perhaps a scene from your childhood, your school, your home or loved ones?

“Anchoring” is the process of associating an emotional or physical response with some environmental, physical or mental trigger. This can be automatic and naturally occurring (such as the fear associated with exams) or we can deliberately create anchors that we choose, for example sports men and women will frequently use anchors to stimulate a desired state (of confidence, control, calm, etc.) that will help their game.

NLP has developed specific techniques for creating anchors in ourselves and in others.

1.3 What Can Anchoring Be Used For?

Sports men and women can use positive ‘stacked’ anchors (associated with confidence, strength, winning, focus, etc.) to use when they need to get back ‘in the zone’

Actors can use anchors to associate with different emotions (such as laughter, tears, fear, etc.) that they can then trigger when they need to recreate an emotion in their character perhaps at short notice

Business people can use anchors to put themselves ‘in the zone’ before a presentation or important meeting

Students can use anchors to establish resourceful and effective states when they study

Sales people can install anchors in their customers to establish positive associations with themselves or their products

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NLP Anchoring

1.4 The Science of Anchoring – The Brain and Neurotransmitters

Altogether, the brain consists of some 10 billion neurons. Each neuron reaches out to one or more other neurons using minute fibres known as axons and dendrites every time we undertake any sort of mental activity.

every time we undertake any sort of mental activity. There are recognisable groups of neurons in

There are recognisable groups of neurons in the brain, but in principle a neuron can communicate with any other brain cell to form a thought or a memory, or to precipitate a course of action. Every time we use our brain to make a memory, certain neurons transmit electrical impulses at lightening speed along their axons. The impulses are picked up by the dendrites of other cells – forming a type of electrical circuitry in the brain.

Each neuron may have hundreds of dendrites. Between each dendrite and each fibre at the end of the receiving cell’s axon is a tiny gap, known as a synapse. In 1911 Santiago Ramon y Cajal, the father of neuroanatomy, discovered that the number of synapses was the real measure of genius. Importantly, though neurons stop reproducing after infancy, axons, dendrites and synapses keep growing as long as we keep learning.

When we use our brains, the electrical impulses sent along the axons cause messenger chemicals, called neurotransmitters, to be released by the axon of one neuron and flow across the synapse to the dendrite of the adjacent neuron. Different types of neurotransmitter carry different types of message – for example, serotonin acts as a natural painkiller and dopamine inhibits some of our movements.

In 1986, Deepak Chopra wrote in his book, Quantum Healing, that “the neurotransmitter touches every single cell in the human body”. “The immune system constantly eavesdrops on your internal dialogue, because of the ability of the neurotransmitter to affect every single cell in the body”.

Memories are therefore stored throughout the body, in the nerve cells that control the muscles.

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1.5 Studies on Anchoring

1.5.1 Pavlov’s Dogs

NLP Anchoring

Ivan Pavlov was a Russian physiologist who is famous for his numerous studies on classical conditioning. Using dogs as subjects, Pavlov paired a conditioned stimulus (food) that normally elicited a conditioned response (salivation) with an unconditioned stimulus (bell ringing). Eventually, the unconditioned stimulus became associated with the conditioned response. Pavlov further conducted research on classical conditioning.

It was determined from research done by Pavlov that learning done through classical conditioning occurred in the cerebral cortex. Work by Pavlov proved that conditioned responses could not be learned by dogs after removal of the cerebral cortex. Thus the cerebral cortex was determined to be critical for the formation and storage of conditioned reflexes.

1.5.2 Edwin Burket Twitmyer’s Knee Jerk

Edwin Burket Twitmyer was born in McElhattan, Pennsylvania on September 14, l873. He received his bachelor's degree from Lafayette College in 1896. In the following year he became instructor in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, and continued his studies there receiving a doctoral degree in 1902 and in 1914 he was appointed professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

In a dissertation Twitmyer did a conditioning study. He tested the knee-jerk reflex of college students by sounding a bell 0.5 seconds before hitting their patellar tendon, Twitmyer found that after several trials, the bell was sufficient to elicit the reflex in some of the students (Twitmyer, 1974). Twitmyer's discovery was in 1902, three years before Pavlov published his work on conditioning of dogs. But it was Pavlov who got the credit for the discovery.

1.5.3 UC Berkeley study of effect on depression by changing physiology

UC Berkeley did a study that took people that were declared clinically depressed and, for four weeks, made them stand in front of a mirror that had three plates at three angles and grin from ear to ear for twenty minutes a day. They had to grin so big that they had “crow’s feet” at the side of their eyes and had to keep their shoulders back and breathe fully whilst they did it.

Results: not a single person was able to remain depressed including a woman that claimed to be depressed even in her sleep (!). At the end of the four weeks, many of them had no more need for medication.

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NLP Anchoring

2 Anchoring Exercises

2.1 Basic Theory

DESIRED OUTCOME:

To be able to anchor a state in a person, at any time in any modality.

THEORY:

A. Definition: Any time a person is in an associated, intense state, if at the peak of that experience, a specific stimulus is applied, then the two will be linked neurologically

B. Anchoring can assist you in gaining access to past states and linking the past state to the present and the future.

PROCESS:

The Four Steps to Anchoring:

1. Have the person Recall a past vivid experience.

2. Anchor (Provide) a specific stimulus at the peak (see chart below)

3. Change the person’s state

4. Evoke the State Set off the anchor to test.

The Five Keys to Anchoring:

Mnemonic Device R A C E
Mnemonic Device
R A C E
Mnemonic Device I - T U R N
Mnemonic Device
I - T U R N

1. The Intensity of the Experience

2. The Timing of the Anchor

3. The Uniqueness of the Anchor

4. The Replication of the Stimulus

5. Number of Times)

APPLICATION OF AN ANCHOR:

Anchor State Up to 5 to 15 Seconds Intensity
Anchor
State
Up to 5 to
15 Seconds
Intensity

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Time

Times) APPLICATION OF AN ANCHOR: Anchor State Up to 5 to 15 Seconds Intensity 24/04/2006 Time

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NLP Anchoring

2.2 State Elicitation Script

The best states to anchor are naturally occurring states. Next best are past, vivid, highly associated states. Least preferable are constructed states.

Can you remember a time when you were totally

Can you remember a specific time?

As you go back to that time now

see what you saw, hear what you heard, and really feel the feelings of being totally X’d

X’d

?

go right back to that time, float down into your body and

2.3 States For Stacking Anchors

To stack anchors elicit several instances of states and anchor them in the same place. The state chosen for a particular stacked anchor can be the same or different. (In a Resource Anchor and Collapse Anchors, the states stacked should be different. In Chaining Anchors the states used for each stacked anchor should be the same.)

A time when you felt totally powerful.

A time when you felt totally loved.

A time when you really felt you could have whatever you wanted, a time when you could have it all.

A time when you felt really energetic, when you had a ton of energy.

A time when you fell down laughing.

A time when you felt totally confident.

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2.4 Collapse Anchors

NLP Anchoring

1. Get into rapport with the client.

2. Tell the client what you are about to do: “In just a moment I am going to do a process called ‘Collapse Anchors’ (explain), and that will necessitate that I touch you. Is that O.K.?”

3. Decide on which Positive/Resource States are needed, and decide on the Negative State to be collapsed. Make it clear which states specifically are involved.

4. As you elicit the Positive States get into each one before you elicit it in the client.

5. Make sure that the client is in a fully associated, intense, congruent state for each of the states you anchor

6. Anchor all the positive states in the same place, I.E. a knuckle or other easily identifiable place.

7. Anchor the negative state once.

8. Fire anchors at the same time until they peak, and the integration is complete. (Watch the client, they will usually exhibit signs of asymetry until the integration is complete.)

9. Release the negative anchor

10. Hold the positive anchor for 5 seconds and then release

11. Test: “Now how do feel about that old state?”

12. Future Pace: “Can you imagine a time in the future when you might be in a similar situation, and what happens?”

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2.5 Chaining Anchors

NLP Anchoring

Chaining is a technique that is used when the desired/resource state is significantly different from the present state and the present state is a stuck state.

1. Get in rapport.

2. Tell the client what you are about to do: “In just a moment I am going to do a process called ‘Chaining Anchors’ (explain), and that will necessitate that I touch you. Is that O.K.?”

3. Identify the undesirable present state (E.G.: Procrastination), and decide on the positive/resource end state (E.G.: Motivation).

4. Design the chain: Decide on what intermediate states are needed to lead to the end state. (EG: “You’re procrastinating, what gets you off that state?”)

1
1

Present

(State#1)

2 Intermediate
2
Intermediate

(State#2)

3 Intermediate (State#3)
3
Intermediate
(State#3)
4 End (State#4)
4
End
(State#4)

5. Get into each state as you elicit and anchor each state separately, beginning with the present state through the end state. (You may have to stack all states to get a high intensity.) Make sure that the subject is out of previous state prior to anchoring the next one. (Break State between states, especially between the last one and the first one.)

6. Test each state. Make sure that the client goes into each one.

7. Chain each state together firing #1 and when #1 is at its peak add #2, and then release #1. When #2 comes to the peak, add #3, then release #2. Add #4, etc. in the same way. (This is NOT a collapse because the two states do not peak at the same time.)

8. Test: Fire present state anchor. Client should end up in final state.

9. Ask the client, “Now how do you feel about procrastination.

10. Future Pace: “Can you think of a time in the future which if it had happened in the past

” EG: How do you feel about

you would have instead?”

(EG: Procrastinated) and tell me what happens

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3

Reference

NLP Anchoring

3.1 The Presuppositions Of NLP

Mnemonic Device R E S P E C T U R - W O R
Mnemonic Device
R E S P E C T
U R - W O R L D

1. Respect for the other person’s model of the world.

2. Behaviour and change are to be evaluated in terms of context, and Ecology

3. Resistance in a client is a Sign of a lack of rapport. (There are no resistant clients, only inflexible communicators. Effective communicators accept and utilize all communication presented to them.)

4. People are not their behaviours. (Accept the person; change the behaviour.)

5. Everyone is doing the best they can with the resources they have available. (Behaviour is geared for adaptation, and present behaviour is the best choice available. Every behaviour is motivated by a positive intent.)

6. Calibrate on Behaviour: The most important information about a person is that person’s behaviour.

7. The map is not the Territory. (The words we use are NOT the event or the item they represent.)

8. (U) You are in charge of your mind, and therefore your results (and I am also in charge of my mind and therefore my results).

9. People have all the Resources they need to succeed and to achieve their desired outcomes. (There are no unresourceful people, only unresourceful states.)

10. All procedures should increase Wholeness

11. There is ONLY feedback! (There is no failure, only feedback.)

12. The meaning of communication is the Response you get.

13. The Law of Requisite Variety: (The system/person with the most flexibility of behaviour will control the system.)

14. All procedures should be Designed to increase choice.

3.2 NLP Training

http://www.nlp.com/ (Matt James) http://www.purenlp.com/ (John LaValle) http://www.inspiritive.com.au/ (John Grinder) http://www.paulmckenna.com/ (Paul McKenna) http://www.meta-nlp.co.uk/

3.3 NLP Websites

http://www.richardbandler.com/ (Richard Bandler) http://www.neurolinguisticprogramming.com/ (Richard Bandler) http://www.johngrinder.com/ (John Grinder) http://www.johngrinder.co.uk/ (John Grinder) http://www.nlpu.com/ (Robert Dilts) c (Robert Dilts Encyclopedia of NLP free online) http://www.nlpcomprehensive.com/ (Steve Andreas, Connie Rae) http://www.nlpschedule.com/ (Richard Bandler) http://www.geniuscatalyst.com/public/michael.php (Michael Neill)

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3.4 NLP Bibliography

NLP Anchoring

The Structure of Magic Vols 1&2 by Richard Bandler & John Grinder

Frogs into Princes by Richard Bandler & John Grinder

NLP, The New Technology of Achievement by Steve Andreas and Charles Faulkner

NLP at Work by Sue Knight

Introducing NLP by Joseph O’Connor and John Seymour

Unlimited Power by Anthony Robbins

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