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Module 17 – PROPELLER

CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

MODULE 17

SUB MODULE 17.7

PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

Rev. 00 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

Contents Page

STORAGE PROCEDURES..................................................... 2

Rev. 00 i 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

“The training notes and diagrams are


compiled by SriLankan Technical Training
and although comprehensive in detail, they
are intended for use only with a Course of
instruction. When compiled, they are as up to
date as possible, and amendments to the
training notes and diagrams will NOT be
issued”.

Rev. 00 1 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

STORAGE PROCEDURES INSTALLED PROPELLERS


Propellers and their associated components contain numerous When propellers are to remain installed but out of service for
parts made from different materials. If they are improperly more than three months, the engine should be run and the
stored they can deteriorate to a stage where they are unable to propeller and its pitch change mechanism exercised to ensure a
perform their function efficiently, or can cause premature failure circulation of oil. If the engine cannot be run the propeller should
due to the erosion or corrosion of the component parts. The be feathered and then unfeathered using the feathering pump,
existing state of the propeller will dictate the method or this exercising should if possible be carried out weekly.
procedures required, for example a propeller installed on a
For periods of greater than three months the pitch change
stored aircraft and a propeller disassembled and stored in its
mechanism and its associated parts should be removed,
component parts in a crate, will call for different treatment.
draining off all the oil. The assembly should be flushed with an
approved inhibiting oil and refitted. The following procedures
should also be adopted in long term storage (over 3 months):-
- Coat the surface of the blades with lanolin,
- Coat the spinner with lanolin,
- Treat all detachable or exposed parts, i.e., screw threads
etc., with rust preventative compound,
- Smear exposed oil seals with silicone grease,
- Cover the propeller hub and operating mechanisms with
waxed paper and tie into position,
- Frequently inspect all the components for corrosion and
deterioration, paying particular attention to the blades and
spinner.

Rev. 00 2 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

UNINSTALLED PROPELLERS jelly, and wrap individually in waxed paper or moisture


vapour proof bags.
Propellers if stored assembled should be kept in conditions that
are warm, dry and dust free. Small two bladed propellers can be - Fit all blanking caps and covers.
stored in racks above ground level to allow for the circulation of
- All exposed surfaces of the blade root bearings should be
air. Three or more bladed propellers can be stored vertically on
coated with mineral jelly and wrapped in waxed paper.
stands with their weight supported by a mandrel passing through
the centre of the hub. For better protection from the elements - Blades should be coated with lanolin then wrapped in grease
the propeller can be dismantled, protected and stored in a proof paper.
specially prepared crate. - Electrical connections should be thoroughly cleaned and
For short term storage of an uninstalled propeller (under three coated with petroleum jelly.
months) the pitch change mechanism should be exercised prior The packing crate should be clearly labelled with:-
to removal from the aircraft. Longer term storage of an
assembled propeller involves methods which are similar to those 1. Part number
used for long term storage whilst installed on the aircraft, except 2. Modification standard
that any attachment fittings removed are to be treated with rust
preventative compound and individually wrapped in waxed 3. Date put into store
paper. 4. Exercise date of bearings
Disassembled propellers, prior to packing, should be prepared
as for long term storage installed with these extra precautions:-
- Rust preventative should be applied to the exposed bore and
hub splines.
- All exposed surfaces such as eye bolts, bolt heads, should
be smeared with rust preventative.
- Immerse the pitch change cylinder in inhibiting oil, allow to
drain, then wrap in waxed paper.
- Dip the pitch change piston complete with oil seals, oil tubes,
hub retaining nut, cones and all other loose parts in mineral

Rev. 00 3 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

PROPELLER BRAKE Due to the heat produced by friction of the pads contacting the
rotating disc, fusible plugs are incorporated in the body of the
Due to the free wheeling characteristics of turbine engines,
brake unit. These plugs will melt if the temperature of the brake
(especially those of the free turbine type), when parked, the
is excessive, releasing the hydraulic pressure and rendering the
propeller can revolve at some speed even in relatively light
brake ineffective.
winds. Because of the inertia stored in a propeller at engine shut
down, the engine, and thus the propeller, will continue to rotate To prevent overheating of the brake, manufacturers usually lay
for some time. The propellers on the passenger access side of down maximum engine speeds at which the brake can be
the aircraft can be a risk to disembarking passengers. A applied and brakes should never be applied at higher speeds
propeller brake is fitted to cut down the free wheel run down time than those specified.
of the engine.
The brake (Figure 17.115) is hydraulic in operation and fed from
the aircraft's hydraulic system. When the brake is applied, the
friction pads ' held in the calliper by pistons, are squeezed
against the disc which is bolted to the drive shaft of the engine.
The friction produced will retard the rotation of the drive shaft
and thus the propeller, eventually bringing it to a halt and holding
it stationary.
The propeller brake lever is usually fitted into the centre console
of the flight deck. It is usual to interconnect the propeller brake
lever with the high pressure fuel cock, in such a way as to
ensure that the fuel cock is selected OFF before the brake lever
can be selected ON. This of course means that the brake cannot
be applied while the engine is running.
Some aircraft such as the ATR allow the RH engine to be run as
an ‘APU’ . This is called ‘Hotel Mode’ and while in this mode the
propeller brake is applied to prevent the propeller and its free
power turbine from rotating. Power restriction in this mode apply
to prevent damage to the turbine.

Rev. 00 4 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

Fig 17.115

Rev. 00 5 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only
Module 17 – PROPELLER
CATEGORY B1– MECHANICAL Sub Module 17.7 – PROPELLER STORAGE AND PRESERVATION

Student Notes:

Rev. 00 6 17.7
Oct 2006 For Training Purposes Only