BEACON November 2010 - Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation | Unitarian Universalism | Governance

BEACON

UNITY TEMPLE UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION

November 2010
FROM REV. ALAN TAYLOR
 just returned from the Service of Ordination and  Installation of the Second Congregational Society  Unitarian Universalist in Concord, New Hampshire,  where our former intern, Michael Leuchtenberger, now  serves. The celebration brought several of Michael’s  colleagues and friends to join his congregation in  celebrating this significant milestone, including Marty  Swisher, who directed the choir, and Jack Rossiter‐ Munley, who provided a welcome. Michael has been, for  many of us, a teacher of embracing joy and play. The  service embodied that spirit.  The morning prior to this service, I preached at the First  Unitarian Church of Worcester, the church where I  served as an intern 13 years ago. It was surprising to see  how much people change in 13 years! I addressed what I  learned from them and what I believe we as Unitarian  Universalists need to do if we are to thrive. If you  listened to my Embracing Diversity sermon, you may  recall the three shifts that I suggested we need to make  as we seek to become more multiracial and multicul‐ tural.  The more I think about those three shifts, the more I  believe these three shifts are important in all that we do:  1) moving from a place of political correctness to  embracing our theological vision; 2) to shift from being  and leading from not only the head but also to the heart  and gut; and 3) to shift from operating from a place of  anxiety, guilt, and shame to operating from a place of  joy.   Reflecting on the past sermon series that explored core  functions and ministries of our congregation, I am  curious where the source of your joy is calling you. Do  you have excitement for gathering with others to  address one of the following questions?   What clears the way for us to embrace change and  creativity, as individuals and as a community? Given how  many people long for connection, how can we expand  our ministries to foster community? As religious ideology 

divides many people, where and how shall we build  bridges of interfaith cooperation? How can our  ministries of faith development and social mission  cultivate ever more courage and conscience? Will we  embrace diversity, particularly cultural and racial  diversity? To what are we being called as a community?   Let me know where the source of your joy is calling you  among these questions and I will gladly put you in touch  with others who share this. As for the last of these  questions, this is for the board leadership. Be in touch  with your board leaders to help them discern to where  we are being called together.  On November 7, our congregation will celebrate the  Installation of Rev. Emily Gage as Minister of Faith  Development. This word, “installation,” may conjure up  some strange images, but I guarantee you, it will be a  celebration of joy! Don’t miss it!  Warmly, 

Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation invites you to celebrate with us as we install The Reverend Emily Lauren Gage as our Minister of Faith Development Sunday, the seventh of November, 2010 5 o’clock in the evening Unity Temple 875 Lake St., Oak Park, IL 60301 708-848-6225 RSVP to installation@unitytemple.org A reception will follow in Unity House Children are welcome to the service and reception. Childcare also provided.

2   •   The Beacon 

INSIDE THIS ISSUE
  Membership Opportunities    Board of Trustees       Community Minister      Religious Education News    Adult Religious Enrichment    Ex Libris        Music Program News      UTUUC Constitutional Amendment  Chalice Circles        Social Mission        Auction 2010: Unity by Design    UT Restoration Foundation Events  The Business of Archiving    November Events Not To Miss                                          2  2  3  4  5  5  6  6  7  8  8  9  10  11 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
From Duane Dowell, President
president@unitytemple.org
n this third installment of Policy Governance 101, the  Board’s series on our church’s governance model, we  will discuss the Board’s role in our church.  You may  remember from our last article that our congregation  operates under the Carver Model of Policy Governance.   According to John and Miriam Carver, the Board has  three main functions:  • Representing the congregation to the Chief of Staff  (Senior Minister);  • Defining operating policies for the Church;  • Monitoring the Chief of Staff’s (Senior Minister)  performance.  Let’s take a look at each of these functions.  First, representing the congregation to the Senior  Minister:  The Board of Trustees, an elected body,  obtains its authority from and is accountable to the  members of the church.  Acting on behalf of the  congregation informs the Board’s policies and decisions.   Board members take their representative roles very  seriously and work hard to keep their “fingers on the  pulse” of the congregation.  Secondly, defining operating policies for the church:   The Board is also responsible for holding the vision of  the church and representing members’ interests to the  Senior Minister about what the church should be and  stand for.  The Board communicates this vision through  the Ends Statements, written outcomes that describe  “What does our church look like when we excel at doing  Worship/Religious Education/Caring Community, etc.?”   These statements are visionary: they address outcomes,  not implementation.  The Senior Minister, working with  the staff, develops the programs and methods for  achieving the Ends or outcomes.  And finally, Monitoring the Senior Minister’s  performance:  According the Policy Governance model,  the Senior Minister’s performance is measured through  the achievement of the Ends Statements.  In other  words, how well is the church meeting its stated  outcomes?  The Board uses several methods of  measurement including congregational surveys, regular  reports from the Senior Minister, assessment of goals  and accomplishments and evaluation tools.  (cont on page 3)  

MEMBERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Are YOU New? Welcome!
 

Introduction to Unitarian Universalism  This course is the prerequisite for Pathways to  Membership sessions, and is for anyone who would like  to learn more about Unitarian Universalism philosophy,  identity, history and theology. For information and to  register for this class, contact Sue Stock at   membership@unitytemple.org or 708‐445‐0306.  Instructor is Rev. Alan Taylor. Next class date: Sunday,  November 7, from 1 to 3 p.m. Location: Unity House.  Cost: No charge. The December class is scheduled for  December 5.       Pathways to Membership  This two‐session class is for those who have already  taken Intro to UU. It focuses on our congregation and its  programs. Participants will have opportunities to discuss  their personal attitudes and beliefs about religion and  spirituality and to share these with others in the class.  For more information and to register for this class,  contact Rob Bellmar at rbellmar@gmail.com or 708‐763‐ 0260. Next class dates: Sundays, November 14 and 21,  from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Location: Unity House Cost: $20.  There are no Pathways sessions scheduled for Decem‐ ber. The first opportunity of the New Year? January 16  and 23, 2011.       For free childcare at all of these opportunities, contact  childcare@unitytemple.org at least one week in  advance. 

November 2010   •    3 

FROM THE COMMUNITY MINISTER
From Rev. Clare Butterfield
Community Minister
Clare@faithinplace.org   omeone sent me an email this morning with pictures  of President Obama’s daughters outside the White  House with the First Dog, waiting for their Dad to come  home and then running to greet him. And they made me  wonder how we got to this place in American politics,  when we have forgotten that our President is a man, a  father and husband, in whose care are these pretty  daughters. To hear him talked about in the press is to  picture something not quite human, dangerous and  terrifying.  Vilifying the opposition is not the sole purview of the  conservative side of the political spectrum lately, either.  I define myself as on the progressive side of the scale but  that doesn’t make me immune from seeing the other  side as a caricature when it suits my purposes. How  many times has the Nazi comparison been made this  election cycle? It is the furthest outpost of rhetoric after  all, and a sign that all standards for critical thinking have  truly been bypassed.  Those of us who prefer logic, reason, compassion,  and an assumption that the intentions of others are  benign are feeling a bit lost in the weeds these days.   “Do they not have grandchildren?” I ask myself, but that  is my anger talking. My faith teaches me that when I  encounter the other I do so with kindness and with love.  This obligation is not reserved for those with whom I  agree. It extends to everyone. And it is primary. My  other obligations fall in line behind it. That the other  side, as I perceive it, does not feel equally obliged at all  times is irrelevant to my obligation—it points up the  difficulty of religious discipline in practice, but doesn’t  alter it.  No matter what happens on Election Day some of us  are going to be disappointed. And most of us are going  to feel however we feel out of a true and perfectly  reasonable philosophical idea about the appropriate role  of government in society, whatever we think that role  should be. Only a few on the extreme ends of the  spectrum are cynical in their search for power, only a  few sincerely despise the other side. Mostly we want a  better future for our children, and disagree about how  that is best to be brought about. And those differences   could promote a dialogue, were we still capable of  having one, which would reveal a better path through 

FROM THE INTERIM MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR
From Tina Lewis
Interim Membership Director
tlewis@unitytemple.org   s many of you may know, I recently began work as  the Interim Membership Director at Unity Temple  and am very busy getting to know the congregation on a  whole new level.  My family and I have been members  for the past 11 years. During that time, I have been  heavily involved in the religious education program for  our children and youth in the congregation.  I feel very  fortunate to be serving in this new role, as building  community supports one of my core values. I welcome  the opportunity to get to know all of you better and to  assist you in making connections in our thriving  congregation. I am available on Sunday mornings before  and after services. In addition, I may be contacted at  tlewis@unitytemple.org or 708‐848‐6225 x102. I look  forward to hearing from you. 

From the Community Minister, cont.     synthesis than either side would generate on its own.  That’s how the democratic marketplace of ideas is  supposed to work. Until it does again, though, remem‐ bering that kindness—love of the other—is the primary  commitment of faith might be helpful. I will if you will.   

From the President, cont. 
  Furthermore, there are several things the Board  does not do:  • The Board does not direct the Senior Minister in  specific activities or events. The Senior Minister,  with the Administrative Team, develops programs  and activities to achieve the stated Ends and hires  and supervises the necessary staff.  • The Board does not get involved in the day‐to‐day  operations of the church. This is the purview of the  Senior Minister as Chief of Staff.  Those are the basics.  The Board and I remain on a  learning curve to figure out how to best adapt these  principles to our own congregational family.  We’ll talk a  little more about the Board in the next installment.    

4   •   The Beacon 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
From Rev. Emily Gage 
Minister of Faith Development  egage@unitytemple.org 
  umbers can’t tell you everything, of course. But  they do help to paint a broad picture of something.  Switching the worship services from 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.  to 9:00 and 10:45 a.m. has made a huge difference for  our religious education program for children and youth.  Last year we had a big imbalance between enrollment in  the early service as compared to enrollment in the late  service. Classes were often either too large or too small,  and it was challenging on both ends for our classroom  volunteers. Now, if you take the preschool through  seventh and eighth grades, we have 92 students  registered in those grades at the early service, and 87  enrolled in those grades in the late service. That’s a huge  difference. Our experiment has worked! There are about  220 students registered overall and some more out  there who have not made themselves an official part of  our programming by registering. Those are some pretty  impressive numbers!  We have 11 ninth graders in our Coming of Age  Program, our first Sunday morning UU identity rites of  passage program. We have 23 eigth graders enrolled in  our Sunday evening OWL (Our Whole Lives values based  sexuality education program). In terms of volunteers, we  have 32 Sunday morning teachers, 12 OWL teachers, 37  assistants (regular helpers), 37 people who are  substitutes, three youth advisors, and four (soon to be  five) paid staff, besides myself. That does not include the  various other parent helpers who lend a hand from time  to time, nor does it include the dozens of people who  are willing to help with special projects, the RE greeters,  or the members of the Religious Education Committee  for Children and Youth. More impressive numbers!  I wanted to share all these numbers with you, just to  give you some sense of what’s happening in the faith  development program for our young people. But I really  got to thinking about numbers on the last weekend in  October, when I went up to the Unitarian Universalist  Church in Rockford for the Central Midwest District’s  youth conference “Some Con a Wonderful.” Although it  was held at the Rockford church, it was our own Unity  Temple youth group who organized, planned, and ran  the con. (Rockford has a building that could easily  accommodate the demands of a youth conference, but  are still building their youth group. We don’t have a  building good for that purpose, but do have a strong  youth group.) By late Friday evening, some 260 youth 

(grades 9‐12) had arrived with their adult advisors for  the weekend. Let me just repeat that: 260 youth. Two‐ hundred‐sixty youth from all around our district—from  as far as St. Louis, MO, and Wausau, WI, and Elkhart, IN,  and from as close as Evanston, Geneva, Deerfield, and  Hinsdale, and many other congregations scattered  around. Twenty‐two of our own youth were there.  The numbers give you a sense of the vast sea of  youth in Rockford, but it doesn’t give you a sense of the  love, joy, empowerment that was present among them.  It’s been a while since I’ve been to a youth con myself,  but the welcoming and accepting atmosphere—the  group of people and attitude that encourage people to  be who they are—has not changed in all that time. It is  an inspiration to watch and it is renewing to be part of.  (Spiritually speaking, that is. Sleep is not a high priority  on the agenda.) And there’s nothing that quite  strengthens your faith as being among a large group of  people who also share that faith. These cons are one of  the great gifts we give and share with our youth. And our  own Unity Temple youth did us proud in their dedica‐ tion, enthusiasm, creativity, humor, and compassion in  their planning and execution of the con. Not to mention  our fabulous youth advisors: Annie CollarMarple, Megan  Tideman, and Hannah Zerphey, and our fabulous youth  coordinator, Heather Godbout, who worked right  alongside them.    Like I said, the numbers only tell part of the story.  But they give you a sense of how many lives are being  shaped and transformed by being part of our Unity  Temple Community. For that, I am so grateful, and I  hope you are too.   

Attention Parents of 1st and 5th Graders!
OWL (Our Whole Lives Values Based Sexuality curricu‐ lum) is coming for first and fifth grade! (And will run on  Sunday mornings beginning January 9th through March  6th.) Parent information session will be held on Sunday  December 12 from 12:30‐1:30 p.m. for parents of first  graders and 1:30‐2:30 p.m. for parents of fifth graders.  More information to come, but please mark your calen‐ dars now! Questions? Contact: Rev. Emily Gage.   

November 28th Activities For All Ages
On Sunday, November 28, due to the Thanksgiving holi‐ day, the only regular religious education classes will be  for the nursery and preschool classes. Everyone from  kindergarten up will be participating in Games Day in  Unity House. You are invited to bring any of your favorite  games that day to share with your Unity Temple friends.  We also will need some adults to oversee the game play‐ ing. If you have any questions, please contact Rev. Emily  Gage at egage@unitytemple.org. Thanks!   

November 2010   •    5 

ADULT RELIGIOUS ENRICHMENT
UU Parenting Workshop: Bringing Our UU Faith Home
Interested in finding ways to grow your children into  kind and responsible human beings true to Unitarian  Universalist values? By creating unique family rituals,  you can feel more connected with each other and with  our greater community. This is also a chance to  participate in a group exploration of the different ways  in which we deal with some of the unique parenting  opportunities and challenges we face as Unitarian  Universalists. We will be using a UU Parenting  Curriculum tailored to include topics the group finds  most interesting. Parents of children of all ages are  welcome. Childcare available by contacting   childcare@unitytemple.org. Faciliators: Sunny Hall &  Carrie Bankes. Tuesdays, 7–8:30 p.m., November 2, 9,  16 & 23. Fee: $10 for supplies and snacks. To register,   e‐mail adultre@unitytemple.org.   

“Movies with Meaning ” Film Discussions
Great films, great conversations and great people are all  a part of the ongoing “Movies with Meaning” series. We  meet on the third Thursday of every month to watch and  share insights about fascinating contemporary films. Join  us in the west balcony of Unity House.  New participants  are sincerely welcomed!  Films screen at 6 p.m. and are  followed by discussion at 8 p.m. Films and dates follow:  November 18, Doubt (2008)  This film adaptation John Patrick Shanley's Tony‐winning  play stars Meryl Streep as a strict principal of a Roman  Catholic school.  Amy Adams plays her innocent  protégé.  A new priest played by Phillip Seymour  Hoffman falls under suspicion when the aging nun  notices a questionable relationship between the priest  and a school boy. Rated: GP‐13  December 16, Joyeux Noel (2005)  Set in 1914 along the Western Front, this account of a  true story depicts a spontaneous cease‐fire during bitter  trench warfare.  German, French and Scottish soldiers  join together to celebrate Christmas Eve together.  It  was nominated in the category of “Best Foreign  Language Film” for both an Oscar and a Golden  Globe.  Rated: PG‐13  

Caregiver Support Group
The Caregivers Support Group is held every third  Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in the West balcony of  Unity House. This drop‐in group is open to anyone  affected by the caregiver role and will take only 60‐90  minutes of your time once a month.  Facilitator: Susan  Anderson ander@uic.edu. No registration or fees.   

EX LIBRIS
We will be open the first and third Sundays of  November with a number of books at drastic sale prices.  There are children's books, heavy‐duty philosophy,  novels and spirituality and many more. Many would  make great holiday gifts.  Please look them over.    Our collection now includes more book titles for  Unitarians and several calendars for 2011. During  December, we will be open every Sunday and we will gift  wrap holiday gifts at no charge. There will be live music  and you will receive a raffle ticket for each item  you  purchase. On December 19 we will choose raffle  winners, who may choose a book free of charge.   Tom Dunnington will be presenting and selling his  book, Joys and Sorrows, on December 7.  It includes a  collection of the thoughts that he has brought to our  worship along  with a collection of his drawings.  It is a  handsome collection.  Holiday sales will end on December 19.  Be sure to  let us help you with your book needs before then.  

Career Transition Outreach
Every Monday from 8:45–9:45 a.m. at Unity Temple,  Diane Wilson, LCPC, and Brooke McMillan, LCSW, help  those facing job loss and career uncertainty.  This  outreach helps participants manage the psychological  and practical aspects of their job transition.  Author of  Back in Control, Wilson is a coach, counselor, and  neurofeedback specialist. For more information email  Diane.G.Wilson@gmail.com. No registration or fees. 

Women's Connection Fall Un-Potluck
All women are invited to our fall un‐potluck on  Friday, November 5 at 6:30 p.m. in Unity  House.  Come to meet new friends and reconnect  with old friends.  We will also tell you about our  annual retreat to be held in February, 2011.  Just  bring an appetizer or dessert to share or $5.  We will  provide the main course of soups and casseroles and  beverages.  Hope to see you all there!—The Women's  Connection. Contact Jenny Earlandson, 

6   •   The Beacon 

MUSIC
From the Music Director
Marty Swisher music@unitytemple.org
ovember brings a full music schedule to Unity  Temple! We welcome the Home Street Recorder  Ensemble for services on the 7th, The Unity Temple  Singers presents Ubi Caritas from the Duruflé Requiem  on the 14th, The Unity Temple Choir sings songs of  Thanksgiving on the 21st, and operatic baritone Bill  Powers joins us on the 28th.   The Unity Temple Choir is please to be featured at  the installation of our own Reverend Emily Gage and  presents songs with our children for that special event in  the life of our congregation.   On November 21st, members of the choir will  perform the Gospel Cantata, Born to Die in joint concert  with our friends at Greater Bethesda Baptist Church on  53rd and Michigan Avenue in Chicago.  Sixteen members  of the choir will sing at 4 p.m. in the Greater Bethesda  Sanctuary, sharing the love of music‐making and  reaching across theological differences to create  beautiful music.  The sanctuary will be electrified with  outstanding soloists and a large instrumental  contingent.  We invite you, our friends and members, to  join us in this special musical and cultural exchange.   Our monthly fourth Friday service In the Style of  Taizé continues this month on the 26th featuring a guitar  solo by Jim Parkes.  Although we are always grateful for  the contributions of Team Taizé, it is most relevant this  month to thank reverends Clare Butterfield and Emily  Gage; tech specialist Michael Swisher; the wonderful  troupe of singers; instrumentalists Jane Wood, May  Gardner, Mary Anne Gardner, Jim Parkes, Scott Aaseng,  Amanda Thomas and Chris Nemeth; coordinator Betsy  Davis; and the invaluable helping hands of Alice Musiek,  Ellen Wehrle, and Rito Salinas.  We continue to serve the  community with this service and enrich our community  with this special dimension of prayer, reflection and  meditation.  We hope you will join us as we continue our  commitment to offering this service.     

MEETING OF THE MEMBERSHIP
Vote on constitutional amendment to change date of the annual meeting
A special meeting of the membership will be held on  November 21, at 10:00 a.m. in the sanctuary to vote  on the proposed constitutional amendment to  change the date of the annual meeting.  Currently,  the constitution requires that the annual meeting  occur in June.  The practice has been to hold the  annual meeting on the first Sunday in June, which  conflicts with A Day in our Village.  The UTUUC Board  of Trustees is proposing an amendment that would  allow the meeting to be held earlier in the year.  To  amend the constitution, a majority of all members  who are eligible to vote must approve the amend‐ ment.  Absentee ballots will be sent to each  member.  The ballot is also available on the website  and in the lobby after services.    

Taizé at Unity Temple
Please join us again for Taizé Service in the Unity  Temple Sanctuary, on Friday, November 26, at 7 p.m.  This service will offer a time for meditation, reflection,  and renewal through music, brief words, and silence.  Come sing, light a candle, and nurture your spirit during  this non‐traditional worship experience—and bring a  friend.  The service will conclude before 8 p.m. For more  information, contact Marty Swisher, Music Director, at  music@unitytemple.org.   

3rd Saturday Coffeehouse in November
North Carolina poet, songwriter and publisher John  Amen will be the featured performer at the 3rd Saturday  Coffeehouse on November 20. In addition to having  published several books of poetry, Amen has also  released two CDs of original folk/folk‐rock tunes and is  founding publisher of The Pedestal Magazine. Amen  travels widely giving readings, conducting workshops  and performing his music.  For his performance at the  Coffeehouse, Amen will read from his recent book At the  Threshold of Alchemy and accompany himself on guitar  with tunes from his albums, All I’ll Ever Need and  Ridiculous Empire.  Unity House doors open 7:30 p.m., open mic begins  at 8 p.m., and feature at 9 p.m. Donation $3‐5. Acoustic.  Open mic limit 5 minutes. Info at 708‐660‐9376.   

November 2010   •    7 

CHALICE CIRCLES
Beyond Bashing: Politics and UU’s
 

Readings  “I am very concerned to avoid the tendency of some on  the Left to dismiss or demean people on the Right. It’s  no excuse that some people on the Right talk and act in  a demeaning fashion towards liberals and secular people  … no worthwhile political goal justifies demeaning the  humanity of those with whom we disagree. It is perfectly  legitimate to challenge the ideas [of those with whom  we disagree] and to warn of the dangers should they  succeed in their stated intentions… [But] What I will not  do, and what I urge my friends in liberal and progressive  movements to not do, is to attribute evil motives to  those on the Religious Right. The vast majority of people  involved in the Religious Right are people who are driven  by principles and who want what is best for the world.”     –Michael Lerner, The Left Hand of God, pp. 8‐9. 
 

to new themes, facts, ideas, questions, it is not the kind  of hospitality that would be indicated by hanging a sign:  ‘Come right in, there is nobody at home.’ It includes an  active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give  heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give  full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the  possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to  us.”     –Philosopher John Dewey, How We Think, 1933 
 

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there  is a field. I’ll meet you there.”     –Rumi, 13th Century mystic poet    

Chalice Circle Fall Get Together
Chalice Circle Ministry Team hosts its annual fall facilita‐ tor get together on Thursday, November 4, from 7–9  p.m. All facilitators and those interested in becoming  facilitators are welcome.  Contact Marge Entemann at  mee2@pobox.com or 708‐445‐8544. 708  

“We affirm the inherent worth and dignity of every  person.” First UU Principle  
 

Focus/Discussion  1. In a letter to the editors of UU Magazine some years  back, a writer stated that Unitarian Universalists seem to  have “a wide theological umbrella” that allows great  diversity in religious beliefs but “a narrow political tent”  that closes the doorway to conservative views. In your  experience, how true is that statement? If you believe  that there is some truth to it, do you view that lack of  diversity as problematic? 
 

Join a Chalice Circle
There are currently 15 Chalice Circles with many  possible schedules and times for meeting. Chalice  Circles create openings for trust, friendship, honesty,  growth and reflection. They are a spiritual practice. We  welcome adults of all ages. Be known as you are, join a  group today. For information about joining a Chalice  Circle or facilitator training contact Marge Entemann at  mee2@pobox.com or 708‐445‐8544. 70 
 

2. What makes people, both conservatives and liberals/ progressives, “demonize” the other side or bash those  who disagree with them? 
 

3. It’s easy in theory to say that we should treat one  another with respect. It’s harder in practice, in the heat  of political discussions, to maintain respectfulness and  civility. Have you found ways of responding to people  whose political views differ from your own that allow  you to stand up for what you believe in without  denigrating opposing views? What are some ways of  doing this? 
 

The group from the SW suburbs—Westchester to  Downers Grove to Lisle—meets Friday nights and is  looking for new members.   

Unity Temple Gives...
The generosity of our congregation is making a   difference in people’s lives.  Every Sunday our   collection plate offerings are donated to a worthy  charitable organization in support of our mission and  values.  During the month of September 2010, your  weekly collection donations contributed the follow‐ ing amounts to these organizations: 
 

4. How can we be genuinely openminded about political  issues, and still be true to our own principles? 
 

Closing Reading  “Open‐mindedness ... may be defined as freedom from  prejudice, partisanship, and such other habits as close  the mind and make it unwilling to consider new  problems and entertain new ideas. (But) it is very  different from empty‐mindedness. While it is hospitality 

Faith in Place: $1775.25  National Association for Mental Illness: $1000.21  Unity Temple Social Mission Council: $765.00 
 

8   •   The Beacon 

SOCIAL MISSION
Walk-In Ministry offering two new client services
Beginning in November, Wednesday mornings at  Walk‐In Ministry will be reserved for appointments to  accommodate two new vital services being offered to  our clients: online job search assistance and budget  preparation assistance.   Most employers now utilize the internet to find  employees, but many of Walk‐In Ministry’s clients do not  have access to a computer and/or are not familiar with  the internet. Walk‐In Ministry volunteers will work with  clients to open email accounts, search and apply for jobs  online, scan or fax resumes, and help clients find  ongoing free public computer and internet access.    Budget preparation assistance will help WIM clients  develop a clearer understanding of their current  financial situation.    Anyone interested in budget or job search assistance  should call 708‐386‐1946 x.908 to make an appoint‐ ment.  Additionally, anyone interested in volunteering to  help with these services please call 708‐386‐1946 x.904.  WIM is open on a walk‐in basis (no appointment  necessary) every week on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday  and Friday from 10–11 a.m. and Saturday from 9:30– 11:30 a.m.  WIM is also open for walk‐in clients on the  first Wednesday of month from 7–8:30 p.m. and all  other Wednesdays from 3:30–5 p.m. Additional hours  can be arranged by appointment.   

AUCTION 2010! UNITY BY DESIGN: COMMUNITY BY CHOICE
Mark Your Calendars!
Silent Auction: Saturday, November 13, 7–10 p.m.   Where: Unity Temple.   Ticket price: only $30 ($35 at the door)  A huge THANK YOU to everyone who bid on the  Catalog.  We had several events that closed and/or  oversold before the October 31 deadline!  Raffle tickets  for a generous cash prize are still available. The jackpot  grows with each purchase! The Committee has worked  hard to organize a Silent Auction event for everyone to  enjoy. A delicious menu has been planned, the band has  been hired, and the Silent Auction items are coming in at  a good pace.  There will be a wonderful variety of items  available and all for a good cause!  Don’t forget to buy a  fantastic tote bag for only $5 or a gorgeous and practical  apron for only $20 – both are available at the Auction  Table each Sunday and at the Auction Event.  Please visit the auction page at  www.unitytemple.org/Auction2010.htm to learn more  about the November 13 Silent Auction event and how  you can support us with donations or participation.  Tickets are on sale via www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/133104 or can be purchased at the Auction table  on Sundays or on the night of the event.   Questions? Want to get involved? We can always  use more hands the night of the event. Contact Jennifer  Marling at 773‐889‐8040 or auction@unitytemple.org.

UU's for Social Justice November 14
The Central Midwest District UUSJ Committee’s annual  meeting will be held at Unity Temple on November  14.  From 2–3 p.m. the program will be "Ethical  Eating:  Thoughts for Food."  An examination of the  environmental, health and economic justice issues that  constitute the ethical eating matrix. The Business  Meeting will follow from 3–5 p.m., covering the financial  report, election of officers, task force reports and  more.  The UUA is in the process of developing a  Statement of Conscience on Ethical Eating. Everyone is  welcome to participate. Contact: Rich Pokorny at 708‐ 848‐3015 or rvpokorny@comcast.net.   

Mrs. Coney, A Tale at Christmas concert
The Oak Park River Forest Area Walk‐In Ministry and Oak  Park Festival Theatre once again present their co‐benefit  concert reading of Mrs. Coney, A Tale at Christmas at 7  p.m. on Friday, November 19 and Sunday, November  21 at Unity Temple.  A reception follows and fantastic  gift baskets will be raffled off.  The Kennedy Center  Award Winning Play with music which has become an  Oak Park tradition is written and directed by Belinda  Bremner.  Last year’s Coney cast returns to tell this tale  of a young boy’s kindness in the hard scrabble Kentucky  winter of 1935.  Young Miranda Theis plays Jamie, the  boy who heals all in his small world when he lets go of  what he has lost but hangs on to who he is.  Live music is  performed before the show.  Tickets are $15 general  admission and $10 for students and seniors.  Tickets are  also available at tickets@oakparkfestival.com.   

Immigration Film
"Tony and Janina's Wedding" is a documentary film  about a Polish family married in the U.S., then separated  by immigration papers. The true story illustrates the af‐ fect of our inadequate immigration law.  Showing at the  Lake Theater in Oak Park on November 4, 4  p.m.    Contact: Shirley Lundin, slundin654@sbcglobal.net.    

November 2010   •    9 

UNITY TEMPLE RESTORATION FOUNDATION
Chris Ware and Charles Burns:     Cartoonists in Conversation
Tuesday, November 2, 2010, 7:30 pm  You can’t get much cooler than this. Both practically  legends, the two cartoonists discuss their craft, with  New City's film editor Ray Pride moderating. Burns's new  X'ed Out is a dazzling spectral fever‐dream—and a  comic‐book masterpiece. Ware's Acme Novelty Library  #20 is the latest edition in an incisive and addictive body  of work. Admission: $10 (with ticket get $10 off  purchase of either X'ed Out or Acme Novelty Library #20  at the event, or $15 off both titles).     

Unity Temple Concert Series: Classical Guitarist Denis Azabagic at UTCS November 6th
The 38th season of the Unity Temple Concert Series  (UTCS) continues Saturday, November 6, with Forest  Park native, Denis Azabagic. One of the most  compelling classical guitarists on the international  concert circuit today, Denis is known for his melodic  fluency, marvelous tone, and unerring musical sense.  Please join us for this evening of musical virtuosity.  There is still time to take advantage of our 3‐pick  subscription. For a preview of our upcoming season  or to purchase tickets please visit our website:  www.utconcerts.com or phone 800‐838‐3006.   

Prairie School Adventures
For kids in Grades 2‐6. 
 

Update from the Diversity Task Force
First, we wish to express our appreciation to the 230  members and friends who completed our survey.  We  are in the process of analyzing the information and will  provide a detailed report in the December newsletter.  Thank you for your many thoughtful comments.  One  hundred eighty‐six respondents, or 82%, say they agree  or strongly agree that "it is important for us to develop  diversity in our congregation."  Our task now is to create  a strategic plan that will act as a road map for us to  move forward towards achieving this goal.  Your input  will guide us.  

Holiday Card Printmaking for Kids & Families  Saturday, November 6, 2010, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.  Get into the holiday spirit with a card making workshop  for kids and parents. Learn printmaking from a  professional artist and create custom holiday greeting  cards with ink, brayers and a real printing press. Our  instructor will encourage you to experiment with color  and composition, and find inspiration in the architectural  spaces of Unity Temple. Instructor: artist David  Jansheski. $70 Early Bird (through Oct. 15), $80 Regular  (Oct. 16‐Nov. 6). Get a $5 discount when you register a  sibling or family member. 
 

Gingerbread Prairie House Workshop  Wednesday, December 29, 2010, 10a.m.–2 p.m.  Cantilevered roofs, horizontal massing, organic  architecture, leaded glass windows…these are just a few  of the phrases you hear about Oak Park’s famous  architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. In this workshop, students  learn to use Wright’s signature construction methods for  the creation of their very own gingerbread structures.  Warm‐up includes a Froebel Block Workshop and a  discussion of Wright’s architecture with a working  architect. Instructors: Jerry McManus, AIA; Peggy Lami;  Jessamyn Miller, Master of Historic Preservation, School  of the Art Institute of Chicago. $55 Early Bird (through  Nov. 3), $65 Regular (Nov. 4–Dec. 29). Get a $5 discount  when you register a sibling or family member.    For more information and tickets, call 708‐383‐8873 or  visit www.utrf.org.   

Parents Support Group
A Parents Support Group for UT families with special  needs children will meet on the third Tuesday of each  month at 709 S. Oak Park Ave, Oak Park, at 7:30 p.m.  Anyone interested please contact Carol DiMatteo or  Tom Dunnington by phone 708‐524‐2859 or e‐mail  carold27@att.net.    

The Purple Sages (Senior Women)
Will be meeting on Wednesday, November 24, from  11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. in the Book Discussion Room on  the 2nd floor of the Oak Park Library.  Bring a brown bag  lunch!  For more information, call 708‐705‐1428.   

Men’s Retreat
Mark you calendar for the Men’s Retreat, January 14‐16.   For information contact Mark Johansen at 708‐383‐3734  or markeric‐j@hotmail.com.   

10   •   The Beacon 

THE BUSINESS OF ARCHIVING
From Ron Moline
he other day, sitting at my desk in the archives  room, I decided to take a large cardboard box that  I had been eyeing for months off the top of a metal  cabinet. Someone other than myself had put it there,  and I presumed that it was material relevant to our  archives. I almost toppled over; it must have weighed  over 20 pounds!  Inside were some old Pioneer Press newspapers,  and decades’ worth of old UU World magazines. I  found a couple of articles on congregational members  in the newspapers, which I saved. As for the UU World  magazines: in some utopian archival space, such things  could be kept, but not in the humble abode of our  Unity Temple archives. All of which segues into how I  make decisions in the “archives’ biz.”   People sometimes ask me if I would like thus‐and‐ so for the archives—old Sunday bulletins, photo‐ graphs, letters, etc. My answer is always yes. This  doesn’t mean, however, “Yes, it will be kept.” It means  that any material relating to our congregation or  property deserves to be examined, so that a  thoughtful decision can be reached about its suitability  for retention.   I wish I could say that such decision‐making  reflects a decision tree that is transparent, rational,  and written down. Not so. One major problem is that  there is not now, and never has been, a systematic  way to keep a complete and chronological record of  our various documents. Under my watch, we have a  continuous record of yearly budgets, expenditures,  annual meetings, most board meetings, and most  Sunday bulletins. Alas, not all. Why? Because I am not  always around, and people don’t always remember.   I have organized the archives into 30 different  categories. In none of even the most important  categories do we have a complete chronological  record. When I took on the job of archivist, records  were to be found helter‐skelter throughout the temple  and Gale house; many were so mildewed that they  were no longer legible. Often, records were simply  absent. We are, in sum, a very human institution.  A more recent problem relates to the advances in  communication technology. I have been struck by how  many fewer paper documents we have for the first  decade of the 21st century, compared to previous  decades. Fewer letters, fewer committee minutes,  fewer memos, etc. What we are losing, in the service  of efficiency and speed, is a record of the deliberative  process by which conclusions are reached. On the 

positive side, I have, in some instances, been able to  begin storing information on CDs.  What do I save, and what do I discard? I realize this  is a delicate area, about which some of you have strong  opinions. We have been fortunate to arrange with the  Oak Park library to store our most important historical  documents in their secure and temperature‐controlled  archival space—namely all documents written and/or  signed by Frank Lloyd Wright, and all documents related  to the building of Unity Temple. The remainder of our  documents are in a small air‐conditioned room in Gale  House.   I save most “official” documents, although I have in  any case only a sprinkling of committee minutes. I save  all newspaper articles that come to my attention about  either Unity Temple, the congregation, or individual  members. I save all photographs of ministers; I save all  photos of members where the member is identifiable by  name. I save photos of unidentified members when they  are part of an identifiable gathering, at an identifiable  time. I make an effort to identify members that I don’t  know, through asking others. Photos of individuals that  are neither identifiable nor dated get discarded, no  matter how fetching.  I save all letters to and from the minister, unless  they are brief and pro‐forma. I save almost all letters  from members, either to the minister or the board. I  love drama, and avidly collect any and all letters,  memos, etc., that hint of controversy or sentiment.  Handwritten documents—increasingly rare, as you can  imagine—seem especially valuable.  I am very proud to report that every document we  have, except for the dwindling number that I have not  yet filed,  is readily available and easily found—from  1871 to the present. Some even pre‐date the founding  of our congregation, including early records of 2nd  Universalist Church of Chicago, with whom we merged in  1935, and which had been established in 1856. I have  compiled a very incomplete index of our holdings, which  does, however, include all our 19th century documents,  and on which I work as time permits.  I continue to welcome any and all contributions you  may wish to make to the archives, given the above  constraints. And I also invite you to pay a visit!    

Need a Ride to the Airport?  
Need a ride to the airport? Your $30 fare benefits Unity  Temple ($20 to UT, $10 to the driver).  Call Russ  Lorraine, 708‐214‐1770; Duane Dowell, 708‐890‐1148;  John Frye, 708‐456‐5266 or 708‐431‐8929; or Lisa   Gariota (weekends and O'Hare only), 773‐594‐1426.    

November 2010   •    11 

NOVEMBER EVENTS NOT TO MISS
 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
board@unitytemple.org    Duane Dowell     President  Ian Morrison      Vice President  Margaret Ewing      Secretary   Glenn Brewer       Treasurer  Jean Borrelli  Betsy Davis  Nina Gegenheimer  Jay Peterson  David Ripley  Diane Scott  Jennifer Walters  Polly Walwark  

November 2, 9,   16 & 23    November 5    November 7    November 7    November 13     

UU Parenting Workshop:   Bringing Our UU Faith Home  7 p.m., West Balcony  Women’s Connection Un‐Potluck  5:30 p.m., Unity House  Intro. to Unitarian Universalism  1 p.m., Unity House  Installation of Rev. Emily Gage  5 p.m. Unity Temple  Auction 2010: Unity By Design,   Community by Choice  7 p.m., Unity Temple 

November 14 & 21  Pathways to Membership    1 p.m., Unity House     November 14    November 18    November 19    November 20    November 21    November 24    November 26    UU For Social Justice  2 p.m., Unity House East  Movies with Meaning: Doubt  6 p.m., Unity House  Mrs. Coney’s Fundraiser  7 p.m., Unity Temple  3rd Saturday Coffeehouse  7:30 p.m., Unity House  Mrs. Coney’s Fundraiser  5 p.m., Unity Temple  Purple Sages (Senior Women)  11:30 a.m., Oak Park Library  Taize Service  7 p.m., Sanctuary 

OUR STAFF
For all calls, please dial 708‐848‐6225   and then your party’s extension: 
 

Rev. Alan C. Taylor, Minister   x101    minister@unitytemple.org  Rev. Emily Gage, Minister of Faith Development  x103    egage@unitytemple.org  Tina Lewis, Interim Membership Director  x102    tlewis@unitytemple.org  David Wilke, Director of Administration  x100    dwilke@unitytemple.org  Martha Swisher, Music Director  music@unitytemple.org  Heather Godbout, Youth Coordinator  X107  indigo1370@aol.com  Meridian Herman, Rental Manager  x108    rentals@unitytemple.org  Sule Kivanc‐Ancieta, Preschool Coordinator  David Osorio, Sexton  Rito Salinas, Sexton  Peter Storms, Accompanist  Jennifer Flynn, Publications Assistant  X105  jflynn@unitytemple.org  Tracy Zurawski, Bookkeeper  x104    bookkeeper@unitytemple.org  Rev. Dr. Clare Butterfield, Community Minister  clare@faithinplace.org 

Visit Our Calendar Online!
All Congregation events and activities are listed on our  web calendar at www.unitytemple.org/calendar.   There you can find real‐time listings of everything oc‐ curring at Unity Temple as well as schedule rooms.   Select Add Event at the top of the calendar and com‐ plete the web form.  You will receive an email when  your UTUUC event as been confirmed.   

BEACON Newsletter Submissions
Submissions for the December 2010 Beacon are due at  10 a.m. on Monday, November 15.  Please email sub‐ missions to newsletter@unitytemple.org. 

Be a Beacon-folding Hero!
Come and help us distribute our beautiful Beacon to  the masses! Our next Beacon folding party will happen  on Friday, November 20 at 9:15 a.m.  Thank you!  

WWW. UNITYTEMPLE. ORG

U NITY T EMPLE U NITARIAN U NIVERSALIST C ONGREGATION 875 Lake Street Oak Park, IL 60301 708/848-6225
Change service requested

Nonprofit  Organization 

US POSTAGE  PAID 
Oak Park, IL 60301 

Permit No. 305 

www.unitytemple.org

Upcoming Services
November 7  November 28 

Creating One Another 
Rev. Emily Gage  Offering: Unitarian Universalist Service Committee    November 14  

Preparing the Heart 
Rev. Jennifer Owen‐O'Quill Offering: Micah’s Porch    Friday, November 26, 7:00 p.m.   

Grace Happens 
Rev. Alan Taylor  Offering: Oak Park Food Pantry    November 21  

Taizé Service at Unity Temple 

The Attitude of Gratitude  Rev. Alan Taylor 
Offering: Oak Park Food Pantry   

Congregation Meeting  November 21 
A special meeting of the membership will be held on  November 21, at 10:00 a.m. to vote on the proposed  constitutional amendment to change the date of the  annual meeting from June to earlier in the year.  To  succeed, a majority of all members who are eligible  to vote must approve the amendment.    For more information see page 6. 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful