Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

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THE 12 VOICES OF THE CUSTOMER
Uncover, translate & deliver what customers want
Sponsored by WCBF
October 13, 2009
Presented by Robin Lawton
International Management Technologies, Inc.
www.imtC3.com
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We appreciate and will support your desire to share this material with others. To get the maximum benefit as easily as possible and
still respect copyright constraint, here are some of your options:
To provide an overview of what you learned and think is most valuable, use these free references from our website at
http://www.imtc3.com/library/articles.cfm:
• Download key PowerPoint slides under “C3 Speech Support Booklet
• Share one or more of the articles or documents here. The most popular, in descending order, are:
1. “Creating Total Customer Satisfaction….” This is a synopsis of concepts covered in detail in Robin Lawton’s
book, Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality, Innovation and Speed.
2. “Balance Your Balanced Scorecard” or “The Customer-Balanced Scorecard: identifying the eight dimensions
of excellence”
3. “Are Your Surveys Only Suitable for Wrapping Fish?”
4. “8 Dimensions of Excellence”
5. Strategic Plan Abstract. This shows how one organization used the 8 Dimensions of Excellence concepts to
integrate their strategic plan and balanced scorecard for relevance from the enterprise to the front line.
• Download one of the sample C3 tools at http://www.imtc3.com/resource/tools.cfm
To actively communicate or demonstrate key concepts, use any of these references at
http://www.imtc3.com/products/products.cfm:
• The DVD program (preferably with the Facilitator Kit) for “Creating the Customer-Centered Culture”
• WEB-BASED Interactive Live Seminars – see http://www.imtc3.com/events/UpcomingEvents.cfm
To apply C3 tools to a project or specific need, download a free sample of Excel-based tools described at
http://www.imtc3.com/resource/tools.cfm . Complete tools are available individually or in sets, organized by topics such as:
• The Voice of the Customer
• Customer-centered projects: chartering and leading a project for rapid, high-impact success
• Innovation and product/service design
To obtain maximum engagement and commitment for action, we bring keynotes, presentations and workshops to you.
Contact us for details at: Phone: 941-907-0666
Email: peggy@imtC3.com or rob@imtC3.com
Web: www.imtC3.com
PLEASE NOTE
International Management Technologies, Inc. trademarks include:
º “Creating a Customer-Centered Culture”
º Customer-Centered Culture
º Customer-Centered Culture (C3) Model
º C3
º C3 Logo
º 8 Dimensions
These materials are exclusive property of International Management Technologies, Inc. This material may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted in whole or part, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise for use with
others, without the written permission of International Management Technologies, Inc.
International Management Technologies, Inc. grants a limited, non-assignable, non-exclusive license to the individual who received this material as
part of a product purchased from International Management Technologies, Inc. to duplicate any of the tools contained herein for his or her personal
use only. Multiple user licenses are available by calling 941-907-0666.
HOW TO SHARE THIS MATERIAL
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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LEARNING OBJECTIVES
• The most common methods for capturing the voice
of the customer
• Why surveys fail and how to avoid that fate
• How to eliminate confusion about who “the
customers” really are
• The word formulas that always uncover what
customers want most (but not necessarily what they
will normally tell you)
• How to translate squishy perceptions into objective
measures with simplicity and speed
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 4
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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VEHICLES FOR UNCOVERING VOC
• Dialogue (ad hoc or structured)
• Legislation
• Regulation
• Contracts
• Specifications
• Designs
• Observation
• Complaints
• Surveys
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 6
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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COMMON SURVEY PROBLEMS
1. The wrong people are surveyed
2. The wrong questions are asked
3. Questions are asked the wrong way
4. Questions are asked at the wrong time
5. Zero dissatisfaction equals total satisfaction
6. Non-customers (prospects) are not surveyed
7. Conducted for the wrong reasons
8. Results are generalized to groups not surveyed
9. Used as a substitute for better methods
10. FINDINGS DON’T DRIVE IMPROVEMENT
Surveys are generally not the most effective way to uncover customer needs. Focus
groups, direct observation and interviews are the recommended vehicles for understanding
customer satisfiers and dissatisfiers. However, once customer desires or concerns are
known, a survey can be a very effective and economical way to determine customer
satisfaction.
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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KEYS TO SURVEY SUCCESS (in Reference)
1. Be clear about the purpose of the survey and who will use the results.
2. Identify specific product(s) to evaluate.
3. Determine which customers and non-customers to query.
4. Decide the timing and frequency of the survey.
5. Good questions find out: By asking questions such as:
What was expected and/or
wanted?
What was experienced?
Level of satisfaction with
the product or service
Degree of relative
importance of this variable
How long did you expect to wait?
How long did you hope to wait?
How long did you actually wait?
How satisfied are you?
Compared with ___________,
how important is that to you?
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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UNCOVERING THE VOICE
OF CUSTOMERS
1. Name the specific product
2. Identify the roles of customers for that product
3. Differentiate the discrete customers within each role
4. Ask the three key questions about outcomes,
functions, features for both product and acquisition
5. Innovate or redesign the product and related process
6. Measure performance along the critical 4 Dimensions
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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C3 is short for Customer-Centered Culture. C3 functions as a
foundation for all enterprise practices. Its cornerstones are:
Philosophy
(mindset, paradigm,
beliefs, values)
1
8 Dimensions
of Excellence
(definition of
success)
2
Measures
(status toward
numerical goals)
3
Methodology
(principles, tools,
application, roles)
4
C3 is described in:
The cornerstones of the foundation include:
1. Philosophy which is sometimes referred to as a new mindset, values, beliefs or paradigm.
2. 8 Dimensions of Excellence which enable a complete and balanced definition of what success
means, prioritized by both customers and ourselves; from strategic direction down to daily
work.
3. Measures which rely on facts to numerically describe what is and what could be.
4. Methodology which includes principles, a set of tools, a manner of application and defined
roles of those involved in their use.
C3 integrates what you know, don’t know & want to know, to create:
- Innovation
- Customer satisfaction
- Unity of purpose
- Simplicity of knowledge work.
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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LANGUAGE MATTERS
• 7 + 5 =
• Service =
• Customer =
• Requirements=
We will provide word formulas/rules on the following concepts:
1. Product / service
2. Customer roles
3. Outcomes expectations
4. Performance expectations
5. Perception expectations
6. Product function
7. Product features
8. Translating perceptions into performance measures
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DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
DVD #1 - Video 2 Service as a Product (Title 2)
Chapter 5, Product Definition
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
The Value of Answers
Customer Segmentation
Target Product Selection
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. Identify and define your personal and organizational products
b. Determine which product is the most important to work on now
Outcome, pages 7, 35-37, 63, 87-90 Chapter 1 - The Service Product Chapter 2 - Differentiating Customers
Outcomes, pages 71-78 Chapter 3 - Define Work as a Tangible Product
Chapter 3 - Define Customers Segmented by
Role, Segment Customers into Relevant
Groups
Also Do
Organization & Customer
Outcomes
Product Definition Customer Roles & Power
PRODUCT DEFINITION
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
1.
Yes No
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
4.
5.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit?
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)?
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above, you’ve mastered the first step in
customer-centered thinking. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. See Instructions for more details.
What is the name of your functional group?
What is the most important product named in 1 through 5?
What discoveries (insights, learnings, “ah ha’s”) did you make?
As a team, list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet:
1
2
Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Name
them below:
PRODUCT DEFINITION
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
1.
Product
2.
Producer
_____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
Your primary role with this product:
6.
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
Fixers
End-Users
Broker for
Producers
Broker for
End-Users
7.
RANK
TOTAL TOTAL
RANK RANK
TIED TO
MISSION IN PLAN CUSTOMER
PRIORITY MEASURED

HOW? GOAL DUE BY
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
MISSION:
PRIORITY OUTCOMES (in decending order)
ORGANIZATION AND CUSTOMER OUTCOMES
Organization: Champion(s):
DESIRED OUTCOMES UNDESIRED OUTCOMES
DISCOVERIES (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
BY WHEN? ACTIONS TOOCCUR
1.
2a.
3a.
2b.
3a.
4.
3b.
5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.
12.
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Chapter 3 - Measure the Degree to Which the
Customers' Expectations are Achieved
The Value of Answers
Customer Segmentation
Target Product Selection
Creating Measures
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
• Identify who your customers are and what role they have with this product.
• Determine who currently has the most power and who should have it.
Chapter 1 - The Service Product Chapter 2 - Differentiating Customers Chapter 3 - Defining Customer Expectations
Chapter 3 - Define Work as a Tangible
Product
Chapter 3 - Define Customers
Segmented by Role, Segment Customers
into Relevant Groups
Also Do
DVD #1 - Video 2 (Title 2) Chapter 5,
Product Definition
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1, Customer
Roles
DVD #2 - Video 4 (Title 4) Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
Product Definition Customer Roles & Power
Voice of the Customer
Product Function
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
1.
Yes No
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
4.
5.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit?
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)?
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above, you’ve mastered the first step in
customer-centered thinking. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. See Instructions for more details.
What is the name of your functional group?
What is the most important product named in 1 through 5?
What discoveries (insights, learnings, “ah ha’s”) did you make?
As a team, list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet:
1
2
Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Name
them below:
PRODUCT DEFINITION
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
1
2
3
4
Performance Perception
1 NO / YES
2 NO / YES
3 NO / YES
4 NO / YES
5 NO / YES
Totals:
6
7 Discoveries You Made:
The Hardest Part of This Exercise:
Type of Expectation
5
Currently
Measured The Top Five Attributes
Total Number of Attributes Identified:
End-Users:
Target Product:
Producer:
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
TEAM NAME ____________________________
1.
Product
2.
Producer
Your primary role with this product: _____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ End-User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
6.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Broker for
End-Users
End-Users
Fixers
Broker for
Producers
7.
RANK
VoC
TOOLS
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TE41
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
Product Function
Do This Next
Creating Measures
Do This Now
Voice of the Customer
Product Function
XP42 Estimated Time >1hour
Also Do
View DVD #1, Chapter 3, Customer Roles
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. Identify what end-user customers want regarding product attributes
b. Discover which customer priorities are currently measured
c. Determine which end-user priorities concern performance or perception
d. Replicate tool use to uncover broker and fixer expectations
• Customer Segmentation
• Outcomes & Innovation Window (XP46)
• Product Design Table (MT46)
Chapter 3 - Defining Customer
Expectations
Do This First
Customer Roles & Power
CU06
1.
Product
2.
Producer
_____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
Your primary role with this product:
6.
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
Fixers
End-Users
Broker for
Producers
Broker for
End-Users
7.
RANK
TeamName
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4 Possible Measures 6 Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1 Product: 1
2
3
4
Performance Perception
1 NO / YES
2 NO / YES
3 NO / YES
4 NO / YES
5 NO / YES
Totals:
6
7 Discoveries You Made:
The Hardest Part of This Exercise:
Type of Expectation 5 Currently
Measured The Top Five Attributes
Total Number of Attributes Identified:
End-Users:
Target Product:
Producer:
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
TEAM NAME ____________________________
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Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
Voice of the Customer Creating Measures Product Design Table
Also Do
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
Outcomes & Innovation Window
Product Features Table
Product-Roles Matrix
CREATING MEASURES
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. Create measures for the seemingly immeasurable customer expectations
Chapter 3 - Defining Customer
Expectations
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
Team Name
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1Product:
1
C Product:
C End-Users:
©
C Product
Attribute
Group
C Customer Expectations
(Voice of the Customer)
C
Rank
C
® Priority 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
³ Target Value
Instructions: Fill in green cells. Use INSERT key to enter + and -. Do not use the arrow keys.
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
Substitute Quality Characteristics
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Totals
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
7.
1
2
3
4
Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
Totals: 0 0 0
6
7
Target Product:
Producer:
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Attributes -
TEAM NAME ____________________________
End-Users:
Total Number of Attributes Identified
Enter Y for Yes below.
The Hardest Thing To Do
Type of Expectation 5 Currently Measured The Top Five Attributes
Discoveries You Made
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Chapter 3 - Customer Expectations
Chapter 4 - Measuring Service
Quality
Chapter 4 - Measuring Service Quality
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
Pages 66-71
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. To translate the "Voice of the Customer" regarding product attributes into measurable product design
criteria (PDC)
b. To develop measures that will enable the producer to monitor and manage quality as defined by the
customer
c. To establish target values, goals and minimums for product performance
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
Customer Roles & Power
Voice of the Customer
Outcomes & Innovation Window
Also Do
Voice of the Customer
& Creating Measures
Product Design Table Product Features Table
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
1
C Product:
C End-Users:
C Product Attribute Group
C Customer Expectations (Voice of the Customer) C Rank
C
® Priority 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ³ Target Value
© Substitute Quality Characteristics
Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A - blue cells) if the preset titl e does not fit your situation.
041306 Copyright© 2006 International Management Technologies, Inc. www. imtc3.com. All rights reserved. MT46
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
EASE OF USE
CERTAINTY
TIMELINESS
When filling in the green cells, use a + and -. IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER key not the tab. If you don't, Excel will think you are doing a cal uculation.
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A - blue cells) if t he preset title does not fit your situation When filling in the green cells, use a + and -. IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER key not the tab. If you don't, Excel will think you are doing a calculation. Product:
End-Users:
Substitute Quality Characteristics Priority
Weighted Value 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Features
PRODUCT FEATURES TABLE
Team Name
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6 Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1Product:
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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UNDESIRED DESIRED
WHOSE VOICE DEFINES EXCELLENCE?
C
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P
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P
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PROCESS
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EFFICIENCY IDENTITY PURPOSE
4
Product Acquisition
Process
Customers Want
3
Product
Characteristics
Customers Want
2
Undesired
Outcomes
Customers
Want to
Avoid
1
Customer
Desired
Outcomes
8
Production Process
Producer Wants
7
Product
Characteristics
Producer Wants
6
Undesired
Outcomes
Producer
Wants to
Avoid
5
Producer
Desired
Outcomes
OUTCOME
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc.
All Rights Reserved. www.imtC3.com
These 8 Dimensions are a succinct but powerful way to identify the critical few areas we must pursue to
achieve excellence. Focus on all 8 Dimensions and excellence can be enhanced. Improve a few and
excellence will be limited. Areas 1-4 drive satisfaction.
The numbering of the 8 Dimensions is intentional. Our long-term enterprise viability is most dependent on
success in area 1, area 8 least. Yet short-term success can be achieved quickly in area 8, creating the illusion
of sustainability. The 8 Dimensions are as relevant in not-for-profit as they are in for-profit environments,
performing well across diverse cultures. See a complete description at www.imtC3.com. The synopsis is:
1. Customer desired outcomes: These are their ultimate hopes: joy, security, personal time, belonging,
health, etc. How well (and quickly) they get those results by working with us reveals our effectiveness.
2. Undesired outcomes customers want to avoid or eliminate: death, taxes, discomfort, wasted time,
frustration, sickness and a host of unwanted conditions. Guard against the assumption (a vital lie) that the
reduction of an undesired outcome improves satisfaction.
3. Product and service characteristics customers want: ease-of-use, accessibility, low cost of ownership,
durability and usefulness. Product refers to any deliverable we can make plural with an "s."
4. Product acquisition process customers want: timely arrival of product requested, no wait or cue time,
ease of acquisition. Our aim is to address process performance in terms customers care about.
5. Producer desired outcomes: Leadership, financial viability, market share, dominance, growth.
6. Undesired outcomes producers want to avoid or eliminate: waste, high turnover, financial loss, customer
defection, instability.
7. Product characteristics producers want: easy to build, low cost to produce, no maintenance or warranty
costs, easy to distribute.
8. Process characteristics producers want: process consistency, low variation, high productivity, comfortable
lead times. It is important to distinguish our activity from the customer's.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 13
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WORD FORMULAS & RULES
QUESTION WORD RULES
1- What is the product?
1. Every product named must be:
a. Expressed as something which can be made plural with an “s”
b. A deliverable, something you can give to someone else
c. Packaged in countable units
d. Very specific (Avoid naming product groups)
2- Who are the customers?
2. A customer is defined by their role(s) with the specific product as:
a. End-user
b. Broker (for either the end-user or the producer)
c. Fixer
WORD FORMULAS TO REVEAL the VOC
3- What are their expectations?
a. Outcome expectations
3. A satisfying (insert product name) will result in (insert expectation)
4. A satisfying (product name) will not result in (insert expectation)
b. Function expectations
(these are usually expressed
as subjective perceptions)
5. A satisfying (insert product name) is (insert expectation)
c. Feature expectations
(these are expressed as
objective, ambiguity-free
criteria)
6. A satisfying (insert product name) has (insert expectation)
4- How can we improve?
a. The translation of
subjective perceptions
into objective design
criteria for the new or
improved product
7. The # of ________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is
not (insert VOC priority answers to formulas 3 and 4)
8. The % of ________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is
not (insert VOC priority answers to formulas 3 and 4)
9. The $ amount of/for/to ________ could indicate that the (insert
product name) is/is not (insert VOC priority answer to formula 4)
b. Goal-setting to have the
biggest impact on
satisfaction and success
10. What is the numerical target to achieve, by when, for each measure
of success?

Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 14
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FOUR KEY QUESTIONS
HOW CAN WE
IMPROVE?
• Design & Innovation
• Customer Satisfaction
• Measures of Success
• Enterprise Excellence
C
WHAT ARE THEIR
EXPECTATIONS?
C
WHO ARE THE
CUSTOMERS?
C
WHAT IS THE
PRODUCT?
C
050709
The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is
dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first, in that order.
The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions.
The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.
Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic, measurably improved
customer satisfaction and organizational performance.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 15
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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PRODUCT
P
R
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T
Products are links between processes and outcomes.
A producer is the individual or group that creates a product for a customer. Products focus our
vision outward to customers, providing a concrete link between process and outcome. A
product is something created by work which can be given to someone else. It is:
• A deliverable • Packaged in countable units
• Very specific • Expressed as something which can be made plural with an “s”
EXAMPLES OF PRODUCT GROUPS:
• Answers • Diagnoses • Recipes
• Blueprints • Greetings • Repairs
• Contracts • Invoices • Reports
• Courses • Plans • Schedules
• Decisions • Policies • Shipments
• Deliveries • Procedures • Strategies
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 17
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PRODUCT DEFINITION
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
Also Do
Organization & Customer
Outcomes
Product Definition Customer Roles & Power
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
- Identify and define your work as products (both personal and organizational)
- Determine which product is the most important to work on now
Outcome, pages 7, 35-37, 63, 87-90 Chapter 1 - The Service Product Chapter 2 - Differentiating Customers
Outcomes, pages 71-78 Chapter 3 - Define Work as a Tangible Product
Chapter 3 - Define Customers Segmented by
Role, Segment Customers into Relevant
Groups
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
DVD #1 - Video 2 Service as a Product (Title 2)
Chapter 5, Product Definition
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
The Value of Answers
Customer Segmentation
Target Product Selection
1.
Yes No
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
4.
5.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit?
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)?
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above, you’ve mastered the first step in
customer-centered thinking. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. See Instructions for more details.
What is the name of your functional group?
What is the most important product named in 1 through 5?
What discoveries (insights, learnings, “ah ha’s”) did you make?
As a team, list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet:
1
2
Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Name
them below:
PRODUCT DEFINITION
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
1.
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
2.
P
r
o
d
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c
e
r
_____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
Your primary role with this product:
6.
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
F
ix
e
r
s
E
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d
-U
s
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s
B
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fo
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P
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s
B
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E
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s
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s
7.
RANK
TOTAL TOTAL
RANK RANK
TIED TO
MISSION IN PLAN
CUSTOMER
PRIORITY MEASURED

HOW? GOAL DUE BY
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No
MISSION:
PRIORITY OUTCOMES (in decending order)
ORGANIZATION AND CUSTOMER OUTCOMES
Organization: Champion(s):
DESIRED OUTCOMES UNDESIRED OUTCOMES
DISCOVERIES (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
BY WHEN? ACTIONS TO OCCUR
1.
2a.
3a.
2b.
3a.
4.
3b.
5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.
12.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 18
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PRODUCT DEFINITION
1.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Products are nouns. If the label you wrote is followed by “. . . ing,” it is an activity (a verb), not a
product. The product is the tangible result of activity. Words like “satisfaction,” “assurance” and
“security” are also not products. They are outcomes (intangible results or conditions) obtained by
using the product.
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
A definition of a product is:
Something created by work which can be given to someone else to achieve the desired outcome.
It is:
- Expressed as something that can be made plural with an "s"
- A deliverable
- Packaged in countable units
- Very specific
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
For example, a product name of “policy, “plan, or “report” isn’t specific enough to claim ownership.
These are product groups. There are probably others who would also claim those products as
theirs. Be specific. A “customer satisfaction policy,” “cycle time reduction plan” or “departmental
budget report” are examples of specific names of products only you or your immediate work group
might claim as yours.
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
List the specific names of at least four products generally identified with the mission of your
enterprise or business unit. Make each product plural with an “s”. Name only products exchanged for
money with people outside the enterprise or business unit. These products must be either (1) purchased or
specifically funded before the product is created or (2) purchased after the product is produced
Select one of the most important products named in 1 through 5. Write in the specific name of the
product on the line below. Do not use “information, “answers,” or the name of a manufactured product
here.
INSTRUCTIONS
What is the name of your functional group?
(Examples of functional groups include: engineering, marketing, purchasing, accounting, etc.)
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)
A business unit can be a division, product sector, agency or department, depending on the kind and size of
enterprise.
Apply this product definition criteria before proceeding.
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
A “relationship” might seem like a product because we can make it plural with an “s”: relationships.
This is one of a very small number of exceptions to the plural-with-an-s rule. A relationship is not a
deliverable, something we can give to someone else. It is an outcome.
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
“Information” can only be considered as a product by the various packaged forms it may take.
Reports, graphs, answers, plans and manuals would be examples of informational products.
Information is the raw material which is delivered to others in some organized or packaged form.
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Satisfaction, security, fun, health, productivity and understanding are outcomes the product might
create. Don't confuse outcomes with the product itself. Executives sometimes think their products
are “leadership” or “vision.” Their true products may consist of mission statements, policies,
strategies, guidelines and assignments which, when used by others, propel the organization in a
desired direction. These kinds of products include what we call source products (policies, strategies
and plans) and will be addressed later. Leadership is either a skill or an outcome, not a product.
Vision is also an outcome; a desired future condition.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 19
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PRODUCT DEFINITION
1.
Yes No
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
4.
5.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
6.
7.
8.
9.
1
2
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)?
What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit?
Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Name
them below:
What discoveries (insights, learnings, “ah ha’s”) did you make?
As a team, list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet:
What is the most important product named in 1 through 5?
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
PRODUCT DEFINITION
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
What is the name of your functional group?
If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above, you’ve mastered the first step in
customer-centered thinking. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. See Instructions for more details.
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 20
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WHAT IS THEIR BUSINESS?
• Sony
• Apple Computer
• Nokia
• Southwest Airlines
• Harley-Davidson
• Oakley
• Military
• Starbucks
• Microsoft
• Lakewood Church
• MO Dept. Of Revenue
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FREQUENT VITAL LIES
1. Growth in market share proves customers are happy.
2. We are on the leading edge in our industry.
3. Few customer complaints= satisfaction.
4. We know what business we are in.
5. Customers don’t know what they want.
6. We know what customers want.
7. Our performance measures confirm our excellence.
(For more go to www.imtC3.com)
• Constraining assumptions
• Self-deception
• Denial
• Excuses for not changing
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 22
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1. Products focus our vision outward to customers.
2. We can only identify our customers by their relationship to
specific products.
3. Information products are created in anticipation of a need;
service products are produced in response.
4. Service products require customer involvement in the
production process.
5. Organize everything by product: customers, measures,
outcomes, problems, processes and teams.
6. 21
st
century leaders define their knowledge products as
quantified deliverables, designed to satisfy the emerging
expectations of highly differentiated customers.
PRODUCT PRINCIPLES
BENEFITS OF DEFINING WORK AS PRODUCTS:
1. Reduces ambiguity in defining “what we do”
2. Creates a tangible link between process and outcome
3. Provides the basis for identifying who “the customer” really is
4. Shifts focus from “how” to “what”, keeping “why” in mind
5. Enables the measurement of the seemingly immeasurable (in terms of unit cost,
quality, value, volume, timeliness, satisfaction, etc.)
6. Simplifies prioritization of work
7. Gives activity purpose
8. Improves accountability
9. Uncovers new sources of differentiation
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 23
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QUESTION #2
WHO ARE THE
CUSTOMERS?
C
WHAT IS THE
PRODUCT?
C
Define all work as:
• Deliverables
• Plural with an ‘s’
• Countable
• Specific
050709
The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is
dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first, in that order.
The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions.
The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.
Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic, measurably improved
customer satisfaction and organizational performance.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 24
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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CUSTOMER ROLES
P
R
O
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T
END-
USER
BROKER
FIXER
An end–user is the customer for whom the product is primarily intended. This customer will personally
use the product to achieve a desired outcome. There are usually more of this type of customer than of
any other. This is the most important type of customer. It is rare that all end-users of a specific product
are a homogeneous group, either in terms of their demographic characteristics or their expectation
priorities. End-users always win in the long run.
A broker is the customer who acts as an agent for the end–user and/or the producer.
• As an agent for the end–user, the broker makes the product more accessible, easier to use and
more appealing.
• As an agent for the producer, the broker “encourages” the user to accept the product.
• The broker’s function is to obtain, transform or transfer products for the benefit of both users and
producers.
A fixer is any customer who will have to make repairs, corrections, modifications, or adjustments to the
product at any point in its life cycle for the benefit of the end-user.
IMPACT OF ROLE ON POWER:
Customers differ in their expectations and their power. Power is the ability to direct or change the
product design. It is common to observe:
• The further a customer is from the product, the more power.
• Customers may have multiple roles with a single product.
• The producer’s dialogue with brokers is more frequent and detailed then with end-users.
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The Value of Answers
Customer Segmentation
Target Product Selection
Creating Measures
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
- Identify who your customers are and what role they have with this product.
- Determine who currently has the most power and who should have it.
Chapter 1 - The Service Product Chapter 2 - Differentiating Customers Chapter 3 - Defining Customer Expectations
Chapter 3 - Define Work as a Tangible
Product
Chapter 3 - Define Customers
Segmented by Role, Segment Customers
into Relevant Groups
Also Do
DVD #1 - Video 2 (Title 2) Chapter 5,
Product Definition
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1,
Customer Roles
DVD #1 - Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1, Customer
Roles
DVD #2 - Video 4 (Title 4) Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
Chapter 3 - Measure the Degree to Which the
Customers' Expectations are Achieved
Product Definition Customer Roles & Power
Voice of the Customer
Product Function
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
1.
Yes No
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
3.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
4.
5.
a. d.
b. e.
c. f.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Can you make the product plural with an “s”?
Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else?
Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer?
Does the product, as named, occur in countable units?
What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates?
What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit?
What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)?
Is the product something only you can claim as yours?
If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above, you’ve mastered the first step in
customer-centered thinking. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. See Instructions for more details.
What is the name of your functional group?
What is the most important product named in 1 through 5?
What discoveries (insights, learnings, “ah ha’s”) did you make?
As a team, list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet:
1
2
Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Name
them below:
PRODUCT DEFINITION
What are at least four of the most important products you personally create?
1.
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
2.
P
r
o
d
u
c
e
r
Your primary role with this product: _____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ End-User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
6.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
B
r
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e
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fo
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E
n
d
-U
s
e
r
s
E
n
d
-U
s
e
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s
F
ix
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s
B
r
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k
e
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fo
r

P
r
o
d
u
c
e
r
s
7.
RANK
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Totals
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
7.
1
2
3
4
Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
Totals: 0 0 0
6
7
Target Product:
Producer:
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Attributes -
TEAM NAME ____________________________
End-Users:
Total Number of Attributes Identified
Enter Y for Yes below.
The Hardest Thing To Do
Type of Expectation
5
Currently
Measured The Top Five Attributes
Discoveries You Made
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 26
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CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Name your target product (from Product Definition Tool).
INSTRUCTIONS
Focus on this one product as you answer questions 2 - 7.
NOTE: Identify the roles people play with this product, using names of positions, titles, or
individuals, not organizational names.
What is the producer's name?
Name the brokers between the producer and end-user customers, if any exist.
What discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”) did you make?
Name the fixers for this product.
What is your primary role with this product?
Now go back and rank the current power of all the parties identified in Numbers 2-5.
Power refers to the ability to direct or change the design of the product. 1 = most powerful. Write only
one 1 in this column, only one 2, and so on, even if the same person appears in more than one place.
Give every entry an unique rank. If there are 12 entries the assigned ranks will go from 1-12. A
customer can have more than one role with a product. Power may vary depending on the role.
Who are the end-users of this product?
• Refer to NOTE in Step 1.
• Apply the Segmenting Customers guidelines as time and importance allow.
• Insert more lines if needed.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 27
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CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
1.
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
2.
P
r
o
d
u
c
e
r
Your primary role with this product: _____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ End-User
_____ Fixer
B
r
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f
o
r

P
r
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d
u
c
e
r
s
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
B
r
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f
o
r

E
n
d
-
U
s
e
r
s
E
n
d
-
U
s
e
r
s
8.
5.
6.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
F
i
x
e
r
s
7.
RANK
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End-users Brokers Fixers
Appendectomy Surgeon Patient
Referring Physician
Insurance
Administrator
Patient Advocate
Customer Service Agent
Attorney
Surgeon
Business Tax
Regulation
Tax Agency
Chief Fin. Officer
Bus. Accountant
Tax Advisor
Tax Specialist
Chief Fin. Officer
Tax Auditor
Car Production
Driver
Passenger
Dealer
Passenger
Mechanic
Customer Service
Agent
Owner
Insurance Policy Underwriter
Policy Holder
Beneficiary
Salesperson
Financial Planner
Customer Service Agent
Departmental
Budget
Finance Manager Department Manager
Mail Room Personnel
Financial Analyst
Department Manager
Secretary
Equipment
Requisition
Requestor
Order Fulfillment
Person at Supplier
Purchasing Agent
Approving Managers(s)
Originator
Purchasing Agent
Training Course
Course Designer
Developer
Participant
Instructor Participant
Registrar
Participant's Manager
Salesperson
Participant
Instructor
Participant’s Manager
Course Designer
Mortgage Lender
Borrower
Builder/Contractor
Mortgage Banker
Processor
Mortgage Consolidator
Collector
Prescription
Prescribing
Physician
Pharmacist
Nurse
Patient
Insurer
Prescribing Physician
X-ray Technician Radiologist Technician Radiologist Referring
Invoice Billing Clerk
Purchaser
Payables Clerk
Insurer
Patient
Auditor
Customer Service Agent
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
PRODUCT PRODUCER
POSSIBLE CUSTOMERS
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 29
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QUESTION #3
WHAT ARE THEIR
EXPECTATIONS?
C
WHO ARE THE
CUSTOMERS?
C
WHAT IS THE
PRODUCT?
C
Define all work as:
• Deliverables
• Plural with an ‘s’
• Countable
• Specific
Differentiate 3 Roles:
• End-users
• Brokers
• Fixers
050709
The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is
dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first, in that order.
The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions.
The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.
Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic, measurably improved
customer satisfaction and organizational performance.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 30
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EXPECTATIONS
P
R
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T
END-
USER
BROKER
FIXER
E
X
P
E
C
T
A
T
I
O
N
S
P
R
O
D
U
C
T
DEFINITION: Customer expectations are considered the basis for determining what
“quality” means. Simply put, quality is the degree to which customers get what they want.
Quality is product-focused.
Customers have expectations about both the attributes of the product and the outcomes to
be achieved by using the product. These expectations are stated in the “voice of the
customer” which may not be directly measurable. They have to be translated by the
producer into precise design criteria which are directly measurable. Producers sometimes
refer to these translations as requirements, specifications or standards. These terms are
not as inclusive as expectations.
Producers in a customer-centered culture proactively solicit emerging customer
expectations and wants to direct both continuous improvement in quality and achieve
breakthroughs in innovation. Producers in a producer-centered culture assume product
specifications totally reflect customer expectations.
CAUTION: What a customer expects can be different than what is wanted. Customers
may expect a dental visit to be unpleasant. They don't want it to be. We should aim to
understand and deliver what customers want, not necessarily what they expect.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 31
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Do This First
Customer Roles & Power
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
- Identify what end-user customers want regarding product attributes
- Discover which customer priorities are currently measured
- Determine which end-user priorities concern performance or perception
- Replicate tool use to uncover broker and fixer expectations
Chapter 3 - Defining Customer
Expectations
Pages 66-71
View DVD #1, Chapter 3, Customer
Roles
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
• Customer Segmentation,
• Product Definition
• Outcomes & Innovation Window
• Product Design Table
Also Do
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
Product Function
Do This Next
Creating Measures
Do This Now
Voice of the Customer
Product Attributes
1.
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_____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
Your primary role with this product:
6.
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
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7.
RANK
Team Name
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6 Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1 Product:
1.
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_____ Producer
_____ Broker for producer
_____ Broker for user
_____ User
_____ Fixer
8.
5.
Your primary role with this product:
6.
CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER
3.
4.
Discoveries (insights, learning, “ah-ha’s”)
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7.
RANK
Team Name
1
2
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4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6 Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1 Product:
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
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Totals
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
7.
1
2
3
4
Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
Totals: 0 0 0
6
7
Target Product:
Producer:
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Attributes -
TEAM NAME ____________________________
End-Users:
Total Number of Attributes Identified
Enter Y for Yes below.
The Hardest Thing To Do
Type of Expectation
5
Currently
Measured The Top Five Attributes
Discoveries You Made
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 32
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VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
EXPECTED
TIME
(Minutes)
2. 2
4a.
2
4b.
3
5.
3
6.
3
7. 1
8. 2
30
3.
Summarize your findings using questions below. Record on the VoC Summary Sheet.
7. What discoveries were made by using this tool?
3. Who are the end-users?
Determine the rank or priority of attributes by recording (in the RANK column) the number
of checks each attribute has received. The one with most checks is ranked “1”. Quickly
rank the top five only. No ties are allowed. Breaking the ties arbitrarily is okay. Complete
steps 5-8 regarding only these top five attributes.
Put a Y (Yes) in the Measured column next to those attributes which are currently
measured. Consider an attribute “currently measured” only if a numerical measure is
published, reported or displayed on a regular basis. Total the number of Y's.
12
1. What is the target product? 5. What was the #1 attribute?
INSTRUCTIONS FOR UNCOVERING PRODUCT ATTRIBUTES
Each person in the group is responsible for recording notes. Assign a time keeper.
2
1. Write in the name of the target product. Remember that this product name must be:
- A deliverable - Packaged in countable units
- Very specific - Able to be made plural with an "s"
(The name of a class of products - reports, answers, orders, plans, etc. - is not
specific enough. Select the specific product name you will focus on.)
Identify all the end-users for this product and write their names in the blanks.
Brainstorm by giving each participant in the group a turn to state an attribute thought to be
desired by the end-users. Everyone writes down each attribute as it’s stated on their
worksheet. The objective is to quickly identify as many attributes as possible. The goal is
30; the minimum is 15. Limit discussion.
Once all the attributes are written down (or time runs out), each participant reviews the list
to identify which three (3) are thought to be most important. Put a check in the RANK
column next to those three. This is done by each individual, without discussion. Do not
combine or group attributes. Do the remaining steps (4b-8) through group discussion.
TOTAL MINUTES
Total the number of Y's (Yes) in the Performance and Perception columns.
Determine whether each of the top five attributes address performance (objective criteria)
or perception (subjective criteria). Put a Y (Yes) in the appropriate Performance or
Perception column. It is okay to indicate that the attribute addresses both performance
and perception.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Attributes must be stated in the “voice of the customer” using this
statement:
A satisfying (product name) is one which is (attribute) . Do not change any
words in this statement to fit your attributes.
Be careful that attributes identified are for the product named, not for some other product.
If the product is a purchase order, the attributes are for the purchase order itself, not the
items the purchase order represents.
The team will report the results by answering the following questions:
b. Does the attribute address performance, perception
or both?
c. Repeat steps 5a and 5b for attributes #2-5.
6. What was the hardest part of doing this?
2. Who is the producer? a. Is it currently being measured? How?
4. How many attributes were identified?
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 33
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VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER Use this worksheet in the printed form.
1. PRODUCT
2. END-USERS
4a-b 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Totals
Attributes
3. 6.
Users agree to license agreement terms described at www.imtC3.com
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Attributes -
5-7
Enter Y for Yes
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SATISFACTION PRINCIPLES
1. The absence of dissatisfaction is not the same as satisfaction.
2. Performance, perception and outcome are the basis of satisfaction.
3. Assume customer expectations are unmet, until you check.
4. Customers always know the outcomes they want.
5. Assuming customers don’t know what they want causes us to give
them what we want.
6. What customers expect is not necessarily what they want.
7. Understand customer-desired outcomes before considering product
functions or features.
8. Current customer behavior is not a predictor of future expectations.
9. Desired outcomes are stable over time.
10. Favor end-users of the final product when their expectations
compete with interests of intermediate product customers.
11. It is possible to achieve standards and specifications yet still not
satisfy customers.
12. A luxury once experienced becomes a necessity.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 35
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THREE QUESTIONS TO ASK
A satisfying (product)
is one which __________. (key word)
Expectation
Uncovered
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UNDESIRED DESIRED
CUSTOMER VOICES
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PROCESS
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EFFICIENCY IDENTITY PURPOSE
4
Product Acquisition
Process
Customers Want
3
Product
Characteristics
Customers Want
2
Undesired
Outcomes
Customers
Want to
Avoid
1
Customer
Desired
Outcomes
8 7 6 5
OUTCOME
An individual customer can speak with four (4) voices:
1. Customer desired outcomes: These are their ultimate hopes: joy, security, personal time,
belonging, health, etc. How well (and quickly) they get those results by working with us
reveals our effectiveness.
2. Undesired outcomes customers want to avoid or eliminate: death, taxes, discomfort,
wasted time, frustration, sickness and a host of unwanted conditions. Guard against the
assumption (a vital lie) that the reduction of an undesired outcome improves satisfaction.
3. Product and service characteristics customers want: ease-of-use, accessibility, low
cost of ownership, durability and usefulness. Product refers to any deliverable we can make
plural with an "s."
4. Product acquisition process customers want: timely arrival of product requested, no
wait or cue time, ease of acquisition. Our aim is to address process performance in terms
customers care about.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 37
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CREATING MEASURES
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. Create measures for the seemingly immeasurable customer expectations
Chapter 3 - Defining Customer
Expectations
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
Outcomes & Innovation Window
Product Features Table
Product-Roles Matrix
Also Do
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
Voice of the Customer Creating Measures Product Design Table
Team Name
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2 End Users: 1 Product:
1
C Product:
C End-Users:
©
C Product
Attribute
Group
C Customer Expectations
(Voice of the Customer)
C
Rank
C
® Priority 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
³ Target Value
Instructions: Fill in green cells. Use INSERT key to enter + and -. Do not use the arrow keys.
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
S
ubstitute Q
uality C
haracteristics
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
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12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Totals
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
7.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 38
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CREATING MEASURES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Record your discoveries.
c. Who should do what by when?
a. Answers to steps 1-7.
b. Would these measures also address priorities of brokers and fixers?
Summarize your findings by reporting:
Name the specific target product.
Identify the end-users you will focus on.
Determine the top five (5) customer expectations regarding product attributes as stated by
customers. REMEMBER: Product attributes must fit the phrase, "A satisfying (product) is one
which is _____________." Refer to your prior work with the Voice of the Customer Tool.
Brainstorm possible measures for each priority expectation using any of the following phrases
(making sure that there is no ambiguity in the measures):
a. The number of _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert
expectation).
b. The % of _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert
expectation).
b. Ease and cost of collecting data
c. Competitive advantage of improvements based on these measures
Be sure that each priority expectation has at least one measure.
Create a performance goal for the top 5 priority measures. Consider the goal from the customer's
point of view (i.e. How long does a customer say it should take to read an instruction booklet?)
Consider whether an absolute number or range of values is appropriate.
Rank the top five measures, considering:
c. The dollar amount of/to/for _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not
(insert expectation).
a. Relevance to end-user priorities (these measures will really reflect what customers want)
INSTRUCTIONS
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 39
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CREATING MEASURES
1
2
3
4
5
5Priority
Of Measure
By When
4 Possible Measures
3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
2End Users:
6 Goal
Team Name
1 Product:
7 Discoveries
8 Who Will Do What
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 40
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QUESTION #4
HOW CAN WE
IMPROVE?
• Design & Innovation
• Customer Satisfaction
• Measures of Success
• Enterprise Excellence
C
WHAT ARE THEIR
EXPECTATIONS?
C
WHO ARE THE
CUSTOMERS?
C
WHAT IS THE
PRODUCT?
C
Define all work as:
• Deliverables
• Plural with an ‘s’
• Countable
• Specific
Differentiate 3 Roles:
• End-users
• Brokers
• Fixers
Reveal Expectations:
• Outcomes
• Functions
• Features
050709
The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is
dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first, in that order.
The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions.
The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.
Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic, measurably improved
customer satisfaction and organizational performance.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 41
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.
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QUALITY
VAG01
PRODUCT
Quality initiatives have traditionally focused on product and process improvement,
influenced by industry (producer) standards, current practices and existing technology.
Improvements tend to be made incrementally, using convergent thinking. The traditional
questions encouraging improvement in quality include:
• How many defects or “things gone wrong” can we count?
• Does this product meet measurable specifications?
• Are we in compliance?
• How can we apply continuous improvement to our process or product?
Benchmarking can help break the convergent thinking paradigm by identifying others who
are already doing things we may think are impossible: it can defeat vital lies. A strong
virtue of benchmarking is that it can lead to very rapid improvement. This can be essential
for success (if not survival) in a fast changing environment.
Benchmarking can be done on (1) processes, (2) products, (3) producer outcomes and (4)
customer outcomes. If your organization practices benchmarking, which of the four get
attention?
Whose definition of quality is being measured: producer's, customer's or both?
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 42
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INNOVATION
S
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Innovation refers to the process of making a desired outcome easier to achieve.
Innovation is outcome-focused. It requires divergent thinking and behavior, in anticipation
of a future condition. Questions which encourage innovation and improved outcomes
include:
• What results are expected by use of this product?
• What alternative products or processes will achieve superior outcomes?
Benchmarking, once completed, guarantees neither continual improvement nor innovation.
A limitation in conventional benchmarking practice is its primary focus of internal process,
secondarily on today’s product(s) and lastly (if at all) on customer-desired outcomes.
Benchmarking can, at best, uncover how to be equal to the best. Customer-centered
continuous innovation can enable the practitioners to become the best and sustain their
leadership position.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 43
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UNCOVERING THE VOICE
OF CUSTOMERS
1. Name the specific product
2. Identify the roles of customers for that product
3. Differentiate the discrete customers within each role
4. Ask the three key questions about outcomes,
functions, features for both product and acquisition
5. Innovate or redesign the product and related process
6. Measure performance along the critical 4 Dimensions
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 44
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WAYS TO APPLY & LEARN MORE
• Use individual or set of tools: http://www.imtc3.com/resource/tools.cfm
• Read, view or play: http://www.imtc3.com/products/products.cfm
– Autographed copy of book
– DVD series with facilitator kit, “Creating a Customer-Centered Culture”
– Game, “Voice of the Customer: the measure of success”
• Attend one of the next web-based sessions or a public live workshop:
http://www.imtc3.com/events/UpcomingEvents.cfm
• Contact Peggy, 941-907-0666 or peggy@imtC3.com to
– Set up a teleconference with Rob (no charge) to discuss your questions or
special needs
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 45
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C3 TOOLS &
REFERENCE
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 46
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10 STEPS TO ALIGN EXCELLENCE
WITH CUSTOMER PRIORITIES
1. Articulate strategic & customer-desired outcomes.
2. Determine how each outcome will be measured.
3. Set numerical improvement objectives and due dates.
4. Select the few products most likely to impact outcome success.
5. Identify end-user, broker & fixer customers for key products.
6. Uncover customers’ priority expectations for each product.
7. Measure seemingly immeasurable expectations.
8. Innovate or redesign products to best achieve outcomes.
9. Cut customer and producer acquisition/supply time by 80%.
10. IMPLEMENT and CELEBRATE SUCCESS with high ROI!
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 47
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VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER:
The Measure of Success
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER is a thought-provoking game of balance, truth and insight.
Fast-paced fun blends with players’ real organizational challenges. Leaders, managers,
change agents and trainers will find this game a terrific tool to strengthen almost any
change initiative.
The object of the game is to convince the Truth-Tellers that your team (1) knows who your
customers really are, (2) understands customer expectations and (3) has performance
measures aligned with those priorities. You’ll find this to be a terrific tool to quickly:
- Introduce core customer-centered culture (C3) concepts
- Demonstrate how to measure customer satisfaction
- Test players’ C3 IQ
- Strengthen transformation initiatives such as Six Sigma/DFSS , Voice of the
Customer, Balanced Scorecards and ISO 9001
Your team uses real information about your customers to create a winning hand. Does an
End-User Straight beat a Strategic Full House? Play the game and find out. Each game
includes facilitator instructions, an animated presentation of instructions for players and
card decks for two teams. Each team may have 4-8 participants.
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 48
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Chapter 3 - Customer Expectations
Chapter 4 - Measuring Service Quality
Chapter 4 - Measuring Service Quality
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
Chapter 5 - Quality & Innovation
Pages 66-71
PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL
a. To translate the "Voice of the Customer" regarding product attributes into measurable product design
criteria (PDC)
b. To develop measures that will enable the producer to monitor and manage quality as defined by the
customer
c. To establish target values, goals and minimums for product performance
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer
Expectations
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
DVD #1 - Chapter 1, Customer Roles
DVD #2 - Chapter 1, Customer Expectations
Customer Roles & Power
Voice of the Customer
Outcomes & Innovation Window
Also Do
Voice of the Customer
& Creating Measures
Product Design Table Product Features Table
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
Do This First Do This Now Do This Next
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
1
C Product:
C End-Users:
C Product
Attribute
Group
C Customer Expectations
(Voice of the Customer)
C
Rank
C
® Priority 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
³ Target Value
©

Substitute Quality Characteristics
Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A -
blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your situation.
041306 Copyright© 2006 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtc3.com. All rights reserved. MT46
PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE
EASE
OF USE
CERTAINTY
TIMELINESS
When filling in the green cells, use a + and -. IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER
key not the tab. If you don't, Excel will think you are doing a caluculation.
1. PRODUCT
2. ENDUSERS
4. 5.
Rank Measured Performance Perception
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
3. 6.
Attributes
VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
- Product Function -
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group
(Column A - blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your
situation
When filling in the green cells, use a + and -. IMPORTANT!
Use the ENTER key not the tab. If you don't, Excel will think
you are doing a calculation.
Product:
End-Users:
Substitute Quality Characteristics Priority
Weighted Value 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Features
PRODUCT FEATURES TABLE
Team Name
1
2
3
4
5
5 Priority Of
Measure
7Who By When
3Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…)
4Possible Measures 6Goal
8Discoveries
Will Do What
CREATING MEASURES
2End Users: 1Product:
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Timeliness Certainty
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# of times instructor has taught course
# of days between request for class and
attendance
% of participants reporting application
% of visuals per page of materials
# of requests for help within first 90 days
# of principles illustrated by examples or
anecdotes
% of core concepts applied with exercise(s)
VOC TO DESIGN
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 50
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 51
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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 52
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For a legible version of this chart please see www.imtc3.com/public/c3friends
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 53
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Answer A complete, accurate knowledge product that
satisfies the end user’s question on the first attempt.

Broker An agent for the end-user and/or the producer

End-user This customer will personally use the product
to achieve a desired outcome.

Expectations Expectations are based on the
customers’ past experience with products. Wants are
desires focused on optimums (vs. minimums) and hopes
(vs. past experiences) regarding a product or outcome.
An experience may be personal or vicarious.

Fixer Any customer who will have to make repairs,
corrections, modifications or adjustments to the product.

Outcome A result achieved or sought.

Performance Expectations Unambiguous, objective
and directly measurable attributes of a product, process
or organization.

Perception Expectations Subjective criteria such as
easy-to-use, timely, often, cheap, quick, understandable,
concise and complete.

Product Something created by work which can be
given to someone else to achieve a desired outcome.




Customer Common synonyms include client,
stakeholder, partner, taxpayer, patient and guest. The
confusion can be compounded by organizing customers
according to location (internal or external). The term is
often used without reference to a specific product. As a
practical matter, a person can only be a customer in
terms of a product. Replace customer with end user,
broker, or fixer.

Output This is often confused with a deliverable (see
product) or a result (see outcome).

Service It is virtually impossible for members of an
organization to agree on what this means. Service is
most frequently used as a verb to describe reactive
activity (e.g. help, support, assist, fix). But it can also be
used as a noun (e.g. legal services) or as an adjective
(e.g. service center). What cannot be defined is difficult
to manage, measure and improve.

Supplier This can refer to a person or group that gives
a product to someone else. Replace supplier with
broker or producer, depending on the relationship with
a given product.





It is: ▪ A deliverable
▪ A noun
▪ Packaged in countable units
▪ Expressed as something which can be made plural
with an “s”

Producer This is the person or group that creates a product
for a customer.

Vital Lie A limiting assumption. An excuse for not changing.
It can prevent the pursuit of the possible.

Ten most common vital lies include:
1. Satisfaction will occur if dissatisfaction declines.
2. We are on the leading edge in our industry.
3. Growth in customer demand or market share means
customers are satisfied.
4. We know what business we are in.
5. We know who our customers are.
6. The most important customers have priority.
7. Customers don’t know what they want.
8. We know what customers want.
9. What customers say they expect is actually what they want.
10. Our performance measures confirm our excellence.
International Management Technologies, Inc. is a
management consulting firm specializing in
customer-centered cultural change, customer
satisfaction, performance measurement, innovation and
service quality. Our mission is to enable clients like you
to achieve and sustain leadership in satisfying
customers. IMT was founded in 1985.

REFERENCE
KEY WORDS WORDS TO AVOID
ABOUT IMT
International Management Technologies, Inc. is a
management consulting firm specializing in
customer-centered cultural change, customer
satisfaction, performance measurement, innovation and
service quality. Our mission is to enable clients like you
to achieve and sustain leadership in satisfying
customers. IMT was founded in 1985.

REFERENCE
Lawton, Robin L., Creating a Customer-Centered Culture:
Leadership in Quality, Innovation and Speed Quality Press,
1993

Miller, Ken, The Change Agent’s Guide to Radical
Improvement, Milwaukee: Quality Press, 2002

Articles available on-line at www.imtc3.com
• “Creating Total Customer Satisfaction, A Service Quality
Strategy that Will Work for You”
• “Using Measures to Connect Strategy With Customers”
• “Balance Your Balanced Scorecard”
• “Are Your Surveys Only Suitable For Wrapping Fish?”

GLOSSARY
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 54
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Author, Keynote Speaker, Consultant, Workshop Leader
Mr. Robin Lawton is an internationally recognized expert in creating rapid strategic alignment
between enterprise objectives and customer priorities. He has over 25 years experience
directing both strategic and operational improvement initiatives. He has developed and
deployed powerful but easy-to-understand principles, strategies and tools to improve and
measure service, knowledge work and customer satisfaction.
The Missouri Department of Revenue and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are
winners of their respective state quality awards (Missouri in 2000, California in 1998) as a
direct result of applying Lawton’s unique principles and tools. These are described in his
best-selling book, Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality, Innovation
and Speed (Quality Press) and at www.imtC3.com. Other clients include award-winning
organizations such as Motorola, AT&T, American Honda, Siemens, American Express, Ford
Motor Company, Eastman Kodak, City of Louisville, Raytheon, Naval Air Depot, Pinellas
County Utilities and many others not yet so well known.
Mr. Lawton is an engaging, humorous and provocative speaker. Rob has been featured at
international, national and regional conferences sponsored by such organizations as the
Japan Management Association, Chamber of Commerce, Federal Executive Board,
Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME), American Marketing Association (AMA)
and American Society for Quality (ASQ). AME, ASQ, International Conference on ISO 9000
and others have named Mr. Lawton “Outstanding Speaker”. He is listed in the directory of
Who’s Who of Business Leaders.
Rob has the unique ability to develop and articulate alternatives to complex organizational
and competitive challenges. He makes the solutions feel like common sense. Rob has a
combination of excellent communication skills, leadership vision and bias for action that
compels others to follow. He is known as a dynamic innovator who inspires others to think
creatively and push the boundaries of what was previously thought impossible.
Mr. Lawton is president of International Management Technologies, Inc. While guiding that
business since 1985, he has periodically served as adjunct faculty at the University of
Minnesota and Metropolitan State University.
ROBIN LAWTON
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved. Page 55
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ABOUT IMT

INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.…

We didn’t invent customer satisfaction. We just help you increase it.
Since 1985, IMT has helped industry and government agencies achieve
stunning results. Over 5-to-1 return on investment is not uncommon.
The secret is the C3 system of organizational transformation.














CLIENTS.. ..TESTIMONIALS..
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Defense Contract Management Agency
General Services Administration
Naval Surface Warfare Center
Defense Logistics Agency
Department of Defense
NAVAIR
ITT Defense
Raytheon
Honeywell

And many more…


LET’S TALK
Please help us understand your challenges.
CALL: 800-729-1468 or 941-907-0666
EMAIL: rob@imtC3.com
VISIT: www.imtC3.com
GSA# GS-10F-0109R, MOBIS schedule
CORE COMPETENCIES

· Strategic Planning
· Performance Measurement
· Customer Satisfaction
· Motivational Key Notes
· Change Management
· Service/Product Design
· Customer-Supplier Relations
· Process Time Reduction
· Strategic Project Management
ON-SITE TRAINING INCLUDES

· Aligning Strategy & Measures with
Customer Priorities
· 8 Dimensions of Excellence
· Uncovering the Voice of the Customer
· Lean Process in Service
· High ROI Projects
· Creating a Customer-Centered Culture
· Measuring Knowledge Work and Satisfaction
· Customer-Centered Six Sigma
· “We reduced cycle time by 80%, saved over $20
million in the first two years and moved from middle of
the pack to #1 of 50 agencies of our kind in the country
on satisfaction.” Governor’s Office
· “I have never experienced a program with a higher
return on investment of time and money. This is also
the most clear and direct method of improvement I have
found.” Department of Revenue
· “IMT provides the management and tactical tools to
implement cultural change, achieving satisfaction
internally and externally to the organization.” Motorola
· “The C3 approach is the most effective model I have
seen in my 15 years in management.” Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory
· “Excellent program! This ... challenged me to make a
mind shift to apply the customer-centered thinking in
my work. The emphasis on creative, divergent thinking
may be the key to our success in the next ten years.”
AVP, American Honda
WE CAN HELP YOU

· Align strategic direction with customer priorities
· Uncover and balance competing customer expectations
· Shorten service delivery times by >50% (without automation)
· Measure performance from the enterprise to the person without tears
· Achieve what you never thought possible
3M
AT&T
NAVAIR
Microsoft
Caterpillar
Motorola
City of Calgary
Six Sigma Academy
Pinellas County Utilities
State Gov’t such as AK, MI, MN, WY

HOW TO SHARE THIS MATERIAL
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We appreciate and will support your desire to share this material with others. To get the maximum benefit as easily as possible and still respect copyright constraint, here are some of your options: To provide an overview of what you learned and think is most valuable, use these free references from our website at http://www.imtc3.com/library/articles.cfm: • Download key PowerPoint slides under “C3 Speech Support Booklet • Share one or more of the articles or documents here. The most popular, in descending order, are: 1. “Creating Total Customer Satisfaction….” This is a synopsis of concepts covered in detail in Robin Lawton’s book, Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality, Innovation and Speed. 2. “Balance Your Balanced Scorecard” or “The Customer-Balanced Scorecard: identifying the eight dimensions of excellence” 3. “Are Your Surveys Only Suitable for Wrapping Fish?” 4. “8 Dimensions of Excellence” 5. Strategic Plan Abstract. This shows how one organization used the 8 Dimensions of Excellence concepts to integrate their strategic plan and balanced scorecard for relevance from the enterprise to the front line. • Download one of the sample C3 tools at http://www.imtc3.com/resource/tools.cfm To actively communicate or demonstrate key concepts, use any of these references at http://www.imtc3.com/products/products.cfm: • The DVD program (preferably with the Facilitator Kit) for “Creating the Customer-Centered Culture” • WEB-BASED Interactive Live Seminars – see http://www.imtc3.com/events/UpcomingEvents.cfm To apply C3 tools to a project or specific need, download a free sample of Excel-based tools described at http://www.imtc3.com/resource/tools.cfm . Complete tools are available individually or in sets, organized by topics such as: • The Voice of the Customer • Customer-centered projects: chartering and leading a project for rapid, high-impact success • Innovation and product/service design To obtain maximum engagement and commitment for action, we bring keynotes, presentations and workshops to you. Contact us for details at: Phone: 941-907-0666 Email: peggy@imtC3.com or rob@imtC3.com Web: www.imtC3.com

PLEASE NOTE
International Management Technologies, Inc. trademarks include: “Creating a Customer-Centered Culture” Customer-Centered Culture Customer-Centered Culture (C3) Model C3 C3 Logo 8 Dimensions These materials are exclusive property of International Management Technologies, Inc. This material may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in whole or part, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise for use with others, without the written permission of International Management Technologies, Inc. International Management Technologies, Inc. grants a limited, non-assignable, non-exclusive license to the individual who received this material as part of a product purchased from International Management Technologies, Inc. to duplicate any of the tools contained herein for his or her personal use only. Multiple user licenses are available by calling 941-907-0666.

Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

Page 2

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
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SM

• • • •

The most common methods for capturing the voice of the customer Why surveys fail and how to avoid that fate How to eliminate confusion about who “the customers” really are The word formulas that always uncover what customers want most (but not necessarily what they will normally tell you) How to translate squishy perceptions into objective measures with simplicity and speed

Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

3

Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

Page 3

VEHICLES FOR UNCOVERING VOC
SM

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• • • • • • • • •

Dialogue (ad hoc or structured) Legislation Regulation Contracts Specifications Designs Observation Complaints Surveys
Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

4

Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

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Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies, Inc. www.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.

Page 5

imtC3.com. 3. Focus groups. The wrong people are surveyed The wrong questions are asked Questions are asked the wrong way Questions are asked at the wrong time Zero dissatisfaction equals total satisfaction Non-customers (prospects) are not surveyed Conducted for the wrong reasons Results are generalized to groups not surveyed Used as a substitute for better methods 10. direct observation and interviews are the recommended vehicles for understanding customer satisfiers and dissatisfiers. 6 Surveys are generally not the most effective way to uncover customer needs.com. Inc. 9. a survey can be a very effective and economical way to determine customer satisfaction. 6.COMMON SURVEY PROBLEMS SM TM 1.imtC3. Page 6 . 8. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. www. Inc. 2. www. FINDINGS DON’T DRIVE IMPROVEMENT Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. once customer desires or concerns are known. 4. 5. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. 7. However.

All rights reserved. www. 5. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Identify specific product(s) to evaluate. www.KEYS TO SURVEY SUCCESS (in Reference) TM SM 1.imtC3. 2.com. Page 7 . Be clear about the purpose of the survey and who will use the results. Inc. Determine which customers and non-customers to query.imtC3. 4. All rights reserved. Good questions find out: What was expected and/or wanted? What was experienced? Level of satisfaction with the product or service Degree of relative importance of this variable By asking questions such as: How long did you expect to wait? How long did you hope to wait? How long did you actually wait? How satisfied are you? Compared with ___________. Decide the timing and frequency of the survey. Inc.com. 3. how important is that to you? 7 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.

6. www. 4. Inc. features for both product and acquisition Innovate or redesign the product and related process Measure performance along the critical 4 Dimensions Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 5.UNCOVERING THE VOICE OF CUSTOMERS TM SM 1. 8 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. Name the specific product Identify the roles of customers for that product Differentiate the discrete customers within each role Ask the three key questions about outcomes. www.com.imtC3. All rights reserved. 2. functions.com. 3. All rights reserved. Page 8 .imtC3.

8 Dimensions of Excellence which enable a complete and balanced definition of what success means. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. roles) Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. don’t know & want to know. 2. C3 integrates what you know. Inc. Measures which rely on facts to numerically describe what is and what could be. a manner of application and defined roles of those involved in their use. a set of tools. beliefs. Inc. www. from strategic direction down to daily work. All rights reserved. to create: . application. beliefs or paradigm. Methodology which includes principles. 3. C3 functions as a foundation for all enterprise practices.com. tools. paradigm. www. 9 The cornerstones of the foundation include: 1.Unity of purpose . Page 9 . Philosophy which is sometimes referred to as a new mindset. prioritized by both customers and ourselves. 4.imtC3. values.Simplicity of knowledge work.com. values) 2 8 Dimensions of Excellence (definition of success) C3 is described in: 3 Measures (status toward numerical goals) 4 Methodology (principles. All rights reserved.imtC3. Its cornerstones are: TM SM 1 Philosophy (mindset.Innovation .WHAT IS C3? C3 is short for Customer-Centered Culture.Customer satisfaction .

LANGUAGE MATTERS TM SM • 7+5= • Service = • Customer = • Requirements= We will provide word formulas/rules on the following concepts: 1. www. All rights reserved.imtC3. Product / service Customer roles Outcomes expectations Performance expectations Perception expectations Product function Product features Translating perceptions into performance measures Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 3.com. All rights reserved. Inc. 6. www. 8.imtC3. 5.com. 4. Page 10 . Inc. 10 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 2. 7.

e. b.Video 4 (Title 4) Chapter 1. 87-90 Priority The Value of 8 Answers DVD #1 . Page 11 . PRODUCT 2. “ah ha’s”) did you make? 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure Broker for Producers Voice of the Customer PRODUCT DESIGN Broker for End-Users 12. 10. goals and minimums for product performance Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. c.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. www. Identify what end-user customers want regarding product attributes Matrix Product-Roles Outcomes & Innovation Window b. 3. Currently Measured NO / YES NO / YES NO / YES NO / YES NO / YES Type of Expectation Performance Perception Producer Product 3b.Differentiating Customers Miller/ C3 DVD Tools* Lawton Book* or Video* 17 18 19 6 Goal TIMELINESS 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 CERTAINT Y 7 Discoveries You Made The Value of Answers Creating Measures DVD #1 . Can you make the product plural with an “s”? c.imtC3. 7. c. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding.Measuring Service Quality Expectations Chapter 5 . Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. “ah-ha’s”) PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE Fixers 2 3 4 5 VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . Customer Expectations DVD #2 . Chapter 3.Define CustomersDesign Table (MT46) Chapter 3 . Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Product Function 3.Chapter 1. Customer Roles DVD #2 . 4. Inc. What is the name of your functional group? TIED TO MISSION CUSTOMER TEAM MEASURED PRIORITY NAME ____________________________ HOW? GOAL DUE BY Do This Now d. d.Product Function - TEAM NAME ____________________________ 2.Determine which end-user priorities concern performance or perception Chapter 5 . pages 7. Determine which product is the most important to work on now 0 0 0 0 0 PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL Weighted Value • Outcomes & Innovation Window (XP46) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Miller/ C3 DVD Tools* Lawton Book* or Video* Customer Roles & Power Voice of the Customer Chapter 3 . RANK Voice of the Customer Product Function 2.Chapter 1. Customer Expectations Expectations DVD or Video* DVD #1 .Product Function 1. Use INSERT key to enter + and -. What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)? d. IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER key not the tab. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? a.Quality & Innovation Chapter 4 . IMPORTANT! Use the ENT ER key not the tab.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. 5. 6. as named. 3. ENDUSERS Product Design Table 3. 4. What is the name of your functional group? Creating Measures 1 Target Product: 2 Producer: 3 End-Users: End-Users PRODUCT DEFINITION CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER BY WHEN? Currently _____ 6 The Hardest Part of This Exercise: Broker for producer 8.Chapter 1. As a team. Discoveries (insights. All rights reserved. you’ve mastered the first step in customer-centered thinking. 2b. 4.The Service Product Discoveries Chapter 2 . Product: End-Users: 6.VoC TOOLS 1. Customer Roles Your primary role with this product: 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Substitute Quality Characteristics Miller/ C3 DVD Tools* Lawton Book* or Video* 7 8 When filling in the green cells. PRODUCT VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . c. Producer Product SM PRODUCT DEFINITION VOICE OF Product Definition 2a. you’ve mastered the first step in customer-centered thinking.Product Attributes TEAM NAME ____________________________ Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. 63. Customer • Determine DVD #2currently has the most power and who should who . 5 Priority Of 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Measure PRODUCT FEATURES TABLE 6 Goal Features 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Also Do Customer Expectations (Voice of the Customer) 9 3. learning. Segment Customers a. Also Do Roles Customer PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL Also Do Expectations this product.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. Can you make the product plural with an “s”? End-Users CREATING MEASURES Yes No If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above. Currently Type of Expectation Performance Attributes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Team Name 10 11 Perception Product Attribute Group Customer Expectations (Voice of the Customer) 1 Rank 2 3 13 1 Product: 2 End Users: EASE OF USE 5 14 15 Totals: 0 0 0 Miller/ C3 Lawton Book* CREATING MEASURES 12 CU06 4 DVD #1 . Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? RANK 2. learning. PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL Product Features Table Outcomes & Innovation Window a. Excel will think you are doing a caluculation. 4 Total Number of Attributes Identified 5 The Top8. _____ Producer _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user _____ User _____ Fixer 4 Possible Measures Product: Tools* 2. MT46 8 Discoveries 30 7. Miller/ C3 Lawton Book* Tools* DVD #2 . 3a.Define Customers Segmented by 7 Who Will Do What Target Product Selection View DVD #1. Is the product something only you can claim as yours? b. Customer Roles Expectations DVD #2 . . f.com. Broker for Producers 4. What discoveries (insights. Customer Roles 7 Discoveries You Made: 1 2 3 Product: 1 Target Product: 2 Producer: PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE 3 End-Users: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 End-Users: DVD #1 . b. RANK Broker for End-Users Do This First 1. Customer Chapter 3 . Champion(s): DESIRED OUTCOMES TOTAL RANK Customer Roles & Power Do This Next ROLES & POWER CUSTOMER 1. use a + and -. learning. have it.com. What is the name of your enterprise (or businesslearning.com. Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? 7. To develop measures that will enable the producer to monitor and manage quality as defined by the customer c.Product Function - Do This Now 4.Chapter 1. occur in countable units? Do This First 1. Rank 5. Name them below: 1 2 Attributes 1 Rank Measured Performance Perception 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 9.Video 2 (Title 2) Chapter 5.Replicate tool 11 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. Inc. Customer Outcomes.ChapterTangible Product Define Work as a 1. Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER MISSION: d.blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your situation When filling in the green cells. If you don't. Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? d. See Instructions for more details. Create measures for the seemingly immeasurable customer expectations the Customer" regarding product attributes into measurable product design criteria (PDC) b.Differentiating Customers 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Chapter 3 . Customer Roles DVD #1 . Totals • Product Chapter 3 . “ah-ha’s”) for Yes below. 4. Yes No a. Identify and define your personal and organizational products Customers' Expectations are Achieved Product Chapter 3 . 3. 35-37. 8. What discoveries (insights. “ah-ha’s”) DISCOVERIES (insights. 11. 2. Five Attributes Measured Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A . Product Function ProducerProduct If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above. list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet: 1 Product: 2 End Product Features Table 6 The Hardest Part of This Exercise: 6. All rights reserved. e.Defining Customer . 4. f. Broker for Producers CREATING MEASURES 4 Team Name 5 Do This Next Users: NO / YES 6 Goal 5. b. 4 Total Number of Attributes Identified: 5 The Top Five Attributes 1 2 3 Product Design Table Type of Expectation Performance Perception 3 8. a. ENDUSERS 6 Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your situation. “ah-ha’s”) _____ User _____ Fixer Measured NO / YES 6. Do not use the arrow keys. www. imtc3. unit)? 5. Quality & Innovationuse to uncover broker and fixer expectations 5 . occur in countable units? VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER 5.The Service Product DVD #1 . learnings. “ah ha’s”) did you make? Fixers Do This First 1. See Instructions for more details. To translate the "Voice of a. . Customer are and what role they have with DVD #1 . 2 3 4 5 DVD #1 . Is the product something only you can claim as yours? b. Performance Perception Enter Y Discoveries (insights. Discover which customer priorities are currently measured Chapter 3c. Does the product. What is the most important product named in 1 through 5? Do This Next f. Your primary role with this product: Totals: _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user _____ Producer _____ End-User _____ Fixer Also Do Substitute Quality Characteristics 7 Discoveries You Made: 8. pages 71-78 Roles DVD #2 . Customer Roles Chapter 3 . Customer Expectations Segment Customers into Relevant Role.Measure the Degree to Which the Chapter 3 . 1 2 DVD or Video* Voice of the Customer & Creating Measures VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? Do This Now 1. Measured 6. Product Definition End-Users: Substitute Quality Characteristics 6 The Hardest Thing To Do 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 3 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure XP42 Estimated Time >1hour Outcome.Measuring Service Quality Pages 66-71 PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL a. Fixers 5.Product Function 9. Customer Roles Discoveries Rank Product Attribute Group 16 Also Do TE41 Chapter 1 . as named.Video 2 Service as a Product (Title 2) Chapter 5. NO / YES NO / YES NO / YES 9. Customer Target Product Selection Roles DVD #2 . c. What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit? a. www.DVD #2 . IN PLAN e.Quality & Innovation Chapter d. list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet: Your primary role with this product: Totals: _____ Producer _____ Broker for user Broker for End-Users Customer Roles & Power Voice of the Customer e.Define Work as a Tangible Segmented by Role. Expectations Groups Priority Customer Segmentation Target Value Instructions: Fill in green cells. c. Name 1 them below: 5. PRIORITY OUTCOMES (in decending order) 7. End-Users 3. 8. Customer • Identify whoChaptercustomersExpectations DVD #1 .Chapter 1. 4 CREATING MEASURESTotal Number of Attributes Identified: 5 The Top Five Attributes 21 End Users: 2 3 4 5 6. ORGANIZATION AND CUSTOMER OUTCOMES UNDESIRED OUTCOMES THE CUSTOMER Power Customer Roles & TOTAL What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? TM 7. What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit? a. Discoveries (insights. e. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 Chapter 1 .VideoCustomer Segmentation 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1.Defining Customer Expectations 7 Who Will Do What By When 27 28 29 Priority Target Value 0 0 0 0 • Customer Segmentation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 041306 Copyright© 2006 International Management Technologies. As a team.Chapter 1.Chapter 1. Do This Next 7. ACTIONS TO OCCUR Creating Measures TABLE d. use a + and -.Customer Expectations Chapter 4 .Chapter 1. To establish target values. Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No / No Yes Product: 1YesTarget/ No Yes / No Yes / No / No Yes / No 2YesProducer:Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No 3YesEnd-Users: / No Yes / No / No Yes / No Yes Yes / No 6. 3a. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? a. learnings. Does the product. Product Definition 7 Who Will Do What 50 By When DVD #1 . 4.ChapterBy When 1. b. All rights reserved.imtC3. Organization: RANK PRODUCT DEFINITION Do This First Do This Now Do This Next Organization & Customer CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER Product Definition Outcomes Do This First Do This Now 1. 2. What is the most important product named in 1 through 5? 7.Defining Customer into Relevant Groups b.your 1. 6. 5. Excel will think you are doing a calculation. If you don't. Customer Expectations Chapter 2 .Chapter 1. f. 1 Product: Team Name e.

com. Guard against the assumption (a vital lie) that the reduction of an undesired outcome improves satisfaction. health. Product characteristics producers want: easy to build. Product acquisition process customers want: timely arrival of product requested. security. high turnover. www. Areas 1-4 drive satisfaction. All rights reserved. Our long-term enterprise viability is most dependent on success in area 1. See a complete description at www.com. no maintenance or warranty costs. high productivity. low variation. The numbering of the 8 Dimensions is intentional. Inc. 8. low cost of ownership. ease of acquisition. Focus on all 8 Dimensions and excellence can be enhanced. All rights reserved. 5. 2.Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.com WHOSE VOICE DEFINES EXCELLENCE? UNDESIRED DESIRED 1 Customer Desired Outcomes SM TM CUSTOMER PRIORITIES 4 Product Acquisition Process Customers Want 3 Product Characteristics Customers Want 2 Undesired Outcomes Customers Want to Avoid PROCESS PRODUCER PRIORITIES P R O D U C T OUTCOME Production Process Producer Wants 8 Product Characteristics Producer Wants 7 Undesired Outcomes Producer Wants to Avoid 6 www. Our aim is to address process performance in terms customers care about. etc. financial loss. belonging. customer defection. Inc.imtC3. Page 12 . durability and usefulness. market share. easy to distribute. instability. 3. All Rights Reserved. accessibility." 4. creating the illusion of sustainability. IDENTITY PURPOSE 12 These 8 Dimensions are a succinct but powerful way to identify the critical few areas we must pursue to achieve excellence. no wait or cue time. personal time. The synopsis is: 1. financial viability. taxes. Process characteristics producers want: process consistency. area 8 least. Product refers to any deliverable we can make plural with an "s. discomfort. Producer desired outcomes: Leadership. dominance. Product and service characteristics customers want: ease-of-use. Undesired outcomes customers want to avoid or eliminate: death. Undesired outcomes producers want to avoid or eliminate: waste. 7. performing well across diverse cultures. comfortable lead times. sickness and a host of unwanted conditions. Producer Desired Outcomes 5 Copyright EFFICIENCY © 2008 International Management Technologies.imtC3. How well (and quickly) they get those results by working with us reveals our effectiveness. Improve a few and excellence will be limited. frustration. low cost to produce. The 8 Dimensions are as relevant in not-for-profit as they are in for-profit environments. wasted time. 6.imtC3. www. Yet short-term success can be achieved quickly in area 8.imtC3. growth.com. Customer desired outcomes: These are their ultimate hopes: joy. It is important to distinguish our activity from the customer's. Inc.

for each measure of success? 3. A satisfying (product name) will not result in (insert expectation) 5. Function expectations (these are usually expressed as subjective perceptions) c. A satisfying (insert product name) has (insert expectation) Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.imtC3. www. A satisfying (insert product name) will result in (insert expectation) 4. Page 13 . Broker (for either the end-user or the producer) c. ambiguity-free criteria) 4. Goal-setting to have the biggest impact on satisfaction and success 7.com. something you can give to someone else c. The translation of subjective perceptions into objective design criteria for the new or improved product b. Very specific (Avoid naming product groups) 2. Feature expectations (these are expressed as objective. A deliverable. What is the numerical target to achieve. Inc.What are their expectations? a. Outcome expectations b.What is the product? 2. The $ amount of/for/to ________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert VOC priority answer to formula 4) 10. A customer is defined by their role(s) with the specific product as: a.Who are the customers? WORD FORMULAS TO REVEAL the VOC 3. End-user b.How can we improve? a. Packaged in countable units d. by when. Fixer 1. Every product named must be: a. A satisfying (insert product name) is (insert expectation) 6. All rights reserved. The # of ________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert VOC priority answers to formulas 3 and 4) 8.WORD FORMULAS & RULES TM QUESTION WORD RULES 1. The % of ________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert VOC priority answers to formulas 3 and 4) 9. Expressed as something which can be made plural with an “s” b.

Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic. The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers. measurably improved customer satisfaction and organizational performance. Inc. All rights reserved. The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions. www. Inc. in that order. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.imtC3.com. All rights reserved.050709 FOUR KEY QUESTIONS TM SM HOW CAN WE IMPROVE? WHAT IS THE PRODUCT? WHO ARE THE CUSTOMERS? WHAT ARE THEIR EXPECTATIONS? • • • • Design & Innovation Customer Satisfaction Measures of Success Enterprise Excellence Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.com. www.imtC3. Page 14 . 14 The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first.

Inc. Inc. www. Page 15 .com.imtC3. Products focus our vision outward to customers. A producer is the individual or group that creates a product for a customer. All rights reserved. 15 Products are links between processes and outcomes. A product is something created by work which can be given to someone else. providing a concrete link between process and outcome. www.PRODUCT TM SM P R O D U C T Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved. It is: • A deliverable • Very specific • Packaged in countable units • Expressed as something which can be made plural with an “s” EXAMPLES OF PRODUCT GROUPS: • Answers • Blueprints • Contracts • Courses • Decisions • Deliveries • Diagnoses • Greetings • Invoices • Plans • Policies • Procedures • Recipes • Repairs • Reports • Schedules • Shipments • Strategies Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.com.imtC3.

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Customer Roles DVD #1 . All rights reserved. Is the product something only you can claim as yours? b. DISCOVERIES (insights. 3a. “ah ha’s”) did you make? 12. See Instructions for more details.imtC3. e. f.Differentiating Customers Chapter 3 .Determine which product is the most important to work on now Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. As a team. “ah-ha’s”) 8. 4. learning.com. 6. No 2. Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? 2. Your primary role with this product: Fixers 4. What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)? d. What discoveries (insights.Define Work as a Tangible Product PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL . RANK 1. 63. 7. learnings. pages 71-78 Chapter 3 . “ah-ha’s”) _____ User _____ Fixer 8. Product Definition The Value of Answers DVD #1 . 3b. Product Definition PRODUCT DEFINITION What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? Customer Roles & Power CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER Producer Product ORGANIZATION AND CUSTOMER OUTCOMES 1. you’ve mastered the first step in customer-centered thinking. _____ Producer _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user Discoveries (insights. DUE BY a. list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet: ACTIONS TO OCCUR BY WHEN? Broker for End-Users End-Users 6. HOW? 10. CUSTOMER PRIORITY MEASURED Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No 7. Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? d.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. 8. c. IN PLAN 7. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit? 6. MISSION: 5. Name them below: 1 2 Also Do DVD or Miller/ C3 Tools* Video* Lawton Book* DVD #1 . RANK Champion(s): DESIRED OUTCOMES TOTAL RANK 2b. b. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? a. What is the most important product named in 1 through 5? d. Inc. Segment Customers into Relevant Groups Outcome. Page 17 . c.Identify and define your work as products (both personal and organizational) . PRIORITY OUTCOMES (in decending order) TIED TO MISSION 5.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. e. Yes a. 4. UNDESIRED OUTCOMES TOTAL 3a. as named. www. Can you make the product plural with an “s”? c. 35-37. Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. What is the name of your functional group? 3. Customer Roles Customer Segmentation Target Product Selection Chapter 2 . 9.PRODUCT DEFINITION TM Do This First Do This Now Do This Next Organization & Customer Outcomes 1. occur in countable units? e. Does the product. 9. pages 7.Video 2 Service as a Product (Title 2) Chapter 5. GOAL 11. Organization: 2a. f. b. 87-90 Chapter 1 .Define Customers Segmented by Role. learning. 3.The Service Product Outcomes. If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above. Broker for Producers 5.

propel the organization in a desired direction. Write in the specific name of the product on the line below. strategies and plans) and will be addressed later. Be specific. It is an outcome. Information is the raw material which is delivered to others in some organized or packaged form.) What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? 3. Does the product. Can you make the product plural with an “s”? Products are nouns. when used by others.Packaged in countable units . a desired future condition. policies. Don't confuse outcomes with the product itself. fun. something we can give to someone else.Expressed as something that can be made plural with an "s" . accounting. Select one of the most important products named in 1 through 5.” Their true products may consist of mission statements. Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? Satisfaction. . . a product name of “policy. etc. A business unit can be a division. Page 18 . This is one of a very small number of exceptions to the plural-with-an-s rule. Inc. Is the product something only you can claim as yours? For example. www. plans and manuals would be examples of informational products.Very specific a. purchasing.com. marketing. There are probably others who would also claim those products as theirs. A relationship is not a deliverable. not a product. answers.” or the name of a manufactured product here. occur in countable units? “Information” can only be considered as a product by the various packaged forms it may take. Vision is also an outcome. If the label you wrote is followed by “. product sector. These products must be either (1) purchased or specifically funded before the product is created or (2) purchased after the product is produced 6. A “customer satisfaction policy. The product is the tangible result of activity. Reports. guidelines and assignments which. These are product groups. What is the name of your functional group? (Examples of functional groups include: engineering. depending on the kind and size of enterprise. Make each product plural with an “s”.PRODUCT DEFINITION TM INSTRUCTIONS 1.imtC3. strategies. agency or department.” “cycle time reduction plan” or “departmental budget report” are examples of specific names of products only you or your immediate work group might claim as yours. Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? A “relationship” might seem like a product because we can make it plural with an “s”: relationships. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. or “report” isn’t specific enough to claim ownership. All rights reserved. d. “plan. What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit) b. 2. Do not use “information. productivity and understanding are outcomes the product might create. as named.” “assurance” and “security” are also not products.A deliverable . not a product. Leadership is either a skill or an outcome. These kinds of products include what we call source products (policies. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? 4. Apply this product definition criteria before proceeding. security. List the specific names of at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit. ing.” it is an activity (a verb). Words like “satisfaction. graphs. c. 5. What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? A definition of a product is: Something created by work which can be given to someone else to achieve the desired outcome. health. “answers. e. It is: . Executives sometimes think their products are “leadership” or “vision. They are outcomes (intangible results or conditions) obtained by using the product. Name only products exchanged for money with people outside the enterprise or business unit.

Is the product something only you can claim as yours? Can you make the product plural with an “s”? Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? Does the product. What is the name of your functional group? 3. learnings. d. “ah ha’s”) did you make? d. 8.com. e. b. f. As a team. f. c. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. What discoveries (insights. c. See Instructions for more details.PRODUCT DEFINITION 1. list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet: 9. 6. b. you’ve mastered the first step in customer-centered thinking. Inc. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? a. Page 19 . as named. b. www. e. What is the most important product named in 1 through 5? 7.imtC3. Yes No a. d. Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. occur in countable units? Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? 2. Name them below: 1 2 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit? a. c. All rights reserved. 4. PRODUCT DEFINITION TM What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above. What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)? 5. e.

WHAT IS THEIR BUSINESS? TM SM • • • • • • • • • • • Sony Apple Computer Nokia Southwest Airlines Harley-Davidson Oakley Military Starbucks Microsoft Lakewood Church MO Dept. All rights reserved. 20 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Of Revenue Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. www.com.imtC3. Inc. All rights reserved. www.imtC3. Inc.com. Page 20 .

imtC3. 21 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 5. Our performance measures confirm our excellence. Growth in market share proves customers are happy. Inc. 7.imtC3. www. We are on the leading edge in our industry. Page 21 .com. All rights reserved. 3. 4.com) Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 6. 2. All rights reserved. (For more go to www. www. Customers don’t know what they want. We know what business we are in.com. Few customer complaints= satisfaction. Inc.FREQUENT VITAL LIES TM SM • Constraining assumptions • Self-deception • Denial • Excuses for not changing 1. We know what customers want.imtC3.

volume. Page 22 . Uncovers new sources of differentiation Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. etc. 4. Information products are created in anticipation of a need. Creates a tangible link between process and outcome 3. timeliness.com. www. service products are produced in response. Enables the measurement of the seemingly immeasurable (in terms of unit cost. Simplifies prioritization of work 7. 2. Products focus our vision outward to customers. Improves accountability 9.) 6.com. Shifts focus from “how” to “what”. satisfaction. keeping “why” in mind 5. processes and teams. Organize everything by product: customers. 6. outcomes. value. designed to satisfy the emerging expectations of highly differentiated customers. We can only identify our customers by their relationship to specific products. Service products require customer involvement in the production process. measures. 22 BENEFITS OF DEFINING WORK AS PRODUCTS: 1.PRODUCT PRINCIPLES TM SM 1. Reduces ambiguity in defining “what we do” 2. Provides the basis for identifying who “the customer” really is 4. 5. 3. 21st century leaders define their knowledge products as quantified deliverables. Inc. www. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved.imtC3. problems. All rights reserved.imtC3. quality. Gives activity purpose 8. Inc.

in that order. Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic. www. The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions. Inc. Page 23 . All rights reserved. The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.050709 QUESTION #2 TM SM WHAT IS THE PRODUCT? WHO ARE THE CUSTOMERS? Define all work as: • Deliverables • Plural with an ‘s’ • Countable • Specific Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. www.com.imtC3.imtC3. But that answer is dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first. 23 The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. Inc.com. measurably improved customer satisfaction and organizational performance.

It is rare that all end-users of a specific product are a homogeneous group. • Customers may have multiple roles with a single product. All rights reserved. Page 24 . End-users always win in the long run. the broker “encourages” the user to accept the product. • As an agent for the producer. • The broker’s function is to obtain. IMPACT OF ROLE ON POWER: Customers differ in their expectations and their power. easier to use and more appealing.imtC3. It is common to observe: • The further a customer is from the product.com. either in terms of their demographic characteristics or their expectation priorities. the more power. Power is the ability to direct or change the product design. the broker makes the product more accessible. Inc. • As an agent for the end–user. All rights reserved.CUSTOMER ROLES TM SM ENDUSER P R O D U C T BROKER FIXER Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. www. There are usually more of this type of customer than of any other. A broker is the customer who acts as an agent for the end–user and/or the producer. or adjustments to the product at any point in its life cycle for the benefit of the end-user. www.imtC3. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. A fixer is any customer who will have to make repairs. transform or transfer products for the benefit of both users and producers. This customer will personally use the product to achieve a desired outcome. • The producer’s dialogue with brokers is more frequent and detailed then with end-users. corrections.com. modifications. This is the most important type of customer. 24 An end–user is the customer for whom the product is primarily intended.

ENDUSERS 2. What is the most important product named in 1 through 5? 7. Broker for Producers 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 4 Total Number of Attributes Identified Enter Y for Yes below.Determine who currently has the most power and who should have it. as named. If you can answer “yes” to the following questions about each of the product names listed above. Customer Expectations Creating Measures DVD or Video* Tools* Miller/ C3 Lawton Book* The Value of Answers Chapter 1 . What is the name of your enterprise (or business unit)? 5. learnings. c. “ah ha’s”) did you make? d. What are at least four of the most important products you personally create? Customer Roles & Power CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER Producer Product Voice of the Customer 1. What are at least four of the most important products your functional group creates? a. e.CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER Do This First Do This Now Do This Next Product Function VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER .Product Function 1. Does the product.imtC3. . PRODUCT TM Product Definition PRODUCT DEFINITION 1.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. Can you make the product plural with an “s”? c. e. 7. RANK 2. Is the product a deliverable you can give to someone else? d. 4. VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . www.The Service Product Chapter 3 . Page 25 . d.Identify who your customers are and what role they have with this product. learning. list below the specific product each member wrote on line 5 of their own exercise worksheet: 6. 20 21 22 23 6 The Hardest Thing To Do 8. Yes a.Product Attributes TEAM NAME ____________________________ 3. Customer Roles DVD #2 . c.Video 2 (Title 2) Chapter 5. Rank 5. occur in countable units? e.com. b. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Name them below: 1 2 29 30 7. Is the product something only you can claim as yours? b. 6. 9. Discuss and agree on which two (2) of these are the most important target products your team should focus on. Your primary role with this product: _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user Discoveries (insights. b. Measured 6. Totals Also Do DVD #1 . Product Definition DVD #1 . Inc.Measure the Degree to Which the Customers' Expectations are Achieved PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL . Is the product intended to create a desired outcome or result for a customer? 2. See Instructions for more details. Segment Customers into Relevant Groups DVD #1 . f. Performance Perception Attributes End-Users 1 2 3 4 5 6 3.Define Customers Segmented by Role.Defining Customer Expectations Chapter 3 . Customer Roles Customer Segmentation Target Product Selection Chapter 2 . What discoveries (insights. What are at least four products generally identified with the mission of your enterprise or business unit? a.Video 3 (Title 3) Chapter 1. f.Define Work as a Tangible Product Chapter 3 . “ah-ha’s”) _____ Producer _____ End-User _____ Fixer 24 25 26 27 28 7 Discoveries You Made 8. 5 The Top Five Attributes 1 2 3 4 5 Totals: Currently Measured Type of Expectation Performance Perception 0 0 0 Fixers 5. As a team. you’ve mastered the first step in customer-centered thinking.Differentiating Customers Chapter 3 .Video 4 (Title 4) Chapter 1. What is the name of your functional group? No 3. All rights reserved. 4. Correct the product names as necessary before proceeding. Broker for End-Users 7 8 9 10 11 1 Target Product: 2 Producer: 3 End-Users: 4.

6. 1 = most powerful. if any exist. titles. Name the fixers for this product.imtC3. Name the brokers between the producer and end-user customers. Power may vary depending on the role. If there are 12 entries the assigned ranks will go from 1-12. Write only one 1 in this column. using names of positions. learning. Give every entry an unique rank. www. A customer can have more than one role with a product.com. not organizational names. or individuals. NOTE: Identify the roles people play with this product. 4.CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER TM INSTRUCTIONS 1. 2. Who are the end-users of this product? • Refer to NOTE in Step 1. What is the producer's name? 3. • Insert more lines if needed. Page 26 . What discoveries (insights. What is your primary role with this product? Now go back and rank the current power of all the parties identified in Numbers 2-5. even if the same person appears in more than one place. only one 2. 5. 7. 8.7. Inc. Focus on this one product as you answer questions 2 . • Apply the Segmenting Customers guidelines as time and importance allow. and so on. All rights reserved. Name your target product (from Product Definition Tool). Power refers to the ability to direct or change the design of the product. “ah-ha’s”) did you make? Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.

www. Your primary role with this product: _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user _____ Producer _____ End-User _____ Fixer 8. learning. Producer Product 7.CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER TM 1. 4. Inc. RANK 2.com. All rights reserved. Broker for Producers 5. 3. “ah-ha’s”) Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Discoveries (insights. Page 27 . Fixers Broker for End-Users End-Users 6.imtC3.

Accountant Car Production Driver Passenger Insurance Policy Underwriter Policy Holder Beneficiary Salesperson Financial Planner Departmental Budget Equipment Requisition Finance Manager Department Manager Mail Room Personnel Financial Analyst Department Manager Secretary Requestor Order Fulfillment Person at Supplier Purchasing Agent Approving Managers(s) Instructor Participant Registrar Participant's Manager Salesperson Mortgage Banker Processor Mortgage Consolidator Nurse Patient Insurer Originator Purchasing Agent Participant Instructor Participant’s Manager Course Designer Collector Training Course Course Designer Developer Participant Mortgage Lender Borrower Builder/Contractor Prescription Prescribing Physician Pharmacist Prescribing Physician X-ray Technician Radiologist Technician Radiologist Referring Invoice Billing Clerk Purchaser Payables Clerk Insurer Patient Auditor Customer Service Agent Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Officer Bus.CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER PRODUCT PRODUCER POSSIBLE CUSTOMERS End-users Patient TM Brokers Referring Physician Insurance Administrator Tax Advisor Tax Specialist Chief Fin. Page 28 .imtC3. All rights reserved. www. Inc. Officer Dealer Passenger Fixers Patient Advocate Customer Service Agent Attorney Surgeon Tax Auditor Mechanic Customer Service Agent Owner Customer Service Agent Appendectomy Surgeon Business Tax Regulation Tax Agency Chief Fin.com.

www.imtC3. www.com. The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions. The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers. Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic.050709 QUESTION #3 TM SM WHAT IS THE PRODUCT? WHO ARE THE CUSTOMERS? WHAT ARE THEIR EXPECTATIONS? Define all work as: • Deliverables • Plural with an ‘s’ • Countable • Specific Differentiate 3 Roles: • End-users • Brokers • Fixers Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved. But that answer is dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first.com.imtC3. All rights reserved. Inc. Page 29 . Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 29 The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. measurably improved customer satisfaction and organizational performance. Inc. in that order.

quality is the degree to which customers get what they want. specifications or standards. CAUTION: What a customer expects can be different than what is wanted. Simply put. Inc. We should aim to understand and deliver what customers want. Producers in a customer-centered culture proactively solicit emerging customer expectations and wants to direct both continuous improvement in quality and achieve breakthroughs in innovation. not necessarily what they expect.imtC3. These expectations are stated in the “voice of the customer” which may not be directly measurable.imtC3. Producers sometimes refer to these translations as requirements. www. All rights reserved. Customers have expectations about both the attributes of the product and the outcomes to be achieved by using the product.com. These terms are not as inclusive as expectations. www. Quality is product-focused. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Customers may expect a dental visit to be unpleasant. Inc. All rights reserved. 30 DEFINITION: Customer expectations are considered the basis for determining what “quality” means. They don't want it to be. Producers in a producer-centered culture assume product specifications totally reflect customer expectations.com. Page 30 . They have to be translated by the producer into precise design criteria which are directly measurable.EXPECTATIONS TM SM P R O D U C T P R O D U C T E X P E C T A T I O N S ENDUSER BROKER FIXER Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.

1 Target Product: 5 2 Producer: 3 End-Users: 6 7 8 9 Broker for End-Users 6 Goal 4 Total Number of Attributes Identified 10 Enter Y for Yes below. Chapter 3. _____ Producer _____ Broker for producer _____ Broker for user Discoveries (insights.Identify what end-user customers want regarding product attributes . Customer Expectations Tools* • Outcomes & Innovation Window • Product Design Table PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL . 6. RANK 3.Chapter 1. Currently Measured Type of Expectation Performance Perception 5 The Top Five Attributes 11 4. Performance Perception Attributes 1 2 3 4 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 3 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure End-Users VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . learning.VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER Product Function Do This First Do This Now Do This Next TM Customer Roles & Power CUSTOMER ROLES & POWER Producer Product Voice of the Customer Product Attributes VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER .Replicate tool use to uncover broker and fixer expectations Miller/ C3 Lawton Book* Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.Defining Customer Expectations Pages 66-71 DVD #1 . 20 21 7 Who Will Do What By When 7 Discoveries You Made 22 23 Your primary role with this product: 6.com. Page 31 . PRODUCT Creating Measures CREATING MEASURES Team Name 2.Chapter 1.Product Attributes TEAM NAME ____________________________ 3.Determine which end-user priorities concern performance or perception . Inc. ENDUSERS 1. Customer Expectations DVD #2 . www. Customer Roles DVD #2 . 4.imtC3.Chapter 1. • Product Definition Chapter 3 . 28 29 30 7. Rank 1 Product: 5.Product Function 1. All rights reserved. Totals Also Do DVD or Video* View DVD #1. “ah-ha’s”) _____ User _____ Fixer 24 25 26 27 8 Discoveries 8. Measured 2 End Users: 2. Broker for Producers 1 2 3 4 5 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Totals: 0 0 0 6 The Hardest Thing To Do Fixers 5. 7. Customer Roles • Customer Segmentation.Discover which customer priorities are currently measured .

the minimum is 15.Able to be made plural with an "s" (The name of a class of products . IMPORTANT NOTE: Attributes must be stated in the “voice of the customer” using this statement: A satisfying (product name) is one which is (attribute) . Assign a time keeper. Quickly rank the top five only. .com. Put a Y (Yes) in the appropriate Performance or Perception column. EXPECTED TIME (Minutes) 1. Inc. Everyone writes down each attribute as it’s stated on their worksheet. Total the number of Y's (Yes) in the Performance and Perception columns.is not specific enough. not for some other product. What was the #1 attribute? a. Put a check in the RANK column next to those three. What discoveries were made by using this tool? Page 32 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. The objective is to quickly identify as many attributes as possible. 3 7. perception or both? c.Packaged in countable units . 5. Remember that this product name must be: .A deliverable . 4a. Brainstorm by giving each participant in the group a turn to state an attribute thought to be desired by the end-users. If the product is a purchase order. Who are the end-users? 4. Consider an attribute “currently measured” only if a numerical measure is published. etc. 8. TOTAL MINUTES The team will report the results by answering the following questions: 1. What is the target product? 2. Do not combine or group attributes. Once all the attributes are written down (or time runs out). Total the number of Y's. 1 2 30 b. reported or displayed on a regular basis.VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER TM INSTRUCTIONS FOR UNCOVERING PRODUCT ATTRIBUTES Each person in the group is responsible for recording notes. Who is the producer? 3. Summarize your findings using questions below. 3. Write in the name of the target product. 4b. What was the hardest part of doing this? 7. answers. Does the attribute address performance. www. orders. not the items the purchase order represents. Select the specific product name you will focus on. The one with most checks is ranked “1”.Very specific . Record on the VoC Summary Sheet. Breaking the ties arbitrarily is okay. Do the remaining steps (4b-8) through group discussion. No ties are allowed. Complete steps 5-8 regarding only these top five attributes.) Identify all the end-users for this product and write their names in the blanks. Determine the rank or priority of attributes by recording (in the RANK column) the number of checks each attribute has received. the attributes are for the purchase order itself. It is okay to indicate that the attribute addresses both performance and perception. 2 12 Be careful that attributes identified are for the product named.imtC3. 6. Repeat steps 5a and 5b for attributes #2-5. without discussion. 2 2. . plans. each participant reviews the list to identify which three (3) are thought to be most important.reports. Put a Y (Yes) in the Measured column next to those attributes which are currently measured. How many attributes were identified? 5. Limit discussion. Determine whether each of the top five attributes address performance (objective criteria) or perception (subjective criteria). The goal is 30. Is it currently being measured? How? 2 3 3 6. This is done by each individual. All rights reserved. Do not change any words in this statement to fit your attributes.

imtC3. . 1.Product Attributes - 2. Enter Y for Yes Perception Attributes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5-7 Users agree to license agreement terms described at www. Inc.com Performance Totals Page 33 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER Use this worksheet in the printed form. PRODUCT VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER TM . www. All rights reserved. 4a-b Rank 5. END-USERS 3.com.imtC3. Measured 6.

com. Current customer behavior is not a predictor of future expectations. A luxury once experienced becomes a necessity.imtC3. 6. The absence of dissatisfaction is not the same as satisfaction. until you check. Inc. Page 34 . perception and outcome are the basis of satisfaction. Assuming customers don’t know what they want causes us to give them what we want. 11. All rights reserved. Performance. 9. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. It is possible to achieve standards and specifications yet still not satisfy customers. Desired outcomes are stable over time. www. 34 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Understand customer-desired outcomes before considering product functions or features. Favor end-users of the final product when their expectations compete with interests of intermediate product customers. 5. www. 10. Assume customer expectations are unmet. Inc. All rights reserved. 7. 4.SATISFACTION PRINCIPLES SM TM 1. What customers expect is not necessarily what they want. 3.imtC3. 12. Customers always know the outcomes they want.com. 8. 2.

www.com. Inc. Page 35 .com. www. All rights reserved.imtC3. Uncovered Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc.imtC3.THREE QUESTIONS TO ASK SM TM A satisfying (product) Expectation is one which (key word) __________. All rights reserved. 35 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.

com. www. Product acquisition process customers want: timely arrival of product requested. www. sickness and a host of unwanted conditions. IDENTITY PURPOSE 36 An individual customer can speak with four (4) voices: 1. 2.imtC3. frustration." 4.com. discomfort.imtC3. All rights reserved. Product and service characteristics customers want: ease-of-use. Inc. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved. accessibility. durability and usefulness. Inc. low cost of ownership. no wait or cue time. Page 36 . Guard against the assumption (a vital lie) that the reduction of an undesired outcome improves satisfaction. Product refers to any deliverable we can make plural with an "s.CUSTOMER VOICES UNDESIRED DESIRED 1 Customer Desired Outcomes TM SM CUSTOMER PRIORITIES 4 Product Acquisition Process Customers Want 3 Product Characteristics Customers Want 2 Undesired Outcomes Customers Want to Avoid PROCESS PRODUCER PRIORITIES P R O D U C T OUTCOME 8 7 6 5 EFFICIENCY Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. etc. Customer desired outcomes: These are their ultimate hopes: joy. personal time. How well (and quickly) they get those results by working with us reveals our effectiveness. Our aim is to address process performance in terms customers care about. health. taxes. ease of acquisition. belonging. security. wasted time. 3. Undesired outcomes customers want to avoid or eliminate: death.

All rights reserved. ENDUSERS 1 Product: 2 End Users: 3.Product Function 1. Rank 5.Chapter 1. 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 3 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE Substitute Quality Characteristics Attributes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 7. Inc.Chapter 1.com. Customer Roles DVD #2 . Page 37 .Quality & Innovation PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL a. Customer Expectations DVD #2 .Chapter 1. Do not use the arrow keys. Create measures for the seemingly immeasurable customer expectations Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Customer Expectations Outcomes & Innovation Window Chapter 3 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 Discoveries Totals Also Do M iller/ C3 DVD Tools* Law ton Book* or Video* DVD #1 .imtC3. PRODUCT Creating Measures CREATING MEASURES Team Name Product Design Table 2. www. 4. 6.CREATING MEASURES TM Do This First Do This Now Do This Next Voice of the Customer VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . Measured Performance Perception Product: End-Users: 6 Goal Product Attribute Group Customer Expectations (Voice of the Customer) Rank 7 Who Will Do What By When Priority Target Value Instructions: Fill in green cells.Defining Customer Expectations Product Features Table Product-Roles Matrix Chapter 5 . Use INSERT key to enter + and -.

2. Summarize your findings by reporting: a. www. All rights reserved. considering: a. Ease and cost of collecting data c. Name the specific target product.com. Who should do what by when? Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Brainstorm possible measures for each priority expectation using any of the following phrases (making sure that there is no ambiguity in the measures): a. Page 38 . Determine the top five (5) customer expectations regarding product attributes as stated by customers. Rank the top five measures. Consider the goal from the customer's point of view (i. How long does a customer say it should take to read an instruction booklet?) Consider whether an absolute number or range of values is appropriate. "A satisfying (product) is one which is _____________. The dollar amount of/to/for _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert expectation). 6. Inc. Record your discoveries. 3. c." Refer to your prior work with the Voice of the Customer Tool. REMEMBER: Product attributes must fit the phrase. b. 8. Would these measures also address priorities of brokers and fixers? c.e. Competitive advantage of improvements based on these measures Be sure that each priority expectation has at least one measure. The number of _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert expectation).CREATING MEASURES TM INSTRUCTIONS 1. Answers to steps 1-7. 7. b. 4. The % of _____________ could indicate that the (insert product name) is/is not (insert expectation). Identify the end-users you will focus on. 5. Relevance to end-user priorities (these measures will really reflect what customers want) b. Create a performance goal for the top 5 priority measures.imtC3.

All rights reserved. www. Page 39 .com.CREATING MEASURES TM Team Name 1 Product: 2 End Users: 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 3 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure 6 Goal 7 Discoveries 8 Who Will Do What By When Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc.imtC3.

com. The C3 methodology provides a structured method for answering these simple questions. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. measurably improved customer satisfaction and organizational performance. The not-so-simple answers will establish a basis for thinking like your customers.imtC3. www. Implementation of this thinking will enable you to achieve dramatic. www.com. All rights reserved. Inc.050709 QUESTION #4 TM SM HOW CAN WE IMPROVE? WHAT IS THE PRODUCT? WHO ARE THE CUSTOMERS? WHAT ARE THEIR EXPECTATIONS? • • • • Design & Innovation Customer Satisfaction Measures of Success Enterprise Excellence Define all work as: • Deliverables • Plural with an ‘s’ • Countable • Specific Differentiate 3 Roles: • End-users • Brokers • Fixers Reveal Expectations: • Outcomes • Functions • Features Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. 40 The goal is to be able to succinctly and completely answer question #4. But that answer is dependent on answering questions numbered 1-3 first.imtC3. in that order. Page 40 . All rights reserved.

imtC3. All rights reserved. This can be essential for success (if not survival) in a fast changing environment. Benchmarking can be done on (1) processes. (3) producer outcomes and (4) customer outcomes. (2) products. VAG01 41 Quality initiatives have traditionally focused on product and process improvement. customer's or both? Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. The traditional questions encouraging improvement in quality include: • How many defects or “things gone wrong” can we count? • Does this product meet measurable specifications? • Are we in compliance? • How can we apply continuous improvement to our process or product? Benchmarking can help break the convergent thinking paradigm by identifying others who are already doing things we may think are impossible: it can defeat vital lies. current practices and existing technology.QUALITY TM SM PRODUCT Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Improvements tend to be made incrementally. A strong virtue of benchmarking is that it can lead to very rapid improvement. All rights reserved. Inc.com.com.imtC3. Page 41 . If your organization practices benchmarking. using convergent thinking. www. influenced by industry (producer) standards. which of the four get attention? Whose definition of quality is being measured: producer's. Inc. www.

Page 42 . Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.com. A limitation in conventional benchmarking practice is its primary focus of internal process.imtC3. Inc. Inc. secondarily on today’s product(s) and lastly (if at all) on customer-desired outcomes. It requires divergent thinking and behavior. uncover how to be equal to the best. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. in anticipation of a future condition. Innovation is outcome-focused. at best.INNOVATION S E M O C T U O O U T C O M E S TM SM Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. www. Benchmarking can. 42 Innovation refers to the process of making a desired outcome easier to achieve. Questions which encourage innovation and improved outcomes include: • What results are expected by use of this product? • What alternative products or processes will achieve superior outcomes? Benchmarking. www. guarantees neither continual improvement nor innovation.imtC3. Customer-centered continuous innovation can enable the practitioners to become the best and sustain their leadership position.com. once completed.

Name the specific product Identify the roles of customers for that product Differentiate the discrete customers within each role Ask the three key questions about outcomes. 6. www. 2.com.imtC3. www.com. 43 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. Page 43 .imtC3. All rights reserved. features for both product and acquisition Innovate or redesign the product and related process Measure performance along the critical 4 Dimensions Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. 5. All rights reserved.UNCOVERING THE VOICE OF CUSTOMERS TM SM 1. functions. 4. 3.

www.com.imtc3. Inc. “Creating a Customer-Centered Culture” – Game.imtC3.imtc3.cfm Contact Peggy. Page 44 .WAYS TO APPLY & LEARN MORE • • Use individual or set of tools: http://www.com to – Set up a teleconference with Rob (no charge) to discuss your questions or special needs Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.cfm Read. “Voice of the Customer: the measure of success” TM SM • • Attend one of the next web-based sessions or a public live workshop: http://www. 941-907-0666 or peggy@imtC3. All rights reserved. www.imtC3.imtc3.com/products/products. 44 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. view or play: http://www.cfm – Autographed copy of book – DVD series with facilitator kit.com. Inc. All rights reserved.com/events/UpcomingEvents.com/resource/tools.

com. All rights reserved.imtC3. Inc. Page 45 .TM C3 TOOLS & REFERENCE Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. www.

7. 8. All rights reserved.10 STEPS TO ALIGN EXCELLENCE WITH CUSTOMER PRIORITIES TM SM 1. 4.com. 2. Determine how each outcome will be measured. Uncover customers’ priority expectations for each product.imtC3. Page 46 . All rights reserved. 3. 10. www. Set numerical improvement objectives and due dates. 6. 46 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.imtC3. 9. IMPLEMENT and CELEBRATE SUCCESS with high ROI! Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Innovate or redesign products to best achieve outcomes. Inc. Inc. 5. Identify end-user. broker & fixer customers for key products. www. Select the few products most likely to impact outcome success. Articulate strategic & customer-desired outcomes. Measure seemingly immeasurable expectations. Cut customer and producer acquisition/supply time by 80%.com.

VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER: The Measure of Success TM SM Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. (2) understands customer expectations and (3) has performance measures aligned with those priorities. Each game includes facilitator instructions. an animated presentation of instructions for players and card decks for two teams.com.imtC3. Does an End-User Straight beat a Strategic Full House? Play the game and find out. Each team may have 4-8 participants. www. The object of the game is to convince the Truth-Tellers that your team (1) knows who your customers really are. You’ll find this to be a terrific tool to quickly: . Voice of the Customer. Balanced Scorecards and ISO 9001 Your team uses real information about your customers to create a winning hand. Inc. managers.Test players’ C3 IQ .Demonstrate how to measure customer satisfaction . www.imtC3. truth and insight. change agents and trainers will find this game a terrific tool to strengthen almost any change initiative. 47 VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER is a thought-provoking game of balance. Fast-paced fun blends with players’ real organizational challenges. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Leaders. Inc. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.Introduce core customer-centered culture (C3) concepts .com. Page 47 .Strengthen transformation initiatives such as Six Sigma/DFSS .

Customer Roles DVD #2 .Quality & Innovation PURPOSE OF THIS TOOL a. Customer Expectations Tools* Outcomes & Innovation Window Chapter 4 . Customer Expectations DVD #1 . Product: End-Users: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Features 3. ENDUSERS Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your situation. Inc. Customer Roles DVD #2 . Excel will think you are doing a caluculation.Chapter 1. Rank 5.Chapter 1. MT46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Weighted Value 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 Discoveries Also Do DVD or Video* DVD #1 . To translate the "Voice of the Customer" regarding product attributes into measurable product design criteria (PDC) b. Measured 6. All rights reserved. www.Product Function 1.com.PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE Do This First Do This Now Do This Next TM Voice of the Customer & Creating Measures VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER . IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER key not the tab.imtC3. To establish target values. If you don't. PRODUCT Product Design Table Product Features Table PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 2.Measuring Service Quality Pages 66-71 DVD #1 . All rights reserved. When filling in the green cells. Excel will think you are doing a calculation. If you don't.Quality & Innovation Miller/ C3 Lawton Book* Book* Chapter 5 .com.Measuring Service Quality Chapter 5 . www. To develop measures that will enable the producer to monitor and manage quality as defined by the customer c. use a + and -.Customer Expectations Chapter 4 . Inc. Page 48 .Chapter 1. IMPORTANT! Use the ENTER key not the tab.Chapter 1.Chapter 1.Chapter 1. Customer Expectations Customer Roles & Power Voice of the Customer Chapter 3 .imtc3. Customer Roles DVD #2 . goals and minimums for product performance Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. 4.blue cells) if the preset title does not fit your situation When filling in the green cells. Performance Perception Product Attribute Group Customer Expectations (Voice of the Customer) Rank Attributes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Team Name CREATING MEASURES 1 Product: 2 End Users: EASE OF USE Substitute Quality Characteristics Priority 3 Priority Customer Expectations (A satisfying product is one which is…) 1 2 3 4 5 4 Possible Measures 5 Priority Of Measure TIMELINESS 6 Goal CERTAINTY 7 Who Will Do What By When Priority Target Value 041306 Copyright© 2006 International Management Technologies. Product: End-Users: Substitute Quality Characteristics PRODUCT FEATURES TABLE Instructions: Change the name of the Product Attribute Group (Column A . use a + and -.

com.PRODUCT DESIGN TABLE Substitute Quality Characteristics Product Training Course VOC TO DESIGN % of visuals per page of materials # of times instructor has taught course % of participants reporting application # of days between request for class and attendance # of principles illustrated by examples or anecdotes # of requests for help within first 90 days 2 End-Users Course Participants % of core concepts applied with exercise(s) 4 (Voice of the Customer) Rank Product Attribute Group 3 Customer Expectations + + + + + 0 0 0 + 0 + Priority Target Value Supported w/materials + + 0 + + 0 0 + + 0 0 + 0 0 0 + + 0 0 0 0 0 0 + 0 0 + + + + + 0 + 0 + + + 0 0 0 + 0 0 + 0 0 0 0 0 + + + + 0 0 + + + + TM Motivating Interactive Ease of Use Relevant to work Practical Begun and ended on time Available when I want it Timeliness Appropriately paced Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Informative Taught by experienced instructor Certainty Factually correct Page 49 7 7 7 3 9 2 8 .imtC3. www. All rights reserved. Inc.

com. Page 50 .imtC3. www.TM Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. All rights reserved. Inc.

Page 51 . Inc. www.com. All rights reserved.imtC3.TM Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies.

com/public/c3friends TM Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Page 52 .imtc3. All rights reserved.For a legible version of this chart please see www. www.imtC3.com. Inc.

patient and guest. Product Something created by work which can be given to someone else to achieve a desired outcome. modifications or adjustments to the product. Output This is often confused with a deliverable (see product) or a result (see outcome). 3. Satisfaction will occur if dissatisfaction declines. Wants are desires focused on optimums (vs. fix). Replace customer with end user. Performance Expectations Unambiguous. cheap. or fixer. The most important customers have priority. past experiences) regarding a product or outcome.g. corrections. customer customer-centered cultural change. is a management consulting firm specializing in management consulting firm specializing in customer-centered cultural change. Our performance measures confirm our excellence. Outcome A result achieved or sought. customers.g. Fixer Any customer who will have to make repairs. legal services) or as an adjective (e. Robin L. An excuse for not changing. Expectations Expectations are based on the customers’ past experience with products. quick. The term is often used without reference to a specific product. performance measurement. Vital Lie A limiting assumption.GLOSSARY TM KEY WORDS Answer A complete. 2. . IMT was founded in 1985. We know who our customers are. Our mission is to enable clients like you service quality. objective and directly measurable attributes of a product.. What customers say they expect is actually what they want. We are on the leading edge in our industry. 7. concise and complete.com • “Creating Total Customer Satisfaction. ▪ A deliverable It is: ▪ A noun ▪ Packaged in countable units ▪ Expressed as something which can be made plural with an “s” Producer This is the person or group that creates a product for a customer. is a International Management Technologies. measure and improve. depending on the relationship with a given product.imtC3. 6. a person can only be a customer in terms of a product. 8. stakeholder. 5. WORDS TO AVOID Customer Common synonyms include client. taxpayer. 9. Our mission is to enable clients like you to achieve and sustain leadership in satisfying to achieve and sustain leadership in satisfying customers. process or organization.com. partner. ABOUT IMT International Management Technologies. assist. minimums) and hopes (vs. We know what customers want.imtc3. Inc. Ken. Replace supplier with broker or producer. www. All rights reserved. The Change Agent’s Guide to Radical Improvement. performance measurement. Perception Expectations Subjective criteria such as easy-to-use. support. often. Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality. 2002 Articles available on-line at www. Growth in customer demand or market share means customers are satisfied.g. Innovation and Speed Quality Press. It can prevent the pursuit of the possible. The confusion can be compounded by organizing customers according to location (internal or external). service center). But it can also be used as a noun (e. customer satisfaction. Service is most frequently used as a verb to describe reactive activity (e. innovation and service quality. Milwaukee: Quality Press. innovation and satisfaction. An experience may be personal or vicarious. Supplier This can refer to a person or group that gives a product to someone else. REFERENCE Lawton. understandable. What cannot be defined is difficult to manage. As a practical matter. broker. Ten most common vital lies include: 1. 4. timely. 1993 Miller. A Service Quality Strategy that Will Work for You” • “Using Measures to Connect Strategy With Customers” • “Balance Your Balanced Scorecard” • “Are Your Surveys Only Suitable For Wrapping Fish?” Page 53 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. Inc. Service It is virtually impossible for members of an organization to agree on what this means. Broker An agent for the end-user and/or the producer End-user This customer will personally use the product to achieve a desired outcome. help. 10. Customers don’t know what they want. Inc. We know what business we are in. IMT was founded in 1985. accurate knowledge product that satisfies the end user’s question on the first attempt.

www. Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. strategies and tools to improve and measure service. AME. Inc. Creating a Customer-Centered Culture: Leadership in Quality. Rob has the unique ability to develop and articulate alternatives to complex organizational and competitive challenges. Workshop Leader Mr. Mr. national and regional conferences sponsored by such organizations as the Japan Management Association. Rob has a combination of excellent communication skills. Robin Lawton is an internationally recognized expert in creating rapid strategic alignment between enterprise objectives and customer priorities. City of Louisville. He has over 25 years experience directing both strategic and operational improvement initiatives. ASQ. Raytheon.com. Inc. Page 54 . Innovation and Speed (Quality Press) and at www. He is known as a dynamic innovator who inspires others to think creatively and push the boundaries of what was previously thought impossible. humorous and provocative speaker. The Missouri Department of Revenue and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are winners of their respective state quality awards (Missouri in 2000. Lawton is an engaging. Federal Executive Board. These are described in his best-selling book. Keynote Speaker. AT&T. Rob has been featured at international. Eastman Kodak.ROBIN LAWTON TM Author.imtC3.com. Mr. Lawton “Outstanding Speaker”. Lawton is president of International Management Technologies. Ford Motor Company. American Marketing Association (AMA) and American Society for Quality (ASQ). All rights reserved. he has periodically served as adjunct faculty at the University of Minnesota and Metropolitan State University.imtC3. Siemens. Consultant. While guiding that business since 1985. Other clients include award-winning organizations such as Motorola. knowledge work and customer satisfaction. Chamber of Commerce. American Honda. Naval Air Depot. California in 1998) as a direct result of applying Lawton’s unique principles and tools. International Conference on ISO 9000 and others have named Mr. Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME). He makes the solutions feel like common sense. He is listed in the directory of Who’s Who of Business Leaders. Pinellas County Utilities and many others not yet so well known. American Express. He has developed and deployed powerful but easy-to-understand principles. leadership vision and bias for action that compels others to follow.

TESTIMONIALS. … We didn’t invent customer satisfaction. IMT has helped industry and government agencies achieve stunning results.imtC3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3M Defense Contract Management Agency AT&T General Services Administration NAVAIR Naval Surface Warfare Center Microsoft Defense Logistics Agency Caterpillar Department of Defense Motorola NAVAIR City of Calgary ITT Defense Six Sigma Academy Raytheon Pinellas County Utilities Honeywell State Gov’t such as AK.. . The emphasis on creative.. saved over $20 million in the first two years and moved from middle of the pack to #1 of 50 agencies of our kind in the country on satisfaction.ABOUT IMT WE CAN HELP YOU TM Align strategic direction with customer priorities Uncover and balance competing customer expectations Shorten service delivery times by >50% (without automation) Measure performance from the enterprise to the person without tears Achieve what you never thought possible INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES. CORE COMPETENCIES Strategic Planning Performance Measurement Customer Satisfaction Motivational Key Notes Change Management Service/Product Design Customer-Supplier Relations Process Time Reduction Strategic Project Management ON-SITE TRAINING INCLUDES Aligning Strategy & Measures with Customer Priorities 8 Dimensions of Excellence Uncovering the Voice of the Customer Lean Process in Service High ROI Projects Creating a Customer-Centered Culture Measuring Knowledge Work and Satisfaction Customer-Centered Six Sigma CLIENTS.” Department of Revenue “IMT provides the management and tactical tools to implement cultural change.imtC3..com.” Motorola “The C3 approach is the most effective model I have seen in my 15 years in management. WY And many more… .com GSA# GS-10F-0109R. divergent thinking may be the key to our success in the next ten years. challenged me to make a mind shift to apply the customer-centered thinking in my work.” Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LET’S TALK Please help us understand your challenges. Inc. MI. MOBIS schedule “Excellent program! This . We just help you increase it.com VISIT: www. achieving satisfaction internally and externally to the organization. Since 1985.. www.. This is also the most clear and direct method of improvement I have found. INC. “We reduced cycle time by 80%.” Governor’s Office “I have never experienced a program with a higher return on investment of time and money. Over 5-to-1 return on investment is not uncommon.” AVP. The secret is the C3 system of organizational transformation. American Honda Page 55 Copyright © 2008 International Management Technologies. MN. CALL: 800-729-1468 or 941-907-0666 EMAIL: rob@imtC3. All rights reserved.

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