You are on page 1of 27

 

4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

 
 

 
 
2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT  
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 1/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

What's the point of this report? 
 
Practically speaking, the idea is to tell our supporters how we spent their money last year. 
It lets people make an informed decision about whether or not we are doing good things 
with their cash, and consequently, whether or not they want to keep supporting us.  
 
Obviously, we want that answer to be yes. But a transparency report shouldn’t be an 
advertisement. Yes, we highlight our accomplishments here, but we also just lay out the 
information, itemizing figures and project budgets for you to interpret as you will.  
 
The desire is that this demonstrates how much we have done with every dollar you give 
us and how much value our patrons get for their five bucks (or whatever) per month. I 
certainly hope that transparency will be good for us. Everybody hopes they'll look good 
naked. But that's not how it went down last time. 
 
The release of our 2017 Transparency Report was a disaster. It led to us being called out 
and shamed publicly, and it led to some patrons pulling their support.  
 
This took me by surprise. The 2017 report had good news to share all around, including 
what I thought was tangible progress in terms of the company's diversity. We looked at 
the gender and ethnic balance of our team, we looked at who was writing stories for our 
website, we looked at who owned shares in the company, and we looked at whose voices 
were heard on our podcasts. By all those metrics, Canadaland seemed like a  company 
heading in the right direction. 
 
But there were some metrics we didn't look at. Which employees had senior jobs? How 
much were we paying women on our team? How much were women of colour getting 
paid? And how much were they getting paid relative to the white men who work here? 
 
The truth is, I wasn’t paying attention to those numbers. But we did reveal them, and 
that let some of you ask me tough questions about equity here at Canadaland.  
 
For the first time, we hired an independent consultant to come take a close look at our 
company – our culture, our practices, everything. She interviewed employees privately. 
She moderated an extensive group discussion. She learned how everyone here really felt 
– about their jobs, about their pay, about the company, and about me.  
 
I won't pretend that this was a fun process. Hearing the truth about yourself can be 
painful. But it was necessary. It was the only way to figure out what was wrong, and to 
figure out a way to do something about it.  
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 2/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

Specifically, the problem, I learned, is not that Canadaland is discriminatory in how it 
pays employees. There was no evidence of that. The general problem is that men tend to 
stay with the company longer than women, and consequently are around to get raises 
and promotions. In short, we have a retention problem: women, and women of colour, 
have been far more likely to leave this company than men.  
 
We came out of this process with a number of new goals and rules (all of which are 
included in the Appendix to this report, along with the independent report itself). We now 
have policies for access and equity, we have a complaints process, and we hired someone 
other than me to handle HR issues. We changed the way we hire, putting the onus on us 
to reach out to marginalized communities and to let people know we want their 
applications. And we hired excellent women at senior levels, including our General 
Manager and new Senior Audio Producer.  
 
So, problems solved? I can't honestly say that yet. I can’t ignore the current absence of 
women of colour on our team. Changing an organization's culture is notoriously hard. But 
if a company as small and as new as ours can't do it, who can? What I can promise is to 
take responsibility for the outcome. It's not okay with me for Canadaland to be a place 
where one kind of employee is more comfortable than everyone else. This issue is not just 
about principles – it's practical. We cover labour stories that pop up at other 
organizations. For us to do so with credibility, I need to take those issues seriously here.  
 
There's a lot I'm proud of in this report, 2018 accomplishments that I think make an 
excellent case for supporting Canadaland (our Thunder Bay podcast with Ryan McMahon, 
Arshy Mann’s relaunch of COMMONS, and Jaren Kerr's investigation of the WE 
organization being chief among them).  
 
It’s time to open our company’s activity to the public so that those who are curious can 
have a good look and make up their own minds. I hope disclosure leaves you with a 
favourable impression of Canadaland. I know that for some, it will not. But accountability 
and transparency aren’t about looking great, they’re about providing the information we 
owe you and that we demand of others, so you can support us, take your money 
elsewhere, or challenge us to be better.  
 
That's the point of this report.  
 

Jesse Brown 
  Host/Publisher 
CANADALAND 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 3/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

TOP CANADALAND STORIES, 2018 
 
 
There have been  questions raised  about the Kielburgers’ WE Movement, and we began 
answering  them. The Kielburgers have announced their intention to  sue .  
 
The downward spiral of the  Toronto Sun  and its columnists involved maligning Muslim 
migrants with a  grotesque falsehood ,  inaccurately identifying  the Toronto incel van attacker 
as “Middle­Eastern,” needlessly  outing a sex worker , and  pre­planning election news 
coverage  for the explicit benefit of the Doug Ford campaign. We covered it all, and 
confronted  their CEO on television. 
 
Jordan Peterson’s waning brand was built in part on the notion that in his career as a 
psychologist, he has, by his own account, helped countless patients live properly. We spoke 
to one of them who told us a  different story . Peterson  threatened to sue us immediately  if 
we published. We did, and he didn’t.  
 
Postmedia has interesting  ties  to Donald Trump.  
 
TIFF  missed an opportunity  to expose child abuse in Hollywood.  
 
Who  funds  Ontario Proud, and why? Why does Ontario Proud keep  threatening to sue  its 
critics? And what’s up with the weird  text messages  they send? 
 
Jian Ghomeshi’s comeback essay for the  New York Review of Books  needed a  fact­check .  
 
The media seems to constantly forget who Faith Goldy really is, so we published a handy 
guide .  
 
The CBC had a bad habit of  picking up other reporters’ scoops without crediting them .  
 
The most recent season of COMMONS put a focus on  Canada’s corporate corruption problem 
three months before the SNC­Lavalin scandal broke. 

 
PATREON MILESTONES 
 

$25,000/month:  Better Pay for everybody here (except Jesse). 
Status: reached on Nov. 10, 2018 
UPDATE: Raises have gone into effect, marking the 3rd year in a row that we have been 
able to significantly increase each employee’s compensation. We also raised our base 
freelance rate by 20% from this time last year. 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 4/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

 
$30,000/month:  A full­time reporter to investigate allegations of 
sexual misconduct in Canada.  
Status: not yet 
UPDATE: We did not hit this goal in our 2018 crowdfunding campaign and are unlikely to 
do so, as we are now cycling down incrementally as we have in prior years. We do have 
funds to assign stories and investigations on this beat, but not enough to put someone on 
them full­time. 
 
 

How We Spend Your Money Each Month 
(current Patreon funding as of April 1, 2019: $26,117 USD/~$35,000 CAD) 

 
Salaries paid for via crowdfunding (in CAD, as of 04/01) — News editors: 
$4437­$5000/month, Managing editor: $5250/month, Senior Producers: 
$4187­$4666/month, Producers & Host/Producers:$4000­$4395/month, Freelance 
writers: $300 per piece (minimum).  

 
 
THINGS YOU ARE NOT PAYING FOR 
CANADALAND makes money two different ways: through crowdfunding via Patreon and 
through commercial revenue from ad sales, branded podcasts on our Earshot imprint, and 
other projects. The ratio fluctuates as patrons and advertisers come and go, but Patreon 
vs. commercial revenue in 2018 averaged about 50:50.  

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 5/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

 
We pay for some of our projects out of the crowdfunded pot, and others out of the 
commercial pot.  Patreon revenue is never used to fund commercial projects, but 
commercial revenue is used to supplement budgets for our crowdfunded work. 
 
Once again: initiatives that are primarily funded through Patreon money often receive 
additional funding through our commercial revenue. But initiatives that are designated as 
commercially funded projects  never  receive money from our Patreon coffers. And we 
never use your money to pay for things you didn’t know about.  
 
However, in 2018 we launched a podcast that might have been a Patreon goal – Wag The 
Doug – but which wasn’t, due to timing. We funded this show out of our commercial 
revenue last year. But due to strong audience support for Wag The Doug, and the show’s 
compatibility with our mission to fill in holes in wider media coverage and inform people 
about Ontario’s dangerous and belligerent premier, it will be a Patreon­funded podcast 
going forward. 
 

Paid for with Patreon crowd­funds  Paid for with commercial revenue 

CANADALAND  OPPO 
COMMONS  Taste Buds 
Thunder Bay   Wag The Doug 
News coverage  Patron rewards (t­shirts, etc.) 
Office rent  DDx 
Libel insurance  Staff beers 

 
DIVERSITY 
(note: diversity stats reflect entire organization as of April 1, 2019, and are not 
limited to Patreon­funded employees/initiatives) 
 
In our office:  40% white men, 40% white women, 20% men of colour 
On­air hosts:  42% white men, 28% white women, 14% men of colour, 14% Indigenous 
men 
Owners:  60% white men, 20% women of colour, 20% men of colour 
Short Cuts co­hosts & CANADALAND guest hosts:  38.5% white men, 28.8% white 
women, 19.2% women of colour, 7.7% men of colour, 3.8% Indigenous women, 1.9% 
Indigenous men  

 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 6/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

OWNERSHIP 

 
Note: 5% of employee options have vested so far. 

 
IMPACT 
Correlation is not causation, but a lot of things we cover change after we’ve covered 
them. Some of these include: 

Our  Thunder Bay podcast  was one of many journalistic efforts, including, notably, 
Tanya Talaga’s  Seven Fallen Feathers , to shine a light on the tragic circumstances of that 
city. Following our podcast, two major government reports, commissioned months earlier, 
were released, confirming the systemic racism we reported on.  The Globe and Mail  later 
opened a year­long bureau in Thunder Bay. Finally, Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School 
reinstated after­school programming for its students. Many other reforms called for in 
Thunder Bay are as yet unfulfilled.  

After we reported on the  WE organization’s partnerships with companies that use 
forced child labour  in their supply chains, WE published a  video  arguing that their prior 
practice of “kicking down doors and rescuing children from factories...did not work.” 
Instead, WE explained that they decided to “support” companies that have child labour in 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 7/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

their supply chains but “which were doing the right thing” in trying to eliminate it. To our 
knowledge, this is a greater level of detail on their practices with regards to child labour 
than had previously been publicly available.  

We documented  the CBC’s chronic practice of reporting their competitors’ scoops 
without giving credit , and they’ve since done a much better job of not doing that.  

We reported on  Postmedia’s connection to Donald Trump.  Trump associate David 
Pecker resigned from Postmedia’s board two months later.  

We reported that  Global News Radio correspondent Lou Schizas called migrant 
children detained by Trump “actors, ” on the air. He was let go as an AM640 contributor 
in September. 
 
After we  fact­checked Jian Ghomeshi’s error­filled essay in the  N ew  Y ork Review  of 
Books , and amid a slew of media uproar elsewhere,  NYRB  editor Ian Buruma left his post.  
 

ERRORS 
 
We publish corrections and clarifications as appropriate, and a full list —  
encompassing both our podcasts and news stories — is available  here . 
 

SOME NUMBERS 
 
In 2018, we delivered   5,173,248 downloads 
  
We have exceeded   20,000,000 total downloads 
Thunder Bay episodes have been downloaded over    1,000,000  times 
Each CANADALAND patron (on average) pays for   12 other people 
to hear our shows (that’s not including our listeners on campus and community 
radio stations – we don’t have those numbers). 
 

 
 
 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 8/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

MOST DOWNLOADED EPISODES, 2018 
 
CANADALAND 
1.We Need To Talk About Reddit 
2.Authors Are Getting Bloody In The Culture Wars 
3.Thunder Bay 
4.Canada’s First Smart City Is A Disaster 
5.The Canadaland Investigation Of The Kielburgers’ WE Movement 
 
COMMONS 
1.The Most Crime­Ridden Neighbourhood In Canada 
2.How Vancouver Became A Money­Laundering Paradise 
3.What The Hell Is A Fairness Letter? 
4.Canada Is Not Racist...According To The Stats 
5.Canadian History X 
 
The Imposter  
1.Sexcoven 
2.Meet The Porn Auteurs 
3.Cadence Weapon And The Black Experience In Sound 
4.Lido Pimienta’s Next Baby 
5.Is Comedy Art? 

 
Last Year’s Goals: How did we do? 
 
2018 GOAL (from the 2017 Transparency Report):  
 

1. Expand, carefully 
We’ve launched a new podcast called OPPO and a branded podcast imprint 
called Earshot, and plan to publish a new food show and our Thunder Bay 
series. The goal is not only to publish great shows, but to do so without 
taking anything away from our existing shows or making our staff’s lives 
miserable.  
 
UPDATE : Expansion has been steady, considered, and deliberate. By limiting new 
projects in 2018 to Taste Buds, Wag The Doug, and Thunder Bay, we did right by 
these efforts. We added a much­needed General Manager to our team, hired a 
Deputy Editor for our news team, gave CANADALAND (the Monday version) its own 
dedicated producer, and found a great model for re­branding and re­launching 
COMMONS. We still don’t have as many producers per show as many equivalent 
U.S. podcasts, but given the different economy of scale in Canada, we’re doing 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 9/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

okay. Our shows are better­resourced than ever and staff burnout issues have 
sharply decreased. However, we contracted in one respect, ceasing production on 
The Imposter with Aliya Pabani, a show we were immensely fond of but which we 
could not make work financially.  
 
2018 GOAL (from the 2017 Transparency Report):  
 

2. Get our money right 
We are at or approaching industry­standard compensation, depending on 
the job. In 2018, we hope to exceed industry standards, while maintaining 
our commitment to a livable work culture where nobody is expected to be 
chained to their desk. We want to maximize our revenue on existing 
projects and pursue additional commercial projects with clear goals in mind 
regarding pay raises and hiring: the idea isn’t to make as much money as 
possible, it’s to make as many great podcasts as we want to and cover the 
stories we need to, while getting paid fairly to do so. 
 
UPDATE:  For the third year in a row, we were able to raise every team member’s 
compensation by an average of 12%. Our audio producers are paid significantly 
more than the  average radio producer salary in Canada.  Our freelance rates for 
written posts are now competitive, in the mid­to­high range of what’s offered by 
other Canadian news outlets.  
 
2018 GOAL (from the 2017 Transparency Report):  
 

3. Grow  our audience 
While some of our content will realistically only ever be of interest to 
Canadians, we are increasingly telling stories that could totally work for 
people anywhere. If Canadians can give a damn about Woodstock, Alabama, 
then why shouldn’t listeners around the world care about Thunder Bay? 
 
UPDATE : Almost as many Americans downloaded Thunder Bay as Canadians, and 
the U.S. numbers are climbing faster than Canadian. We expect the show’s U.S. 
listenership to exceed its Canadian listenership in a matter of days. This is an 
exciting proof of concept: it is possible for us to tell a hyper­local Canadian story 
and deliver it to a significant audience around the world. 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 10/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

2018 GOAL (from the 2017 Transparency Report):  
 

4. Cover online media more and better 
The death spiral of legacy news is our original beat, and its death rattle is 
still the loudest sound in our media ecosystem. But startups and other new 
online players are increasingly relevant, and in 2018 we will ramp up our 
understanding and coverage of them.  
 
UPDATE:  We’ve done well by this goal, covering new outlets and entities like The 
Post Millennial, publishing a guide to the new partisan digital press, delving into 
dank Canadian subreddits, and reporting on the funding sources of Ontario Proud. 

 
2019 Goals 
 

1. Keep the media in check this federal election 
Things are going to get weird this fall, and it’s never been more crucial to have a 
watchful eye on anyone and everyone who’s trying to influence Canadians. This 
means a critical eye on new players as much as legacy news media.  
 
2. Grow our audience within Canada 
We serve over 100,000 podcasts every week to an audience that we built simply by 
making the best content we can. We have never put much time, money, or effort 
into marketing our shows and stories in order to grow our audience. We’ve actually 
had a dumb, prideful resistance to doing so. But the simple fact is, there are 
hundreds of thousands of Canadians out there who might like our stuff but who 
don’t know that we exist. Spending some money (from our commercial revenue, 
not our Patreon funds) to spread the word is not just a good business idea, it will 
serve the mission of Canadaland by increasing the impact of our stories. An 
awareness campaign reaching NPR’s Canadian podcast listeners is underway.  
 

3. Watchdog the Bailout 
Canada is the only country in the world thus far to respond to the current news 
industry crisis by bailing out newspapers with government subsidies. Canadaland 
will closely watch this secretive process, demand accountability on who is getting 
public money and how much, and report diligently on the impacts of this 
unprecedented intervention into Canada’s independent press.  
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 11/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

4. Tell another really big story. 
We thought we could make something that could stand up against any other 
“premium” podcast out there, while telling a Canadian story that we felt deeply 
needed to be told to as many people as possible. With Thunder Bay, we proved to 
ourselves that we could. Now, we want to do it again. 
 
 
APPENDIX A:  

MISSION STATEMENT 
 
Our mission is to serve our supporters.  
 
The funds we receive from them are not donations. It’s payment for the services we 
provide.  
 
Initially, the service we offered was media criticism. This has grown to include many other 
services: media reporting, political commentary, enterprise investigations, and more. 
Beyond these specific initiatives, it has increasingly become our role to do what others in 
the media won’t: to challenge, question, and investigate power when others fail to do so, to 
boost voices that others neglect or marginalize, to fill in gaps that others have ignored or 
abandoned. It’s also our job to energize the Canadian public discourse and make it 
interesting for people to be engaged. 
 
Representation 
 
With these values in mind, we understand that the service we provide is not simply to 
create media, but to represent specific interests of our supporters. We are an extension and 
an agent of their interest in having access to good, reliable journalism, to hold the media 
and government accountable, to know when they have been misinformed or lied to, to have 
a voice in public discourse, to be seen and heard, and to have issues they care about 
addressed.  
 
Decisions about what we produce and how we grow are primarily informed by whether or 
not new initiatives provide our listeners and readers with things of public value they aren't 
getting anywhere else.  
 
Journalistic Principles 
 
As a news organization that is largely focused on reporting on and criticizing other 
journalists, our own journalistic standards and practices are under constant scrutiny. We 
strive to exceed the standards that we apply to others. As such, our journalistic practice 
prioritizes the following values: 
 
● Accuracy 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 12/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

● Fairness 
● Accountability 
● The public’s right to know 
 
We emphasize these four values deliberately and place them above other common 
journalistic goals such as speed, exclusivity, or objectivity. The application of our values, 
like journalism itself, is a daily, lived, and imperfect operation. Each story presents unique 
challenges, and like all news organizations, we will make mistakes. How we address them, 
account for them, and learn from them, will define us.  
 
Profit 
 
Canadaland Media  is a for­profit business that is determined to survive and thrive amid 
media market collapse. As such, it is part of our mission to prioritize the  p
  rofitability and/or 
profit potential  o
  f new projects and initiatives. We do not accept that some projects are 
worthy enough to justify operating continuously at a loss. If a series does not make money 
or compel people to support us (with money), we won't continue to make it. Unlike 
traditional news organizations that impose “firewalls” between editorial and commercial 
operations, we believe that modern journalists must not be kept ignorant or isolated from 
business realities. We will pursue commercial opportunities and projects that do not 
necessarily speak to our journalistic mission, but we will be explicit, internally and publicly, 
about which projects these are, and we will not spend our supporters’ money on these 
projects. 
 
As a private company co­owned by its employees, Canadaland is committed to sharing its 
success with employees, and bases compensation on how well the company is doing, not on 
our industry’s (shitty) standards. If Canadaland continues to thrive, compensation for all will 
continue to increase, without limitation. If the company faces financial trouble, employees 
will collaboratively discuss cost strategies that may include consensus­based pay cuts in 
order to prevent layoffs. We all have a shared interest in sustaining the company and 
weathering difficulties together.  
 
Quality 
 
Canadaland’s  mission is also to produce excellent, engaging content  a
  nd to raise industry 
standards (and our own). Everything we produce reflects on our brand, and we constantly 
push to tell stories better, to improve production values, and to publish better writing and 
reporting.  
 
We are initiators and innovators in the Canadian media, and our product must always be 
leading the pack. We do not endeavour to be all things, but we do intend to do the things 
we choose to do very well.  
 
Culture 
 
As a news organization that covers and comments on all kinds of subjects, discussions in 
our workplace involve controversial topics. We workshop opinions and rely on each other for 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 13/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

argument and criticism. Anyone who is present during such conversations is welcome and 
encouraged to participate. If editorial teams do not want group input, they should take their 
discussions private. Some employees unaccustomed to editorial workplaces should expect a 
wider range of expression than they may be accustomed to in other professional settings.  
 
BUT, none of the above will be considered or accepted as a justification or excuse for 
creating a miserable workplace or harming colleagues. While we do expect hard work and 
commitment from ourselves and our colleagues, we do not accept that staff must sacrifice 
their well­being or health in service of our mission. Our mission, in fact, includes 
collectively building a healthy, sustainable, cooperative, diverse, and equitable work 
culture, in which we offer fair pay, equal pay for equal work, health benefits, 
co­ownership, training, opportunities for advancement, and creative expression. Like the 
practice of our journalism, meeting these goals will be an imperfect, daily operation, in 
which we will hold each other accountable and constantly strive to be better .  

 
APPENDIX B:  

CONSULTATIVE REPORT ON CANADALAND 
by Karen B. K. Chan (fluidexchange.org). July 17, 2018 
 

INTRODUCTION & CONSULTATIVE PROCESS 
 
After a “twitter storm” of criticism aimed at Canadaland Media, and following the departure 
of a number of employees over the company’s five­year tenure, the company engaged me 
in March 2018 to explore and address issues related to  diversity, equity, and workplace 
wellness . 
 
The  consultative process  was in four parts: 
1. Individual interviews with the current in­office team  
2. Providing the team with analysis and recommendations (this report), from which the 
team will set priorities and timelines,  
3. Meeting with individuals as needed, with feedback and support, and 
4. Skills training for the team to support diversity, equity, and workplace wellness 
  
This  report  is in four parts: 
1. Introduction and consultative process 
2. Background and existing conditions 
3. Recommended actions 
a. Acknowledgment  
b. Company structure 
c. Staffing structure and roles 
d. Policies 
e. Other issues 
4. Recommended training 
 
Individuals who were interviewed: 
● Jesse Brown 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 14/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

● Dave Crosbie 
● Jonathan Goldsbie 
● Allie Graham 
● Abby Madan 
● Corey Marr 
● Aliya Pabani 
● Kevin Sexton 
 
Since the interviews, which were completed April­May, 2018, much progress and change 
has already taken place. As such, this report is a snapshot in time of Canadaland Media’s 
ongoing growth and transformation. 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND EXISTING CONDITIONS 
 
Growing Pains 
 
In a short five years, Canadaland Media grew from a one­person project into a media 
company with multiple podcasts, a handful of full­time and part­time employees, a  Patreon 
support network, and a large fan and advertiser base. Many of the current struggles are a 
result of  e
  xpected growing pains.  
 
Multiple interviewees described the early days of Canadaland Media as “scrappy” and as a 
“hobby project” where the general sentiment was to “just take a project and go do it”. Many 
operations were figured out “on the fly” as the company grew. Moving into its new identity 
as a full­fledged media company requires a conscious scaling up of infrastructure. Like other 
companies in this position, needs are identified over time, and limits are sometimes only 
identified by boundaries being crossed. 
 
Some of these growing pains include: 
● Inconsistent provisions of contracts, job descriptions 
● Inconsistent payroll, hiring, and dismissal procedures 
● Lack of a human resources and conflict resolution policy 
● Lack of trained management and human resources personnel 
● Unclear roles, responsibilities, and support structure within shows 
● Unclear boundaries between editorial and sales, branded and unbranded content 
● Unclear processes for determining work assignments, processes for show 
development, and processes for acquiring resources for shows 
● Lack of an official statement of values, vision, and purpose 
 
Bring Equity and Diversity to Life 
 
Multiple employees identified inclusivity, diversity, giving voice, and media criticism as 
fundamental values of Canadaland Media, and reasons for their own interests in working at 
the company. 
 
While there has been pointed efforts in hiring equitably, in creating content that is socially 
conscious, and in amplifying underrepresented voices, the functional structure of the 
company reflects the general power in greater society: Cis white men occupy senior, 
management positions with the most power. 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 15/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

 
There was no intention to build the company this way, and in fact, strong intention to build 
something much more diverse and equitable. Jesse, along with many employees, feels 
stumped as to how to actualize that vision of diversity.  
 
Demographics and identity, while important and measurable aspects of diversity, are only 
the beginning. What is lacking is a deeper understanding of how social injustice “out there” 
plays out as interpersonal dynamics and workplace climate within the company.  
 
Some of these dynamics include: 
● How the  precariousness of work  for young, recently­graduated employees with 
little or no experience and how that affects their perception of their job, their ability 
to ask for and receive direction and feedback, their freedom to take creative risk, 
their ability to set clear and firm boundaries. 
● How the tradition of the media / journalism industry’s “say what’s on your mind” 
culture translates differently for people who have been conditioned differently 
because of their gender or how they are racialized in the world, and because of how 
they perceive the risks (i.e., declaring that all can  speak freely and be critical 
doesn’t mean everyone then feels like they can). The result is that those with more 
power speak their mind and those with less power do not, or not as easily, and the 
power imbalances tip further. 
● How the masculinist and individualist tradition of the media / journalism industry’s 
“say what’s on your mind” culture expects invulnerability. It assumes that harm is 
not done if unintentional, or that when harm is done, it is up to the individual to take 
care of it. The result is that  tensions and injury accumulate  between employees, 
without effective ways of addressing them. Equitable workplaces hold the 
competencies of thoughtful speech, listening, and also relationship repair with a high 
regard. 
● How the norms of mainstream journalism industry and other fast­paced businesses 
include  aggressive, passive­aggressive communication , and that these have, at 
times, occurred at Canadaland Media. Aggressive and passive­aggressive 
communication are used when under duress, as attempts to persuade, debate, or 
negotiate, and are not necessarily noticed by the people who are practising them. 
Aggressive communication includes dismissing requests or boundaries, talking 
someone out of their request or boundary, and patterns of defensiveness that 
impede communication. Passive­aggressive communication includes responding to 
requests with promises that are not followed up on, encouragement in lieu of 
practical support, rhetorical questions to shut conversation down, and “grumpiness”. 
These contribute to an environment that some employees find intimidating, 
unfriendly, and antagonistic. 
● How the combination of differences of power, experience, and personal resources 
contribute to patterns of  passive communication , which includes unclear 
boundaries, reluctant assent or acceptance, the expectation to be mind­read, and 
resentment. 
 
If Canadaland Media’s current visions for diversity and equity are to be actualized, and in 
order for the company to successfully operate in resistance to dominant, unjust power 
structures, the focus must widen to beyond employee demographics and identity politics. 
There must be active changes to the workplace culture, development of skills to sustain that 
culture, and buy­in from all employees of the shared vision. The next section details some 
of these changes. 
 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 16/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS 
 
a. Acknowledgement  
 
To begin to evolve Canadaland Media toward its vision, to even begin to officially articulate 
its vision, the company must first acknowledge its past and current conditions. It is clear 
from company leadership that the commitment to change is real. At the same time, this has 
not always been the case. Organizational growing pains and diversity and equity issues have 
been brought up by various employees over the years. They have not been taken up 
seriously or effectively. That change now comes after public attention is both welcomed and 
also a sore spot for those who have been asking for change repeatedly. An 
acknowledgement of the failure to address these issues in the past is a gesture of repair, 
and an important step to moving forward. 
 
Given Canadaland Media’s dedication to transparency, it may also be its interest to make 
this acknowledgement available publicly, alongside whatever else it chooses to communicate 
about the process. 
 
b. Company structure 
 
Hiring.  Postings should follow a consistent template and clearly state if it is public or only 
through person­to­person circulation. All job postings should include a job description. It 
should be clear before selecting candidates for interview who the hiring committee consists 
of, and what decision­making power they have. Candidates’ questions about the job must 
be answered as accurately as possible. References must be checked. When a job is offered 
to a candidate, it should be clear the amount of time they have to consider it.  
 
Dismissal.  Employees who are dismissed must receive the notice in writing (email is 
appropriate), and be given a Record of Employment (ROE). 
 
Employment Contracts and Job Descriptions.  All full­ and part­time employees must 
receive employment contracts; the only exclusion is those who are paid piecemeal for their 
work. Employees who are paid by the hour must keep logs of their hours worked.  
 
To begin the transitional process of creating job descriptions, current employees can catalog 
their responsibilities. Leadership should then adjust the job descriptions to cover gaps, 
eliminate unnecessary overlaps, and to balance expectations. The drafts should then be 
circulated back to the current employees who hold those positions for final adjustments 
together. 
 
Aside from meeting employment standards, having employment contracts and job 
descriptions also assures employees of the security of their jobs. It is an important move to 
promote equity in the workplace. 
 
Payroll.  There must be a payroll system that keeps track of employees and issues 
paycheques on time. 
 
Pay Scale and Other Remunerations.  Move towards balancing roles and pay scales. 
Decrease disparities between a job and its competitive rate in the market, prioritize those 
with the greatest percentage disparity.  
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 17/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

Promises of shares and revenue percentages have to be written down, with deadlines where 
appropriate. These can either be delivered or their non­delivery must be acknowledged and 
a new agreement made. 
 
Office Manager.  A number of these organizational issues (job posting templates, job 
description templates, employment contracts, payroll, etc.) can be the responsibility for a 
part­time office/HR manager. 
 
Communication Lines about Staffing Changes.  Public announcements of staffing 
changes can only be made after the employee directly involved has already been notified. 
Outside of the decision makers, inter­office discussions of staffing changes, including 
assignment changes, just happen after the employee directly involved has already been 
notified. In other words, changes concerning an employee’s responsibilities or full/part­time 
status should be communicated to the employee as early as possible. 
 
c. Staffing structure and roles 
 
Clarity between Editorial and Sales/Marketing responsibilities, Branded and 
Non­Branded Content.  As Canadaland Media moves into creating branded content 
through Earshot, the confusion and overlap between the two will naturally dissolve. Until 
then, it needs to be a conscious effort on every employee’s part to emphasize the 
separation. This includes: 
● Clarifying whose responsibility it is to set and communicate about deadlines with 
editorial staff 
● Clarifying the process and persons involved in making decisions about advertisers, 
sponsors, and clients for branded content 
● Clarifying the process and persons involved in making decisions about editorial 
content 
● Clarifying the terms of participation of creators in both/either team: Can a producer 
produce both for Earshot and editorial content? Do creators on both teams receive 
the same pay? Can  Patreon  donations be put toward creation of branded content? 
 
Mentoring, Skill­building, and Feedback to Producers.  Some producers mentioned the 
need for and expectation of feedback during the creation process. At the same time, some 
producers may not need or expect this. When it is desired, it should be communicated to 
the Managing Editor in advance, and then timely and specific feedback should be given.  
 
Aside from show content, feedback about how to increase listenership and streamlining 
production process may also be sought. 
 
Requests for Resources and Support.  Requests for additional resources for shows, 
human or otherwise, should be submitted in writing (email is OK). After the processes for 
determining feasibility, even if the requester is present for the process, the decision should 
be noted in writing along with timelines where appropriate (email is OK). Leadership will 
work toward communicating accurately possibilities and limits. A clear “no” (and perhaps “to 
be revisited in X months”) is harder to say and hear in the immediate, but better for 
workplace expectations and climate in the long run, compared to a “yes” or “we’ll see” that 
is left without follow up. 
 
With the limited resources of a small media company, all employees at Canadaland Media 
should operate with realistic expectations. Unlike larger or better­resourced companies 
which can ask the question, “what do we need in order to create our best work?”, the 
discussion may be more fruitful when focused on, “What’s possible with what’s available?” 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 18/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

 
Meetings.  Meetings require structure; it can be a template of standing items. Attendees 
present, discussions, and decisions need to be written down, even in brief, and read back at 
the end. Meeting notes should be kept centrally in a shared drive. There can be a rotational 
notetaker, a rotational or consistent chair.  
 
Clearly delineate what belongs in a staff meeting, and what doesn’t. Is it a place to report 
progress? Is it a place to workshop a concept?  
 
Not all updates require feedback. The persons involved can ask for specific feedback (which 
would be time­limited during the meeting, or via email). Unsolicited feedback should be 
given judiciously. Interventions should only happen if what is presented contravenes 
company policies or values. 
 
Consider having separate meetings for Earshot/branded teams and journalistic teams.  
 
Check­ins and Updates  during meetings should be clearly distinguished, and there should 
be space designated for each (frequency is up to the team). During a go­around of either a 
Check­in or Update, it is useful to allot a certain amount of time to each person (and use a 
timer). 
Check­ins  are about how a person is feeling, their state of mind/mood, and any requests or 
needs they may have as a result. Check­ins are meant to increase connection between team 
members, to allow others to know you: Avoid just listing what you are doing, and avoid 
talking about the content of work projects. 
Updates  are progress summaries about projects. They can include invitations for feedback, 
but feedback should fall within the allotted time (the rest will be relegated to email, or 
meeting outside of the go­around). 
 
Leadership Role Clarifications.  With the establishment of a Managing Editor role, and the 
likely advent of a Human Resource Manager or Office Manager role, the communication and 
reporting lines between producers, hosts, interns, other team members and management 
have to be clearly defined in writing as part of job descriptions, and/or as part of an 
organizational tree. 
 
Create Show “Bibles” for Every Show.  Following Abby [Madan]’s initiative, and perhaps 
using it as a template, a “bible” should be created for every show. This will ensure 
continuity and succession. Consider not calling it a “bible”.  
 
Studio Booking.  There needs to be a system for booking the studio and communicating 
with relevant persons. 
 
Space.  A larger office space is long overdue. Being cramped and not having 
one’s own desk increases existing tensions. 
 
5. Policies 
 
Vision and Values Statements.  Create these to guide the company in the next 5­ 10 
years. It can be a simple, collective process, guided by an employee or intern. It can take as 
little as an hour to create. Future decisions can then be compared to these statements to 
ensure alignment. New and existing employees must be informed of and sign on to them. 
Revisit in 3­4 years. 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 19/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

Agreements.  Despite its roots in being counterculture and anti­establishment, Canadaland 
Media needs to have a clear set of guidelines or rules on how to engage with each other. In 
some workplaces, the rules are understood, unspoken, and enforced by leadership skilled in 
people management. Given Canadaland Media’s past and existing challenges, it may be best 
to have them  written down  and posted. Conflict resolution processes and acceptable conduct 
statements can also be part of the agreements. 
 
Conflict Resolution.  A policy and procedure that details how conflicts and problems can be 
addressed at Canadaland Media is helpful and can contribute to an employee’s sense of 
agency. 
 
Equity and Diversity.  Given the unique position it occupies in the industry, an explicit 
statement of intention and commitment about Canadaland Media’s stance on countering 
systemic inequities in its external­facing work and internal operation is necessary. 
 
6. Other Issues 
 
Public Clarifications.  The company can, in consultation with the consultant, decide how 
and when to address accusations and misunderstandings publicly. It is suggested that it 
makes transparent: 
● Past issues, in brief 
● Current process 
● A few answers to questions and accusations that have been posed explicitly or 
implicitly, from a non­defensive angle 
 
Making Peace with the Reality of Canadaland Media.  There is a diversity among the 
employees regarding how they have come to work at Canadaland Media, and how it serves 
them. They relate very differently to ideas of social justice, media arts, economics and 
advertising, money and other resources. It is important that all employees find a way to 
make peace with the reality of Canadaland Media, which is a company that is both 
counterculture and embedded within it. It requires the economy to sustain its work, and its 
work is to criticize the world, including economic systems. 
 
Checkpoints for Assessing Progress.  It is recommended that the company revisits the 
progress it has made regarding the issues and recommendations raised in this report 
annually, perhaps during a quieter time in the year’s cycle. It can then highlight successes, 
identify shortcomings, and set goals for the coming year. 

RECOMMENDED TRAINING 
 
Outline of a full­day training for entire staff and management team: 
 
(15) Intro 
Updates of progress thus far, where this training comes from 
 
(10) From the interviews 
General tone and culture at Canadaland Media – from interviews  
 
(30) Humanizing each other 
What worlds do we each come from? Who else are we besides our role at work? 
 
(60) Power / Planets exercise + unconscious bias 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 20/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

How do larger contexts play out in the workplace? What kinds of dynamics naturally 
surface? What kind are helpful, and what kind make the situation worse? What are 
subtle ways that bias and power/powerlessness manifest? How do we keep being better 
at our work? 
 
(30) Zones + Compass 
A framework and tool for assessing what we do when we are threatened, what are our other 
options? Useful in workplace as well as in managing guests, clients, and other external 
contacts. Will refer back to this throughout the rest of the day. 
 
(45) Lunch Break 
 
(120) Scenarios 
● Effective and professional communication: What are common workplace 
missteps? What are the indicators that they are happening? How do you change 
the patterns that are not useful? 
● Boundary setting and assertiveness: How to communicate clearly and directly if it 
brings up fear or guilt? 
● Giving and receiving feedback: How to push each other’s work most effectively? 
How to hear feedback and put it to use without letting it sink you? 
● Simple conflict: How do you manage disagreements and minimalize damage to 
relationships or morale? 
● Calling out / calling in: How to most effectively address differences in values? 
How to most effectively make change with allies, neighbours, and coworkers? 
 
(20) Close 
 
 
 
 
 
 
APPENDIX C:  
Problem and Conflict Resolution Policy 
Canadaland Media is committed to sustaining a positive work environment in which 
employees work constructively together. The Problem and Conflict Resolution Policy and 
process are a foundation for promoting individual agency, interpersonal trust, as well as 
leadership accountability. 

The Policy is intended to:  

● Improve communication and understanding between employees; and between 
employees and management 
● Provide the opportunity to resolve a problem or conflict quickly and fairly  
● Resolve conflicts while minimizing reprisal for those who initiate the resolution 
process 
● Promote confidence and trust among all team members 

Informal conflict resolution and complaint process  

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 21/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

Although not required, employees are encouraged to follow the informal approach to 
problem resolution  prior  to making a formal complaint.  
 
1. Raise concern or complaint with the person(s) involved in the conflict, or that you 
have a complaint about. Use Canadaland Media Conduct Policy (see Appendix E) as 
much as possible. 
 
2. If a resolution is not achieved, discuss your concern with your direct report. In 
situations where this may be difficult or inappropriate, discuss concern with a 
member of management. You may request anonymity, which your direct report may 
grant at their discretion. If you consider anonymity to be mandatory, see the formal 
complaint process below.  
 
3. The manager will, within three (3) working days, inform you of the proposed plan of 
action. 
 
4. If you are not satisfied with the informal resolution of the problem, proceed with the 
formal problem resolution process. 

Formal conflict resolution and complaint process  

1. Set your complaint in writing and deliver it to the General Manager. If the General 
Manager is the subject of your complaint, deliver it to the Publisher.  
2. Include support details of the conflict or the problem. 
3. You may request anonymity in your written complaint, and management must grant 
it.  
4. Management will decide whether or not to conduct an investigation, or to engage 
with an external consultant to make such a decision. 
5. Within five (5) working days of receiving the conflict resolution request or complaint, 
management will inform you of the plan of action in writing. You must sign and date 
to confirm receipt of the reply, and to indicate whether you agree or disagree with 
the proposed plan of action.  

6. If you agree with the proposed plan of action, the plan will be carried out. A copy of 
the plan can be included in your personnel file. 
7. If you do not agree to the proposed plan of action, management may decide at its 
discretion to engage an external mediator or facilitator. 

APPENDIX D:  
 
Anti­Racism, Access, and Equity Policy and Human Rights Complaints 
Procedure  
 
A:  STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT 
  
Canadaland Media is made up of people from diverse communities. Canadaland Media 
recognizes that barriers to access exists for members of diverse communities, particularly 
for equity­seeking communities, and we are committed to acting as a positive force in 
eliminating these barriers. 
  
To achieve this, Canadaland Media will: 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 22/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

● ensure that diverse communities have access to its employment opportunities 
● promote the goals of anti­racism, access, and equity; and 
● take reasonable steps to ensure its hiring procedures, work environment, 
decision­making processes, and its products and productions reflect the communities 
that it serves 
  
Canadaland Media prohibits discrimination or harassment, and protects the right to be free 
from hate activity based on age, ancestry, citizenship, creed (religion), colour, disability, 
ethnic origin, family status, gender identity, marital status, place of origin, membership in a 
union or staff association, political affiliation, race, receipt of public assistance, sex, sexual 
orientation, or any other personal characteristic by or within CANADALAND. 
  
B:  POLICY AND ACTIONS ON ANTI­RACISM, ACCESS & EQUITY 
  
Management 
Canadaland Media is committed to ensuring that it has equitable and transparent hiring 
processes, and that these processes are communicated to all employees and managers. 
Management is committed to mentoring employees toward leadership roles. Management is 
committed to outreaching beyond current networks to expand the reach of its hiring, 
promotion, and audience base. 
  
Environment 
Canadaland Media is committed to maintaining an environment where all individuals are 
treated with dignity and respect and are free from all forms of discriminatory treatment, 
behaviour, or practice. Canadaland Media is committed to addressing systemic inequities in 
both overt and covert ways, including work culture, interpersonal dynamics, selection 
processes for staffing, editorial issues, as well as perspectives represented in editorial and 
marketing content. Canadaland Media is committed to the principle that discrimination does 
not have to be intentional. It can result from practices or policies that appear to be neutral 
but, in reality, have a negative effect on groups or individuals based on racialization, 
gender, class, creed, etc. 
  
Products and Productions 
Canadaland Media is committed to ensuring that its products and productions are accessible 
to and respectful of diverse communities. This involves engaging with diverse and critical 
perspectives and persons on editorial content, and in seeking to have issues that affect a 
community be represented as much as possible by that community. 
  
Training and Education 
Canadaland Media is committed to ensuring that those involved in public interfaces (public 
relations, productions, promotion, and advertising) have the knowledge, understanding, and 
skills to respectfully work with members of diverse communities, particularly equity­seeking 
communities. 
  
For the purposes of this policy, equity­seeking communities include Indigenous people, 
women, people with disabilities, racialized persons, people belonging to lower 
socio­economic classes, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, Two­Spirit, and transgender people. 
  
  C:  HUMAN RIGHTS COMPLAINT PROCEDURE 
  
Definitions 
  
Complainant :  the individual alleging the discriminatory treatment or behaviour 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 23/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

  
Respondent :  the individual against whom the allegation of discrimination is made 
  
Employee : for the purpose of this policy, the term “employee” includes employees, paid 
apprentices, contractors, and consultants working with CANADALAND 
  
Avenues of Complaint 
Complaints will be dealt with by the management team. Employees producing podcasts 
should first complain to the Managing Editor. News and sales employees should first 
complain to the General Manager. Where appropriate, the Publisher will consult with the 
General Manager. 
  
Any situations in which the Publisher has been named in a complaint will be dealt with by 
the General Manager. Any situations in which the General Manager has been named in a 
complaint will be dealt with by the Publisher. Complainants will have the option of filing a 
complaint anonymously. 
  
Right to Complain 
Individuals have the right to complain about situations they believe to be discriminatory or 
harassing in nature. This policy prohibits reprisals against employees because they have 
complained or have provided information regarding a complaint. Alleged reprisals are 
subject to the same complaints procedures and penalties as complaints of discrimination. 
  
Reporting a Complaint 
Although individuals may first choose to make a verbal complaint, a written summary of the 
incident will be required. 
Complaints should be reported to the General Manager or Managing Editor as soon as 
possible. If the complaint is delayed beyond three months, the complainant should outline 
the reason for the delay in reporting the incident(s). 
  
A letter of complaint should contain a brief account of the offensive incident(s), when it 
occurred, the person(s) involved, and the names of witnesses, if any. The letter should be 
signed and dated by the complainant. 
  
Investigation 
Within three working days of receiving a complaint, the Publisher or the Human Resources 
contact must initiate the investigation process. 
  
If the complaint involves alleged criminal behaviour such as physical violence or sexual 
assault, law enforcement must be notified. 
  
As soon as possible after receiving the complaint, the  Publisher  will notify the individual(s) 
being named in the complaint. All individuals named in the complaint have a right to reply 
to the allegations against them. (If the complaint is against the Publisher, the General 
Manager will notify him as soon as possible.) 
  
Individuals named in the complaint as witnesses will be interviewed. 
When appropriate, management may retain outside investigators to investigate complaints. 
  
Settlement and Mediation 
With the consent of the complainant and the respondent, the investigator or a mediator may 
attempt to mediate a settlement of a complaint at any point prior to or during an 
investigation. 
  
 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 24/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

Every effort will be made to reach a settlement satisfactory to the complainant and the 
respondent. 
  
Confidentiality 
All individuals involved with a complaint must ensure the matter remains confidential 
throughout the investigative process. 
  
The investigator will release information on a need­to­know basis. Whenever possible, 
investigation reports are presented in a summary format without the names of witnesses. 
  
Findings and Recommendations 
Once the investigation is complete, the investigator will prepare a written report 
summarizing investigation findings. 
  
Final Decision 
The individual(s) who filed the complaint and those named in the complaint have the right 
to review and comment on the investigation findings with the Publisher or the Managing 
Editor. 
  
Remedy 
A response to a founded complaint could include remedial action ranging from: 
1. requiring the respondent to provide a verbal or written apology; 
2. giving a verbal or written reprimand, with a copy to the respondent’s personnel file; 
3. dismissal of the respondent. 
  
If the findings do not support the complaint, CANADALAND MEDIA might: 
● make a recommendation for training or better communications; or 
● recommend that no further action is necessary. 
  
It may be that no action is taken against the respondent, but there might be a need for 
some management or systemic activity. 
  
A complainant who is found to have made a frivolous or vexatious complaint may be subject 
to disciplinary action. 
  
Timeframe 
Complaints should be reported within three months of the incident. If the report is made 
after three months, an explanation of the delay should accompany the complaint. 
  
Complaints will be dealt with in a timely manner. 
  
Records 
When remedial action requires discipline of an employee, a record of the disciplinary action 
will be placed on an individual’s personnel file. All other records of the investigation will be 
kept separate and apart from the personnel file. 
  
Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario 
This internal procedure is available to individuals to resolve complaints of discrimination. 
Parties also have recourse to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, however; once a 
grievance is filed with the HRTO, the internal procedure is not an option. 
 
 
 
  
 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 25/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

  
 
  
 
 
 
APPENDIX E:  
CONDUCT POLICY 
 
This policy applies to all Canadaland Media employers and employees regardless of 
employment agreement or position. Each individual is bound by their contract to follow this 
Conduct Policy while performing their duties. 
 
Compliance with law 
All employees must protect our company’s legality. They should comply with all 
environmental, safety, and fair­dealing laws. We expect employees to be ethical and 
responsible when dealing with our company’s finances, products, partnerships, and public 
image. 
 
Respect in the workplace 
All employees should respect their colleagues. Employees should adhere to our Anti­Racism, 
Access, and Equity Policy in all aspects of their work, from hiring and performance 
evaluation to interpersonal relations.  
 
All employees should aim to use effective, professional communication both internally and 
externally that: 
● is clear, direct, coherent 
● is open, present, and engaged 
● is non­violent 
● involves active listening and avoids interrupting another speaker 
● seeks consent before touch or disclosure of other people’s personal information 
● avoids personal remarks about another employee’s appearance or circumstances 
● involves continuous efforts to be available for communication with their 
colleagues 
● prioritizes communication’s impact over its intent 
 
Protection of Company Property 
All employees should treat our company’s property, both material and intangible, with 
respect and care. Employees should respect incorporeal property, including trademarks, 
copyright, and confidential information. Employees should use them only to complete their 
job duties. Employees should protect company facilities and other material property 
(e.g., computers, recording material) from damage and vandalism, whenever possible. 
Employees should maintain a tidy and clean work environment and clean up after 
themselves. 
 
Conflicts of Interest 
We discourage employees from accepting gifts from any party that is a subject (or a likely 
subject) of our editorial coverage. We prohibit briberies for the benefit of any external or 
internal party. We expect employees to avoid any personal, financial, or other interests that 
might hinder their capability to perform their job duties. 
 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 26/27
 
4/4/2019 2018 TRANSPARENCY REPORT - Google Docs

No employee involved in the production of our journalism can accept money, gifts, trips, or 
other benefits from individuals or organizations that they cover, or are likely to cover.  
 
Employees are required to proactively disclose to management possible or perceived 
conflicts of interest as they arise, as soon as they present themselves. This includes possible 
or perceived conflicts arising from personal relationships.  
 
Editorial employees must recuse themselves from covering topics or stories that they know 
will place them in a conflict of interest.  
 
Job duties  
All employees should fulfill their job duties with integrity and respect toward our Patreon 
supporters, our listeners, readers, sources, subjects, guests, and the wider community. 
Managers should delegate duties to employees taking into account their competences and 
workload. Employees should let managers know if workloads are too heavy or too light and 
then follow management instructions and complete their duties with skill and in a timely 
manner. We encourage mentoring throughout our company.  
 
Punctuality and work hours 
Employees should honour their appointments and time commitments with punctuality. The 
nature of our work demands flexible and non­standard working hours. Employees should 
keep track and have a good sense of their accruing work hours. Different employees 
complete tasks within different timeframes. If the actual number of hours worked 
consistently exceeds expectations and compensation, it is the employee’s responsibility to 
alert management. Management will then work with the employee to amend the situation. 
(It is nevertheless a duty of management to proactively seek an awareness of the actual 
hours worked by employees, and manage their workloads accordingly.) This can entail: 
bringing in extra help, providing paid time off (time in lieu) to reflect additional hours 
worked, providing training to improve efficiency. 
 
Open­Door Communication 
Management should make efforts to be available privately so employees can approach them 
to: 
● Ask questions or get feedback 
● Express a complaint or concern or raise awareness of a problem 
● Ask for resolution to an inside dispute or conflict (see Conflict Resolution Policy) 
● Make suggestions for change 
 
Employees should ask for an appointment in advance, whenever possible, if they want to 
talk about a significant matter. 
 
Disciplinary Actions 
Canadaland Media may have to take disciplinary action against employees who repeatedly 
or intentionally fail to follow our Conduct Policy. Disciplinary actions will  depend on the 
violation. 
 
Possible consequences include: 
● Reprimand (verbal for lesser infractions, written for formal infractions) 
● Demotion or removal of duties 
● Non­renewal of time­limited contracts 
● Suspension or termination 
● Legal action (in cases of corruption, theft, embezzlement, or other unlawful 
behavior) 

 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LeKz6ZrhiJLrkyBLacoxPSDkV_4aJeqYoentIRmBAdk/edit?ts=5ca619b2 27/27